The RV Atlas Podcast
The RV Atlas Podcast
RVFTA Podcast Network
The RV Atlas is a weekly show exploring RV and family travel. Every episode has a feature segment highlighting the RV industry, the campground industry, tips and tricks, or destination guides. We also include gear reviews and interviews with interesting personalities from all arenas of the RV industry.
Campground Review! Four Mile Creek Near Niagara Falls, NY
Gretchen Holcombe from Boxy Colonial On The Road is back on The RV Atlas podcast this week and she is our guest blogger here as well! Check out her recent post and interview on the podcast to hear about her stop in Burlington, Vermont. And to hear about her awesome stop at Four Mile Creek State Park and Niagara Falls click on the media player above, or read here guest post below! Guest Post by Gretchen Holcombe **All photos by Gretchen Holcombe Niagara Falls is one of the world’s most spectacular sights…and it’s also one of its most crowded. Niagara Falls State Park welcomes more than 8 million visitors a year, and on a busy summer day it can feel like they’re all there at the same time. My husband and I had seen the falls before, but we were excited to make our first trip there with our kids this summer and more than willing to brave the crowds and to shell out money for quintessential tourist experiences like the Maid of the Mist boat ride. Four Mile Creek State Park But we were also eager to get a break from the nonstop action in the evenings, and we found the under appreciated Four Mile Creek State Park, just 20 minutes down the road from Niagara Falls, to be an excellent retreat.  Four Mile Creek offers up 250 spacious tent and RV sites on the shores of Lake Ontario, about half primitive sites and half with electric hookups (potable water and dump stations are available). In addition to the big sites and quiet setting, we appreciated the bargain pricing: sites are just $24/night for electric, and $18 for dry camping. There are a lot of excellent sites to choose from here, but the ones in the 200 loop that overlook Lake Ontario are the pick of the campground, with enormous “backyards” and great views; look for the even numbered sites between 222 and 240. If you don’t have an RV with you, the park is popular with tent campers and also has six yurts available for rent.  Niagara Falls State Park It’s an easy drive from Four Mile Creek to Niagara Falls State Park, and we spent lots of time there checking out the falls from all different vantage points. We parked on Goat Island (we were able to save the $10 fee by showing our pass from Four Mile Creek) and walked all around the area; there are several great places to admire the view, including Terrapin Point and Luna Island. You can walk or take the trolley from Goat Island over to the visitor center and to all the shopping and restaurants in town. The Maid of the Mist leaves from this area and takes you on a very wet trip out to the bottom of the falls; it’s a splurge at around $25 per person for a 20 minute boat ride, but it’s worth it for a view and experience you can’t get any other way.  Some of our Niagara Falls plans were derailed both by the fact that the Canadian border was still closed to Americans thanks to COVID and by the very wet weather we had while we were in the area. But the silver lining was that this led us to find some great off-the-beaten-path destinations that we likely wouldn’t have seen otherwise.  We spent one rainy morning at Niagara Power Vista’s visitor center, an excellent museum all about the history of and science behind using the falls to produce power. There are lots of hands on activities, a movie, and one particularly charming exhibit where Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison debate the merits of AC vs. DC power. The Niagara Falls Underground Railroad Heritage Center is another excellent rainy day (or any day) stop. Niagara Falls’ proximity to Canada made it a natural Underground Railroad hub, and this small museum tells the stories of some of the enslaved people who passed through here on their way to freedom in engaging and creative ways.  Our family never passes up a good fort, so we made a trip to Old Fort Niagara to dive deeper into the history of...
