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November 2, 2019
This episode was recorded at Temple Law during Temple Law’s celebratory Law Review Symposium: Looking Back and Looking Ahead, 10 Years of Public Health Law Research in September 2019. My guest host is Rachel Rebouché from the Center for Public Health Research at Temple University Beasley School of Law. Together we enjoyed a wide-ranging discussion with some brilliant researchers, Jennifer Karas Montez from the Syracuse University Maxell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Evan Anderson from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, and Wendy Parmet, Matthews Distinguished University Professor of Law and Director, Center for Health Policy and Law at Northeastern University.
October 28, 2019
My guest is Matthew Cortland, a patient and healthcare rights advocate from Massachusetts. He received his graduate training in public health from Boston University and earned a JD from George Mason University School of Law. He is disabled and chronically ill, but a superbly effective lawyer, writer, and speaker as well as a well-known healthcare and disability rights activist. We recently staged a one day Symposium at the law school entitled Getting Real About Health Care for All. Matt was kind enough to join us and add his compelling thoughts about what healthcare for all should look like for those in the disability community and the dangers members of that community face during periods of transition in financing and delivery models. It was touch and go whether we would hear from him, not only did the airline and TSA conspire against him but he picked up a horrible cough and cold—something that most of us can throw off, but not someone on his drug regimen. As a result, his presentation was punctuated by coughs, sniffles, and much drinking of tea, but all covered up by Matt’s own self-deprecating humor. In case you don’t listen all the way through the acknowledgements at the end of the show please consider visiting Matt’s Patreon page https://www.patreon.com/mattbc and sponsor his health. Towards the end of his talk Matt asked for a breather, help, “his reasonable accommodation” from the audience in the form of questions. I include two, the first from our friend Matthew Lawrence who is a health law professor at Penn State’s Dickinson Law school and then one from my colleague Ross Silverman who is on the faculty at the Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health at Indiana University and also serves as a Professor of Public Health at our law school.
October 19, 2019
I am joined by Professor Wendy Mariner, Professor of Health Law at Boston University School of Public Health and Professor of Law at Boston University School of Law. We thought it would be a good idea to reflect on some of the current health law and policy stories with a lightning round. We discussed the latest abortion case to be granted cert., the current state of play in Medicaid work requirements, the new Tennessee block grant proposal, the latest on the opioid litigation, the current state of play on the public charge rule, the latest on the Safehouse safe injection facility litigation in Philadelphia, potential wellness programs on the exchanges, and surprise billing.
September 18, 2019
This episode was recorded at the 2019 meeting of the Southeastern Association of Law Schools during a panel reviewing the year in healthcare financing. In this episode I take a look at state regulation of health insurance, first, from the perspective of states playing defense and shoring up their own laws in case the ACA disappears and, second, how some are playing offense, actually seeing to improve upon the ACA baseline.
September 5, 2019
Two great guests this week, Rachel Rebouché and Scott Burris, both from Temple Law School in Philadelphia. We’re here not only to tease Temple Law’s 2019 Law Review Symposium: Looking Back and Looking Ahead, 10 Years of Public Health Law Research, Thursday, September 12, 2019, but also to discuss some cutting edge issues in public health responses to the opioids overdose crisis and the erosion of reproductive rights. Scott, of course, is a Professor of Law at the law school, where he directs the Center for Public Health Law Research. He is also a Professor in Temple’s School of Public Health. He is the author of over 200 books, book chapters, articles and reports on issues including urban health; discrimination against people with HIV and other disabilities; HIV policy; research ethics; and the health effects of criminal law and drug policy. His work has been supported by organizations including the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Open Society Institute, the National Institutes of Health, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Rachel Rebouché is a Professor of Law at Temple and also serves as Associate Dean for Research. She teaches Family Law, Health Care Law, and Contracts and is currently a co-investigator on two grant-funded research projects related to reproductive health, one housed at the Emory University Rollins School of Public Health and another funded by the World Health Organization. Her recent research also includes articles in law reviews and in peer-reviewed journals on relational contracts, prenatal genetic testing and genetic counseling, collaborative divorce, parental involvement laws, and international reproductive rights.
August 28, 2019
The Oklahoma opioid verdict was handed down on August 26 and, of course, there’s only one person to discuss it with, Jennifer OIiva. Professor Oliva is on the faculty at at Seton Hall Law where she specializes in health, FDA, and evidence law. An honors graduate of Georgetown University Law Center, Professor Oliva was a Public Interest Law Scholar and served as Executive Notes & Comments Editor of The Georgetown Law Journal. After law school, Professor Oliva clerked on the 10th and 3rd Circuit court of appeals. She also served as the Deputy State Solicitor of the State of Delaware.
August 23, 2019
Recorded at the 2019 annual meeting of the Southeastern Association of Law Schools, Professor Elizabeth Weeks, Associate Dean for Faculty Development & the J. Alton Hosch Professor of Law at the University of Georgia School of Law discusses the latest high profile ACA case, Texas v. U.S. Professor Weeks is a highly regarded health law scholar whose teaching and research interests include torts, health law, health care financing and regulation, and public health law.
August 19, 2019
This episode was recorded at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Association of Law Schools during a panel reviewing the year in healthcare financing. This episode features a talk by Professor Fazal Khan who teaches Health Law & Policy, Bioethics, Public Health Law and International Products Liability at the University of Georgia School of Law. His current research focuses on several major themes:  reform of the American health care system, the effect of globalization on health care and the challenge of regulating emerging biotechnologies. His talk was on the financing of telemedicine and the slow alignment of the technologies with health care value and other models.
August 13, 2019
Recorded at the 2019 annual meeting of the Southeastern Association of Law Schools during a panel reviewing the year in healthcare financing, this episode features a talk by Professor John Cogan from the University of Connecticut School of Law. Professor Cogan focuses his research and teaching on health care organizations and finance, health law and policy, federal health programs, health care fraud and abuse, and health insurance law. He is the co-author of a treatise on Medicare and Medicaid bankruptcy issues, as well as the author of numerous scholarly articles on a range of health insurance topics, including the Affordable Care Act and HIPAA. In this talk Professor Cogan discussed first, Medicaid: including expansion, work requirements, and the latest court decisions; second, Section 1557 and the proposed civil rights regulations; and third, the DeOtte v. Azar case and the resultant contraceptive mandate mess.
