Better at English
Better at English
Lori Linstruth
Podcast for EFL and ESL learners who want learn conversational English. Listen to our live, unscripted English conversations featuring authentic English vocabulary, slang, idioms, and more. Go to https://www.betteratenglish.com/transcripts for FREE transcripts and vocabulary notes. Have fun listening and learning English with us!
054 – What in the world is leaf peeping?
Episode summary Autumn is in full swing here in the northern hemisphere, so this Real English Conversations episode is full of vocabulary related to the colors, weather, moods and feelings associated with this time of year. Lori and her friend Eliza talk about exercising outdoors, the health benefits of spending time out in nature, and whether or not it’s a good idea to pick and eat wild mushrooms. Are you feeling tired and drained? Grab your audio player and some headphones, get yourself to a park or forest, and have a nice walk while practicing your English listening! I guarantee you'll feel better after you do this than you did when you started. :-) Get in touch with Eliza Eliza on Udemy Eliza’s instagram Eliza’s teacher profile on italki Supplementary material for further study How nature affects our health and well-being https://www.takingcharge.csh.umn.edu/how-does-nature-impact-our-wellbeing What is leaf peeping? Read this article in The Guardian and find out. Includes a wealth of adjectives related to being outdoors in the autumn. https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/oct/09/autumn-colour-brings-joy-to-uks-growing-band-of-leaf-peepers This article explains how you can boost your mood by spending time in nature https://www.health.harvard.edu/mind-and-mood/sour-mood-getting-you-down-get-back-to-nature TRANSCRIPT PREVIEW Hi English learners! Lori here, your teacher from Betteratenglish.com. Wherever and whenever you happen to be listening to this I hope you’re doing great. I’m recording this in early November 2020, and if you aren’t living out in the bush somewhere with no connection to the outside world, you’re probably aware that it’s a pretty stressful time. So because the past few episodes I’ve given you have been about rather heavy topics, I thought I’d give you something lighter for a change. A couple of weeks ago I recorded a fun conversation with another English teacher. Her name is Eliza and she is from Belarus. She’s not a native speaker of English, but her English is fantastic. I really enjoyed talking to Eliza, and I think you’ll agree that her infectious enthusiasm and positivity really shine in this conversation. And I also think that teachers who are not native speakers of the language they teach have a deep understanding of what it’s actually like to learn that language, and that this can really benefit their students. I often wish that I could somehow experience learning English like a non-native speaker, just so I would have insight into what it’s really like. Eliza teaches online at italki, so if you feel like your personalities would click and you want to get in touch with her about lessons, you’ll find her italki profile linked the show notes. All right, the conversation you’ll hear is actually the very first time Eliza and I ever spoke. So I start off by asking her about how she learned English, because I was really curious about that. What follows is a great example of a typical informal conversation in English between two people who don’t know each other, but who at least have some things in common. Becoming conversational in a foreign language is really difficult because conversations are completely unpredictable. There’s no way that you can prepare in advance for everything that might happen in a conversation. As you’ll hear, Eliza and I cover quite a range of topics. We talk about how Eliza learned English as a child, then move on to the health benefits of spending time outside, our favorite seasons, and even whether or not it’s a good idea to pick and eat wild mushrooms. Here in the northern hemisphere it’s autumn, or fall, right now, so there is a lot of vocabulary related to the colors, the weather and the feelings and moods of autumn. And hey, I even learned a new English expression from this c...