Sep 8
31 min
Campground Review: Four Mile Creek and Niagara Falls, New York
Gretchen Holcombe from Boxy Colonial On The Road is back on The RV Atlas podcast this week and she is our guest blogger here as well! Check out her recent post and interview on the podcast to hear about her stop in Burlington, Vermont. And to hear about her awesome stop at Four Mile Creek State Park and Niagara Falls click on the media player above, or read here guest post below! Guest Post by Gretchen Holcombe **All photos by Gretchen Holcombe Niagara Falls is one of the world’s most spectacular sights…and it’s also one of its most crowded. Niagara Falls State Park welcomes more than 8 million visitors a year, and on a busy summer day it can feel like they’re all there at the same time. My husband and I had seen the falls before, but we were excited to make our first trip there with our kids this summer and more than willing to brave the crowds and to shell out money for quintessential tourist experiences like the Maid of the Mist boat ride. Four Mile Creek State Park But we were also eager to get a break from the nonstop action in the evenings, and we found the under appreciated Four Mile Creek State Park, just 20 minutes down the road from Niagara Falls, to be an excellent retreat.  Four Mile Creek offers up 250 spacious tent and RV sites on the shores of Lake Ontario, about half primitive sites and half with electric hookups (potable water and dump stations are available). In addition to the big sites and quiet setting, we appreciated the bargain pricing: sites are just $24/night for electric, and $18 for dry camping. There are a lot of excellent sites to choose from here, but the ones in the 200 loop that overlook Lake Ontario are the pick of the campground, with enormous “backyards” and great views; look for the even numbered sites between 222 and 240. If you don’t have an RV with you, the park is popular with tent campers and also has six yurts available for rent.  Niagara Falls State Park It’s an easy drive from Four Mile Creek to Niagara Falls State Park, and we spent lots of time there checking out the falls from all different vantage points. We parked on Goat Island (we were able to save the $10 fee by showing our pass from Four Mile Creek) and walked all around the area; there are several great places to admire the view, including Terrapin Point and Luna Island. You can walk or take the trolley from Goat Island over to the visitor center and to all the shopping and restaurants in town. The Maid of the Mist leaves from this area and takes you on a very wet trip out to the bottom of the falls; it’s a splurge at around $25 per person for a 20 minute boat ride, but it’s worth it for a view and experience you can’t get any other way.  Some of our Niagara Falls plans were derailed both by the fact that the Canadian border was still closed to Americans thanks to COVID and by the very wet weather we had while we were in the area. But the silver lining was that this led us to find some great off-the-beaten-path destinations that we likely wouldn’t have seen otherwise.  We spent one rainy morning at Niagara Power Vista’s visitor center, an excellent museum all about the history of and science behind using the falls to produce power. There are lots of hands on activities, a movie, and one particularly charming exhibit where Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison debate the merits of AC vs. DC power. The Niagara Falls Underground Railroad Heritage Center is another excellent rainy day (or any day) stop. Niagara Falls’ proximity to Canada made it a natural Underground Railroad hub, and this small museum tells the stories of some of the enslaved people who passed through here on their way to freedom in engaging and creative ways.  Our family never passes up a good fort, so we made a trip to Old Fort Niagara to dive deeper into the history of...
Sep 8
31 min
Campground Review! North Beach Campground: Burlington, VT
On today's episode of the The RV Atlas podcast we are excited to have Gretchen Holcombe from Boxy Colonial On The Road back on the show to talk about part of her family's epic summer road trip through New England! Gretchen loved her family's stop in Burlington, Vermont and she really enjoyed using North Beach Campground as her basecamp! The campground itself was simple and rustic, but the location was FANTASTIC!  