June 19, 2019
I have two excellent guests this week. Dr. Julie Cantor is an adjunct faculty member at the UCLA School of Law. She is a graduate of Stanford University, UC Berkeley School of Law, and the Yale University School of Medicine. Dr Cantor has two decades of public policy and advocacy experience focused on federal healthcare policy. She has published broadly including in the New England Journal, Annals of Internal Medicine, the Indiana Law Review, the ABA Human Rights Journal, the NYT Debate section, and has submitted amicus briefs in several Supreme Court cases. Making a welcome return to the pod is Ross Silverman, Professor of Health Policy and Management at the Indiana University Richard M. Fairbanks School of Public Health at IUPUI, and holds a secondary appointment as Professor of Public Health Law at the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law. His research interests include legal, ethical and policy issues in public health and medicine, mobile health law and policy, interdisciplinary curriculum development, professional school admissions, medical humanities, human rights, and patient safety. Professor Silverman has published extensively on vaccination issues. Our discussion topic rotates around the recent measles outbreaks and the public health and public health law issues they raise. If you happened to pick up the June 5 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine you will have seen articles by both Julie and Ross (co-authored w/ Douglas Opel and Saad B. Omer) addressing aspects of the current law and policy debates. Other sources noted were this op-ed by Prof. Michael Willrich, Yiddish mistranslation, this New York Times risk-benefit analysis, and Angela Shen’s Measles Madness And Value post.
June 4, 2019
Elizabeth Chamblee Burch holds the Fuller E. Callaway Chair of Law at the University of Georgia. She has a stunning publication record, published in the New York University Law Review, Cornell Law Review, Virginia Law Review, Vanderbilt Law Review, Washington University Law Review, Boston University Law Review and George Washington Law Review, among others. In 2015, Professor Burch was awarded the American Law Institute’s Early Career Scholars Medal in recognition of her work on class actions and multidistrict litigation, and its potential to influence improvements in the law. She teaches and researches civil procedure, class actions and mass torts. Her new book Mass Tort Deals was published last month by Cambridge University Press. The book is an excellent read and illuminates a highly complex area of litigation. Our conversation explored the role of repeat player lead plaintiffs’ and defense attorneys, the functions and control of the MDL judge, and, of course, we discussed the opioid litigation and how the state cases may impact any settlement.
May 7, 2019
A swift return to the pod by Jennifer Oliva. Jenn is an Associate Professor at West Virginia University in the College of Law and School of Public Health. This Spring she has been a visiting research scholar at The Petrie-Flom Center at Harvard Law School. In the Fall she will be joining the faculty at Seton Hall Law School. Her work has been published by or is forthcoming in the Duke Law Journal, Northwestern University Law Review, Ohio State Law Journal, North Carolina Law Review, and the George Mason Law Review. We continue to explore some of the themes we discussed with Leo Beletsky in the last episode. Here, Jenn and I drill down into some of the issues surrounding the opioid litigation. Issues and questions discussed include the relationship between the federal district court MDL litigation in Cleveland and actions brought by state attorneys-general in their own courts, the implications of the recent Oklahoma settlement, and the chances/challenges of fashioning “public health” remedies that would mitigate the effects of the opioid overdose epidemic.
April 28, 2019
I am joined by guests Leo Beletsky & Jennifer Oliva. Leo is a Professor of Law and Health Sciences and the Faculty Director of the Health in Justice Action Lab at Northeastern University School of Law. He holds a joint appointment with the Bouvé College of Health Sciences. He has broad expertise and an enviable research and publication record in the public health impact of laws and their enforcement, with special focus on drug overdose, infectious disease transmission and the role of the criminal justice system as a structural determinant of health. Jennifer is an Associate Professor at West Virginia University in the College of Law and School of Public Health. This Spring she has been a visiting research scholar at The Petrie-Flom Center at Harvard Law School. In the Fall she will be joining the faculty at Seton Hall Law School. Her work has been published by or is forthcoming in the Duke Law Journal, Northwestern University Law Review, Ohio State Law Journal, North Carolina Law Review, and the George Mason Law Review. We discussed the conceptual and practical flaws in Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs (PDMPs), on which see these great articles by Leo and by Jenn, opioidphobic moves such as Michigan’s NonOpioid Advance Directive, the apparent animosity of federal prosecutors towards evidence-based public health initiatives like SEPs or SIFs, some of which is the subject of ongoing litigation. And of course we talked about the role of social determinants on which, again, see Leo or structural determinants on which I have written.
April 17, 2019
I am joined by guest host Claudia Haupt, Associate Professor of Law and Political Science Northeastern University School of Law and guests Ignacio Cofone, Assistant Professor of Law at McGill University, Jessica Roberts, the Director of the Health Law & Policy Institute and an Alumnae College Professor in Law, and Ana Santos Rutschman, Assistant Professor in the Center for Health Law Studies and the Center for International and Comparative Law at Saint Louis University. We were gathered together in Boston for the Promises and Perils of Emerging Health Innovations symposium organized by our friends at Northeastern University School of Law.
March 15, 2019
I am joined by Aaron Kesselheim and Jonathan Darrow, faculty members at Harvard Medical School and members of the Program On Regulation, Therapeutics, And Law (PORTAL) group directed by Dr. Kesselheim. The conversation began with a discussion about drug price narratives, including whether drug prices are still increasing? We also critically discussed at least some of Vox’s 8 ideas for bringing down drug prices, and some better ones! The conversation then shifted to some issues, including pricing and expectations, with gene therapy drugs. We spent a short time on the resignation of Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Scott Gottlieb before ending our discussion with some information about PORTAL’s innovative online course, “The FDA and Prescription Drugs: Current Controversies in Context.”
February 25, 2019
For over two decades our school of law In conjunction with the IU School of Medicine has conferred the McDonald-Merrill-Ketcham Memorial Award for Excellence in Law and Medicine. This year’s honoree was Dr. Karen DeSalvo, who is currently Professor of Medicine and Population Health at the University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School. She served in the Obama Administration as National Coordinator for Health Information Technology and Acting Assistant Secretary for Health and previously was the Health Commissioner for the City of New Orleans. I am very grateful to Dr DeSalvo for making her remarks available on TWIHL. Her talk begins in New Orleans in the aftermath of Katrina, explains zip code health, emphasizes the roles of Social Determinants of Health, demonstrates how social determinants impact particular health outcomes, presents a systematic model for dealing with social determinants, explains Public Health 3.0, and discusses the gap between health and social care spending. Along the way Dr. DeSalvo also discusses the role of technologies such as ride share companies disrupting social services and digital assistants such as Amazon Echo acquiring more health information.
