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October 11, 2019
What’s all the buzz around direct listings? How are companies weighing IPOs vs. alternatives to raising capital in the public markets? Those questions were the focus of a recent panel at the Goldman Sachs Private Innovative Company Conference. Goldman Sachs’ Will Connolly, Spotify CFO Barry McCarthy, and Latham & Watkins partner Greg Rodgers sat down with Exchanges at Goldman Sachs host Jake Siewert to talk about Spotify’s own history with direct listings and what the future may hold for other companies planning to go public. “Companies’ needs and objectives are changing,” Connolly said, pointing to how technology has resulted in companies scaling much faster than in the past. “And when those needs and objectives change, it makes sense that people would seek out new ways to enter the public markets.” Adding context to the discussion, which was taped live in Las Vegas, Goldman Sachs’ David Ludwig joins Jake in the studio to talk more about the evolving needs of clients and how the firm is partnering to meet their objectives.
October 1, 2019
In this episode, David Solomon reflects on his first year as Goldman Sachs CEO: “I've been very focused on making sure that our client focus is at the center of everything we do, and that we really work with our clients as one firm,” he says. “We're a divisional firm, we've always been a divisional firm, but I think there's a great opportunity to make sure for our clients that we're delivering the whole firm.” Looking toward year two, Solomon says his priorities are about execution – from centralizing the firm's investing platforms to scaling new business initiatives, such as the Apple-Goldman Sachs credit card. “The big thing that we as a leadership team -- and I'm very personally focused on -- is the rollout of our broader strategy,” Solomon says.
September 25, 2019
Adapting to a warmer world could drive one of the largest infrastructure build-outs in history, according to a new report from Goldman Sachs’ Global Markets Institute, titled Taking the heat: making cities resilient to climate change. The report acknowledges the importance of reducing carbon emissions but focuses on the need to adapt to ongoing changes in the climate. Cities, which are home to the majority of the world’s population and generate most of its GDP, will need to develop climate resilience across all types of infrastructure, including coastal protection, transportation, energy and communications. They will need to take an “all-of-the-above” approach to financing, according to Sandra Lawson, executive director of the Global Markets Institute, because “even the most prosperous cities are not going to be able to fund this alone.” Amanda Hindlian, chief operating officer of Global Investment Research and president of the Global Markets Institute, recommends that cities “start now” and allow for maximum flexibility, so that they can “benefit from input costs and economies of scale that that come from new technologies and that make these problems easier to address in economically feasible ways over time.”      
September 19, 2019
What’s it like to be a Goldman Sachs intern? In this episode, two interns from this past summer talk about their experiences at GS, as well as what they value in an employer—from diversity to work-life balance. Also in the studio was head of Human Capital Management Dane Holmes to discuss how the interns’ perspectives—and the results of a larger, firm-wide intern survey—translate into how employers are thinking about connecting with a younger generation of workers.
September 13, 2019
John Waldron is a busy man. He’s almost a year into his role as Goldman Sachs COO and President, and he’s also a father of six. In this episode, Waldron demystifies his day-to-day and explains why he’s even more focused on executing on the title “COO” than “president.” “My role right now really is to first learn the firm and understand the inner workings of the firm, and so that’s a really operationally intensive job, thus the chief operating officer component,” says Waldron. “The president job comes into play more on an external basis where you’re out with clients, with governments, with regulators and other external constituencies where that title has real resonance.” Waldron also discusses how younger employees can identify and invest in mentors, as well as the importance of recharging out of the office. For Waldron, that means getting home for dinner with his family if he has to head out to a client event later in the evening. “I’ll have a little bit of peanut butter and jelly and then I’ll have a steak tartare later on,” he tells podcast host Jake Siewert.
September 3, 2019
Technology is changing the structure of the financial industry, says Marty Chavez, global co-head of the Goldman Sachs Securities Division. In this episode, he discusses how the industry is reshaping. “If you look inside a financial services firm, you’ll find there has traditionally been a relatively small number of roles that we talk about—so there’d be bankers, salespeople and traders,” Chavez says. “Now, all of those simple, easy categories are going away and they’re going away fast, and it’s becoming much more complicated and much more multidimensional.” This breaking down of clear categories also changes how financial firms compete with each other. “The traditional notions of ‘You’re my competitor’ are giving away to something that looks much more like coopetition—maybe not my favorite word, but you compete in some areas and you cooperate in some other areas; and some other areas you might be a client, or they might be a client,” Chavez says.       
August 22, 2019
For this special episode of Exchanges, we’re running our newest podcast, Top of Mind at Goldman Sachs. Hosted by Allison Nathan, a senior strategist in Goldman Sachs Research, Top of Mind examines the macroeconomic issues that are shaping the global economy. In each episode, Allison interviews Goldman Sachs experts—as well as influential policymakers, academics, and investors—on market-moving topics. The series’ latest installment, Dissecting the Market Disconnect, takes a close look at the divergence between falling bond yields and rising equity prices. Bridgewater Associates’ Ray Dalio and Goldman Sachs’ Jan Hatzius join Allison to dive into this dynamic and understand how concerned investors should really be about economic growth.      
July 25, 2019
The next 10 years of mobility will bring more change in the way that people and products move than any decade since the invention of the automobile, Goldman Sachs Research’s Heath Terry explains in this episode. Emerging technologies and business models like ride-hailing and sharing, autonomous driving and delivery, micro-mobility and even eVTOL (flying cars, finally) stand to disrupt profit pools that we estimate exceed $700 billion, and venture-backed startups and incumbents will attempt to address over $7 trillion in spending. Given the size of the opportunity, it should come as no surprise that access to capital has created a hyper-competitive environment marked by massive operating losses driven by marketing, subsidies, incentives, and capital investment. As this environment matures and rationalizes, Goldman Sachs Research expects consolidation that will lead to profitability, the establishment of category leaders, and significant opportunities for investors.
July 3, 2019
In this episode, Jennifer Davis, head of retail investment banking for Goldman Sachs, explains how retailers are expanding their growth strategies against a backdrop of continued e-commerce growth and shifting demographics. While Davis acknowledges that growth strategies are “very specific to a retailer or brand,” she outlines three key areas of focus for her clients: customer demographic growth, channel growth (including the rise of digitally native brands), and geographic growth.
June 26, 2019
Although financial markets tend to be explained largely in quantitative terms, human behavior still plays a major role in driving price action, says Sheba Jafari, head of technical analysis for Goldman Sachs’ Securities Division. Jafari, who looks at historical patterns to predict movements in markets, explains: “In my opinion, the mere fact that we have the existence of [asset] bubbles indicates that markets are still run by emotions -- fear, greed and hope.” Also in the episode, Jafari discusses the impact of AI and machine learning on trading decisions and her own unlikely path from film studies to finance.
