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August 11, 2020
The illustrious and well-regarded Gil Fink joins the Adventures in Angular panel to talk about profiling your Angular apps. Profiling consists of finding bottlenecks, and memory leaks among other problems within your application. Most of the time, the problems are hard to see from the development side. Usually, they appear when your user uses a devise that is slow or a connection that is faulty. Gil explains how to find and fix them. Panel Alyssa Nicoll Shai Reznik Younes Jaaidi Brooks Forsyth Chris Ford Eddie Hinkle Guest Gil Fink Angular Remote Conf 2020 Links https://pptr.dev Lighthouse - Using the node cli JS VidCon Picks Gil Fink: Follow Gil on Twitter > @gilfink Wokwi https://github.com/wokwi/wokwi-elements Star Wars The Clone Wars Alyssa Nicoll: BundleSize.dev - Analyze and Benchmark your JavaScript and TypeScript Shai Reznik: FREE WORKSHOP - The Roadmap to Angular Testing Mastery https://www.ng-conf.org Younes Jaaidi: Reactive Extensions for Angular Chris Ford: Eero @GrumpySkeletor Brooks Forsyth: LoopBack 4 Eddie Hinkle: Animal Crossing Follow Adventures in Angular on Twitter > @angularpodcast
July 21, 2020
In this episode of Adventures in Angular, Will Gant, author of Remote Work talks about working from home and working outside of the client's office. He and Brooks share their experience with working through the challenges, benefits, and methods of working remotely. Panel Brooks Forsyth Guest Will Gant Angular Remote Conf 2020 Picks Will Gant: Follow Will's work on > www.simpleprogrammer.com Brooks Forsyth: NGXS Tiger King Follow Adventures in Angular on Twitter > @angularpodcast
July 7, 2020
Subrat Kumar Mishra is a full stack developer who has worked with Angular and Java. He's the host of the Fun of Heuristic YouTube channel. He talks about OOP principles, Node.js, lazy loading components, and why he chose Angular. Panel Alyssa Nicoll Brooks Forsyth Chris Ford Eddie Hinkle Guest Subrat Kumar Mishra Angular Remote Conf 2020 Picks Subrat Kumar Mishra: Follow Subrat on > YouTube - Fun Of Heuristic Deno Eddie Hinkle: WestWorld Sentry Alyssa Nicoll: Debugging Features in v9 I did a tl;dr stream for ng-conf each night after the talks, check them out here Chris Ford: The World According to Jeff Goldblum @SoVeryBritish (Very British Problems on Twitter) Mansions of Madness Brooks Forsyth: Tiger King Theia - Cloud and Desktop IDE Platform Gitpod - Online IDE for GitHub and GitLab Follow Adventures in Angular on Twitter > @angularpodcast
June 23, 2020
Angular Remote Conf August 25th to 28th Maxim joins the Adventure to discuss building Progressive Web Apps using Angular. He starts out talking about some of the features of native apps and how to get some of that on the web. Then he walks through the benefits and methods of using PWA's. Panel Younes Jaaidi Brooks Forsyth Chris Ford Guest Maxim Salnikov "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! Links Building Progressive Web Apps @angular/pwa schematic PWA-POLICE/pwa-bugs Progressive Web Apps on iOS are here ­čÜÇ - Maximiliano Firtman Maximiliano Firtman – Medium Trusted Web Activity the StackOverflow issue Workbox Picks Maxim Salnikov: Follow Maxim on Twitter @webmaxru What PWA Can Do Today PWABuilder Brooks Forsyth: Paper Dolls by Cory Younes Jaaidi: Tiny Angular application projects in Nx workspaces Service Workies Chris Ford: Progressive Web Apps (PWA) - The Complete Guide Course | Udemy Academind Follow Adventures in Angular on Twitter > @angularpodcast
June 9, 2020
Nishu Goel joins the Adventure to talk about how Web Components can be used in Angular applications and how to use them to share functionality across multiple applications written in different frameworks. We also dive into how web components are used and compatibility across browsers. Panel Brooks Forsyth Chris Ford Charles Max Wood Eddie Hinkle Guest Nishu Goel "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! Links Angular elements overview manfredsteyer/ngx-build-plus Web Components in Action Stencil Web Components web-component-tester Can I use... Custom Elements Everywhere Dyo is it canceled yet? Picks Charles Max Wood: Step-by-Step Angular Routing by Nishu Goel The Masked Singer Expert Secrets Chris Ford: Rhod Gilbert Clips on Youtube Brooks Forsyth: Capacitor: Universal Web Applications Eddie Hinkle: NestJS Sunlight and Warm Weather Nishu Goel: Follow Nishu on Twitter > @Dcoustawilson WebAssembly WASM game Playing with rabbits Follow Adventures in Angular on Twitter > @angularpodcast
May 26, 2020
Evan Weaver is the CEO and founder at Fauna. He starts out talking about the problems that existed when working at Twitter with databases and scaling. They began as a consultancy and the grew into a serverless database company. Panel Charles Max Wood Brooks Forsyth Chris Ford Eddie Hinkle Guest Evan Weaver "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! Links JSJ 384: FaunaDB: Support for GraphQL and Serverless Development with Evan Weaver .NET 007: What We Know About LINQ Picks Charles Max Wood: The Chronicles of Narnia Adult Box Set (Audiobook) by C. S. Lewis Brooks Forsyth: Forestry.io Chris Ford: Spider-Man 3 Eddie Hinkle: LinkedIn Evan Weaver: Follow Evan on Twitter > @evan, Fauna.com Quick start - jwt-auth Follow Adventures in Angular on Twitter > @angularpodcast
May 12, 2020
JavaScript Remote Conf 2020 May 13th to 15th - register now! Brooks Forsyth is an Ionic and Angular developer who has coined a new stack called the IAN stack. The panel discusses the pros and cons of using a combination of Ionic, Angular, and NestJS to build mobile apps and their supporting APIs Panel Charles Max Wood Shai Reznik Chris Ford Guest Brooks Forsyth "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! Links nestjs/nest LoopBack Picks Charles Max Wood: The Expanse Star Trek: Picard Shai Reznik: http://TestAngular.com Demystifying Dependency Injection: Angular vs NestJS - Kamil Mysliwiec Chris Ford: Green Lantern Ionic 5 Brooks Forsyth: Follow Brooks on Twitter @brooks_forsyth “Pizza is an investment in your future” IAN Stack Follow Adventures in Angular on Twitter > @angularpodcast
April 28, 2020
JavaScript Remote Conf 2020 May 13th to 15th - register now! Tracy Lee joins the adventure to talk about where the panel thinks Angular is headed. The conversation ranges from features of Angular 9 and Ivy to Scully to what we all thing the next thing will be. Panel Charles Max Wood Chris Ford Eddie Hinkle Guest Tracy Lee "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today!   Links Scully Version 9 of Angular — Project Ivy has arrived! Web Components in Action Geo for Bootstrap, a Timeless Theme by Divshot Investing in Underrepresented Minorities in Tech Picks Charles Max Wood: Clean Coders Podcast Theme Forest Templates Legendary: A Marvel Deck Building Game React Native Chris Ford: Arkham Horror Third Edition London | RxJS Live!!! Eddie Hinkle: Improved Build Errors on Angular 9 Crisis on Infinite Earths (CW TV show) Tracy Lee: Follow Tracy on Twitter @ladyleet, Github, LinkedIn Funeral Potatoes Tater Tot Hotdish Toad in the Hole Follow Adventures in Angular on Twitter > @angularpodcast
April 21, 2020
JavaScript Remote Conf 2020 May 13th to 15th - register now! Michael Hladky is a developer from Vienna. He's a consultant and trainer on Angular. He loves RxJS. He got into Angular on version 1.2 or so. He built a bunch of applications in AngularJS and the patterns he invented to gain performance now show up in the current versions of Angular. We dive into how he got into Angular and his history with the framework. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Michael Hladky Sponsors Sentry Cachefly "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! Picks Charles Max Wood: Generation Z Unfiltered Shift
April 7, 2020
