Hackaday Podcast
Hackaday Podcast
Hackaday
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Podcast by Hackaday
Ep090: DIY Linux SBC, HDMI CEC, Fake Bluepills, and SCARA Arms
Hackaday editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys chat about our favorite hacks from the past week. We start off with a bit of news of the Bennu asteroid and the new Raspberry Pi Compute Module. We drive ourselves crazy trying to understand how bobbin holders on sewing machines work, all while drooling over the mechanical brilliance of a bobbin-winding build. SCARA is the belt and pully champion of robot arms and this week's example cleverly uses redundant bearings for better precision. And we wrap up the sh
Oct 22
1 hr 7 min
Ep089: 770 Potato Battery, Printing Resin Resist, and No-Internet Video Chat
Hackaday editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams weigh the hacking gold found across the internet this week. We can't get over the epic adventure that went into making a battery from 100 pounds of potatoes. It turns out you don't need Internet for video conferencing as long as you're within a coupe of kilometers of everyone else. And move over toner transer method, resin printers want a shot at at-home PCB etching. We'll take a look at what the Tesla selfie cam is doing under the hood, and lose our marbles
Oct 15
45 min
Ep088: Flywheel Trebuchet, Thieving Magpies, Hero Engines, and Hypermiling
Hackaday editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys riff on the hardware hacks that took the Internet by storm this week. Machining siege weapons out of aluminum? If they can throw a tennis ball at 180 mph, yes please! Welding aficionados will love to see the Hero Engine come together. We dive into the high-efficiency game of hypermiling, and spin up the polarizing topic of the Sun Cycle. The episode wouldn't be complete without hearing what the game of Go sounds like as a loop sequencer, and how a variable sp
Oct 8
48 min
Ep087: Sound-Shattering Gliders Pressing Dashcam Buttons, and Ratcheting Up Time
Hackaday editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams dish up a hot slice of the week's hardware hacks. We feature a lot of clocks on Hackaday, but few can compare to the mechanical engineering elegance of the band-saw-blade-based ratcheting clock we swoon over on this week's show. We've found a superb use of a six-pin microcontroller, peek in on tire (or is that tyre) wear particles, and hear the sounds of 500 mph RC gliders. Turns out 3D printers are the primordial ooze for both pumping water and positioning c
Oct 1
54 min
Ep086: News Overflow, Formula 1/3 Racer, Stand Up Rubber Duckies, and Useless Machine Takes a Turn
Hackaday editors Elliot Williams take Mike Szczys peruse the world of hacks. There was so much news this week that we lead off the show with a rundown to catch you up. Yet there is still no shortage of hardware hacks, with prosthetic legs for your rubber ducky, a RC cart that channels the spirit of Formula 1, and a project that brings 80's video conferencing hardware to Zoom. There's phosphine gas on Venus and unlimited hacking projects inside your guitar. The week wouldn't be complete without the joy of ri
Sep 24
53 min
Ep085: Cable Robots Two-Ways, Cubic Raspberry Pi, Plastic Wrap Kayak, and Digging Inductors
Hackaday editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams take a look at all the hacks from the week that was. We think we've found the perfect tentacle robot, and the controller for it is fittingly also a tentacle. An unrelated project uses the same bowden cable trick as the tentacle controller to measure deflection. If you're more of a material-science geek, refining black sand to make your own inductors is a fascinating hack. And we wrap up the episode talking SSH keys and buses that go off road, but not in the w
Sep 17
51 min
Ep084: Awful Floppy Disk Music, Robot Climbs Walls, An Undersea Lab, Inside a Digital Pregnancy Test
With Editor in Chief Mike Szczys off this week, Managing Editor Elliot Williams is joined by Staff Writer Dan Maloney to look over the hacks from the last week. If you've ever wondered how the Beatles sound on a floppy disk, wonder no more. Do you fear the coming robopocalypse? This noisy wall-climbing robot will put those fears to rest. We'll take a look at an undersea lab worthy of the Cousteau name, and finally we'll look inside a digital pregnancy test and wonder at its unusual power switch. Show notes
Sep 11
52 min
Ep083: Soooo Many Custom Peripherals, Leaving Bluetooth Footprints, and a Twirlybird on Mars
Hackaday editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams ogle the greatest hacks from the past 168 hours. Did you know that Mars Rover didn't get launched into space all alone? Nestled in it's underbelly is a two-prop helicopter that's a fascinating study in engineering for a different world. Fingerprinting audio files isn't a special trick reserved for Shazam, you can do it just as easily with an ESP32. A flaw in the way Bluetooth COVID tracing frameworks chirp out their anonymized hashes means they're not as perf
Sep 2
57 min
Ep082: DJ CNC, NFC Black Box, Sound of Keys, and Payin' for 3D Prints
Hackaday editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys check in on the best hacks from the past week. All the buzz is the algorithm that can reverse engineer your house keys from the way they sound going into the lock. Cardboard construction goes extreme with an RC car build that's beyond wizard-level. Speaking of junk builds, there's a CNC mill tipped on its side grinding out results worlds better than you expect from salvaged CD-ROM drives. And a starburst character display is a clever combination of laser cutt
Aug 27
57 min
Ep081: Mask-apult, Beef Tallow, Grinding Melted Plastic, and Stretching Flowing Metal
Hackaday editors Mike Szczys and Tom Nardi chew the beef tallow as they take a tour through some of the best and most interesting articles from the past week, from kicking off another round of the popular Circuit Sculpture contest to building artisan coffee makers. We'll look at the engineering behind the post-apocalyptic face mask launcher of our nightmares, and stand in awe at the intersection of orbiting spacecraft and lawn emojis. Several tiny remote controlled vehicles will be discussed, and we'll take
Aug 19
54 min
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