June 10, 2019
While systematic investing has origins in academia dating back to the 1950s, only in the past several years has it evolved into practical applications for portfolio construction. In this episode, Heather Shemilt and Tom Leake of the Goldman Sachs Securities Division explain how ARP strategies work and the diversification and customization benefits they offer investors. "Alternative risk premia, or ARP, are long/short strategies that are designed to generate positive returns in exchange for an investor taking risk," Shemilt explains. "These strategies are seeking to provide persistent exposure to these factors or risk premia, such as carry value or momentum...What's interesting is that ARP can be systematically harvested across all of the asset classes." Also in the episode, they discuss how the ARP industry will continue to evolve, including the impact of big data, AI and machine learning on these strategies, with Leake acknowledging adoption of these technologies is still in "early days." This podcast was recorded on May 15, 2019. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2019 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
May 30, 2019
When Kathy Matsui first published research on "Womenomics," exploring the economic outcomes of women in the workforce, Japan had one of the lowest female participation rates in the developed world. Now, 20 years later, Japan's female participation rate is 71%, which tops the US and Europe. In this episode, Kathy Matsui joins us in the studio to discuss the progress that has been made over the next two decades and where challenges remain. "I believe Womenomics is working in Japan's context," Matsui says, though she notes that it remains "a work in progress" with significant room to improve the nation's gender leadership and pay gap. This podcast was recorded on April 23, 2019. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2019 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
May 22, 2019
The 2017 tax overhaul created incentives for investing in certain low-income communities across America, or "opportunity zones" as they're called. In this episode, Margaret Anadu, head of Goldman Sachs Urban Investment Group, explains the opportunity zone investing landscape and the role of private capital in revitalizing struggling communities. "There's no way we're going to change the situation in low-income communities and bring back all of that opportunity without the investment of private capital," Anadu says. This podcast was recorded on May 7, 2019. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast is not financial research nor a product of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2019 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
May 9, 2019
In this episode, Steve Strongin of Goldman Sachs Research discusses a new report from Goldman Sachs' Global Markets Institute, titled "What the Market Pays For." One of the main findings is that equity investors tend to pay for persistence or what is sometimes called "visibility." Strongin also discusses why large corporations often feel that they aren't rewarded for innovation the way small firms are. The reason for this, Strongin explains, is how the market perceives the "deep pocket risk" involved. Investors worry that large firms may overspend on failing projects because they have the resources to do so. Smaller companies, however, don't have as much money to be able to do the same. Strongin also discusses how corporate reporting can be managed to improve firms' valuations. This podcast was recorded on May 1, 2019.. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2019 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
May 6, 2019
The findings of Goldman Sachs Asset Management's (GSAM) annual insurance survey are in, and insurance companies generally believe that US markets are in late stages of the economic cycle. Of the companies surveyed, 84% indicated that the US will see a recession within the next two years, but only 2% think that the recession will come this year, explains GSAM's Mike Siegel. Given these views, along with the current environment of high equity valuations and low bond yields, the key consideration on insurers' minds, Siegel says, is "where to safely deploy their capital in order to get a recent return." This podcast was recorded on April 26, 2019. The views and opinions expressed herein should not be construed as an offer to buy or sell any securities and such views and opinions may differ from those of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research or other departments or divisions of Goldman Sachs and its affiliates. This information may not be current and Goldman Sachs has no obligation to provide any updates or changes. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by any Goldman Sachs entity. The portfolio risk management process includes an effort to monitor and manage risk but does not imply low risk. Copyright 2019 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
April 30, 2019
In the wake of the financial crisis, the low interest rate environment gave consumers little incentive to put their money into savings accounts. That's changing in the UK, says Goldman Sachs' Des McDaid, with savings rates "back on the agenda." In this episode, McDaid, who oversaw the launch of Marcus by Goldman Sachs in the UK, explains the factors driving the renewed demand for savings accounts and compares savings habits in the region to those around the world. This podcast was recorded on March 5, 2019. The views and opinions expressed herein should not be construed as an offer to buy or sell any securities and such views and opinions may differ from those of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research or other departments or divisions of Goldman Sachs and its affiliates. This information may not be current and Goldman Sachs has no obligation to provide any updates or changes. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by any Goldman Sachs entity. The portfolio risk management process includes an effort to monitor and manage risk but does not imply low risk. Copyright 2019 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
April 23, 2019
When banks reigned in their lending activities after the global financial crisis, there was a gap in the market as small-to-medium sized businesses had nowhere to go to raise capital that they needed to grow. In this episode, Greg Olafson and Nishi Somaiya of Goldman Sachs' Securities Division discuss how alternative asset managers have filled that gap in Europe through direct lending to middle-market companies. "This form of lending in Europe has evolved and has become an asset class in its own right, to the point where companies now have an option where they go [to raise capital]," Somaiya says. This podcast was recorded on March 6, 2019. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast is not financial research nor a product of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. This recording should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2019 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
April 11, 2019
Emerging market economies are showing early signs of stabilization, according to Kevin Daly of Goldman Sachs Research, and a number of the factors that contributed to the weakness of EM economies last year have now been reversed. "There has already been the beginnings of a recovery from the lows pasted in September-October last year," he says. Also in the episode, Daly discusses the outlook for his core focus area, CEEMEA – Central and Eastern Europe, Middle East and Africa – and explains the impact of Turkey's economic turmoil. "We expect the recovery in Turkey to be very slow…but nevertheless, we do seem to be past the worst point of Turkish growth" he says. He argues that the long-term growth outlook for the region is positive. This podcast was recorded on March 6, 2019. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2019 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
April 1, 2019
Technology is changing the physical layout of cities, says Jim Garman, who runs real estate investing for Goldman Sachs' Merchant Banking Division in Europe. For instance, while e-commerce is driving down demand for brick-and-mortar storefronts, it's accelerating demand for warehouses and other logistical assets. "Logistics has become a very in-favor asset class for investors," Garman says. "Whereas retail has become a very out-of-favor asset class at the moment." Also in the episode, Garman discusses the change in office buildings, student housing, and more. This podcast was recorded on March 6, 2019. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. The views and opinions expressed herein should not be construed as an offer to buy or sell any securities and such views/opinions may differ from those of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research or other departments or divisions of Goldman Sachs and its affiliates. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2019 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
March 25, 2019
Integrating ESG - environmental and social governance - into asset managers' portfolios is becoming a "business imperative," says Richard Manley, head of Environmental Social Governance Research in Goldman Sachs Research. In this episode, Manley explains the business case for ESG, why Europe is leading other regions and what households can do to lower their carbon footprint. This podcast was recorded on February 1, 2019. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2019 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
March 18, 2019
From our office in London, this episode is all about Europe's investing environment, including how investors are preparing for possible Brexit scenarios, drivers of the region's economic slowdown and where clients are finding alpha. "The number one issue that clients in Europe are facing is how do we get returns," says Andrew Wilson, CEO of Goldman Sachs Asset Management for Europe, the Middle East and Africa, who explains how both macro and political uncertainties are weighing on investors' minds. This podcast was recorded on March 5, 2019. The views and opinions expressed herein should not be construed as an offer to buy or sell any securities and such views and opinions may differ from those of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research or other departments or divisions of Goldman Sachs and its affiliates. This information may not be current and Goldman Sachs has no obligation to provide any updates or changes. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by any Goldman Sachs entity. The portfolio risk management process includes an effort to monitor and manage risk but does not imply low risk. Copyright 2019 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
March 11, 2019