December 23, 2018
The return of TWIHL’s infamous and extra long “Who’s Been Naughty or Nice?” Holiday show. This year’s festive appreciation of healthcare law and policy features the seasonal vocalizations of Zack Buck, Erin Fuse Brown, and Elizabeth Weeks Leonard. Nominees for both naughty and nice include a wealth of administration moves, plenty of good and bad Medicaid news, drug pricing, and a whole lot more to fill the stockings and require conspicuous amounts of egg nog.
December 16, 2018
Abbe Gluck, Professor of Law and the Faculty Director of the Solomon Center for Health Law and Policy at Yale Law School, and I continue a deep dive into some of the issues raised at the November 2018 Yale roundtable on on “The Law and Policy of AI, Robotics, and Telemedicine in Health Care.” We are joined by our expert friends Nathan Cortez, Professor of Law and Associate Dean for Research at the SMU Dedman School of Law, and Sharona Hoffman, Edgar A. Hahn Professor of Law; Professor of Bioethics and Co-Director of the Law-Medicine Center at Case Western Reserve University School of Law, leading to a deep dive into FDA regulation and data-driven healthcare discrimination. Discussion topics included potential updates to the language of the ADA to deal with discrimination on the basis of AI/Big Data predicted healthcare issues and practical questions about the application and enforcement of the FDA’s functional definition of “medical device.”
December 7, 2018
I am joined by Abbe Gluck, Professor of Law and the Faculty Director of the Solomon Center for Health Law and Policy at Yale Law School. In November 2018 her team pulled together an excellent roundtable on “The Law and Policy of AI, Robotics, and Telemedicine in Health Care.” This episode of TWIH is the first of two taking a deeper dive into just a few of the issues that were so well presented at the roundtable. Here we were joined by Michael Froomkin, the Laurie Silvers and Mitchell Rubenstein Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Miami School of Law and by Nicholson Price, Assistant Professor of Law at The University of Michigan Law School. Topics ranged from consent in the next generation of healthcare research to data protection, and appropriate regulatory models.
November 26, 2018
A long overdue return from health care privacy and security guru Kirk Nahra. Kirk is a partner at Wiley Rein LLP in DC and teaches privacy courses at American University. We have a broad-ranging discussion touching on European General Data Protection Regulation (particularly its territorial scope), the new California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (particularly its attempted HIPAA carve-out), the (un)likelihood of federal privacy regulation, and some recent HIPAA cases and settlements.
November 16, 2018
What do you get when you put some super-smart lawyers from a top law firm and the Federation of State Medical Boards in a room and raise the topic of AI regulation? Answer: Some pretty smart ideas about future implementation, reimbursement, liability and regulation. Joining me for the discussion are Terry Dee, Jiayan Chen, Kate McDonald, and Dale Van Demark, all partners in various offices of McDermott Will & Emery and Eric Fish, Senior Vice President for Legal Services at The Federation of State Medical Boards. The discussion involves some predictable issues such as data protection and FDA regulation but also raises additional questions about business models, liability constructs, and the role of reimbursement.
November 10, 2018
I am joined by Professor Wendy Mariner, Professor of Health Law at Boston University School of Public Health and Professor of Law at Boston University School of Law. It’s three days after the midterm elections and we thought it would be a good idea to reflect on some of the health law and policy stories. For more see http://blog.petrieflom.law.harvard.edu/ 2018/11/08/10-health-law-and-policy-takeaways-from-the-midterm-election/#more-26940
November 5, 2018
If you listened to the last episode of TWIHL you may recall that it was recorded early on October 26th 2018 just before I kicked off our conference on the intersection of health care and immigration policy. Thereafter, it was my distinct pleasure to welcome Wendy Parmet as our keynote speaker. Professor Parmet is the Matthews Distinguished University Professor of Law and Director, Center for Health Policy and Law; Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs, Northeastern University School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs. With Patricia Illingworth she authored The Health of Newcomers, Immigration, Health Policy, and the Case for Global Solidarity, published last year by NYU Press. Wendy was most generous in letting me share her talk on TWIHL.
October 27, 2018
This week I welcome to the pod YY Brandon Chen, Brietta Clark, and Medha Makhlouf. We have a broad discussion about the intersection of health care and immigration policy. We look at federal initiatives such as the proposed public charge rule and existing federal restrictions on providing healthcare to “newcomers.” Our guests explain attributes of the Canadian and Californian systems that, rather than being exceptional and progressive example, themselves in their detail illustrate some of the broader discussions we are (or should be) having.