To listen to Gretchen and Jeremy talk about North Beach Campground and some things to do in Burlington, Vermont, please click on the media player above or subscribe to The RV Atlas wherever you get your podcasts! To find out more about Burlington, Vermont and North Beach Campground click simply keep reading and check out Gretchen's guest blog post right below!! All photos by Gretchen Holcombe! Guest Post By Gretchen Holcombe After a year of shorter trips close to home, our family of six was eager for a return to exploring farther afield. My in-laws 50th anniversary celebration on Cape Cod, Massachusetts gave us a great excuse to head for New England this summer, and we spent close to two months exploring Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, and then farther west in New York and Michigan. Two parents, four boys, and three dogs in a 32 foot trailer has its challenges, but overall we had an amazing trip and are already planning next summer’s itinerary. Burlington, Vermont My oldest son loves to share geography trivia, so by the time we got to Burlington, Vermont this summer the whole family knew that it’s the “smallest biggest city in America.” In other words, it’s the smallest city in the United States that also has the largest population of any city in its state. And, indeed, Burlington feels like a quirky small town with the kinds of diverse offerings and resources that you’d expect in a much bigger city: museums, tons of restaurants and shopping, a university, and a beautiful lakefront setting. It’s a great combination, and Burlington quickly shot to the top of our favorite places in New England list.  North Beach Campground It’s not often that you get the chance to combine urban camping and beach camping, but the city-run North Beach Campground offers exactly that. The campground is right in town and directly on the bike path that will take you the mile and a half or so to the downtown waterfront area, and right across that bike path is North Beach—a lovely spot on Lake Champlain where you can swim or kayak and then enjoy ice cream or dinner at the outdoor restaurant. The campground itself is fairly rustic, with grassy sites and bathhouses that could use some updating, but the sites are a bargain at $45/night for full hookups, $41 for water/electric, and $37 for tent sites. If you have a bigger rig, the full hook up sites are your best bet; the water/electric sites are jumbled together along narrow roads in the middle of the campground and looked pretty tough to get into. We had site 6, right along the main road through the campground, and found our site spacious and easily accessible. If you want a little more privacy, the other section of full-hookup sites, numbers 113–119 are on a quieter road.  What to Do in Burlington, Vermont Echo Leahy Center:This is a kid friendly science museum by the water (a quick bike ride or a not as quick walk along the bike path from the campground) with the usual assortment of hands on activities, an adorable play area for younger kids, and a fascinating exhibit all about the science and history of Lake Champlain. Island Line Rail Trail: Burlington’s a great town for biking. If you didn’t bring your own bikes you can rent them downtown and then ride from there all the way to the causeway in Colchester that goes across the lake to Grand Isle.  Ethan Allen Homestead: short but engaging tour of the home of this fascinatin...
Aug 28
34 min
Ithaca is Gorges! Robert Treman State Park and More…
Today I am so excited to welcome a first time guest correspondent on to the show to give us a terrific campground review of Robert Treman State Park in Ithaca, New York! The RV Atlas crew visited Ithaca about 7 years ago during an amazing two week RV trip across New York State. We didn’t stay at Robert Treman State Park during that trip. But we have always wanted to camp there! On today's episode of the RV Atlas podcast my friend Ellen Dominus Broude is going to take us to Robert Treman State Park. Ithaca is gorgeous! And Ellen brings this campground, the state park, and area to life for our listeners! I met Ellen on social media through The RV Atlas group. Like many of you, I sometimes complain about the role that social media plays in our lives. But then I stop and remember just how many awesome people I have met through the RV Atlas facebook group. Ellen is an amazing person--and I just knew that she would be so much fun to have on the show. Ellen and her husband own an adorable Airstream named Frida. I love following her account @fridatheairstream and I think you will too! 6 Things I Love About My RV Before I asked Ellen to come on the RV Atlas podcast, I also asked her to join me on my new GO RVing show--"6 Things I Love About My RV." I am so glad she said yes! Check out her episode right below! To listen to Ellen and Jeremy talk about Robert Treman State Park and all of the best things to do in the Ithaca area--click on the media player at the top of the page. Or subscribe to The RV Atlas wherever you get your favorite podcasts! See You at the Campground! --Jeremy