A Goldman Sachs Research study of the last 100 years suggests US recessions can be boiled down to five major causes - and several (like industrial and oil supply shocks) look structurally less threatening today. But among those that still bear close watching are the financial balances of households and corporations, which GS Research's Chief Credit Strategist Lotfi Karoui says aren't showing signs of a private sector living beyond its means. Outstanding mortgage debt has declined drastically and consumer credit growth has slowed to a four-cycle low, while on the corporate side, strong profitability and debt-servicing capacity are providing a buffer for rising net leverage. That said, there are several pockets of risk - including the growth in leveraged loans, direct lending, and delinquencies in the subprime auto loan market - but Karoui thinks it's unlikely we'll see them drag the broader economy into a downturn. This podcast was recorded on February 26, 2019. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2019 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
February 25, 2019
In France, Goldman Sachs Investment Banking clients are focused on key three risk factors, according to Goldman Sachs' Pierre Hudry: geopolitical outlook, market stability and rising shareholder activism. Amid the uncertainty, however, French management teams remain focused on scaling businesses to compete on the global stage. "Achieving scale and being able to compete notably with the US players, which are massively consolidating and the Chinese players, who are benefitting from the whole market is really top of mind for these corporates," Hudry says. This podcast was recorded on February 1, 2019. The information contained in this recording was obtained from publicly available sources and has not been independently verified by Goldman Sachs. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this recording and any liability as a result of this recording is expressly disclaimed. The recording should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction. Goldman Sachs is not giving investment advice by means of this recording, and this recording does not establish a client relationship with Goldman Sachs. Copyright 2019 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
February 19, 2019
This episode is all about Europe's technology sector, from the pace of tech disruption and the growth of AI, to how companies are innovating in the face of political and regulatory constraints and more. Jo Hannaford of Goldman Sachs' Technology Division, points to Europe's geography as a key driver for development and innovation in technology in the region. "You feel like [in] Europe that [the countries'] physical distance doesn't really stop people being able to really...come together and communicate." This podcast was recorded on February 1, 2019. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast is not financial research nor a product of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2019 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
February 11, 2019
The bumpy deceleration underway in China will be met with additional economic policy easing, albeit with some notable differences to previous stimulus, says Goldman Sachs Research's Andrew Tilton. He expects a slightly smaller and later stimulus relative to other slowdowns, leveraging not only Chinese policymakers' typical favored tools like infrastructure spending but also a tax cut. This podcast was recorded on February 1, 2019. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2019 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
February 4, 2019
Last year, venture capital investment in China surpassed North American totals for the first time in history, bringing Chinese business models to a stage and scale that "the entire world needs to pay attention to" in the eyes of Goldman Sachs Research's Piyush Mubayi. Corporate venture capital plays a major role: the country's big tech companies are active investors domestically, and now they're also setting sights on new markets. In this episode, Mubayi joins Jake Siewert to discuss developments in China's corporate venture capital space, as well as trends he's seeing in the broader tech sector. This podcast was recorded on October 24, 2018. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2019 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
January 22, 2019
Making a comeback alongside higher spot prices this year will be the rapid growth in US shale, says Jeff Currie, with new pipeline capacity unlocking supply from the Permian Basin and re-anchoring the market around a fast-cycle, lower-cost New Oil Order. This podcast was recorded on January 10, 2019. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2019 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
January 11, 2019
"Startups right now are all using technology in different ways to drive growth, to drive expansion internationally...to continue to innovate their products..." says Kim Posnett of Goldman Sachs Investment Banking, who expects a strong IPO and M&A market for tech companies in 2019 given the pervasiveness of technological applications and access to capital. In this episode, Posnett discusses what to expect from the tech sector in the year ahead, from the biggest trends shaping internet and software businesses around the globe to how tech companies are thinking about IPOs to whether the pace of innovation among startups can continue and much more. This podcast was recorded on December 6, 2018. The information contained in this recording was obtained from publicly available sources and has not been independently verified by Goldman Sachs. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this recording and any liability as a result of this recording is expressly disclaimed. The recording should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction. Goldman Sachs is not giving investment advice by means of this recording, and this recording does not establish a client relationship with Goldman Sachs. Copyright 2019 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
December 20, 2018
"[As a founder] there is no stopping. The commitment is bottomless in a way that I've never had before...and so it requires a level of emotional resilience and balance that is not the easiest thing to do," says Josh Hoffman, co-founder and CEO of biotech startup Zymergen in the latest episode of the firm's podcast, Exchanges at Goldman Sachs. Hoffman joined Jen Rubio, co-founder and chief brand officer of luggage startup Away, and Dan Dees, co-head of Goldman Sachs' Investment Banking Division to discuss what it's really like to start and scale a company. This podcast was recorded on October 18, 2018. The information contained in this recording was obtained from publicly available sources and has not been independently verified by Goldman Sachs. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this recording and any liability as a result of this recording is expressly disclaimed. The recording should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction. Goldman Sachs is not giving investment advice by means of this recording, and this recording does not establish a client relationship with Goldman Sachs. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
November 27, 2018
In our first ever podcast taped in Hong Kong, we're exploring one of the highest growth sectors in China: healthcare. Stephanie Hui, head of Goldman Sachs' Merchant Banking Division in Asia-Pacific, ex-Japan, joins us in the studio to discuss the drivers behind healthcare's explosive growth in China and how investors are viewing the industry's risk and reward. This podcast was recorded on October 22, 2018. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. The views and opinions expressed herein should not be construed as an offer to buy or sell any securities and such views/opinions may differ from those of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research or other departments or divisions of Goldman Sachs and its affiliates. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
November 12, 2018
In this episode, we sit down with Amanda Hindlian and Sandra Lawson, two of the authors of a Goldman Sachs Global Markets Institute report called "Closing the gender gaps: Advancing women in corporate America." The report aims to contribute to the ongoing dialogue surrounding gender equality by analyzing some of the drivers of the gender gaps in seniority and pay and by helping clients to address these obstacles and biases. This podcast was recorded on November 2, 2018. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
October 29, 2018
This episode is all about the London Interbank Offered Rate, or LIBOR as it's commonly called. Beth Hammack, Goldman Sachs' global treasurer, and Jason Granet, head of the firm's LIBOR transition efforts, discuss what LIBOR is, what went wrong with the interest rate and now why and how the financial industry is moving to an alternative rate. As far as what the shift away from LIBOR means for markets, Hammack says, "First and foremost I think the impact is going to be hopefully an improvement in safety and soundness." This podcast was recorded on September 27, 2018. The information contained in this recording was obtained from publicly available sources and has not been independently verified by Goldman Sachs. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this recording and any liability as a result of this recording is expressly disclaimed. The recording should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction. Goldman Sachs is not giving investment advice by means of this recording, and this recording does not establish a client relationship with Goldman Sachs. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
October 15, 2018
Poland is sometimes overshadowed by its European neighbors, but it's an important player within the region, according to Goldman Sachs' Artur Tomala and Brent Watson. In this episode, Tomala and Watson describe Poland's economic, business and political environment and why robust job opportunities are leading many Poland emigrates to return home. "We're starting to see people come back," Watson says. "And it's all based upon the fundamental principle of having quality work." br> This podcast was recorded on August 2, 2018. The information contained in this recording was obtained from publicly available sources and has not been independently verified by Goldman Sachs. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this recording and any liability as a result of this recording is expressly disclaimed. The recording should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction. Goldman Sachs is not giving investment advice by means of this recording, and this recording does not establish a client relationship with Goldman Sachs. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLLC. All rights reserved.