Nov 11
20 min
053 – Is seeing believing? Deepfakes and the information apocalypse
When you watch the news these days, do you trust your eyes and ears? Do you think what you’re seeing is real and happened the way it is being shown? Or is your first reaction to think: Hmm, I wonder if this video is fake? That’s what today’s episode is about, so stay tuned. TRANSCRIPT PREVIEW - Get the full transcript here: https://www.betteratenglish.com/053-is-seeing-believing-deepfakes-and-the-information-apocalypse-transcript Before we get started, I hope you’ll indulge me in a little Better at English background info. I don’t do Better at English for the money, but some of you have been going out of your way to send me thank-you gifts. So thank you so much to Charles for his very generous Paypal donation, and to the mystery person who sent me the Handbook of Self-Determination research from my Amazon wish list. I honestly didn’t know that it was even possible to find my Amazon wish list anymore, so getting a mystery book delivered was a real surprise! I’d also like to thank Zhuo Tao (I hope I’m saying that right) who wrote my favorite review this month: It goes like this “This podcast is getting better and better by every episode. It’s no longer just some language learning material, but food for thought as well.” That is indeed what I’m trying to do, so that was really nice to get that feedback. You can say thanks here: https://www.betteratenglish.com/support-better-at-english All feedback from you lovely listeners, whether it’s reviews, email, voice messages, donations, Amazon wish list gifts...it’s all positive feedback that fuels my motivation to keep doing this...it’s a sign that you’re getting value from the episodes, which is what it’s all about. So thank you! OK, thank you for indulging me...let’s get on with today’s topic. Deepfakes and the Information Apocalypse Today we’re looking at misinformation and disinformation in our modern age, and how technologies like deepfake are making it increasingly harder for us to know what is really happening in the world, to separate fact from fiction. This episode builds on my earlier episodes about AI—that’s artificial intelligence—which you can find further down the podcast feed as episodes 47 and 48. Before we go any further, take a moment to ask yourself how much you trust what you see, hear, and read these days, whether it’s online, in a newspaper, or coming from an expert or politician in a live televised address. Is seeing believing, as the expression goes? Go ahead, think of some recent examples that are personally relevant to you. Now ask yourself how your beliefs about what is true influence your actions, how much they shape what you actually do as you move through life. How do these beliefs influence, for example, who you vote for, what you buy, what you eat, which books you read, which car you drive? You don’t need to be a Ph.D. in psychology to understand that our beliefs about what is true or false affect our actions. Nobody wants to make decisions based on lies or misinformation, so we all want information that we can trust. Just to give a current example, look at what’s happening regarding masks and the Corona-virus. If you think masks do help stop the spread and protect others, you’re likely to wear one even though they are uncomfortable and it’s kind of a pain in the butt. And if you think masks don’t help at all, you are more likely to resist wearing a mask or even flat out refuse. I mean, why bother if they don’t work, right? And if you have really strong beliefs about this, you might even march in protest against the rules that require you to wear a mask. The point is, your chosen path will be based on what you believe is right and true. We are living in a pretty crazy time right now, and humanity is facing huge challenges. And it’s no secret that many of the big issues are extremely polarizing.
Oct 24
31 min
052 – The Other F-word: talking about fat
Talking about fat and fat bodies is a tricky area to navigate in English because the word FAT is so laden with meaning, associations, emotions, and feelings -- and these are different for everyone. In this episode, you'll hear a wide variety of people who self-identify as fat talking about their experiences. You'll hear how they think, feel and talk about their own bodies and how they experience things as a person of size. There are many registers (styles) of English represented here, as well as many different regional dialects. Links to all sources are provided, and most of these are videos. I encourage you to watch the videos to see the language being used in context. A transcript preview is below. You can find a pdf of the full transcript here: https://www.betteratenglish.com/052-the-other-f-word-talking-about-fat-transcript I hope you find this episode thought provoking and useful. TRANSCRIPT PREVIEW Hi English learners, Lori here, your teacher from betteratenglish.com. In today's episode you are going to hear various people's thoughts, opinions and feelings related to the f-word. No, not the swear word you hear all the time in movies and TV. I'm talking about the other F-word: fat. Yes, fat. Madison A Krall Let's talk about fat bias and thin privilege | Madison A. Krall | TEDxMileHigh https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gak58BcuPh0 Madison: When you hear the word fat what thoughts and images come to mind? Some of you might think of fat as the extra 10 pounds you're currently trying to lose. Others might be thinking, "Hmm, I wonder what the fat content was in the bag of potato chips I had for lunch?" And some of you when you hear the word fat, might think back to that time in middle school when someone called you fat, and how it has affected the rest of your life. Let's just admit it. Fat can