JavaScript Remote Conf 2020 May 14th to 15th - register now! Doguhan Uluca, the author of "Angular for Enterprise-Ready Web Applications", explains the concepts of enterprise and the Angular ecosystem. He is a strong proponent of the evergreen motto, which means the fundamentals and techniques you learn and master will be useful to you for years to come. Panel Chris Ford Shai Reznik Alyssa Nicoll Charles Max Wood Guest Doguhan Uluca ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Picks Chris Ford: Emoji Tetra Your Roadmap to Angular Testing Mastery Shai Reznik: Joe Rogan Experience #1309 - Naval Ravikant Doguhan Uluca: Microsoft Edge Chromium Browser Follow Doguhan on Twitter > @duluca Charles Max Wood: Clean Coders Podcast Follow Adventures in Angular on Twitter > @angularpodcast
March 24, 2020
JavaScript Remote Conf 2020 May 14th to 15th - register now! Chris is new at working from home. Chuck and Brooks have been working from home for several years. They walk through the ins and outs of how to be productive at home with kids, family, and others at home and how to maximize communication with your team when you're not in the same place. Chuck also offers some advice to managers who find themselves suddenly managing remote workers. Panel Charles Max Wood Chris Ford Brooks Forsyth ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links How Infinite Red Improved Remote Video Meetings With a Few Hand Gestures Toggl - Free Time Tracking Software RescueTime: Fully Automated Time Tracking Software TimeFlip – smart time tracker Picks Charles Max Wood: JavaScript Remote Conf 2020 Bad Lip Reading Chris Ford: Honest Trailers Honest Trailers - The X-Men Trilogy Shia LaBeouf Live By Rob Cantor Honest Game Trailers Wash Your Lyrics Brooks Forsyth: Going on a hike Follow Adventures in Angular on Twitter > @angularpodcast
March 10, 2020
Alyssa, Chris, and Chuck dive into whether or not Angular is declining in popularity. They begin talking about a tweet by @wellpaidgeek and things like State of JS and what it says about the growth and relative popularity of Angular when compared with Vue, React, and Svelte. The discussion also weaves into whether or not it's worth starting in or finding a job in today. Panel Alyssa Nicoll Charles Max Wood Chris Ford ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links The myth Angular is in decline The State of JavaScript 2019 https://twitter.com/wellpaidgeek/status/1201916542188957703 Angular, React - Google Trends The State of JavaScript 2019: Front End Frameworks Apache Wicket Picks Charles Max Wood: DevsWhoWrite Writing Excuses NaNoWriMo Workshops with Chuck Chris Ford: Ninth House by Leigh Bardugo Star Trek: Picard   Follow Adventures in Angular on Twitter > @angularpodcast
February 25, 2020
Christian walks Charles and Younes through the 10 commandments of building Angular applications. We talk about how to arrange Angular applications, design components, and best practices. We also talk through tools, teams, and performance. Panel: Younes Jaaidi Charles Max Wood Guest: Christian Lüdemann ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links: angular/flex-layout cypress.io Jest Nx husky immer Angular Architect Accelerator The Ten Commandments of Angular Development Picks: Younes Jaaidi: Dark Charles Max Wood: LinkedIn Hunter HubSpot Christian Lüdemann: Follow Christian on Twitter - @chrislydemann How Google Works: Eric Schmidt, Jonathan Rosenberg https://christianlydemann.com/
February 25, 2020
Christian walks Charles and Younes through the 10 commandments of building Angular applications. We talk about how to arrange Angular applications, design components, and best practices. We also talk through tools, teams, and performance. Panel: Younes Jaaidi: Charles Max Wood Guest: Christian Lüdemann ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links: angular/flex-layout cypress.io Jest Nx husky immer Angular Architect Accelerator The Ten Commandments of Angular Development Picks: Younes Jaaidi: Dark Charles Max Wood: LinkedIn Hunter HubSpot Christian Lüdemann: Follow Christian on Twitter - @chrislydemann How Google Works: Eric Schmidt, Jonathan Rosenberg https://christianlydemann.com/
February 11, 2020
Dale Spoonemore joins the adventure to talk about his journey from no coding experience to writing one of the most popular gardening apps on the web with Ionic. Dale explains how learning to garden sparked a journey that led him to teach himself Angular and Ionic to build the Seed to Spoon app. Panelists Alyssa Nicoll Charles Max Wood Younes Jaaidi Dave Cooper Guest Dale Spoonemore ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links https://www.instagram.com/fromseedtospoon/ The Depression Cure https://www.seedtospoon.net/ https://capacitor.ionicframework.com/ https://getbootstrap.com/ https://cordova.apache.org/ Essentialism https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular https://twitter.com/angularpodcast Picks Dave Cooper: https://github.com/scullyio/scully Alyssa Nicoll: On Becoming Babywise: Giving Your Infant the Gift of Nighttime Sleep Younes Jaaidi: Outcome Over Output: Also Impact and Effort https://github.com/ngneat/lib Charles Max Wood: Raymond Feist The Riftwar Saga The Man In A High Castle Dale Spoonemore: Smart Pots Gardening Containers SodaStream Boom Town
February 4, 2020
Philippe De Ryck is a web security expert out of Belgium. Philippe trains developers on building secure apps. Philippe started coding in high school and worked on system administration projects. He then went onto get a PhD in security. Along with security he also worked on development so when he is working with clients he can go through the code and point out security problems. Philippe also gives some tips to those who want to get started on security consulting. Philippe says its a mindset and a person just needs to dive in and start reading books and blogs about it to develop the approach. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Philippe De Ryck Sponsors Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Cachefly ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links AiA 268: Secure Angular Apps with Philippe De Ryck https://pragmaticwebsecurity.com Picks Charles Max Wood: Security Engineering Book Anova Culinary Sous Vide Precision Cooker Nano Masterbuilt Smoke Hollow SH19079518 Digital Electric Smoker Philippe De Ryck: https://www.foodpairing.com/en/home https://letsencrypt.org/ https://www.chefsteps.com/
January 28, 2020
Dave Cooper is a Data Analyst at E Database Marketing from London, UK. Host: Aaron Frost Joined By Special Guest: Dave Cooper My Angular Story is produced by DevChat.TV in partnership with Hero Devs. Sponsors Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Cachefly ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links Dave's Twitter Dave's LinkedIn https://www.npmjs.com/package/data-mocks Picks Aaron Frost: Survivor - TV Show Dave Cooper: Become a locksmith
January 21, 2020
Zama Khan Mohammed is a Software Architect, building Enterprise Web Applications with more than 7 years of experience. He currently works at Tekzenit. He has recently authored a book "Angular Projects: Build Nine Real-world Applications from Scratch Using Angular 8 and TypeScript" which is available at Amazon. Zama talks about the 9 projects he covers in his book. Host: Aaron Frost Joined By Special Guest: Zama Khan Mohammed My Angular Story is produced by DevChat.TV in partnership with Hero Devs. Sponsors Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Cachefly ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links Zama's LinkedIn npx Zama Khan Mohammed Angular Projects: Build Nine Real-world Applications from Scratch Using Angular 8 and TypeScript Picks Zama Khan Mohammed: https://developer.chrome.com/devsummit/
January 14, 2020