October 1, 2018
Europe's energy sector is undergoing a transformation toward sustainable energy sources, says Goldman Sachs Research's Alberto Gandolfi. In this episode, Gandolfi discusses why clean energy has started to undercut the cost of conventional generation. "In several regions of Europe right now, renewables are way, way cheaper than any other technology. So we think they're going to displace conventional generation over the next decade," Gandolfi says. This podcast was recorded on August 2, 2018. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
September 17, 2018
International Goldman Sachs Asset Management CEO Sheila Patel joins us in the studio to discuss key trends facing investors, from where opportunities remain in emerging markets assets to the growth of ESG investing to sovereign wealth funds' shift towards transparency. "Across the board [with both legacy and new sovereign wealth funds] what you've seen go on is an increase in transparency, a realization that the level of concern about their actions or what they might be doing could lead to a potential distrust or a disruption of their activities." This podcast was recorded on August 2, 2018. The views and opinions expressed herein should not be construed as an offer to buy or sell any securities and such views and opinions may differ from those of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research or other departments or divisions of Goldman Sachs and its affiliates. This information may not be current and Goldman Sachs has no obligation to provide any updates or changes. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by any Goldman Sachs entity. The portfolio risk management process includes an effort to monitor and manage risk but does not imply low risk. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
September 10, 2018
Europe's business environment is in focus as companies simplify their corporate structure, global trade tensions continue and the tech industry faces increased scrutiny. Marc Nachmann, co-head of the Goldman Sachs Investment Banking Division, joins us to talk through how these factors and more are shaping business decisions and M&A in Europe. "CEO confidence remains quite strong in light of strong U.S. GDP growth, European growth recovering, and a pretty good consumer environment almost everywhere," Nachmann says. "So business environment is pretty good, confidence is high, and as a result, everybody's pretty open-minded to consider strategic transactions." This podcast was recorded on August 2, 2018. The information contained in this recording was obtained from publicly available sources and has not been independently verified by Goldman Sachs. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this recording and any liability as a result of this recording is expressly disclaimed. The recording should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction. Goldman Sachs is not giving investment advice by means of this recording, and this recording does not establish a client relationship with Goldman Sachs. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
August 23, 2018
"The scale of deals we're seeing [in Asia] is something we've never seen before," says Alison Mass of the Goldman Sachs Investment Banking Division. While Mass has been traveling to Asia for more than twenty years to meet with private equity clients, her most recent business trip with colleague Brian DeCenzo felt different in terms of the industry's maturation and international sophistication. In this episode, Mass and DeCenzo explain why global private equity firms are raising multi-billion dollar funds in Asia, the impact of increased Chinese buyers in global auctions, how Asian companies are embracing innovation and more. This podcast was recorded on July 31, 2018. The information contained in this recording was obtained from publicly available sources and has not been independently verified by Goldman Sachs. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this recording and any liability as a result of this recording is expressly disclaimed. The recording should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction. Goldman Sachs is not giving investment advice by means of this recording, and this recording does not establish a client relationship with Goldman Sachs. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
August 17, 2018
Looking at investor returns, European equities are trailing U.S. peers while beating emerging-market stocks in 2018. As part of our closer look at emerging economic and market themes in Europe, Sharon Bell of Goldman Sachs Research discusses the factors that explain this performance, zeroing in on U.K., German and French stocks. Bell breaks down investors' preference for growth companies over value stocks that trade at cheaper prices, particularly against a backdrop of ongoing political uncertainty and a slower pace of economic growth in the region. As for her outlook for the rest of the year, Bell says European companies look poised to deliver decent earnings growth of around 10 percent in 2018 and equities' performance could improve if political concerns subside. This podcast was recorded on August 1, 2018. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
August 7, 2018
Is there a bubble in technology? Goldman Sachs Research's Peter Oppenheimer doesn't think so. Despite the recent stumbles in some of tech's biggest names, the sector continues to dominate global stock indexes. "The thing that's really set apart [today's] technology revolution as we're seeing it expressed in the stock market since the financial crisis is that these companies have been very successful," says Oppenheimer. "They've been very dominant in terms of returns, but they've also been extraordinarily successful in terms of their earnings power, and their valuations have not become that extreme." Oppenheimer draws attention to just how large the tech sector has become by comparing tech companies' valuations to country GDPs and discusses the challenges facing today's most dominant players. This podcast was recorded on July 19, 2018. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
August 3, 2018
Germany is in focus in Europe and around the globe as its historically strong economy undergoes a transformation adapting to the digital age. As part of our closer look at emerging economic and market themes in Europe, we sat down with Wolfgang Fink, chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs Germany and Austria, to talk about Germany's economy and business trends, including how technology is impacting German corporations. "Technology change is affecting all large [German] corporates," Fink says. "Most importantly, with respect to access to their customers… the disruption of their business models, the change in their value chain." Also in the episode, Fink discusses the future of the European Union and political challenges facing Chancellor Merkel. This podcast was recorded on July 19, 2018. The information contained in this recording was obtained from publicly available sources and has not been independently verified by Goldman Sachs. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this recording and any liability as a result of this recording is expressly disclaimed. This recording should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction. Goldman Sachs is not giving investment advice by means of this recording, and this recording does not establish a client relationship with Goldman Sachs. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
July 20, 2018
From the financial problems facing Americans to how psychology explains people's saving and spending habits, this episode is all about money. Entrepreneur Adam Dell, founder of Clarity Money, a personal finance app that was acquired by Marcus by Goldman Sachs in April 2018, joins us to talk about all this and more, including how he created a mobile app to simplify individuals' money management. "Startups that have risen to prominence are focused on transparency, advocacy and simplicity - what I consider to be the tectonic shifts in consumer finance," he says. This podcast was recorded on June 14, 2018. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. The information contained in this podcast was prepared for general information purposes only, does not constitute research, advice or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener and are not a substitute for personalized financial advice. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast. Goldman Sachs and its affiliates expressly disclaim any liability (including any direct, indirect, or consequential loss or damage) for this podcast and its content. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
July 9, 2018
Rising trade tensions with the United States should not obscure the importance of China's progress in transforming its economy and opening its markets, according to Goldman Sachs Research's Tim Moe. On the latest episode of our podcast, Exchanges at Goldman Sachs, he says the size of the Chinese economy and its diminished reliance on trade to fuel growth makes it resilient to the direct impact of trade tariffs. At the same time, the inclusion of China A shares in global benchmark stock indexes means the Chinese market is poised to become an even bigger player on the global equity stage. "We have a very strong view that the opening up of the A-share market is something that investors globally really need to take very seriously and prepare for," he says. With a market capitalization of $9.3 trillion-second in size to only the US stock market--"people are just going to have to care about this," Moe says. The approved A shares will be phased into the MSCI indexes slowly, but as their inclusion ramps, benchmarked funds will be required to hold a greater proportion of Chinese assets. And with that comes greater exposure to a deep market with "lots of opportunity for so-called alpha generation or stock-picking capability," Moe says. This podcast was recorded on June 28, 2018. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
June 21, 2018
From consumers' growing influence and vertical consolidation to the shift to value-based care and questions around drug pricing policy, there's a lot going on in the healthcare industry. Jo Natauri, global head of healthcare investing in Goldman Sachs' Merchant Banking Division, joins us in the studio to discuss what corporations and investors are focused on. "Operating-wise, these businesses are performing really well," Natauri says. "Healthcare is a defensive industry. But if you look at the environment right now, it's really tied to the risk around policy." This podcast was recorded on May 14, 2018. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. The views and opinions expressed herein should not be construed as an offer to buy or sell any securities and such views/opinions may differ from those of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research or other departments or divisions of Goldman Sachs and its affiliates. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
June 11, 2018