August 31, 2018
These four episodes were recorded at the 2018 SEALS conference. Four of us got together as a panel to discuss Healthcare in the Era of the Trump Administration. I was joined by Nicole Huberfeld, Professor of Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights, Health Law, Policy & Management at Boston University’s School of Public Health, Zack Buck, Assistant Professor of Law and Wilkinson Junior Research Professor at the University of Tennessee, and Jennifer Bard, Professor of Law in the College of Law at the University of Cincinnati with a joint appointment in the Department of Internal Medicine at the College of Medicine. She is currently a Visiting Scholar at the O’Neill Institute for Local and Global Health Law at Georgetown University Law Center. This was a panel, not a typical studio recording so to get the most out of it you may wish to download our slides that are linked at TWIHL.com
August 26, 2018
These four episodes were recorded at the 2018 SEALS conference. Four of us got together as a panel to discuss Healthcare in the Era of the Trump Administration. I was joined by Nicole Huberfeld, Professor of Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights, Health Law, Policy & Management at Boston University’s School of Public Health, Zack Buck, Assistant Professor of Law and Wilkinson Junior Research Professor at the University of Tennessee, and Jennifer Bard, Professor of Law in the College of Law at the University of Cincinnati with a joint appointment in the Department of Internal Medicine at the College of Medicine. She is currently a Visiting Scholar at the O’Neill Institute for Local and Global Health Law at Georgetown University Law Center. This was a panel, not a typical studio recording so to get the most out of it you may wish to download our slides that are linked at TWIHL.com
August 21, 2018
These four episodes were recorded at the 2018 SEALS conference. Four of us got together as a panel to discuss Healthcare in the Era of the Trump Administration. I was joined by Nicole Huberfeld, Professor of Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights, Health Law, Policy & Management at Boston University’s School of Public Health, Zack Buck, Assistant Professor of Law and Wilkinson Junior Research Professor at the University of Tennessee, and Jennifer Bard, Professor of Law in the College of Law at the University of Cincinnati with a joint appointment in the Department of Internal Medicine at the College of Medicine. She is currently a Visiting Scholar at the O’Neill Institute for Local and Global Health Law at Georgetown University Law Center. This was a panel, not a typical studio recording so to get the most out of it you may wish to download our slides that are linked at TWIHL.com
August 16, 2018
These four episodes were recorded at the 2018 SEALS conference. Four of us got together as a panel to discuss Healthcare in the Era of the Trump Administration. I was joined by Nicole Huberfeld, Professor of Health Law, Ethics & Human Rights, Health Law, Policy & Management at Boston University’s School of Public Health, Zack Buck, Assistant Professor of Law and Wilkinson Junior Research Professor at the University of Tennessee, and Jennifer Bard, Professor of Law in the College of Law at the University of Cincinnati with a joint appointment in the Department of Internal Medicine at the College of Medicine. She is currently a Visiting Scholar at the O’Neill Institute for Local and Global Health Law at Georgetown University Law Center. This was a panel, not a typical studio recording so to get the most out of it you may wish to download our slides that are linked at TWIHL.com
June 5, 2018
This week on the pod I welcome Amy McGuire, the Leon Jaworski Professor of Biomedical Ethics and Director of the Center for Medical Ethics and Health Policy at Baylor College of Medicine and Natalie Ram, a Professor of Law at The University of Baltimore School of Law. Our conversation revolves around the arrest of the suspected Golden State Killer who was partially identified by a DNA match through a publicly accessible database. Legal topics range from the Fourth Amendment to HIPAA and the Common Rule as we discuss implications for personal privacy and major, DNA-led projects such as Precision Medicine.
May 24, 2018
Special guest host Wendy Mariner from Boston University and I welcome Scott Burris and Abraham Gutman from Temple University’s Center for Public Health Law Research. We discuss the failures associated with the Fair Housing Act including the delayed implementation of the Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing rule, the eviction epidemic, the tragedy of the silos in public health interventions, and the concept of “health in all policies.”
May 14, 2018
Thad Pope, Professor of Law and Director of the Health Law Institute at MitchellHamline School of Law joins us to discuss some extremely difficult end-of-life cases that are being litigated on each side of the Atlantic. In the U.S. (specifically, in California and New Jersey) the tragic Jahi McMath case continues with no apparent end in sight. We discuss compelling narratives such as that in the New Yorker and attempt to frame the legal and ethical issues. Comparison and distinctions can be drawn between that case and Alfie Evans case in the UK that has led to multiple appeals to the UK Supreme Court and the European Court of Human Rights. One of our questions (there are many) is whether we are looking at likely challenges to the accepted evidence as to brain death or merely (?) another chapter in our cultural war about the meaning of life.
May 4, 2018
Jessica Roberts, the Director of the Health Law and Policy Institute and a George Butler Research Professor at the University of Houston Law Center returns to the pod. She specializes in health law, disability law, and genetics and the law and her book on “Health ism,” co-authored with fried of the pod Elizabeth Weeks Leonard, is forthcoming from Cambridge University Press. We begin by discussing health discrimination before, during, and after the ACA. Then, we discuss Jessica’s take (admirably articulated in a recent Michigan Law Review book review) on the nudging at the center of healthcare’s version of behavioral economics.
April 27, 2018
In April, 2018 the Northeastern University School of Law held a conference titled “Diseases of Despair: The Role of Policy and Law.” TWIHL was asked to be the event’s podcast partner and we roped in Leo Beletsky, our friend and one of the conference organizers to act as co-host for two special TWIHL episodes. We recorded two shows, this, the second, concentrated on healthcare law and policy. TWIHL thanks all the conference attendees and the organizers for their help and a wonderful conference.
April 20, 2018
In April, 2018 the Northeastern University School of Law held a conference titled “Diseases of Despair: The Role of Policy and Law.” TWIHL was asked to be the event’s podcast partner and we roped in Leo Beletsky, our friend and one of the conference organizers to act as co-host for two special TWIHL episodes. We recorded two shows, this, the first, concentrated on public health aspects. TWIHL thanks all the conference attendees and the organizers for their help and a wonderful conference.
April 13, 2018
A long overdue appearance on the Pod by Kansas University law professor Andrew Torrance who teaches and conducts research in patent law, intellectual property, innovation, and so much more! Andrew leads us through a couple of fascinating topics on the bleeding edge of IP. First, he discusses the use of a page ranking-like model to value patents. Second, he introduces us into some governance and related models applied in the synthetic biology community to avoid the tragedy of the commons but without resorting to traditional IP protection.
April 6, 2018
A welcome to first-time Pod guest, political scientist Jamila Michener, a Professor in the department of Government at Cornell University. Her research focuses on poverty and racial inequality in American politics. She is the author of a new book, Fragmented Democracy: Medicaid, Federalism and Unequal Politics (Cambridge University Press). We tackle Medicaid from her original perspective—how and why federalism (not to mention Section 1115 waivers) allows for unequal treatment of Medicaid recipients across out nation, and some of the damage to democratic institutions that result.
March 30, 2018
A welcome to first-time Pod guest Philip Rocco. Philip is on the faculty in the Department of Political Science at Marquette University. His research examines the consequences of institutional fragmentation for the development of public policy, with a focus on the politics of health reform in the United States. We cover a lot of territory inspired by Phil’s recent publications, Medicaid managed care and data, All-Payer Claims Databases, and public comments received during the Medicaid waiver process. A brief lightning round touches on ACA stabilization, more data about Indiana’s 1115 waiver, and the stinkbug-in-chief.
March 22, 2018
A welcome return from Rachel Sachs, a Professor at the Washington University in St. Louis School of Law. her primary research interests lie at the intersection of patent law and health law, with a particular focus on problems of innovation and access and the ways in which law helps or hinders these problems. She is a prolific scholar who has a knack for identifying cutting-edge research. We discuss various aspects of the drug price phenomenon, attempting to find some explanations for our current and exploring some possible solutions.