be a pretty loaded word, no matter who you are. Kelli Jean Drinkwater Enough with the fear of fat | Kelli Jean Drinkwater https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bzlYyhh3X0w Kelli: I'm here today to talk to you about a very powerful little word, one that people will do almost anything to avoid becoming. Billion-dollar industries thrive because of the fear of it, and those of us who undeniably are it are left to navigate a relentless storm surrounding it. I'm not sure if any of you have noticed, but I'm fat. Not the lowercase, muttered-behind-my-back kind, or the seemingly harmless chubby or cuddly. I'm not even the more sophisticated voluptuous or curvaceous kind. Let's not sugarcoat it. I am the capital F-A-T kind of fat. I am the elephant in the room. Fat | Eating Disorders | One Word | Cut https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UWXwIPs-xWg Speaker 1: There are lots of good fats, and I don't think fat on your body is a bad thing. And I don't think fat in your food means fat on your body but it's been used as hate speech. Speaker 2: Fat can be a hateful word. It can destroy some people. But in some ways fat can be good. And depending on how you image yourself, your fat can actually be great. Speaker 3: I see a lot of mothers with their daughters say, don't eat that or else you're gonna get fat. It's like, is that really the one thing that you don't want your daughter to be? ********* Yes, a fat is a loaded word that raises a lot of feelings, emotions, and associations. I’m taking a risk with this episode, because, as you’ll hear, conversations around fat and body size can quickly lead you into precarious territory, even if you have the best of intentions. It’s a highly charged topic. But I think that’s all the more reason to understand different people’s perspectives on fat and being fat, and to have language to talk about it sensitively. Apart from vocabulary related to the topic,
Oct 6
28 min
Get FREE podcast transcriptions with Otter.ai (it’s super cool, I promise).
Did you know that you can get FREE transcriptions of any podcast in English, and that it's fast and easy to do? That's right, ANY PODCAST! And did I say FREE? If you are serious about your English learning, you will love Otter.ai -- a FREE online service that transcribes audio files. This means podcasts, audio taken from videos, anything at all where the language is fairly clear. All you do is upload the file to otter.ai, and then let the A.I do the rest. It's unbelievably awesome. You can watch my little YouTube demo video demo here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Gw4jviWdno You can find Otter.ai here: https://otter.ai Note: This is not a sales pitch, I don't have any involvement with Otter.ai other than being a very satisfied customer (I use their paid plan because I need the extra features. You won't need extra features unless you want to transcribe more than 10 hours of audio per month, or if you need to transcribe files that are longer than 40 minutes each.) The transcript of this audio podcast is below. If you get value from my podcasts, please leave a rating or review. It really helps me a lot! Cheers, Lori TRANSCRIPT Hi, English learners, Lori here, your teacher from betteratenglish.com. Today, I don't have a conversation for you, I'm actually working on the next conversational episode. And that should be up in the next couple of days. But as I was working on it, I realized that the online service, the tool that I use to transcribe the conversations would be super, super useful for your English learning. So I just wanted to share that with you today, and let you know about it so you can try it yourself. First of all, let's get this out of the way. It's completely free. And I don't make any money for recommending it to you. No one is asking me to tell you this. It's simply something that I use myself and that I think, is really awesome. And I think it would almost be a crime for me to not let you know about it. "Okay, okay, Lori. All right, fine, get on with it, let us know what it is." Okay, the tool is called Otter.ai. That's O T T E R dot A I. And what it is, is an online service where you can upload audio files, and it, the artificial intelligence will create a transcript of the audio. But that's not even the best part. For me, I think the most useful thing, the thing that makes it so awesome for learning English, is that once the AI is finished with your transcript, you can listen to the audio as you're reading the transcript, and then you can click anywhere in the transcript, and the audio will jump to that section. So just imagine the implications of this. Now you can take any audio file with spoken English, and you can upload it, have it transcribed for free, and then listen to it, click anywhere in the transcript, and listen to just that part. So if you find a section that you want to do some kind of listen-and-repeat practice for your pronunciation or your intonation, or just to kind of "wrap your mouth around" a new piece of language, it's super, super easy to do now. I think it's just so great that you can go and find any podcast in English, anything that you want to listen to anything that you want to learn from, and it doesn't matter if they have already given you a transcript or not. You can just upload the file and make your own which is super, super awesome. The free plan on otter.ai does have some limitations. And one of those is that you can only transcribe 10 hours' worth of audio per month. So every month it resets and you get another 10 hours. And the files that you upload can only be up to 40 minutes long. So if you have a super long, say, an epic Joe Rogan podcast that's three hours long, you're going to have to --before you upload it for transcription -- y...