Fifty years ago, if you asked Americans how they mainly saved for retirement, chances are they'd answer: "my pension." That's no longer the case. After surging in the post-World War II years, corporate pensions have been on the decline in the US over the past couple decades, largely driven by a stricter regulatory environment and long period of low interest rates, says Goldman Sachs' Michael Moran. With fewer corporations offering comprehensive pension plans, Moran says it will be up to individuals to carry the burden of retirement savings. "It's going to be falling on a lot of individuals in terms of saving for retirement, investing money themselves and then realizing how long they're going to have to use that money in retirement." This podcast was recorded on April 13th, 2018. The views and opinions expressed herein should not be construed as an offer to buy or sell any securities and such views and opinions may differ from those of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research or other departments or divisions of Goldman Sachs and its affiliates. This information may not be current and Goldman Sachs has no obligation to provide any updates or changes. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by any Goldman Sachs entity. The portfolio risk management process includes an effort to monitor and manage risk but does not imply low risk. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
May 24, 2018
From subscription services with generous discounts on concessions to comfier theaters, the film industry is moving aggressively to get more people off their sofas and to the box office, says Drew Borst of Goldman Sachs Research, so far with mixed results. Some efforts (think: reclining seats) are likely to prove more successful than others (think: forays into alternative content like eSports), he says. But one constant is likely to be a heavier reliance on big-budget blockbusters to draw audiences even as TV ups its game. "In television, the hits keep getting smaller and smaller and smaller as the supply has ballooned. It's become a crowded marketplace, and it's difficult for even a very well-produced, high-quality series to stand out," Borst says. "In movies, it's just the opposite. The hits are getting bigger and bigger...in the United States, but also globally." This podcast was recorded on May 16, 2018. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
May 21, 2018
It's not a matter of if Extended Reality (XR) will touch all aspects of our lives-it's a matter of when, says Heather Bellini of Goldman Sachs Research. By 2025, XR is projected to generate over $100 billion in sales, with the consumer and e-commerce sectors being its biggest beneficiaries. The technology carries broad implications for healthcare, education and real estate as well. "Ultimately, this AR/VR/mixed reality movement will change the way we interact with technology forever," Bellini says. This podcast was recorded on April 5, 2018. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
May 8, 2018
eSports - professional video gaming - has over 350 million viewers worldwide. In this episode, Ryan Nolan, global head of digital gaming in Goldman Sachs' Investment Banking Division, and his colleague Moritz Baier, a former eSports world champion, discuss how eSports is going mainstream after facing early skepticism. "I think the entire ecosystem is going to enjoy richer valuations, greater monetization opportunities and broader reach with time," Nolan said. This podcast was recorded on March 14, 2018. The information contained in this recording was obtained from publicly available sources and has not been independently verified by Goldman Sachs. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this recording and any liability as a result of this recording is expressly disclaimed. The recording should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction. Goldman Sachs is not giving investment advice by means of this recording, and this recording does not establish a client relationship with Goldman Sachs. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
April 27, 2018
The oil and natural gas investment cycle is entering an "age of restraint," according to a newly-published report from Goldman Sachs Research. In this episode, we sit down with Michele Della Vigna, Commodity Equity business unit leader in EMEA, to understand what this means for the sector. "The period of restraint is a period where fear around long-term demand distraction from decarbonization and electric vehicles is forcing the industry to really rationalize its capital investment," Della Vigna says. This podcast was recorded on April 16, 2018. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
April 19, 2018
As cryptocurrency volatility continues, Steve Strongin, Charlie Himmelberg and Jeff Currie of Goldman Sachs Research reaffirm their cautious stance on the long-term viability of bitcoin and other first-generation cryptocurrencies. "This should be a battle of the best technology, and instead it seems to be a common wave of enthusiasm," says Strongin, head of GS Research, of the buzz surrounding the first generation. "Certainly these technologies offer some promise, but on the other hand, when you think about how much they will need to change to meet that need, you realize…how different those future generations are going to be." This podcast was recorded on April 10, 2018. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
April 5, 2018
The fintech sector has been evolving rapidly as new startups emerge and large financial institutions figure out how to adapt...or else get left behind. To understand where we are in the "three waves of fintech," we spoke with Jeff Gido, global head of the financial technology sector in Goldman Sachs' Investment Banking Division. "We're seeing much more two-way dialogue [between financial services incumbents and startups]. We're seeing much more cooperation, much more partnerships. And we're actually seeing a lot of investment by traditional financial services into these fintech startups." This podcast was recorded on March 8, 2018. The information contained in this recording was obtained from publicly available sources and has not been independently verified by Goldman Sachs. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this recording and any liability as a result of this recording is expressly disclaimed. The recording should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction. Goldman Sachs is not giving investment advice by means of this recording, and this recording does not establish a client relationship with Goldman Sachs. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
March 23, 2018
Small businesses make up over 99 percent of all U.S. enterprises, and they employ 60 million Americans, nearly half the national workforce. In this episode, we sit down with Steve Strongin and Amanda Hindlian of Goldman Sachs' Global Investment Research Division to discuss the state of small businesses in America. We also hear directly from some of the small business owners of Goldman Sachs' 10,000 Small Businesses program about their biggest challenges to growth. This podcast was recorded on March 9, 2018. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
March 12, 2018
What are the markets telling us about expectations for the economy and monetary policy? We sat down with Francesco Garzarelli, co-chief markets economist of the Global Macro Research team, who says recent upticks in volatility reflect a stronger US growth outlook and uncertainty about how the Federal Reserve will respond to it. He discusses why investors should pay attention to the "term premium" reflected in bond prices to assess whether investors are too complacent about inflation, and the implications of divergence in monetary policy between the US, Europe and Japan. This podcast was recorded on March 6, 2018. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
February 23, 2018
The popularity of podcasts is surging, as millions of listeners turn to their smartphones each day for audio content ranging from quick news to immersive storytelling. So what makes a great podcast, and how are podcasts changing traditional media and journalism? To answer those questions, we sat down with two of the most popular podcast hosts and producers, Alex Blumberg of Gimlet Media and Jacob Weisberg of Slate. This podcast was recorded on January 31, 2018. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast is not financial research nor a product of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
February 9, 2018
The U.S. is in its second-longest equity bull market in the post WWII-era, at nearly nine years. Can financial markets continue on their upward course, or is the recent volatility a sign that bearish conditions are on their way? Sharmin Mossavar-Rahmani, chief investment officer of the Goldman Sachs Investment Strategy Group, discusses her team's 2018 investment outlook, titled (Un)Steady as She Goes, and explains its recommendation that clients stay invested in equities in the year ahead. This podcast was recorded on February 5th, 2018. The views and opinions expressed herein should not be construed as an offer to buy or sell any securities and such views and opinions may differ from those of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research or other departments or divisions of Goldman Sachs and its affiliates. This information may not be current and Goldman Sachs has no obligation to provide any updates or changes. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by any Goldman Sachs entity. The portfolio risk management process includes an effort to monitor and manage risk but does not imply low risk. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
February 2, 2018
"We are looking at a once-in-a-generation secular change in the way we produce power," says Gonzalo Garcia, co-head of the Global Natural Resources Group in Goldman Sachs' Investment Banking Division and co-head of Latin America for the firm. In addition to discussing the shift to renewable energy and how CEOs are adapting, Garcia also addresses the macroeconomic backdrop of Latin America and why clients view the region as an attractive growth opportunity. This podcast was recorded on January 17, 2018. The information contained in this recording was obtained from publicly available sources and has not been independently verified by Goldman Sachs. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this recording and any liability as a result of this recording is expressly disclaimed. The recording should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction. Goldman Sachs is not giving investment advice by means of this recording, and this recording does not establish a client relationship with Goldman Sachs. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
January 25, 2018
Now over the hurdle of tax reform, the question becomes which political priorities the Trump Administration will tackle next. Alec Phillips, chief US political economist for Goldman Sachs Research, says the potential for a mid-term election shakeup is likely to delay legislative progress on infrastructure and compromise on immigration, but he does expect movement on financial deregulation this year. Trade tensions with China could also re-heat as the Administration responds to the results of several key international trade investigations. This podcast was recorded on January 22, 2018. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity.