March 15, 2018
We are joined by award-winning medical investigative reporter Jeanne Lenzer. Her first book, “The Danger Within Us: America's Untested, Unregulated Medical Device Industry and One Man's Battle to Survive It.” Lenzer puts forward strong arguments that the medical device industry is under-regulated. Woven through her analysis is the story of one patient’s dangers and difficult journey involving an implanted device together with related stories about physicians and researchers.
March 10, 2018
We welcome back one of the pod’s most popular guests. Heather Howard is a member of the faculty at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. With her help we unpack the latest flurry of Section 1115 waiver approvals. Some seem ripe for considerable skepticism, threatening the healthcare of many. Others, current or proposed, give us some cause for cautious optimism.
March 1, 2018
University of Maryland health law professor Diane Hoffman joins us to discuss the human microbiome market, probiotics, and microbiota transplants. The science is fascinating but the regulatory system is confused and confusing. Professor Hoffman’s involvement in ELSI working groups researching these areas makes her the go-to source for ideas on the various options regulatory options (including by the FDA and FTC) and their potential impact on the growth of this new and rapidly evolving science.
February 21, 2018
Pod favorite and BU public health and law professor Nicole Huberfeld makes a welcome return. We discuss Medicaid work requirements, lockouts, and health literacy testing and reflect on the new CMS-imagined Medicaid space. As CMS blows past its traditional guardrails we ask, what are the limits for post-ACA Medicaid, a tightly controlled welfare benefit rather than universality-enabling health insurance? We end our discussion by weighing the possible legal challenges to the recent Section 1115 waiver plans. Also, we try to stay cheerful!
February 15, 2018
We welcome Jacob Sherkow, a law Professor at the Innovation Center for Law and Technology, at New York Law School. There he teaches a variety of courses related to intellectual property. His research focuses on how scientific developments, especially in the biosciences, affect patent law and litigation. Prof. Sherkow is a prolific scholar, the author of over two dozen articles on these and related topics in both traditional law reviews and scientific journals. Our conversation begins with an excellent CRISPR primer before traversing some fascinating questions about gene-editing patent litigation around the world, licensing issues, and the broader array of regulatory issues encountered by such emerging technologies.
February 6, 2018
A first time visit from Dr. Carl Ameringer, professor of health policy and politics at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia. A lawyer with a PhD in political science, he is an expert on issues surrounding our national debate on health care reform. We discuss his latest book “US Health Policy and Health Care Delivery: Doctors, Reformers, and Entrepreneurs” published by Cambridge University Press.
January 31, 2018
Seton Hall law professor Carl Coleman leads our deep dive into human subjects research, the revised common rule, and the most import features of the latter. We question and speculate on the reasons for the continued freezing and delays surrounding the revised common rule, discuss the arguably marginal improvements over its predecessor, some comparative perspectives, and some of the annoyances still felt by researchers about both the original and revised rules.
January 23, 2018
It's a stormy healthcare landscape out there, so this show is all lightning round. We cover several areas: Litigation: Nic provides the Ariadne's thread through a labyrinthine pharma-tort judgment out of California. The metal on metal hip litigation has resulted in a big judgment, but medical device regulation is still fundamentally broken. Disgruntled Centene enrollees are suing the ACA insurer of last resort for ultra-narrow networks (and Washington state is not happy, either). Washington may lead the way for future narrow network regulation or consent decrees. We followed up on the duodenoscope superbug litigation saga, focusing on duties to translate foreign language emails in discovery. Regulation: We discussed a crisis in long-term care, following up on last week's discussion with Paul Osterman. Medicare is not making it any easier for many who qualify for help. We reviewed the new priorities of HHS's Conscience Rights, er, Civil Rights Division (and potential responses to conscience claims). The rise of Medicaid work requirements is a hot topic, as Kentucky Governor Bevin imposed them last week. By the way, watch out for a future post by Frank at the LPE Blog on Trumpcare's transformation of Medicaid. His latest health care post there was titled "The Epicycles of Health Care Market Design: Time for a Paradigm Shift in Health Policy." Also of interest this week: the ethics of fake operations; the UK's Minister of Loneliness; and Covered California covers the coverage roller coaster, as does Vox.
January 17, 2018
We welcome back our good friend Zack Buck, Professor of Law and Wilkinson Junior Research Professor at the University of Tennessee College of Law. He teaches bioethics and public health, torts, health care finance and organization, health care regulation and quality, and fraud and abuse. He is producing really interesting scholarship relating to our seemingly ever-present and intractable healthcare price and cost issues. Our conversation includes some compelling “lightning” stories, including wellness plans, the Health Affairs retirement of the great Tim Jost, and Medicaid work requirements. Then Zack demonstrated his true mettle, answering questions about MACRA/MIPS, value bundle reimbursement models, and state law attempts to reel in drug costs.
January 10, 2018
Frank and I welcome labor economist Paul Osterman, Professor of Human Resources and Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management. His most recent book is “Who Will Care For Us: Long Term Care and the Long Term Workforce,” which is the basis for our discussion. He argues that the expansion of the role of direct care workers “will save the system money, both by obtaining better health outcomes—thereby reducing visits to emergency rooms, hospitals, and nursing homes—and by shifting some tasks to lower-paid occupations.” Our discussion covers the demographics of care workers, scope of practice issues, the role of Medicare and Medicaid, possible technological innovations, and quality regulation.
December 20, 2017
We welcome back one of our most popular guests, Northeastern School of Law professor Andrea Matwyshyn. Our conversation combines some reflections on the past year, events of the last week, and a deep dive into some of the issues that healthcare AI raises and must face going forward.
December 5, 2017
A welcome return to the pod by Boston University health law professor Wendy Mariner. The three of us present an expanded “lighting round.” We discuss the end of the individual mandate, Murray-Alexander, deficit hawks targeting Medicare, the ramifications of the CVS-Aetna merger, the CMS Guidance on the contraceptive services opt-out, and a new health security settlement out of California.
November 17, 2017
Another return visit from Leo Beletsky, our friend and Northeastern University School of Law professor. Beletsky is a fearless critic of the more obvious “solutions” to the opioid crisis such as incarceration. His take is far more nuanced, using a public health frame to understand the crisis and employing evidence-based analysis to determine appropriate responses. Our wide-ranging conversation included analysis of attempts to combat crisis though law enforcement and interdiction, the inapplicability of the “vector” epidemic frame to opioids, and primary, secondary, and tertiary public health interventions.