Aug 20
40 min
10 Tips for Surviving a Multi-Family Trip in One RV!
Shellie Bailey-Shah is back on the show today for another great episode of The RV Atlas podcast! Today she is sharing 10 tips for surviving a multi-family RV trip in one RV! To listen to Shellie and Jeremy discuss all ten tips click on the media player above or subscribe to The RV Atlas wherever you get your shows! Here are her notes from the show! Background: We recently took a cross-country trip from Portland, Oregon to Tampa then across the south to Phoenix and back home to Portland. The middle leg — Tampa to Phoenix — we invited by brother, sister-in-law and two nephews to join us for their first ever RV adventure. The leg included 5 national parks and 2,500 miles of travel. That’s 2,500 miles with seven people and a dog in a 38-foot motorhome. Miraculously, we all survived. Keys to success: Each of these tips is discussed in detail on today's episode of The RV Atlas! 1/Set expectations for the start when it comes to finances 2/Set expectations when it comes to responsibilities 3/Make sure the itinerary includes something for everyone 4/Do not overpack 5/Have a bag of tricks 6/Make sure everything has its place 7/Make sure everyone has a designated place to sleep 8/Consider the impact of long driving days, especially on younger kids 9/Plan to spend time apart when you land somewhere, especially important for teens 10/Have some grace with each other and exercise patience
Aug 16
28 min
Campground Review: Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park Guadalupe River
We are thrilled to have our friend Shellie Bailey-Shah back on the show this week for an awesome review of Yogi Bear's Jellystone Park Guadalupe River in Kerrville, Texas! This was a short stop for Shellie and her family (and extended family!) on a long trip. Her entire crew enjoyed this Jellystone immensely! To listen to Shellie's review click on the media player above or subscribe to The RV Atlas wherever you listen to your favorite shows! This podcast interview was based on an article that Shellie wrote for Kid Tripster! We will link to it after it has been posted!
Aug 14
29 min
6 Things I Love About My RV! Jeremy’s Brand New Show!
Today's episode of The RV Atlas podcast is a behind the scenes look at the first four episodes of "6 Things I Love About My RV," Jeremy's brand new YouTube and IGTV show for Go RVing! Join Jeremy and Stephanie as they talk about the origins of the show and why Jeremy decided to strike out on his own for this 8 part series! Jeremy and Stephanie also talk about the first four episodes of the show and the people and RV's that are featured! Episode One (Bill and Nancy) Each episode of 6 Things I Love About My RV is a fast, fun, and information mini tour of a different RV. Instead of walking through the entire rig and talking about each and every feature, this show focuses on each owner's very favorite features! 6 of them to be exact! Episode 2 (Diane) Each tour is ten minutes or less and we talk about each owner's favorite features AND their favorite aspects of RV Life! Where have they been? Where are they going? etc...etc... Episode 3 (Ellen) The first four episodes cover a variety of towable! But there are several motorized units in episodes 5-8! Each owner was so much fun to talk to and clearly, they really LOVE THEIR RV's!! Episode 4 (Shire and Dave) I hope you check out each and every episode of 6 Things I Love About My RV and I hope that you take a listen to today's episode of The RV Atlas podcast for a behind the scenes look!!!
Aug 9
25 min
Campground Review! Jellystone Park Delaware Beaches
Hey Boo Boo! Stephanie is back on The RV Atlas podcast this week for our review of Yogi Bear's Jellystone Park Delaware Beaches! On today's episode of the podcast we give an overview of Jellystone Park Delaware Beaches, and talk about some fun things to do in this gorgeous section of coastal Delaware. This was a bit of a quick trip for us that we tacked on to a major baseball tournament for Max and Theo at the Cal Ripken experience in Aberdeen, Maryland. It was a tough tournament for the boys and we all really needed a break after the hot weekend of baseball. So the pools and waterslides at the Jellystone (and the nearby beaches) were a welcome respite for our boys--who were exhausted at the end of the tournament. This past spring a company named Blue Water bought this particular Jellystone and began to quickly make some new additions and improvements to the park. Stephanie and I have loved the Blue Water properties that we have visited over the years and we were both excited to take a look and see what they were up to here. We have visited Blue Water properties in the past (including Massey's Landing and the Chesapeake Bay KOA) and loved them! When we first pulled into the Jellystone and checked into our cabin the boys were thrilled to hear the happy sounds of an ice cream truck driving around the campground and selling its wares! The boys were pumped because it was sooooo hot out and it had been all weekend long at the baseball tournament in Aberdeen. Stephanie could not come to the baseball tournament that weekend because of work, but she showed up at the Jellystone a few minutes after we arrived and we were all thrilled to see her and catch her up on the happenings at the tournament. After we all got unpacked and set up in the cabin we immediately took off for the pool and the brand new waterslides that Blue Water recently installed. I am pleased to report that the waterslides were both FAST and both young Wesley and Max and Theo approved of their velocity! After cooling