In this episode of Adventures in Angular the panel interviews Juan Stoppa about what it is really like working on an enterprise application for a large company. They start by discussing state management and the solutions that they are using and the benefits of using a custom solution.   Juan then explains that it can be difficult getting features out to clients quickly and what their flow looks like. The panel wonders about their architecture and explains the difference between trunk-based development and branch-based development. Juan considers how Angular 9 will improve their use of feature flags. The panel explains what feature flags are.    Shai Reznik aks Juan about their testing. The panel considers how important end to end testing is in an enterprise application. Juan shares the tools they use for testing. Another challenge they face developing an enterprise application is meeting the requirements for the clients since they have so many and they have long release cycles. They finish by discussing the culture in large companies. Panelists Shai Reznik Charles Max Wood Alyssa Nicoll Guest Juan Stoppa Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Cachefly ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________   Links https://www.katalon.com/  https://twitter.com/juanstoppa?lang=en https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular https://twitter.com/angularpodcast Picks Shai Reznik: https://www.apollographql.com/docs/angular/  https://www.testim.io/ Silicon Valley Alyssa Nicoll: Family Game Night Star Wars Movies Juan Stoppa: Angular 9 VisBug  Charles Max Wood: The Expanse The Mandalorian Letters from Whitechapel Shadow Hunters King of Tokyo
January 14, 2020
Tracy Lee is a Google Developer Expert, and Co-Founder of This Dot Labs and This Dot Media joins Aaron on this week's My Angular Story to share her coding journey. Tracy majored in marketing and was interested in coding because her boyfriend was a developer. She also loves building communities and has helped build 12 companies in the past 14 years. Her main interests are coding in Angular, React, Ember, Artificial Intelligence, Augmented Reality and Machine Learning. In her free time, she runs Venture Hacked with the mission to help create relationships between startups and investors as well as give talks at conferences on her coding adventures and enjoys pairing with friends. Host: Aaron Frost Joined By Special Guest: Martina Kraus My Angular Story is produced by DevChat.TV in partnership with Hero Devs. Sponsors Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Cachefly ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links Tracy's Twitter Tracy's LinkedIn Picks Aaron Frost: CBS Survivor Tracy Lee: Scanwich (Scandinavian Sandwitch)
January 7, 2020
Martina Kraus is a Google Developer Expert, consultant, and trainer. She joins Aaron on this week's My Angular Story to share her experiences with the Angular community. Both Aaron and Martina agree that Angular community is very accepting and friendly. Martina mentions that her Angular Conference experience was the ngVikings and she felt very included and welcome the whole time she was there. Martina also shares her Google Developer Experience as well. Martina believes developers should work on improving their strengths. For example, if a developer does not like to give talks at the conferences then maybe she should focus on writing blog pieces instead. Martina then talks about some of the things she is excited about in Angular right now. ´┐╝One of them is Angular Ivy and Martina is currently in the process of writing a blog piece on Angular Ivy. Aaron and Martina both agree that developers should try the Ivy update and see if their app works. Host: Aaron Frost Joined By Special Guest: Martina Kraus My Angular Story is produced by DevChat.TV in partnership with Hero Devs. Sponsors Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Cachefly ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links Martina's Twitter Martina's LinkedIn Picks Aaron Frost: Control Value Accessor Interface in Angular Pinewood Derby Hero Devs Scholarship Program https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlD9JYP8u5E Martina Kraus https://www.preethikasireddy.com/ Find something that scares you and do it
December 31, 2019
Juan Stoppa, Head Of Development at Wealth Dynamix, joins Aaron Frost in this week's My Angular Story. Juan is originally from Argentina and he is currently based in London. Host: Aaron Frost Joined By Special Guest: Juan Stoppa My Angular Story is produced by DevChat.TV in partnership with Hero Devs. Sponsors Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Cachefly ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links Juan's Twitter Juan's LinkedIn FormQL Picks Juan Stoppa: Visual Studio Online TypeScript 3.7 Aaron Frost: Zone.js Hero Devs Scholarship Program
December 24, 2019
William Grasel,Tech Lead, Google Developer Expert and Software Engineer from São Paulo, Brazil joins Aaron Frost in this week's My Angular Story. William has been working with Angular since 2013. He originally started with Backbone.js and Angular.js and eventually migrated to Angular. Aaron and William talk about what it takes to be a Google Developer Expert (GDE) and William's experience becoming one. William defines his expertise in Angular as Reactive programming and RxJS. Host: Aaron Frost Joined By Special Guest : William Grasel My Angular Story is produced by DevChat.TV in partnership with Hero Devs. Sponsors Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Cachefly ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links William's Twitter Picks Aaron Frost: Roadtrips Laffy Taffy Jokes William Grasel: The Last of Us Infrastructure Code
December 17, 2019
James Spivey, the Director of Engineering at Shutterstock joins Aaron Frost in this week's My Angular Story to talk about his journey as a developer and how he started using Angular. Aaron and James talk about James' work at Shutterstock as well as his working experience with Angular. Aaron asks James to put him through a mock interview and asks him how to do compound selectors in NgRx. James encourages Aaron to ask him to define "compound selectors". They then talk about how James seems himself as a manager and how the leadership culture should be at a company especially in "inclusivity". Aaron mentions that inclusivity may not have a checkbox but its really important to behave in an inclusive manner. Host: Aaron Frost Joined By Special Guest : James Spivey My Angular Story is produced by DevChat.TV in partnership with Hero Devs. Sponsors Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Cachefly ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________   Links James Spivey Twitter Picks Aaron Frost Devon L─░ndsey's Suit James Spivey https://bazel.build/
December 10, 2019
Thomas Burleson, Solutions Architect focusing on React and Angular from West Des Moines, Iowa join Aaron Frost in this week's My Angular Story. Thomas shares his journey as a developer and how he was introduced to Angular. Thomas and Aaron also talk about the evolution of the Angular community. Thomas was an Applied Physics major in college and when he failed a programming class he never thought he would be a developer. But then he wanted to know what was behind the software he was using and he taught himself how to code. Thomas then shares some tips on what abilities you need possess if you want to become a developer, one of which is the ability to sit in front of a computer 10-12 hours a day. The second one is to be willing to put in the time to learn. Finally Aaron asks him Thomas how to get out of a "quicksand" situation where you cannot drop the things you are working on but would like to change your project or position. Thomas outlines some cases why one can find themselves in a quicksand situation and what to do about it. Host: Aaron Frost Joined By Special Guest : Thomas Burleson My Angular Story is produced by DevChat.TV in partnership with Hero Devs Sponsors Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Cachefly ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links AiA 135 Angular Flex Layouts with Thomas Burleson Thomas Burleson Twitter Thomas Burleson LinkedIn https://material.angularjs.org/latest/ Picks Aaron Frost Angular vs. React: Change Detection Jennifer Wadella Thomas Burleson https://github.com/immerjs/immer Maxim Koretskyi