Sep 29
3 min
051 – The good, the bad, and the flat-out liars. Real English Conversation
Imagine if you will, the following scenario. You’ve volunteered to take part in a psychology study, say, at your university. All you have to do is show up to the lab, sit by yourself in a little booth and play a very simple game of chance, something like flipping a coin, where there's no skill involved, only luck. You get paid one dollar just for showing up, that’s guaranteed. And if you’re lucky and win the game, you’ll get paid 5 dollars cash. But if you lose, you get nothing. Here’s the kicker: it's up to you to tell the researchers if you won or lost, they won't be able to tell. So there are three possible outcomes: you can win and get 5 dollars, you can lose and get nothing, or....you can lose, but lie and still get the 5 dollars. And nobody will know. What would you do? What do you think other people would do? As it happens, a recent study just looked at this, and there was a cunning little twist: those crafty researchers actually DID know if people won or lost. So they also knew if people told the truth about it or if they lied. The study, called "Cheaters, Liars, or Both? A New Classification of Dishonesty Profiles" is absolutely fascinating. And today you'll hear a conversation ‒ in American English – with some people discussing it. The conversation is from one of my favorite podcasts, The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe. It's a podcast featuring smart people having interesting discussions about science, technology, and critical thinking. If you are at all interested in those topics, I highly recommend it for your English listening practice. This is definitely a show that will make you smarter, and will teach you lots of vocabulary. The episodes don't always have transcripts, but I've transcribed the part you're going to hear today and put it in the show notes, which you can find at betteratenglish.com/transcripts. You know, if you like, you can turn this episode into a more challenging task for yourself. In the show notes you'll also find a link to a New York Times article about the study. In the conversation you'll hear a woman summarizing this same article to her friends. So before you continue listening, you can hit pause and go read the article yourself. Then imagine how you might summarize it for friend and what you might discuss. What language would you use? What vocabulary would you need? Spend a few moments imagining how you might talk about it with a group of friends. Then listen to the rest of this podcast and compare your ideas with what you hear in the conversation. All right, let's get to it. You'll hear a woman named Cara doing most of the talking. She explains the study's findings to her friends Steve, Bob, Jay, and Evan. They they all discuss what they make of it. Are you ready? Let's go: TRANSCRIPT PREVIEW Get the full transcript here Steve: All right, Cara, you're gonna tell us about the psychology of lying and cheating. Cara: Right! So this is a field of psychological inquiry that goes back basically to the beginning of experimental psychology, right? Psychologists, psychologists have always been interested in deception. So a new paper said, OK, well, we want to do is we want to see if we can sort of beef up and retest some old concepts in the kind of construct of lying, cheating deception, but we want to go beyond that. And we want to say, Okay, this is not an all or nothing phenomenon, right? Like, you could say, That person's a liar, or that person lied, or that person's a cheater, that person's dishonest, but there are shades of grey, aren't there? Steve: Mm hmm. Evan: Of course, of course. Bob: Yeah, absolutely. Little white lies. Cara: Totally. There lies that actually help us. Bob: There are lies that actually get people killed. Cara: Yep.