off and hitting the water slides about 30 times each everyone was hungry and ready for dinner. Stephanie had actually been in the region near Jellystone Delaware Beaches a few weeks earlier for a conference and she really wanted to take us up to the beach for dinner! So she drove us all to the Big Chill Beach Club which is located inside Delaware Seashore State Park. This place had stunning views of the bay bridge and of the ocean. It is located right smack on the beach and the food was really, really good. It was Sunday night and we got right in without waiting. It felt good to be back together as a family after the long weekend of baseball craziness. After a relaxing meal by the water we headed back to the cabin and crashed pretty early so we could be refreshed and ready to go for a day of swimming at the pool and the beach! The rest of our stay went by quick--but we enjoyed every second of our time at the campground and in coastal Delaware Location of Jellystone Park Delaware Beaches Jellystone Park Delaware Beaches serves as a great basecamp for exploring Coastal Delaware. It is about 20 minutes to Lewes, which is a fantastic beach town with lots of charm, great food, and shopping. If you go to Lewes make sure to grab breakfast at Eggcellent, because it is excellent! The Jellystone is also about 40 minutes from Rehobeth Beach--which has a much more boisterous and partly-like atmosphere--especially in the summer.  So this campground is not right by the beach--but it serves as pretty good jumping off point for a day trip to the beach. The entire Delaware coast is gorgeous. So why have we never camped here before? Partly because we felt like it was too much like our home at the Jersey Shore. Turns out it is very different,
Aug 6
27 min
Northern California Beach Camping: Big Sur to Crescent City!
On this week's episode of The RV Atlas podcast we are back with part two of our California beach camping series! In episode one our good friend Lauren Eber (from @afamwithavan on Instagram) was our guide and she gave us some incredible campground recommendations from San Diego to Santa Barbara. Along with each campground pick she shared great spots for food, fun, and adventure in those particular locales. Lauren is a California native and she knows the California coast intimately! Her campground picks and recommendations Northern California Beach Camping are absolute perfection. This two part podcast series should be on the top of your list if you are planning a California beach camping trip. On today's episode Lauren is sharing her top campground picks from Big Sur to just below Crescent City! Jeremy also jumps in at the end of the show with his top two picks from the Crescent City area right outside Redwoods National and State Parks. This is another great episode of The RV Atlas podcast that you don't want to miss! To listen to today's show on Northern California Beach Camping click on the media player above or subscribe to The RV Atlas wherever you get your podcasts! For an overview of Lauren's picks check out her show notes below this helpful map that pinpoints the campgrounds that we talk about in part two of our California beach camping series! Lauren's Overview of Northern California Beach Camping Northern California has some of the most spectacular coastline in the world, accessed via the world famous Highway 1, which is on just about every list of America’s, or even the world’s, best road trips, and with good reason.  Northern California beaches are very different from the So Cal beaches we covered in our prior episode. NorCal beaches are more about exploring the gorgeous scenery, quaint beach towns, redwood forests, vineyards, and farm-to-table cuisine than sunbathing and bodysurfing.  Northern California weather is a lot cooler and foggier than SoCal, frequently overcast and windy. Expect 64 and foggy as the norm, rather than 72 and sunny. Dressing in layers is still key. The best months for sunshine are September and October. Lots of dramatic cliffs, rocky shores, tidepools, cold water, the occasional Great White Shark; often too rough for swimming, with a dangerous undertow, so don’t assume that “beach” means swimming. Some places it does, but look into it so you know what you’re getting. That doesn’t mean it’s any less fun or relaxing. Just different. Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park Big Sur has one of the most dramatic, beautiful stretches of coast in California. Redwood forests up against the towering cliffs above the ocean. The campground has 204 sites for RVs up to 32 feet. Some are in a towering redwood forest. Some are along the Big Sur River. All are incredible. My favorites are some of the sites in the 170s along the river, but it’s a real toss up with some of the sites on the opposite side in the 140s, in the redwoods, along a big meadow. No hookups, but lots of amenities. Restrooms with flush toilets and showers, wifi, and laundry. There is also a lodge in the park, with a small grocery store and cafe. The campground is not actually right on the ocean, and it doesn’t have ocean access, but it does have hiking trails with sweeping ocean views, and it is just a short (1 mile) drive to popular Pfeiffer Beach with the famous keyhole arch. If you’re up for hiking, don’t miss the 2-mile Pfeiffer Falls Trail, which leads to the Valley View Overlook with a tremendous view of the Big Sur River Valley, Pt. Sur and Andrew Molera State Park, and a view of Pfeiffer Falls, a 60-foot waterfall. Big Sur has some world-renowned restaurants and hotels, like Nepenthe, Deetjen, and the Post Ranch Inn’s Sierra Mar.