January 8, 2018
Venture capital has taken on a higher profile in the public imagination in recent years, thanks to the dramatic success of several early bets that have since become household names. Heath Terry, lead internet sector analyst for Goldman Sachs Research, shares where venture firms are focused now and what that means for the future of global industries, including health care and financial services. This podcast was recorded on November 14, 2017. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2018 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
December 20, 2017
The year's most notable elections in Europe produced largely market-friendly results, stability that has helped support the deal-making environment across the continent. Anthony Gutman, co-head of UK Investment Banking at Goldman Sachs and co-head of Investment Banking Services in EMEA, discusses the sectors and geographies where activity has been most robust, why activism is on the rise in Europe and what Brexit has meant so far for clients and the firm. This podcast was recorded on December 7, 2017. The information contained in this recording was obtained from publicly available sources and has not been independently verified by Goldman Sachs. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this recording and any liability as a result of this recording is expressly disclaimed. This recording should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction. Goldman Sachs is not giving investment advice by means of this recording, and this recording does not establish a client relationship with Goldman Sachs. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
December 14, 2017
Banks in the United States are well-positioned to benefit from corporate tax reform, says Goldman Sachs Research's Richard Ramsden. What's less clear is how they'll continue to fend off challenges from technology companies, which have already made inroads in certain businesses, like payments. Richard shares his outlook for the sector heading into 2018, talking through the regulatory and technological changes that are on everyone's minds - including what bitcoin means for banks. This podcast was recorded on December 11, 2017. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
December 6, 2017
Ride-hailing companies are poised for explosive growth over the next decade, according to Stefan Burgstaller, head of European industrials equity research. Their prominence may usher in the era of the 'pay-as-you-go' car, which could have dramatic effects on the entire automotive ecosystem. This podcast was recorded on November 2, 2017. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved
November 22, 2017
Eric Ryan and Adam Lowry were childhood friends who started a business together. Then it got crazy. They discuss building Method, the innovative homecare company, out of the dirtiest bachelor pad in San Francisco, and why both got the itch to start-up a second time, Eric with Olly Nutrition, and Adam with Ripple Foods. This podcast was recorded on October 19, 2017. The information contained in this recording was obtained from publicly available sources and has not been independently verified by Goldman Sachs. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this recording and any liability as a result of this recording is expressly disclaimed. This recording should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction. Goldman Sachs is not giving investment advice by means of this recording and this recoding does not establish a client relationship with Goldman Sachs. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
November 22, 2017
From the 2017 Goldman Sachs Builders + Innovators Summit: Shan-Lyn Ma, co-founder and CEO of online wedding destination Zola, and Gregg Renfrew, founder and CEO of skincare and cosmetics brand Beautycounter, are joined by Goldman Sachs co-head of Investment Banking John Waldron to discuss fundraising, recruiting top talent and building brands that last. This podcast was recorded on October 19, 2017. The information contained in this recording was obtained from publicly available sources and has not been independently verified by Goldman Sachs. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this recording and any liability as a result of this recording is expressly disclaimed. This recording should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction. Goldman Sachs is not giving investment advice by means of this recording and this recoding does not establish a client relationship with Goldman Sachs. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
November 7, 2017
Hugh Lawson, head of Goldman Sachs Asset Management's Institutional Client Strategy and ESG and Impact investing efforts, is joined by Scott Brown, CEO of New Energy Capital, and Elizabeth McGeveran, Director of Impact Investing at the McKnight Foundation, to discuss how socially conscious investing has become mainstream and where it could be headed. This podcast was recorded on October 10, 2017. The views and opinions expressed herein should not be construed as an offer to buy or sell any securities and such views and opinions may differ from those of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research or other departments or divisions of Goldman Sachs and its affiliates. This information may not be current and Goldman Sachs has no obligation to provide any updates or changes. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by any Goldman Sachs entity or individual to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. No part of this podcast may, without GSAM's prior written consent, be reproduced, redistributed, published, copied or duplicated in any form, by any means. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
October 30, 2017
Eight years into the "most unloved" bull market in history, many investors are asking how much longer the upswing can last. Peter Oppenheimer, chief global equity strategist for Goldman Sachs Research, discusses why identifying the peak may be less important than recognizing a bear market once it starts, and what history can tell us about the types and tenures of these declines. This podcast was recorded on October 16, 2017. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC. All rights reserved.
October 19, 2017
Harvey Schwartz, president and co-COO of Goldman Sachs, took a year off after high school, though it wasn't part of any kind of grand plan - he readily admits there wasn't one. But it did introduce him to his first mentor, and the concept of investing in other people's success that has been a defining theme of his three decades in finance. He shares how his path has evolved over the course of his career and his thoughts on today's market environment. This podcast was recorded on October 3, 2017. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast is not financial research nor a product of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
October 13, 2017
Markets are up, volatility is down and clients have questions. David Solomon, president and co-COO of Goldman Sachs, discusses the rise in passive investing, how technology is making the world more competitive and his 35-year career on Wall Street. This podcast was recorded on September 7, 2017. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast is not financial research nor a product of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
October 9, 2017
After a distinguished career in politics that included roles as prime minister of Portugal and president of the European Commission, José Manuel Barroso was named chair of Goldman Sachs International in 2016. He discusses the future of European integration amidst populist movements across the region, the challenges and opportunities in global trade and his role at the firm. This podcast was recorded on September 20, 2017. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast is not financial research nor a product of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
September 25, 2017
Paul Russo, co-COO of the Equities Franchise in the Goldman Sachs Securities Division, explains how technological change and regulatory reform helped develop a growing class of institutional investor - systematic traders - and what a rising interest rate environment could mean for the equity markets. This podcast was recorded on August 30, 2017. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast is not financial research nor a product of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. This recording should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
September 18, 2017
Jörg Kukies, co-CEO of Goldman Sachs in Germany and Austria, discusses Germany's unique role within Europe and on the global stage during a period of significant political and economic developments in Europe and globally. This podcast was recorded on September 13, 2017. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast is not financial research nor a product of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. This recording should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
August 22, 2017
For all the pain that e-commerce has inflicted on retailers, the brick-and-mortar store is far from dead, according to Goldman Sachs Research's lead retail analyst Matt Fassler. Instead, he says, survivors of the latest round of retail disruption will succeed in part by narrowing their sights, focusing either on efficiently distributing goods or improving the in-store experience for customers. This podcast was recorded on August 14, 2017. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
August 7, 2017
With energy demand expected to double in Asia by 2030, and with a billion people currently without electricity, Ankur Sahu, co-head of Goldman Sachs' Merchant Bank in Asia-Pacific, says that renewables fill a crucial gap in the marketplace. Investors have been faced with ample opportunity, he says, so much so that an industry previously thought as niche has rapidly broadened to include large institutional investors -- even in emerging markets. This podcast was recorded on August 1, 2017. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. The views and opinions expressed herein should not be construed as an offer to buy or sell any securities and such views/opinions may differ from those of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research or other departments or divisions of Goldman Sachs and its affiliates. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
July 20, 2017
Health care is projected to make up nearly forty percent of the US federal budget by 2025. In an effort to slow down cost increases, some in the industry have begun to explore value-based contracts, potentially transforming the industry's economics. Jami Rubin and Robert P. Jones of Goldman Sachs Research discuss how placing an emphasis on patient outcomes - instead of volumes of medications or services sold - could impact investors, companies and consumers. This podcast was recorded on July 12, 2017. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
June 30, 2017