December 3, 2019
My Angular Story is celebrating its 100th episode today with hosts Aaron Frost and Charles Max Wood. Host: Aaron Frost Joined By Special Guest : Charles Max Wood My Angular Story is produced by DevChat.TV in partnership with Hero Devs Sponsors Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Adventures in DevOps Podcast Cachefly __________________________________________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ___________________________________________________________________________________________   Links Picks
November 26, 2019
Today Aaron Frost welcomes a very cool guest on My Angular Story, Aaron Ma who is an 11 year old software and hardware developer. Aaron mainly focuses on on web development, self driving cars, flying cars, robotics, Python, C++ and machine learning. Aaron started programming at the age of 5 by teaching himself HTML by watching YouTube videos. He then continued with an Introduction to CSS course. Aaron's father who is a full stack developer also encouraged and helped in his coding journey. Aaron Frost asks Aaron if he can remember what he learned from the first HTML video he watched and whether he thought it was hard to learn. Aaron Frost asks Aaron for tips on how parents can teach their kids how to program. Because Aaron has such an extensive background with programming already at age 11, Aaron Frost also wants to know how much and how Aaron's dad was involved with Aaron's learning process. Aaron Frost then wants to know how Aaron taught himself TensorFlow . Host: Aaron Frost Joined By Special Guest : Aaron Ma My Angular Story is produced by DevChat.TV in partnership with Hero Devs Sponsors Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Adventures in DevOps Podcast Cachefly ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links Aaron's LinkedIn Aaron's Website Aaron's Twitter  
November 20, 2019
"The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is available on Amazon. Get your copy here today only for $2.99!
November 20, 2019
"The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is available on Amazon. Get your copy here today only for $2.99!
November 19, 2019
Ado Kukic has been a professional developer since the age of 15. He is a developer Evangelist Lead at Auth0 working remotely out of Las Vegas, Nevada. Aaron and Ado talk about Ado's introduction to Angular and his work at Auth0. Ado has been working wth Angular for the last 7 years. His day to day is at Auth0 is focused on getting out into the developer community talking to developers about authentication access management and securing their applications securing their Angular applications. Host: Aaron Frost Joined By Special Guest: Ado Kukic My Angular Story is produced by DevChat.TV in partnership with Hero Devs _______________________________________________________ Sponsors Sentry– use the code “devchat” for two months free on Sentry’s small plan DevEd Podcast CacheFly _______________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood will be out on November 20th on Amazon. Get your copy on that date only for $2.99 _______________________________________________________ Links Ado's LinkedIn https://auth0.com/blog/the-worlds-first-rxjs-conference-just-happened-in-vegas/ Picks Aaron Frost: RxJS Live: Conference RxJS Live London Ado Kukic: ng-Conf ng-vegas 2015
November 12, 2019
In this episode of Adventures in Angular the panel interviews Stephen Cooper about his recent talk at Angular Connect. His talk was about ngTemplateOutlets. Stephen answers the questions of the panel about ngTemplateOutlets and explains how and when to use them. He starts by explaining the difference between component outlets and template outlets.  Aaron Frost, Frosty, asks Stephen to walk through how to make a ngTemplate and explain what it is useful for. The panel considers the various use cases they would use this for. Frosty wonders why he would use a ngTemplateOutlet instead of a bunch of ngIfs. Stephen explains when it would be wise to use ngIfs and when it would be better to use ngTemplateOutlets.    The panel discusses ngComponentOutlets, Stephen explains how they relate to ngTemplateOutlets and how they give you another level to reusing components. He overviews the best way to use ngComponentOutlets and warns listeners of the tricky parts.    Stephen shares the best times to use ngTemplateOutlets and overviews some of the common use cases he has seen for them. He explains that they are very useful when creating shareable components or repeating similar chunks of code in a component. He shares some resources to help listeners get started.  Panelists Aaron Frost Alyssa Nicoll Brian Love Shai Reznik Guest Stephen Cooper ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood will be out on November 20th on Amazon.  Get your copy on that date only for $1. ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Flatfile Cachefly Links ngTemplateOutlet: The secret to customisation | Stephen Cooper   https://ngtemplateoutletcontext.stackblitz.io  https://github.com/StephenCooper/ngTemplateOutlets  Advanced Angular: Implementing a Reusable Autocomplete Component  https://twitter.com/CooperDev  https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular https://twitter.com/angularpodcast Picks Brain Love: Being back in the USA Zelda: Breath of the Wild Alyssa Nicoll: Mr. Milks Destiny 2:Shadowkeep Aaron Frost: Garrett Reisman https://medium.com/ngconf Shai Reznik: TestAngular.com One Strange Rock Stephen Cooper: Visiting museums near you
November 5, 2019
My Angular Story hosts Stephen Cooper,Developer at G-Research from London. Joe Eames guest hosts this week's show to talk about Stephen's journey as an Angular developer and latest contribution to Angular. In college, Stephen majored in Math and Computer Science and felt that he enjoyed Computer Science aspect more. At G-Research,which is an algorithmic trading platform, Stephen works as a programmer in quantitative research and analysis. Stephen explains where Angular fits in that context. Joe and Stephen discuss how much math is necessary for working as a developer and Stephen mentions while his background may have helped him in getting the job, he doesn't use math that much in his daily work. Joe then asks Stephen about the talk he gave at AngularConnect which was Stephen's first major conference talk. Stephen talks about how he prepared for it and the blog piece he wrote about it at dev.to My Journey to AngularConnect 2019. Host: Joe Eames Joined By Special Guest: Stephen Cooper My Angular Story is produced by DevChat.TV in partnership with Hero Devs Sponsors Sentry– use the code “devchat” for two months free on Sentry’s small plan Adventures in .NET CacheFly Links https://dev.to/cooperdev/my-journey-to-angularconnect-2019-238b Stephen's Twitter Stephen's LinkedIn Building with Ivy: rethinking reactive Angular | Mike Ryan | #AngularConnect 2019 Picks Joe Eames: Miniature Wargaming Painting Stephen Cooper: https://dev.to/
November 5, 2019