Aug 1
57 min
Eggs on the Hiawassee River Rally at Riverbend Campground!
Casita Dean May is back on the RV Atlas for the second week in a row with another jam packed episode! Last week Dean gave us a detailed review of the Townsend/Great Smokies KOA. This week we are packing in a double episode! Dean is here to review the Riverbend Campground in Hiawassee GA, and to tell us about his recent trip there for the Eggs on the Hiawassee River Rally! One of my favorite episodes we have ever done on the RV Atlas podcast was CASITA DEAN AND THE INVASION OF THE EGG PEOPLE. It was an amazing episode where Dean broke down the intel on all of the best egg camper makes and models. He also gives a 101 primer class on the egg camper lifestyle. If you are interested in learning about egg campers and egg camper culture, you should take a listen! On today's episode of the RV Atlas Dean explains why he and his awesome wife Laura are so drawn to egg campers.  Dean and I also discuss why egg camper owners are so rapid and why they have such a cult-like following. After that Dean gives us an awesome review of the Riverbend Campground in Georgia--home to the Eggs on the Hiawassee River Rally that Dean and Laura have attended several times. Here are Dean's notes for the show!! To listen to Jeremy and Dean's conversation, click on the media player above, or subscribe to The RV Atlas wherever you get your shows! Location of the Riverbend Campground Riverbend Campground is in the beautiful hills and mountains of northeast Georgia.The campground is about 10 minutes south of Hiawassee, GA. Hiawassee is just over 2 hours northeast (107 miles) of Atlanta, GA or just under 3 hours (138 miles) from Knoxville, TN. Despite only having a population of less than 1,000, Hiawassee is a nice little town located in a touristy and recreational area, so there are ample places to buy groceries, shop, go out to eat, and have fun. Type of Campground: Private Size of Campground:165 RV sites with the majority having full hookups and the remaining sites having electric and water. Physical Appearance of the Campground and Surroundings The campground is relatively flat surrounded by green rolling hills and small mountains. The beautiful Hiawassee River runs the entire length of the campground. Many sites have shade trees while the newer sites in the back of the campground have exposure to the sun. Oh, the bathrooms are nice, too! Price Range and Ease of Booking Reservations can only be made by phone and/or email. There is no on-line reservation system.Daily rate is $45.00 for RVs and $40.00 for tents.They also offer reasonable weekly, monthly, and seasonal rates. Site Details at Riverbend Campground All sites have electric (both 30/50-amp) and water. The majority have sewer as well.The sites are nicely graveled and have fire rings and picnic tables.The sites are well kept and nicely spaced. *Bonus – The campground offers a free honey wagon service for the electric/water sites. On Wednesdays, they will dump your gray tank. On Fridays, they will dump your black/gray tanks. Also, there are seasonal sites at Riverbend. They are well maintained, landscaped, and very attractive. Wi-Fi/Cell Phone Service: Cell phone service is fine. Wi-Fi in the campground is EXCEPTIONAL. Over the last few years, the campground lost access to cable. After a couple of iterations, they decided to add a Wi-Fi router to EVERY site. The best Wi-Fi we have ever had, perhaps superior to Anchor Down’s fiber optic Wi-Fi! The downside is that there is no cable; however, since Laura and I don’t have or want a TV in our RV, we love the premium Wi-Fi service!!! Activities at Riverbend Campground Organized Activities and Recreation (some activities are seasonal): Pool, Fishing,
Jul 25
40 min
Load more