November 11, 2017
Renowned hematologist-oncologist, researcher, and writer Vinay Prasad joins us to discuss his sternly-held views on modern clinical and research practice. We discuss the effectiveness (or not) of cancer screening, a more realistic take on the cancer moonshot, and the continual conflicts of interest issues in medicine-issues that maybe are not solvable with transparency laws.
November 1, 2017
We welcome Loyola University Chicago Professor Spencer Waller who brings his antitrust skills to bear on competition in healthcare markets. Our discussion centers on Professor Waller’s recent essay, available at https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2819543. The key issue is whether healthcare antitrust is (or should be) another example of healthcare exceptionalism or transubstantive. Our discussion ranges from competing models of antitrust theory to remedies and enforcement and healthcare “snowflakes.”
October 25, 2017
We welcome University of Maryland scholar Amanda Pustilnik, a recognized leader in the emerging area of Neuroscience and the law. Our conversation includes a primer on the area and a discussion of the more import areas, including criminal reasonability and the measurement of chronic pain. Our lightning round concentrates on the current proposals and counter proposals surrounding the workings of the insurance exchanges and we take a close look at Iowa’s challenging individual insurance market.
October 14, 2017
Back from a short hiatus we greet Michelle M. Mello, Professor of Law and of Health Research & Policy at Stanford University. She is the author of more than 150 articles and book chapters on the medical malpractice system, medical errors and patient safety, research ethics, regulation of pharmaceuticals, legal interventions to combat obesity and noncommunicable disease, and other topics. Our conversation focused on her recent work on medical apologies, communication-and-resolution programs, overlapping surgery (which refers to operations performed by the same primary surgeon such that the start of one surgery overlaps with the end of another), reconciliation after medical injury, and the influence of the malpractice environment on care patterns. The lightning round featured a tour of the many facets of synthetic ACA repeal: CHIP delay, health budget slashing, zombie reconciliation, marketing budget cuts, inexplicable "maintenance" efforts that bring down HealthCare.gov for 12 hours a day at peak sign up periods, the Trump EO on association health plans, and the suspension of CSR payments. As Nancy LeTourneau reports, “synthetic repeal won’t be scored by CBO and has tossed aside any attempt to replace the law. That means that the results could be even more disastrous for the American people.”
September 21, 2017
We take advantage of a very special opportunity to talk with Alta Charo, Professor of Law and Bioethics at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Topics ranged from ethical and regulatory perspectives on CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing, to the Trump administration's manifestly counter-productive ending of the Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program, to the politicization of reproductive “science” by Trump appointees to HHS.
September 14, 2017
Adam Gaffney, physician, writer, public health researcher, and healthcare advocate joint us to discuss the “right to health” in all its manifestations and the slow crawl of U.S. healthcare to universalism and single-payer. It’s a broad-ranging discussion, touching on law, human rights, political discourse, and economics. A brief “lightning” round focuses on the exposure of Facebook’s ethos and healthcare consolidation and concentration.
September 8, 2017
American University Washington College of Law Professor Lewis Grossman joins us to discuss his fascinating article “AIDS Activists, FDA Regulation, and the Amendment of America’s Drug Constitution.” Prior to that discussion our Lightning Round touches on nursing home arbitration, the decline in the number of FDA warning letters, the EEOC Wellness regulation, single payer, and the resilience of the exchanges.
September 1, 2017
We talk with legal scholar-journalist Julia Powles who has done some deep dives into the world of Alphabet’s Deep Mind’s relationship with NHS data. Our conversation starts with Julia’s collaborator, Hal Hodson, and his reporting on Deep Mind for the New Scientist. Julia explains the findings of the Information Commissioner and the subtle intersection of the Data Protection Act 1998 and the “boot out” to the Caldicott Guidelines. The relevance to the U.S. is confirmed with discussions of the “first mover” advantages in establishing data market power, the problems associated with the privatization of public health data, and the “transparency paradox” associated with big data companies.
August 24, 2017
Our annual Back To School Special returns in time for a new semester. In this second part we welcome TWIHL Allstars Erin Fuse Brown, Zack Buck, and Jessica Roberts. In this part, topics state health laws in the time of Trump, price and cost issues, ERISA, MIPS, a fraud and abuse case to watch, and genetic “property” statutes. We ended with some general thoughts about what we learned from the reform and repeal choose of the past seven months.
August 17, 2017
Our annual Back To School Special returns in time for a new semester. In this first part we welcome TWIHL Allstars Nick Bagley, Micah Berman, Glenn Cohen, Nicole Huberfeld. Our conversations covered a lot of ground including CSR payments, House v. Price, gene editing, the Trump administration’s approach to regulation, healthcare federalism, and the future of waivers under CMS’s new management.
August 11, 2017
A deep dive into pharmaceutical patent protection and its intersection with the FDA new drug approval process. We touch on molecular drugs, biosimilars, data exclusivity, market exclusivity, the runway to generics, and fascinating differentials between different drug types or families. This is an intensely complex area and we were glad to have the benefit of a truly expert guide.
August 4, 2017
Two of the nation’s leading researchers into prescription drug costs join us for an in-depth exploration of the reasons for our high and increasing drug bill and a critical analysis of some of the investment, transparency, value, and outcomes-based metrics being used to determine “fair” prescription drug costs.
July 28, 2017
Our guest this week is Wendy Netter Epstein, who is Associate Professor of Law at DePaul University, and Faculty Director of DePaul's Jaharis Health Law Institute. Her teaching and research interests focus on health care law and policy, contracts, and commercial law. Professor Epstein has won Excellence in Teaching Awards from both DePaul University and the College of Law. We discussed some of her research on contract law and health care, including "The Health Insurer Nudge." The lightning round this week included a discussion of institutional liability, and divergent paths for antitrust (the Obama/Trump emphasis on professions and occupational licensure, or the Better Deal focus on mergers). Recalling our conversations with Guian McKee and Jessica Mantel, we also discussed the macroeconomic impact of health care institutions. Obamacare certainly helped Detroit, but Dan Diamond worries that the Cleveland Clinic (and many other hospitals) are not providing levels of community benefit high enough to justify their tax exemption.
July 21, 2017
On another international episode of the Pod we chat with Claudia Pagliari, Senior Lecturer in Primary Care and Informatics and Director of Global eHealth at Edinburgh University in the UK. A psychologist by training she is an internationally recognized expert in health informatics. Our broad-ranging discussion touched on digital technology for health sector governance in low and middle income countries, drug advertising rules, DTC genetic tests, medical app curation, and transatlantic perspectives on data sharing.