In this episode of Adventures in Angular the panel interviews Tara Manicsic. Tara is an Angular Developer Experience Engineer at Netlify. Tara explains what she does at Netlify. She explains what Netlify is and introduces the topic for today’s episode, JAMstack. She explains what services Netlify offers and the packages they offer.   She explains that the JAM in JAMstack stands for JavaScript API Markup, which outlines the best practices of a JAMstack architecture. During her explanation of JAMstack and the benefits of a microservice architecture, she references Smashing Magazine and their switch to JAMstack.    Tara overviews each letter of JAM and how they affect JAMstack. J or Javascript refers to the use of a JavaScript language, like Angular and others. Tara lists the API’s one might use for the A in JAM. The panel discusses the M or Markup. Markup serves up fast and safe prerendered content. Tara explains what prerender means and it makes the content safer and the sites faster. Tara then overviews the entire JAMstack process and explains atomic deployment.    The panel considers how JAMstack is picking up in the Angular ecosystem. Tara outlines a few of the benefits seen when using JAMstack and the panel considers the possible use cases. She shares a few real-life examples of the success seen when JAMstack is used in an enterprise application.    Panelists Brian Love Shai Reznik Guest Tara Z. Manicsic Adventures in Angular is produced by DevChat.TV in partnership with Hero Devs Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Flatfile Cachefly Links https://www.netlify.com/ https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular https://twitter.com/angularpodcast Picks Brain Love: Living with Yourself Shai Reznik: Angular Testing Tip — The Easiest Way To Start Your Test  Joker Tara Z. Manicsic: Fleabag Netlify Tutorial - How to build and deploy websites using Netlify https://www.ng-conf.org/2019/sessions/workshop-jamstack-from-i-dont-know-to-pro/
October 29, 2019
Aaron Frost talks to Kevin A. McGrail, Director of Business Growth at InfraShield on this week's My Angular Story. Kevin specializes in cyber security and e-mail security. At InfraShield they specialize in cyber physical security in critical infrastructures. Kevin explains what cyber physical security entails and how it is different than IT security. It includes both information security and operational security including a wide spectrum from computer access to building access. Bridging both physical and cyber space security requires Kevin to use a lot of Angular but Angular is only one of the 40 languages Kevin uses in his job. Kevin gives examples of cyber security breaches he runs into and the number one failure he sees all the time is that there is a lack of process that goes from development to QA and then to production. He often asks his clients " if there is a security issue in your code and i give you a one line code of patch for it, how long will it take you to deploy that to production"? and the shorter the answer to that the better the client is in their cyber security implementation. One of the other issue Kevin runs into often is when clients fork their Angular and then they are hesitant to update their Angular version because of all the security patches they have in place. So that becomes a catch 22 example so Kevin warns against forking Angular because it becomes a big security risk. Kevin goes on to share some of the other common mistakes that companies make that puts at them risk for security. Host: Aaron Frost Joined By Special Guest: Kevin A. McGrail My Angular Story is produced by DevChat.TV in partnership with Hero Devs Sponsors Sentry– use the code “devchat” for two months free on Sentry’s small plan Adventures in DevOps CacheFly Links Kevin's LinkedIn Picks Aaron Frost: https://www.npmjs.com/package/angular-prerender Kevin A. McGrail: Learn about regular expressions - Global regular expression (GREP)
October 29, 2019
In this episode of Adventures in Angular the panel has fun interviewing David East about Firebase. David starts by sharing what it was like at the recent Firebase Summit in Madrid. There were so many announcements they had a tough time fitting them all into the one-hour keynote address.   One of the cool new features announced at the Firebase Summit is Firebase Extension, David describes it as serverless without any code. The panel discusses this feature and how it works. Another cool feature announced is Google Analytics for Firebase. This allows you to use Firebase tools in conjunction with Google Analytics. The panel considers the smart things you can do in your app with this feature.    The next feature the panel discusses is Remote Config which allows you to store data and then pull out that information on demand. If you use the Google Analytics for Firebase you can target specific data for certain audiences. David explains that before this could only be done with native apps. He also explains how in doing this you no longer have to worry about the gtag loader and defines gtag for the panel.    The panel gets a little off track as David jokingly explains his beef with Aaron Frost, Frosty. Frosty host My Angular Story and a while back had twitted looking for awesome angular stories. David had responded but never heard back from Frosty. Frosty jokingly says he faxed an invite to David. The panel jokes about how awesome David’s episode will be and tells everyone to look out for his episode.    Getting back on track, David gives more examples of ways to use the Remote Config feature on with the Google Analytics for Firebase. Frosty confesses he needs to get better at looking at analytics. Sharing an example from a company he is currently working for, Frosty explains how they made nearly 2 million dollars just by changing the color of a button. The panel considers how minor changes like that can make such a big difference and how analytics helps you target your audience.    David shares the story behind writing Angular Fire. Jeff Cross worked on the angular team and started writing angular fire but then left for Nrwl. After Jeff left, David took over and ended up rewriting the entire library. He explains some of the mistakes that they made that led to the rewrite and how he fixed them.    The panel wonders at David about using Angular Fire and NgRX. David tells the panel that the Firebase console uses NgRx under the hood and shares what he learned while working on it. Using firebase and NgRx can be very confusing because of the mass duplication of responsibility. David’s advice is to let Firebase and NgRx do their own thing and connect the dots with RxJs.    David discusses Firestore, a very advanced caching system and what you can do with it. Including, working offline and setting security rules. Frosty brings up Firebase Messaging Cues, he explains that it is similar to three-way messaging cues except its n-way. David explains that even though he is intrigued by the idea, he does not approve of the name. The panel considers possible use cases for an n-way messaging cue. David explains some of the costs and benefits of this architecture.    The episode ends with a discussion of Firebase’s documentation, which is currently a group of markdown files. David defends the simplicity of this documentation style and gives recommendations and resources for those who need more help.  Panelists Aaron Frost Brian Love Alyssa Nicoll Shai Reznik Guest David East Adventures in Angular is produced by DevChat.TV in partnership with Hero Devs Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp Flatfile Cachefly Links https://firebase.google.com/ https://firebase.google.com/summit My Angular Story https://fireship.io/ Fireship Youtube https://twitter.com/_davideast https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular https://twitter.com/angularpodcast Picks Brain Love: Bonnie Love Aaron Frost: Stop shaming people Miss Saigon Alyssa Nicoll: David East David East: Alyssa Nicoll Freakonomics The Signal and the Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail-But Some Don't  
October 22, 2019