Sep 21
15 min
050 – Help! I have a horrible neighbor (fixed)
Neighbors can be great friends, but let’s face it: sometimes they can be absolutely horrible. But what do you do when you’re stuck living next to a neighbor who you just can’t get along with, no matter what you try? In this episode of Better at English, Lori introduces you to the “How To” podcast with Charles Duhigg. It’s a conversational podcast that covers ways to deal with all kinds of life problems, and does so in an entertaining and fun way. And best of all, it has free transcripts that you can use for your English learning. Lori plays some extracts from the conversation, and looks at some of the interesting language. The full transcript of this episode is here: TRANSCRIPT PREVIEW Hi English learners! Lori here, your teacher from betteratenglish.com. So nice that you’re here! Come on in, kick off your shoes, sit back and get ready for some English listening practice. Today I’m going to play you some bits of conversation from one of my current favorite podcasts. It’s not a special English learning podcast; it’s a podcast for native speakers of English. But if you can follow along with the conversations in my own podcast, you should be able to follow this one as well. Just like I do, they have free transcripts available on their website, so you can use them to support your English learning. I’ve put links to everything in the show notes. The name of the podcast is “How to with Charles Duhigg”. If the name Charles Duhigg is familiar to you, it could be that you’ve heard of his book “T he Power of Habit.” If you’re an upper-intermediate or advanced learner and you’re interested in psychology, I can highly recommend it. The Power of Habit is one of those books that teaches you something useful and just makes your life better. Charles’s podcast is the same: it’s entertaining, of course, but it also teaches you useful strategies that you can apply in your own life. “How to” is an interview show, so it’s very conversational. Charles helps people figure out how to deal with difficult or awkward problems. He usually has a co-host who is either a celebrity or some kind of expert. In the episode called “How to confront a crazy neighbor,” Charles’s co-host is comedian and actor Tig Notaro. Their guest is a woman named Sarah. Sarah is in the middle of a very unpleasant and stressful conflict with her neighbor. Charles and Tig are going to help her figure out what to do. First let’s listen to Sarah giving some background information about her living situation: “My name is Sarah and I’m a college counselor. I work with high school students who are low income, and I just bought a condo this year. This is the first time I’ve ever owned a house or anything. So that was pretty exciting. It’s a small building, there are just three units in it. So it’s me living on the first floor and then a guy who lives behind me and then a family who lives upstairs.” Sara mentions that she lives in a condo. Condo is short for condominium. In the US, a condo is like an apartment or flat, but with one big difference. Do you know what it is? Can you guess from what you heard? Listen again: “I just bought a condo this year. This is the first time I’ve ever owned a house or anything. So that was pretty exciting.“ The key word is bought. Sarah said she bought the condo, not that she rents it. So the difference between a condo and an apartment or flat is that in a condo, you own the space that you live in – the unit. You actually buy it, and you can sell it. But in an apartment you just pay rent every month. You don’t actually own an apartment unit. So buying a condo is a much bigger deal than just renting an apartment because it’s such a big financial investment. In Sarah’s condo building, there are three living units – it sounds like they are all attached.
Sep 17
19 min
049 No excuses – The best place to get FREE speaking practice right now
This is NOT a sales episode, I promise! Seriously, I have found and tested the BEST place to find people to practice speaking English with for free. It only takes 5 minutes to set up an account, and you'll be up and running, practicing your English with nice people from all over the world. No hidden charges, no sales, I promise you...as of September 2020 when I am publishing this podcast, it's 100% free. There aren't even annoying ads! No excuses. Start speaking NOW. :-) You can find free4talk.com here. It's a great place to practice speaking with other non-native speakers. If you prefer to have structured lessons with a native speaker teacher, italki is probaby still the best value. But for FREE speaking practice, definitely check out free4talk! For my list of other places where you can practice your English online, see this page. TRANSCRIPT Hi, English learners, Lori here, your teacher from betteratenglish.com. Today I have a very short and simple episode for you. Now, I know a lot of you really want to get more English speaking practice, because you're mainly concerned with becoming more fluent with your English speaking. But the problem is that you have a hard time finding people to practice with, especially since, you know, it can be expensive to get an online teacher, and you don't have money and I totally, totally understand. So what if I told you that five minutes after listening to this podcast you could be online, joining in a whole community of people just like you who want to practice their English. And you could actually be practicing, literally within five minutes. I swear it blew my mind when I found this site. It's called Free4talk.com, and it's 100% free. And I promise you, I have no vested interest in this website. I don't know them. They're not paying me anything. I don't make any money for recommending it to you. I just think it's such an amazing resource that I would actually feel really bad if I didn't tell you all about it. Now, if you're already listening and thinking, "Oh, no, no, that's not for me. I've already tried conversation exchanges and it's a real pain in the butt because I have to first log in and look at a bunch of profiles and then find somebody and then send a message and, and hope that they're going to get back to me and then we have to arrange a time and then more often than not, when I show up for our appointment, there's nobody there, they've totally flaked on me." And I get it. That is a real pain, and that is frustrating. And you've spent all this time and still not gotten any practice. I promise you free4talk is 1000 times easier. Literally, within five minutes, you can find the site, create an account, log in, find a room and start talking to people. And the big difference between free4talk and these other conversation exchange sites is that it's based on chat rooms. And that makes it super, super easy. I've been logging in off-and-on over the past couple of weeks and giving it a try. And the good news for all of you who are listening who are learning English, is that English is by far the most popular language. Every time that I've logged in there's been at least 40 different chat rooms. Sometimes there's been close to 100 different chat rooms of learners all over the world, people just like you who are on there to practice their English. So I hope this is getting you excited. And that you're thinking "Yeah, cool. I want to go try it." So here's what you're going to need if you want to try it. All you need is a computer with a mic. Or you can also use an Android phone or an iPhone. And you're going to need a Google account because that's how you log in. I think the site is actually based on the same engine that drives Google Hangouts. So you can't use it if you don't have a Google account.