July 13, 2017
Frank and Nic internalize their travel issues and try to get to grips with some of the recent stories from healthcare land. Among the stories we discuss are UK Information Commissioner’s report on the Royal Free - Google DeepMind trial, US-EU competition policy (another Google case), a class action in Alaska involving a DTC genetic service that is butting heads with a very strongly worded state statute, the opioid crisis seen through a litigation lens, and our latest thoughts, rants, and questions about health reform/repeal including the latest on the three-legged stool and cost-sharing subsidies. Finally, and with great trepidation we raise the wise of single-payer care only to uncover a new policy position taken by one of your hosts!
July 6, 2017
Two very special guests and the Pod’s first power couple interview. Leslie and John Francis join us to discuss their new book “Privacy: What Everyone Needs to Know” published by Oxford University Press. Leslie Francis is a professor of law and a professor of philosophy at the University of Utah, and John Francis is a research professor in the Political Science Department, also at the University of Utah. Leslie is one of our leading privacy scholars and John is an expert in comparative politics and regulatory policy, ethics, and data policy. We explored privacy theory, how privacy differs between economic domains, and the relative benefits of consent, use, and delinking regulation.
June 27, 2017
University of California law professor Michelle Goodwin joins us for a detailed discussion about the increasingly adverse relationship between women and the state. Increasingly, pregnancy is being policed by an array of oppressive state laws, many of which are being used in contexts far removed from their legislative intent. Our conversation includes a detailed look at the abortion cases and their limitations. We end with a disturbing narrative about under age marriages in the U.S., often in circumstances that otherwise would be statutory rape.
June 20, 2017
Hastings law professor and antitrust expert Jaime King joins us to discuss competition and consolidation in healthcare delivery. We discussed (apparently) pro-competitive collaborations, price transparency models, the limits of demand-side reforms, Gobeille’s interpretation of ERISA as a major blow to state initiatives, and innovative cross-market activities.
June 14, 2017
Perhaps we should have called it “We Should Have Quit Will We Were Ahead!” In any event, a 100th show doesn't come around every week (or even every 8.5 days), and we wanted to express our thanks to all our guests and listeners while reflecting (hence the self-indulgence) on the journey so far.
June 5, 2017
Wendy Parmet, Matthews Distinguished University Professor of Law at Northeastern University and one of the great figures in contemporary health law & public health law and policy joins us to discuss her new book, co-authored with Patricia Illingworth, The Health of Newcomers: Immigration, Health Policy, and the Case for Global Solidarity, New York University Press (2017). This is a far-reaching piece of work looking at the interdependence of natives and newcomers across several health dimensions. Our discussion progresses into an old Pod favorite, “Docs and Glocks,” before ending with some observations on the current state of scientific knowledge regarding opioid interventions.
May 27, 2017
We welcome LeHigh University political scientist Laura Katz Olson who discusses Medicaid’s survival and it’s less than successful track record as a model for universal healthcare. Her latest book, “Elder Care Journey: A View from the Front Lines” offers both a compelling narrative and an opportunity to assess our current system of long-term care from both theoretical and personal perspectives. Among the questions we ponder: Why do system design, implementation, and legal structures conspire to increase the burdens on family caregivers, and how do those issues impact access?
May 17, 2017
With help from our good friend Nathan Cortez from SMU School of Law we take a detailed look at the American Health Care Act. In addition to coming to grips with some of its complex provisions we discussed how it will fare in the Senate. Here Professor Cohen’s expertise on Reconciliation and the Byrd Amendment proved essential. We also, let truth be told, took the opportunity to get a few things off our collective chests!
May 10, 2017
We are joined by Robert K. Smoldt, Chief Administrative Officer emeritus of Mayo Clinic and Associate Director of the Arizona State University Healthcare Delivery and Policy Program. The topics discussed are alternate payment systems including pay for value. We do a deep dive into P4V, elicit comparisons with healthcare in Japan, and ponder integrated care models.
May 2, 2017
Khiara Bridges, Professor of Law and Professor of Anthropology at Boston University joins us for an in-depth discussion of her new book “The Poverty of Privacy Rights.” The book takes a highly critical look at how Medicaid recipients are treated and whether they are left with any (or any meaningful) privacy rights.
April 26, 2017
Brown University School of Public Health researcher and teacher Elizabeth Tobin-Tyler joins us for a far-reaching conversation about social determinants of health. In particular, we discuss medico-legal partnerships and their role in filling unmet legal needs that are themselves increasingly recognized as social determinants. We discuss issues framed by Professor Tobin-Tyler’s scholarship such as professionalism, conflicts of interest, funding, and medico-legal education.
April 19, 2017
We are joined by Deborah Stone, Distinguished Visiting Professor in the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University. She is famous for her classic, “Policy Paradox: The Art of Political Decision Making,” which has had four editions over 25 years and has been translated into five languages. We discuss the ACA and healthcare in the world of Trump and a counter-narrative to technocratic healthcare based on “caring.”
April 11, 2017
Health policy researcher Heather Howard returns to the pod and, not surprisingly, Medicaid was the focus of our talk. We discussed various Medicaid issues; the extent non-expansion was driven by policy or politics, work requirements under Section 1115 waivers, state administrative costs associated with draconian Medicaid expansion criteria (particularly when compared to the macroeconomic effects of a robust healthcare system), cost-sharing and the “private option” in existing state plans, and the likelihood of Section 1332 waivers moving states to universal care or, at least, meaningful innovation.
April 5, 2017
Microeconomist Craig Garthwaite from the Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University joins us. We discussed the structural challenges both in the ACA marketplaces and the proposed, and the Zombie-like AHCA. The conversation moved from the three-legged stool to other causes of market fragility, the reasons for the recent slowdown in health care spending, and whether insurance expansion overtaxed our healthcare system, and issues surrounding emergency department utilization.
March 29, 2017
This week's conversation was with Northeastern University School of Law Professor, Andrea Matwyshyn. An expert on cyber security and healthcare Andrea helped us understand the changing approached of federal regulatory agencies, the continued threats from the Internet of Health Things and how the market and policymakers must find ways to reward developers for producing safe and secure code. We ended with a brief discussion (unlikely to be our last) of Blockchain as a security model.