This week My Angular Story welcomes Brad McAlister, Software Engineering Lead at Sapphire Digital. Sapphire Digital does healthcare transparency software for insurance companies. Brad works on a product called Smart Shopper which gives the costs of treatment options for same procedures at different hospitals. Brad and Aaron discuss healthcare costs specifically how complicated it is. Brad talks about how SmartShopper works. They then talk about Brad's NG-Conf appearances and the Angular meet-ups he has started. Before he was a developer, Brad worked in IT for 12 years. He learned HTML very early on but he got side-tracked into web hosting rather than web development. He made the transition to development eventually and has been with Sapphire Digital for the past 5 years. Brad and Aaron talk about what is important for the Angular community and Brad shares there should be a balance between being on the "bleeding edge" of technologies and always falling back on what you know. Aaron asks Brad for an example of something Brad learned to do differently in the past 12 months. Brad then talks about the projects he is working on right now and what he is planning to work on in the future. Host: Aaron Frost Joined By Special Guest: Brad McAlister My Angular Story is produced by DevChat.TV in partnership with Hero Devs Sponsors Sentry– use the code “devchat” for two months free on Sentry’s small plan Adventures in Blockchain CacheFly Links Brad's LinkedIn Brad's Twitter SmartShopper Picks Aaron Frost: TypeScript 3.7 optional chaining feature Brad McAlister: Nx Adventures in Angular
October 15, 2019
This week My Angular Story welcomes Philip Fulcher, Software Engineer at Hach. Philip gave his first talk at Angular Denver 2019 on Intro to Bazel with Bonnie Brennan Aaron wonders why despite years of developers experience, Philip never gave a talk at a conference before this year. Philip and Aaron discuss some of the best practices of giving a talk at a conference,one of which is not running over the talk's time limit. They also talk about what it takes to get accepted to talk at a conference. Philip mentions he just submitted a proposal to give a talk in JSConf Hawai╩╗i which takes place on February 5th-7th 2020 in Honolulu, Hawai╩╗i. One of the interesting tips Philip shares about giving talks at conferences is how often times you will not be the person that knows the most about that subject in the room. But giving a talk gives you a chance for people to come ask you questions and therefore meeting people that you might collaborate or ask for advice from in the future. Host: Aaron Frost Joined By Special Guest: Philip Fulcher My Angular Story is produced by DevChat.TV in partnership with Hero Devs Sponsors Sentry– use the code “devchat” for two months free on Sentry’s small plan Adventures in Blockchain CacheFly Links Philip's LinkedIn Philip's Twitter Hach Angular Denver 2019 JSConf Hawai╩╗i Picks Aaron Frost: Being Nice to new people on StackOverflow Philip Fulcher: Watching Formula 1 Racing Formula 1: Drive to Survive Shift+F1 Podcast
October 8, 2019
In this week’s episode of Adventures in Angular the panel has fun interviewing Narwhal rocks star and NgRx expert, Wes Grimes. Wes starts by sharing how he got started in NgRx. In a previous company, Wes was the lead architect for a project that had need of a state management solution, so it was his job to figure out how to use NgRx. While figuring it out he created a structure for using NgRx and used that structure to write a blog article about best practices for NgRx.   This blog article took the world by a storm and now has over 200,00 views. People are now building libraries and courses based on his article. The panel has a little considering the possible searches that lead people to his article. Jennifer Wadella shares some of the weirder searches that have led people to her posts. After their fun, the panel tries to get back on track.    This article thrust Wes into the world of helping people understand NgRx, what he calls a mystical machine. He explains how this article was only the beginning of learning NgRx and that he is currently working on revising that first post. The main point covered in the article was how to organize the store and how to store it in the file system. It walks through creating angular modules for each slice of the store. The second point is covers heavily is the use of barrels.   The biggest problem Wes see people run into in NgRx is they do not know where all their actions are. He shares the solution he uses for this problem, using a public API to group actions so they are easier to find. The panel expresses their frustration with the hard time the CLI has with barrel files. Wes explains why this is a common problem and shares a solution.    The panel asks for other gotcha’s to watch for when using NgRx. Wes explains how and what developers miss out on when they fail to use selectors to their fullest. When selectors are used correctly and completely developers receive all the benefits of the testing they do on NgRx. The other benefits are builtin memoization and reusability.    Another gotcha he warns against is using facades before fully understanding NgRx. This really fires up the panel, who then debates the use of facades in NgRx. Aaron Frost expresses his opinion that NgRx isn’t for everything and that by using facades you may not need to use NgRx. Wes explains that the large companies he works for are already committed to NgRx as their solution and he advises them not to use facades.   Wes explains the downsides of using NgRx, the first is when developers jump in before they understand it and back themselves into a corner. Another downside is the upfront investment cost when learning NgRx.    The panel jumps in wondering what Wes thinks of hiding those developers unfamiliar in NgRx with a facade. Wes explains how in doing this the team would be compromising architecture in order to avoid teaching developers to use NgRx properly. He clarifies that he doesn’t think facades are bad but in order to use them correctly in NgRx developers must first understand how NgRx works. Aaron explains why when working with developers unfamiliar with angular he advises them not to learn NgRx right away.   Wes shares how he has seen developers misuse facades. When using a facade it entices developers to hop back and for between imperative and declarative code. Aaron jumps in and explains that imperative code in reactive programming is very bad. He invites listeners to go out and learn more about this because it is very important to understand.    The panel considers strategies to help teams code reactively. Wes recommends requesting data from the server. This pattern is straight forward to implement and handles a lot of the common use cases in the store. Aaron suggests turning off default change detection, doing so will force the programmers to code reactively. Another way suggested is to structure teams separating concerns.    The episode ends with Wes sharing his experience joining the NgRx core team by working in the documentation, filling in gaps that he found. He also shares what will be coming to NgRx. The platform will be expanding beyond just state management, supplying reactive libraries for angular. They are also getting ready for an experimental release of NgRx component.  Panelists Aaron Frost Brian Love Jennifer Wadella Shai Reznik Alyssa Nicoll Guest Wes Grimes Adventures in Angular is produced by DevChat.TV in partnership with Hero Devs Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp Flatfile Cachefly Links NgRx — Best Practices for Enterprise Angular Applications  The Facade of NgRx Facades  Building with Ivy: rethinking reactive Angular | Mike Ryan | #AngularConnect 2019  https://twitter.com/wesgrimes https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular https://twitter.com/angularpodcast Picks Brain Love: The Great Hack Shai Reznik: RxJS: A Better Way To Write Frontend Applications - Hannah Howard - JSConf US 2018  Complex Features Made Easy With RxJS - Ben Lesh  Aaron Frost: Lizzo Jennifer Wadella: https://twitter.com/began_7/status/1177880930549223424  https://github.com/vmbrasseur/Public_Speaking  Wes Grimes: ngGirls
October 1, 2019