Sep 14
8 min
048 – The Robots are Coming – part 2
Here comes part 2 of Lori and Will's discussion about A.I. and automation. If you enjoy these podcasts, please take a moment and rate or review. You can find the full transcript at https://www.betteratenglish.com/transcripts. TRANSCRIPT PREVIEW Lori: I heard that...I think it's Pizza Hut already has... or no... Domino's is already experimenting with robot pizza delivery vehicles. Yeah. I mean, this this is happening now. Will: Well, you know, a main...I've been talking about this whole automation thing....oh, by the way, jot this down. If you've never seen it. There's a, there's a short 15-minute video on YouTube called Humans Need not Apply. And it puts the entire conversation and frames it into a perfect, digestible, understandable video that explains automation for anybody who's interested and doesn't have, you know, hours of time to spend on the topic. Lori: Oh yeah, great, thanks! Will: So jot that down. Yep, no problem. Lori: Done. Will: But Amazon, which everybody knows who Amazon is, the company, they did, they did something about maybe six months ago or so. They implemented a grocery store that had no cashiers, it was set up with turnstiles that using your mobile device, you would log in before you entered the store. You would get whatever you needed at the market, groceries, whatever you needed, and you would leave, you wouldn't stand in a line you would just walk through the turnstile and be automatically charged to your account. And I remember when Amazon did this I kind of freaked out a little bit because I, I said, you know, I sounded like the crazy preacher man running down the hill, I said to anybody I'd ever spoken to the topic about, they're testing a patent for this type of framework to be rolled out on a larger scale to the supermarket industry. And in the past week, Amazon has purchased Whole Foods and I am positive that it is connected to their concept of implementing this...you know, cashierless...you know, turnstile, just walk in and walk out, fully automated, market shopping experience. Lori: Wow, I ....Oh, my goodness. I didn't know that they had bought Whole Foods. Will: Yep. In the past week. I lost my mind when I read it. Lori: Wow. Wow. I mean, it's something like that, I mean, a lot of people would lose their jobs or you know, the the poor cashiers. But at the same time, it sounds like a nice shopping experience, that you just walk in, get your things and walk out and everything is taken care of...I ...provided that it's all accurately...that you're accurately charged for your items. Will: Yes. Of course, and it's a perfect...it's a perfect example of "If it works for the consumer..." which it sounds like that's a no brainer. And there...if the quarterly numbers come out for Whole Foods, and they see massive profits as a result of not having to carry those salaries and that that level of overhead as a result of employing humans, then it'll also make sense from a business perspective. And we will inevitably start to see the shift into the direction of automation. When it works for people and it works for businesses and the governments are scrambling around trying to figure out what to do with all of these, you know, unemployed unemployable people. It almost like a dirty word, unemployable. You're unemployable. Lori: Yeah. But it really depends on how, you know, what is going to happen with society as this, you know, as these changes start taking place, because the point that that...remind me of what his name was. Do you remember the name of the guy who made this this video about the rise of AI? Will: Aaaah.... Lori: I can't remember his name. Well, in any case, the point he made was that if these things do happen, we could if things go well, and if we plan properly,
Sep 7
18 min
047 – The robots are coming. Are you ready?