March 22, 2017
Joined by Michigan University School of Law Professor Nicholas Bagley, an expert on health law and federalism, we discussed “Federalism and the End of Obamacare,” his recent and extremely thoughtful Yale Law Journal essay. We also talked about the risk corridor payments litigation and wondered whether the insurers will ever get paid.
March 14, 2017
A  great conversation with UMKC Law Professor Ann Marie Marciarille. We discuss a brand range of topics, including the post-NFIB Medicaid “gamble,” the concept of the cost-shifting hydraulic, our less-than-rigorous mechanisms for dealing with infectious diseases, the long-tail of the Actavis case, and what happens when your inhaler stops working in the Portuguese Azores (and what that tells us about our drug distribution and pricing models).
March 6, 2017
A fascinating discussion with UK-based digital anthropologist Lydia Nicholas. We talk about the problems of digital news (and healthcare) bubbles and the problems about constructing a digital space for those who are vulnerable or not digitally native. In the process we touch on the problems surrounding the UK’s much troubled care.data initiative and the issues raised by the relationship between Google Deep Mind and the Royal Free hospitals. But, we also touch on the optimism underlying future initiatives being baked into the UK’s version of a learning healthcare system.
February 24, 2017
We greet two experts in the burgeoning field of food law. Joanna Sax is a Professor of Law at California Western School of Law. She’s interested in the science-law nexus and particularly in GMO foods. Diana Winters is a Professor of Law at IU McKinney School of Law. Her research involves issues of food safety, the decision-making processes of federal agencies, and some of the federalism issues that arise in the food safety domain. Our conversation was wide-ranging as you would expect of this emerging, important field of law.
February 16, 2017
We greet Judy Solomon, Vice President for Health Policy at the nonpartisan research and policy institute, the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, for a broad-reaching discussion on ACA repeal/replacement/repair and the increasingly likely restructuring of Medicaid. We delve deep into Medicaid policy, block grants, and what we know about “innovative” expansion models.
February 8, 2017
Washington University law professor and bioethicist Rebecca Dresser joins us to discuss her latest book, Silent Partners: Human Subjects and Research Ethics. This scholarly yet in many ways acutely personal examination of the ethics surrounding human subjects research makes a powerful statement in favor of subject inclusion to counter balance what Dresser calls researcher ethnocentrism. Among fascinating topics we discuss are dealing with rule-breaking research subjects and the treatment of research subjects in fiction.
January 30, 2017
Georgia State Professor of Law Erin Fusee Brown makes a welcome return to the podcast. Our discussion centered on surprise medical bills (including balance billing),“inscrutable price opacity,” and medical debt collection, This is a difficult area and one that the ACA only began to confront. Looking forward, our consensus was that increasingly this will become the province of “bifurcated” state laws acting, of course, under the specter of ERISA preemption.
January 20, 2017
We welcome University of Missouri-Columbia law professor Sam Halabi who brings a wealth of academic and practical experience to the podcast. As the conversation evidences he is interested in corporate governance and regulation at both national and international levels.
January 12, 2017
This week we are honored to have a conversation with Professor Tim Jost from Washington & Lee School of Law. Jost, one of our most prolific scholars and astute commentators, not to mention the rock around which the Health Affairs blog is built, looks back at the successes and failures of the ACA, speculates on some of the reasons for its rocky road, and looks ahead to repeal and replacement.
December 23, 2016
Our irreverent but also quite serious annual survey of who or what has been nice or naughty in health law and policy during the last year. Our experts make some great picks and dig deep into the underlying policy coal and candy. Plus, of course, our “surprise” bonus round as we pick who we would like to welcome singing carols outside our homes! Great thanks to Professors Nicole Huberfeld (University of Kentucky College of Law), Elizabeth Weeks Leonard (University of Georgia School of Law), Lindsay Wiley (American University Washington College of Law), Jessica Roberts (University of Houston Law Center), and Glenn Cohen (Harvard law School).
December 13, 2016
A conversation with University of Tennessee Professor Zack Buck. His recent research proposes an interesting fiduciary approach to dealing with the problem of over-treatment and also ponders the best way to deal with the "financial toxicity” that results from related phenomena.
December 2, 2016
We are joined by UNC law professor Richard Saver who presents his new research on the Sunshine Law that was part of the ACA. His findings are fascinating and inevitably led to a broader discussion of the worth of transparency-based regulation.
November 25, 2016
Loyola Chicago law professor Jordan Paradise joins us to discuss some of her recent work in life sciences law. We start with a review of some of the regulatory issues involving e-cigarettes and discuss the 2016 FDA regulations. We then move into a discussion of FDA regulation of biologics and biosimilars and Jordan explains naming and substitution issues.
November 11, 2016
We talk to medical sociologist Dr. Jill Fisher about her cutting edge research about clinical research participants and its implications for informed consent and IRB oversight. Before that a quick rant about post-election healthcare law and policy!
November 2, 2016
A conversation with UCLA law professor Russell Korobkin about his proposal to use cost effectiveness analysis to set up personal choices as to how to determine personal expenditures on insurance coverage. The conversation is broad-ranging and includes discussion of moral hazard, consumer-directed healthcare, the UK’s NICE agency, autonomy and the role of market approaches. Plus, of course, a lightning round!
October 21, 2016
A conversation with Loyola-Chicago law professor Larry Singer about hospital inequality, Medicaid expansion, and state budget crises, together with some predictions about the post-election landscape. A full-on lightning round involved drug policy, AI, EU privacy, and a novel way to get a glimpse of a hospital charge master.
October 14, 2016
A conversation with UCLA law professor Allison Hoffman about her new article that suggests a new social insurance model for long term care and reframes the risk involved as that suffered by the elderly person’s “next- friend.” Plus a fast-moving lightning round on physicians’ political affiliations, PHI in the cloud, and nursing home arbitration clauses together with a plea for TWIHL listeners to contribute to “Partners in Health.”
October 6, 2016
A conversation with UC Davis Law Professor Lisa Ikemoto about repro tech markets, CRISPR, and interdisciplinary values and communication.
September 28, 2016
Frank conducts a wide-ranging discussion with lawyer, ethicist, and historian Paul Lombardo.
September 22, 2016
A conversation with health economist Dr. Melinda Buntin. We discuss Medicaid expansion, Medicare costs, effect of the recession on health care costs, CBO scoring, MIPS, plus a lightning round.
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