In this week’s episode of Adventures in Angular the panel interviews Shlomi Assaf, talking about ngrid. After some playful banter about the naming of Ngrid, Shlomi shares the reasons behind building ngrid. The company he was working for at the time need a grid, he tested nggrid but wanted something completely opensource, so he built one. He also explains that nggrid caused some problems in their project which made him want something more customizable. Shlomi explains how much work is needed on the application and asks listeners to contribute to documentation or other areas of the project. Shai Reznik endorses Shlomi as one of the smartest peoples he knows and tells listeners if they want to learn from someone who knows a lot about angular to step up and join this project.    The panel asks about the challenges Shlomi faced while building this app and what it was like using the CDK. Nggrid has a how company working on it but ngrid has only Shlomi. Shlomi explains that the CDK had a lot of the building blocks need to building blocks to build this application and was the power behind the project. The CDK’s lacks the ability to extend easily which was a challenge. He explains that his biggest frustration while building the application was the drag and drop feature.    Shlomi shares many of the features he built into the application that even though he built it over a three year period he could do it piece by piece because of the way he designed it. He considers the selling points of the application and shares them with the panel. Shlomi compares ngrid to other grid, explaining how templating, creating columns and pagination are all made easier with ngrid. With ngrid there is also virtual scrolling and you can control the width of each column.    Next, the pane considers performance, asking how the grid would handle if you loaded thousand or even tens of thousands of records and data onto the grid. Shlomi explains that unless the cells were extremely complex that ngrid’s performance would not suffer. The panel how ngrid could work with serverside rendering but not with NativeScript. Shlomi explains version support and advises listeners to use Angular 8.   The panel ends the episode by sharing information about next year's ng-conf. Tickets go on sale on October 1, 2019, the best deals go fast so watch out for them. Many of the panel will be there, Brian Love will be giving the Angular Fundamentals Two-Day Workshop. The CFP also opens October 1, 2019, and will close January 1, 2019. Aaron Frost invites anyone who would like to submit to reach out to the veteran panelists to nail down ideas for their conference proposals. He also recommends submitting more than one.    Panelists Aaron Frost Brian Love Jennifer Wadella Shai Reznik Alyssa Nicoll Guest Shlomi Assaf Adventures in Angular is produced by DevChat.TV in partnership with Hero Devs Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp Cachefly Links https://www.npmjs.com/package/@pebula/ngrid  https://shlomiassaf.github.io/ngrid/  https://www.ng-conf.org/speakers/  https://twitter.com/aaronfrost https://twitter.com/brian_love?lang=en https://twitter.com/AlyssaNicoll?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor https://twitter.com/shai_reznik?lang=en https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular https://twitter.com/angularpodcast Picks Brain Love: NG-DE 2019  Angular Connect Shai Reznik: The magic of RXJS sharing operators and their differences Let Me Off at the Top!: My Classy Life and Other Musings  Aaron Frost: Connecting with your children Shlomi Assaf: How we make Angular fast | Miško Hevery
September 24, 2019
In this week’s episode of Adventures in Angular the panel interviews Manfred Steyer, the creator of ngx-build-plus and angular architecture expert and consultant. Ngx-build-plus is a way to extend how the CLI is doing its build. Manfred explains how ngx-build plus works in two different ways. The first is that it provides a partial webpack configurations file that merges with the webpack configuration that the CLI is using. The second, it provides a plugin with free methods that influence the CLI.   Manfred consults with companies on architecture, he explains that the main problem when people take a simple application and make it complex, big, with a lot of entities and forms. This makes it difficult to manage in the long term. He borrows ideas from domain-driven design to help these companies structure their applications.    Strategic domain-driven design is one of the main strategies he uses when structuring an application. Strategic domain-driven design is subdividing a big application into subdomains, then modeling those subdomains separately. By modeling the separately, the coupling is limited. This makes it easier to change parts of the code without breaking anything unrelated in the application.    The panel asks Manfred for recommendations for using domain-driven design in their architecture. Manfred recommends using libraries within monorepos and outlines the benefits. Using this method creates isolation, you can’t easily access everything in the library because of the public API. Manfred explains how a public API works like a facade.    Nx is the recommended tool for the monorepos, as it adds many great features to the CLI and is not as heavyweight as other monorepo solutions. Manfred explains one of his favorite features called tagging. This restricts which libraries can access another library. The panel discusses some examples of tagging.    The panel wonders about Manfred’s opinions on state management solutions. Manfred explains that he doesn’t believe that every application needs a state management solution. When used at the wrong time a state management solution is an overkill. He also explains that not using a state management library does not make someone a bad person.   The panel discusses how you know if you need a state management solution. Manfred indicates two things to look for when considering the use of a state management library. First, is there a lot of state? Second, is the state going to be used by many different components?    If you are not sure he recommends starting with a facade and adding a state management library later if needed.  The panel explains what a facade is. A facade is when you combine a lot of systems under a single API, like jquery. Manfred gives an example of what a management facade should look like. The panel shares experiences explaining how it works and gives advice and examples of using a facade.    The topic turns to the importance of testing. Manfred shares his testing philosophy, asking how do you sleep at night knowing you have to change a part of the application? Does it scare you because you know you are going to break everything in a terrible and painful way? Or, Do sleep soundly because you know you are safe to do what needs to be done. Shai Reznik equates this to the shake meter, how much does your hand shake when you push the button to execute a change.   Manfred’s recommends starting with unit testing, testing where you need it and avoid a testing coverage goal. Unit testing he explains are more stable than end-to-end testing. You do need end-to-end testing but very little in comparison to unit testing. Aaron Frost shares the tool protractor flake as a way to combat the flakiness of end-to-end testing.   Manfred explains that there are two common mistakes people make in their angular architecture. The first is over-engineering and under-engineering an application. He explains the problems that arise with each and how to combat this problem. The sweet spot can be found by knowing what you want, finding the right structuring to fit what you want.    The panel wonders how to measure the cleanliness of code in an application. Manfred recommends looking at each indirection and deciding if it is necessary. The panel explains what indirections are, an example is event mechanisms, you can’t see a direct effect. The panel discusses NgRx as an indirection framework. Manfred warns not to use NgRx all the time only when you need it.   This launches the panel onto a tangent of choosing tools and how to weight the pros and cons of each tool. The phrase “use it when you need it” is considered by the panel, the genericness of the phrase is discusses. The panel advises new developers who don’t have the experience to gauge if they need something or not to do the research necessary to understand a tool and to experiment with it.    The panel comes back to the other common mistake made with architecture which is chatty applications. Applications that send thousands of requests to the backend causing the application to slow. The panel considers why this happens. Aaron explains the concept of affordance and how this results in chatty applications.  Panelists Aaron Frost Brian Love Shai Reznik Guest Manfred Steyer Adventures in Angular is produced by DevChat.TV in partnership with Hero Devs Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp Cachefly Links NgRx + Facades: Better State Management https://www.npmjs.com/package/protractor-flake https://twitter.com/manfredsteyer?lang=en https://www.softwarearchitekt.at/ https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular https://twitter.com/angularpodcast Picks Brain Love: The 5 Big Features of TypeScript 3.7 and How to Use Them  Shai Reznik: Angular Testing Course Hip-Hop Evolution Aaron Frost: RxJs Live  Lover  Manfred Steyer: Star Trek: Picard ngrx-etc  