Digitization ravaged the music business, but nearly 20 years after the launch of Napster, the industry has returned to growth on the back of a "second digital revolution," according to Lisa Yang of Goldman Sachs Research. Streaming services are leading the way, growing the revenue pie for artists and labels both and creating new opportunities for companies across the music ecosystem. Yang is joined by Marc Geiger, worldwide head of music for William Morris Endeavor; and Patrick Spence, CEO of Sonos, to talk about where music was and where it could be headed. This podcast was recorded on June 27, 2017. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
June 16, 2017
The retail sector is at the epicenter of technological disruption and changing consumer behavior. But according to Goldman Sachs' Kathy Elsesser, global chair of the Healthcare Group and the Consumer and Retail Group in Investment Banking, and Kim Posnett, global head of Internet Investment Banking, these shifts are more evolution than revolution. An omnichannel approach, combining traditional brick-and-mortar and ecommerce offerings, is emerging as the primary way forward for companies at both ends of the spectrum. This podcast was recorded on June 8, 2017. The information contained in this recording was obtained from publicly available sources and has not been independently verified by Goldman Sachs. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this recording and any liability as a result of this recording is expressly disclaimed. This recording should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction. Goldman Sachs is not giving investment advice by means of this recording, and this recording does not establish a client relationship with Goldman Sachs. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
May 22, 2017
Long dominated by government agencies, space is now in play for private companies and venture capitalists, who see big potential in areas like launch, communications and exploration. Noah Poponak, senior Aerospace and Defense equity research analyst for Goldman Sachs Research, says this investment interest has helped reduce launch costs and spur innovation across related industries, opening up a new chapter in the history of the space economy. This podcast was recorded on May 3, 2017. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
May 8, 2017
Environmental, social and governance metrics have matured to the point where they can help mainstream investors beat their benchmarks, says Goldman Sachs Research's Derek Bingham. As a member of the GS SUSTAIN team, which seeks to identify companies with long-term growth potential, Bingham and his colleagues study which sustainability measures most closely align with returns over time. He shares the team's findings and explains why he sees ESG research as integral to a "holistic" take on stock selection. This podcast was recorded on May 2, 2017. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
April 26, 2017
The two-year negotiation process of Brexit has officially commenced amidst Europe's year of elections, meaning the broader sense of uncertainty that has underpinned much of the region's business operations will continue for the foreseeable future. Richard Gnodde, vice chairman of Goldman Sachs and chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs International, discusses how companies - Goldman Sachs included - are adapting to the political landscape. This podcast was recorded on April 24, 2017. The information contained in this recording was obtained from publicly available sources and has not been independently verified by Goldman Sachs. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this recording and any liability as a result of this recording is expressly disclaimed. This recording should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction. Goldman Sachs is not giving investment advice by means of this recording, and this recording does not establish a client relationship with Goldman Sachs. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
April 7, 2017
Tim Moe, chief Asia Pacific equity strategist for Goldman Sachs Research, says recent economic data indicate global growth has perhaps reached "peak momentum." While that could mean more modest returns for equity investors going forward, there is still value to be found in Asia, he argues, most notably in China. This podcast was recorded on April 3, 2017. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
March 27, 2017
The manufacturing sector has long offered a window into the changing nature of work and the evolution of technology. Clare Scherrer, global co-head of the Industrials Group in Goldman Sachs' Investment Banking Division, discusses how industrial businesses are managing technology and workforce investments amidst economic and political change. This podcast was recorded on February 27, 2017. The information contained in this recording was obtained from publicly available sources and has not been independently verified by Goldman Sachs. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this recording and any liability as a result of this recording is expressly disclaimed. This recording should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction. Goldman Sachs is not giving investment advice by means of this recording, and this recording does not establish a client relationship with Goldman Sachs. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
March 10, 2017
President Trump's policy agenda is a source of intense interest for investors and clients around the world. Michael Paese, co-head of the Office of Government Affairs at Goldman Sachs, and Alec Phillips, US political economist in Goldman Sachs Research, discuss how the president's agenda has evolved as he's transitioned from the campaign trail to the White House, the outlook for tax reform, health care, trade and other issues, and what the Administration can realistically expect to achieve in a divided Washington. This podcast was recorded on March 8, 2017. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
February 22, 2017
Sheila Patel, chief executive officer of Goldman Sachs Asset Management International, shares how her discussions with clients in Asia have changed since the election of Donald Trump, with a focus on trade, risk and the evolution of active and passive strategies in an age of technological disruption. This podcast was recorded on February 10, 2017. The views and opinions expressed herein should not be construed as an offer to buy or sell any securities and such views and opinions may differ from those of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research or other departments or divisions of Goldman Sachs and its affiliates. This information may not be current and Goldman Sachs has no obligation to provide any updates or changes. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by any Goldman Sachs entity or individual to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. No part of this podcast may, without GSAM's prior written consent, be reproduced, redistributed, published, copied or duplicated in any form, by any means. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
February 7, 2017
The United States appears poised to revisit its trading stance with China - and Asia more broadly - after the inauguration of President Donald Trump. Andrew Tilton, chief Asia economist of Goldman Sachs Research, considers the Asian economies most at-risk of disruption and the evolving roles of both China and the US in the region. This podcast was recorded on February 6, 2017. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
January 17, 2017
US equities have returned nearly 300% since the trough of the global financial crisis, and now sit at historically high valuations. Sharmin Mossavar-Rahmani, chief investment officer of Private Wealth Management at Goldman Sachs, says that high valuations alone are not enough to warrant underweighting equities. What's important is context: she explains her optimism towards the US economy, as well as the potential risks to her views. This podcast was recorded on January 10, 2017. The views and opinions expressed herein should not be construed as an offer to buy or sell any securities and such views/opinions may differ from those of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research or other departments or divisions of Goldman Sachs and its affiliates. This information may not be current and Goldman Sachs has no obligation to provide any updates or changes. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by any Goldman Sachs entity or individual to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. The portfolio risk management process includes an effort to monitor and manage risk, but does not imply low risk. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
January 10, 2017
Each new generation comes of age with different experiences and preferences than their parents. Goldman Sachs Research's Hugo Scott-Gall, Lindsay Drucker Mann and Christopher Wolf discuss how the differing habits of three generations that make up the bulk of US consumption today -- Gen X, Millennials and Gen Z - are changing how Americans spend and manage their careers. This podcast was recorded on October 4, 2016. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2017 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
December 27, 2016
Artificial intelligence - the science of teaching computers to think like humans - could reshape the global economy by making both capital investments and labor costs more efficient. That would provide a meaningful boost to productivity growth, which has stagnated since the internet boom of the 1990s. Heath Terry of Goldman Sachs Research discusses the technology's most promising uses, the industries set to take advantage and how widespread adoption might impact the labor market. This podcast was recorded on December 2, 2016. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2016 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
December 12, 2016
Gary Cohn reflects on his journey from a difficult childhood struggle with dyslexia to serving as president and chief operating officer of Goldman Sachs. As he departs the firm after 26 years, Cohn shares some of the experiences that have shaped him, and reflects on the value of diversity, the importance of perseverance and learning how to turn failure into success. This podcast was recorded on December 12, 2016. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast is not financial research nor a product of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2016 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
December 12, 2016
Investors have flocked to financials since Donald Trump's election in expectation of a steepening yield curve and regulatory reform boosting bank bottom lines. Richard Ramsden, business unit leader of the Financials Group in Goldman Sachs Research, explains how tightening monetary policy, higher inflation and a potential infrastructure spend could be even more important for the trajectory of the US financial industry. This podcast was recorded on December 8, 2016. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity.