A study predicts that all human tasks could be automated in the next 30 years. And that all human jobs might be replaced within the next 100 years or so. Holy crap! What will we do when the robots take over? A.I. is coming. The robots are coming. But are we ready? In this Real English conversations podcast from Better at English, Lori and her American friend Will talk about their questions and concerns about the rise of A.I. (Artificial intelligence) and the automation of human labor. You can find the full transcript in my archive of English conversation transcripts for language learners. Additional resources and supplementary material Humans need not apply Video about how automation and A.I. will affect the job market for humans https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Pq-S557XQU Robots will beat humans at every task https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2017/06/this-is-when-robots-will-start-beating-humans-at-every-task-ae5ecd71-5e8e-44ba-87cd-a962c2aa99c2 Traffic death statistics https://www.cdc.gov/injury/features/global-road-safety/index.html Dirty, Dirty robots. Funny (but still disturbing) video about A.I. from comedian Lee Camp https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HyfxP6ZyNtw Link to original Yale / Oxford study about A.I. This is for learners of academic English. People in the videos about A.I. summarize findings from this study. This is the actual academic study for comparison. https://arxiv.org/pdf/1705.08807.pdf Elon musk on the Joe Rogan podcast, talking about A.I. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ra3fv8gl6NE Elon Musk's talk at SXSW https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B-Osn1gMNtw Ted talk with neuroscientist and philosopher Sam Harris https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8nt3edWLgIg Sam Harris on the Joe Rogan Podcast https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BChxQHyFIOI&t=1487s TED talk by Peter Haas A robot designer who is afraid of robots The Real Reason to be Afraid of Artificial Intelligence https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TRzBk_KuIaM How frightened should be be of A.I.? Article in the New Yorker, free, with full text and audio so you can read along as you listen. https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2018/05/14/how-frightened-should-we-be-of-ai Video about delivery robots https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujzjZuhE92g
Aug 31
18 min
The robots are coming – pre-listening task
Hi English learners! Lori here, your teacher from better at English dot com. This little update is just to let you know that new Real English Conversations are coming. I know you love the conversations, and I do love making them for you, but they are quite a lot of work, let me tell you! In fact, I just invested in some fancy new recording equipment that’s going to make it much easier for me to record and transcribe the conversations in the future. Because hey, let’s face it, what good is a conversation episode with out a transcript that you can use to learn from? The first new conversation is coming in the next couple of days, and I’m letting you know in advance because I think you’ll get more benefit from the conversation if you can familiarize yourself with the general topic before you listen. “Hey Lori, what’s the topic?” Oh yeah, what’s the topic? You’ll be hearing me and an American friend talk about AI, or artificial intelligence, and the automation of human labor. Yes, the robots are coming and – whether we like it or not – a lot of the work that humans are doing now, a lot of our jobs, our skills, will be replaced by machines and artificial intelligence. How are we going to deal with that as a society? Where will we find our sense of value and purpose when we don’t have to work anymore? And how will we make a living in the first place? How will we put a roof over our heads and put food on the table? These are some of the things you’ll hear us discuss. You won't think I'm so cute when I take your job. And in the conversation we mention some videos and other things that we’ve seen online. And that’s not so fun for you if you haven’t seen the video yourself and have no idea what we're talking about. So I’ve put the links to these in the show notes for this episode, and if you check out the background material in advance, you’ll be on the same page with us as you listen to the conversation. You won’t be left in the dark, scratching your head, when you hear us mention the videos. So I highly encourage you to take the next couple of days and get familiar with some of these materials so you’ll get more out of the conversation when I post it next time. That’s all for this time...I’ll see you soon with a brand new, fresh, juicy, delightful and delicious real English conversation. Unless I’m replaced by a robot before then. Oh, wait. How do you know I’m not already a robot now...seriously, how would you know? Woo! Scary question. Anyway, as always, you can find me at www.betteratenglish.com if you want to leave a comment, send an email, or leave me a voice message. I love getting voice messages from you so I can hear you show off your beautiful English. You can do all of that from my website. Until next time, here’s wishing you an inspired and productive day. Bye for now. SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL FOR PRE-LISTENING Funny (but still disturbing) video about AI by a comedian Dirty Dirty Robots Facts, figures and big questions about what will happen when machines and AI take over our jobs Humans need not apply Article and short video about some predictions related to Artificial Intelligence and automation This is when robots will start beating humans at every task For learners of academic English - here is the original study by researchers at Oxford and Yale. This is the study that the people in the videos talk about. When will AI exceed human performance?
Aug 29
3 min
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