November 17, 2016
As President-elect Donald Trump makes the transition from the campaign trail to the White House, investors will be watching carefully to determine the economic issues at the top of his agenda. Alec Phillips, Goldman Sachs Research's political economist in Washington, discusses where Trump can act on his own without Congress, why corporate tax changes are more likely than personal tax cuts in 2017, and how Trump may reshape the leadership of the Federal Reserve. This podcast was recorded on November 15, 2016. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2016 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
November 14, 2016
As the UK moves closer to triggering formal talks on its exit from the European Union, investors are focused on the terms of the new relationship it will strike with Brussels. Goldman Sachs' Chief European Economist Huw Pill discusses the spectrum of issues to be resolved in the negotiations and what the ultimate outcome between a "hard" or "soft" Brexit means for the UK, Europe and the global economy. This podcast was recorded on November 8, 2016. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2016 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
October 31, 2016
Tyler Haney, founder and CEO of activewear brand Outdoor Voices, and Tata Harper, founder and co-CEO of Tata Harper Skincare, are joined by Goldman Sachs' David Solomon to discuss entrepreneurship and the global health and wellness movement. This podcast was recorded on October 20, 2016. The information contained in this recording was obtained from publicly available sources and has not been independently verified by Goldman Sachs. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this recording and any liability as a result of this recording is expressly disclaimed. This recording should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction. Goldman Sachs is not giving investment advice by means of this recording, and this recording does not establish a client relationship with Goldman Sachs. Copyright 2016 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
October 13, 2016
Purpose-driven loans - for housing, education and automobiles - comprise most of the consumer credit market, with credit cards making up most of the rest. But the industry is undergoing a profound shift, as new entrants leverage responsive technologies to offer better experiences for consumers. Harit Talwar, head of Digital Finance at Goldman Sachs, discusses the evolving role of technology in finance and the launch of the firm's new online personal loan platform, Marcus by Goldman Sachs. This podcast was recorded on August 17, 2016, with portions re-recorded on October 12, 2016. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. The information contained in this podcast was prepared for general information purposes only, does not constitute research, advice or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener and is not a substitute for personalized financial advice. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast. Goldman Sachs and its affiliates expressly disclaim any liability (including any direct, indirect, or consequential loss or damage) for this podcast and its content. Copyright 2016 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
September 27, 2016
Quantitative easing by the world's major central banks has helped deflate bond yields and pushed valuations across asset classes to historic levels. Peter Oppenheimer, chief global equity strategist and head of Macro Research in Europe for Goldman Sachs Research, discusses how the long-term case for investing in stocks has evolved and why he sees the most likely scenario from here as a 'Fat & Flat' range of tepid yet positive returns and greater volatility. This podcast was recorded on September 12, 2016. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2016 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
September 12, 2016
Technology's rapid progress and expanding scope are having a significant impact on the nature of work. Steve Strongin, head of Goldman Sachs Research, and Sandra Lawson, director of the Global Markets Institute, explain why preparing for the jobs of the future is about more than STEM. This podcast was recorded on September 7, 2016. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2016 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
August 26, 2016
Technology companies are entering areas traditionally dominated by the media and telecom industries, forcing legacy players to adapt. Michael Ronen and Dave Dase of the Investment Banking Division discuss the emerging partnerships, developing rivalries and most promising opportunities in the new media landscape. This episode was recorded on August 8, 2016. The information contained in this recording was obtained from publicly available sources and has not been independently verified by Goldman Sachs. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this recording and any liability as a result of this recording is expressly disclaimed. This recording should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction. Goldman Sachs is not giving investment advice by means of this recording, and this recording does not establish a client relationship with Goldman Sachs. Copyright 2016 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
August 12, 2016
Until recently, low carbon technologies like wind and solar were a niche part of the global energy landscape. But Goldman Sachs Research's GS SUSTAIN team, which focuses on identifying long-term industry leaders, says that low carbon technologies like onshore wind, solar PV, LEDs and hybrid/electric vehicles are now "taking off the training wheels" and rapidly gaining share. According to GS SUSTAIN's Jaakko Kooroshy, these four technologies not only could help global carbon emissions peak as early as 2020, versus mainstream expectations of a peak closer to 2030-they're also poised to reshape competitive dynamics across the global economy. This podcast was recorded on July 11, 2016. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2016 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
July 28, 2016
Heath Terry and Matt Fassler of Goldman Sachs Research discuss the explosive growth of e-commerce and how brick-and-mortar retailers are contending with changing consumer habits, generational shifts and technological disruption. This podcast was recorded on June 30, 2016. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2016 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
July 13, 2016
Jami Rubin, business unit leader of the Healthcare Research Group for Goldman Sachs Research, discusses top trends in healthcare, including progress in the fight against cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer's, cutting-edge science in gene therapy and gene editing, and how the drug industry is dealing with debates over pricing and mergers. This podcast was recorded on June 17, 2016. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2016 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
June 28, 2016
The UK's vote to leave the EU sets in motion a series of complex adjustments for the UK and Europe that will take years to play out. Huw Pill, chief European economist in Goldman Sachs Research, discusses the economic and market implications of the Brexit vote. This podcast was recorded on June 27, 2016. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2016 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
June 16, 2016
Armen Avanessians, chief investment officer of Goldman Sachs Asset Management's Quantitative Investment Strategies team, discusses how big data can help investors make smarter, better informed decisions. This episode was recorded on April 26, 2016. The views and opinions expressed herein should not be construed as an offer to buy or sell any securities and such views/opinions may differ from those of Goldman Sachs Global Investment Research or other departments or divisions of Goldman Sachs and its affiliates. This information may not be current and Goldman Sachs has no obligation to provide any updates or changes. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by any Goldman Sachs entity or individual to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. The portfolio risk management process includes an effort to monitor and manage risk, but does not imply low risk. Copyright 2016 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
June 3, 2016
A better external backdrop is just part of the reason why emerging market assets have surprised in the first half of 2016. Kamakshya Trivedi, chief Emerging Markets macro strategist in Goldman Sachs Research, considers the local and global factors influencing asset prices in developing economies around the world, including China, Brazil and India. This podcast was recorded on May 17, 2016. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied, distributed, published or reproduced, in whole or in part. The information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or a recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener. Neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefor (including in respect of direct, indirect or consequential loss or damage) is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs, and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial, economic, legal, accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity. Copyright 2016 Goldman Sachs. All rights reserved.
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