September 17, 2019
Episode Summary In this episode of Adventures in Angular Tomas Trajan, an angular elements expert, breaks down how to use angular elements for the panel. Tomas explains that angular elements are great for very specific use cases.   Tomas starts by describing a scenario with a large enterprise with tens of developer teams and hundreds of developers, they have a few choices on how to organize their applications. The first option is a messy monolith. The second option is using monorepos and Nx. The final option is to use a multi-spa solution.   Tomas explains how the multi-spa solution works. This solution consists of 80 stand-alone applications, on the same page and share components. Tomas outlines the common problems when using the solutions and how using angular elements combat those problems.   The panel moves on to considers how you know if you should use angular elements in this way. Tomas provides two questions to ask yourself when deciding whether or not to use angular elements. The first question is, are you in a multi-spa scenario? The second question is, are components shared across applications? If the answer is yes for both of those questions then angular elements can only help the situation.    In last week’s episode of Adventures in Angular the panel interviewed Victor Savkin about using monorepos and Nx. The panel asks Tomas to compare the strategy of using monorepos and Nx to his strategy of using multi-spa with angular elements. He explains why an enterprise might choose multi-spa over monorepos. He also gives the reasons the organization he is working with chose to work with multi-spa.    Aaron asks for clarification for using elements in these multi-spa projects. Tomas goes into great detail, breaking down the way multi-spa and angular elements work together. They walk through it together using consumer profiles as an example.   Tomas explains that using his approach all the applications update components all at once using angular elements. The panel considers the benefits of using Tomas’s approach and which scenarios it would work best for. Aaron expresses his appreciation for all the work Tomas did and the problems he overcame then bundling his solution in a library together so developers can just use it without all the pain.      The library can be found on Github. Tomas tells the panel that there has already been some community contribution to the library. He describes some of the pull requests they have received along with the plans they have for angular elements.    The topic turns to mismatched versioning and how the bundle will work. Tomas explains that the only problem they have seen with mismatched versioning is with zone.js. He shares some workarounds to the problem and promises that they are working on a solution.    The episode ends with the panel listing all the major benefits that an enterprise can gain from using the multi-spa and angular elements approach. It will save them money, allow teams to work together, create and isolation. Tomas also shares some of the new features available in angular elements today.    Panelists Aaron Frost Brian Love Guest Tomas Trajan Adventures in Angular is produced by DevChat.TV in partnership with Hero Devs Sponsors   Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp Cachefly Links AiA 256: Debunking Monorepo Myths with Victor Savkin https://angular-extensions.github.io/elements/  https://twitter.com/tomastrajan  https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular https://twitter.com/angularpodcast Picks Brain Love: https://node-atl.org/  Shai Reznik: https://netbasal.com/  Aaron Frost: How to Be Less Stupid About Race: On Racism, White Supremacy, and the Racial Divide Tomas Trajan: Slipknot EX
September 10, 2019
Episode Summary Victor Savkin, former angular team member and now cofounder of Narwhal Technologies Inc or Nrwl, returns to Adventures in Angular to teach the panel about monorepos. Victor starts by explaining what monorepos are and why you might need one. Monorepo style development is when multiple projects developed in the same repository and the tools used to manage code between those apps.    There are many benefits to using monorepos as Victor explains to the panel, such as sharing code between apps. Monorepos help you see what's going on in reality as well as helps you take control of the structure of your code. It also allows for more interesting deployment strategies. Victor talks briefly about his time at Google, working on the toolchain and using a large monorepo.   After the panel asks about the costs of using a monorepo strategy, Victor explains that there are many perceived costs that are actually false or easily overcome. The first perceived cost he tells the panel about is how people get confused and believe that apps have to be deployed together when they really have to be developed in the same repository. The second is the fear of misplaced ownership, that some other developer will come along and ruin their code. Victor explains that ownership can be configured and controlled so that no one you don’t trust can touch your code.    The next myth developers believe about monorepos is that it doesn’t scale and especially when it comes to performance. Victor explains that when the app is set up correctly and testing used correctly this isn’t a problem. The final perceived cost is that Git will break. Victor debunks this by explaining that you would have to be doing extremely well in order for Git to be a bottleneck and even then there are ways around that problem.    Victor explains the one real cost and that is you have to change the way you code. The panel discusses a few different coding styles. Victor recommends getting used to single version policy and trunk-based development. He defines trunk-based development, explaining how it works and why it is better for monorepos than long-range branch development.    Victor sees two types of groups who want to get started in monorepos and he explains what they most commonly do wrong. The first is greenfield projects who jump right in without thinking about it and eventually crash. The second is teams with a giant app and through a monorepo in hoping it will help them structure their app. He explains there is a right way to start using monorepos in both situations.   Asking the important question is how to get started. Agreeing upon the structure, naming, ownership, are you going to build the frontend and backend in the same repo, and the answers to a bunch of other questions will affect your work the most, even more than the tooling you use. Some of these answers will be specific to your company where others will be universal, like naming and ownership.    With other tools for monorepo out there, the panel asks Victor why Nrwl decided to build their own tool. Victor explains that the current tools on the market do not do it all. Lerna only does one thing great and Bazel is very selective on who can run it. Nrwl is hoping to marry Bazel to Nx, so they can allow everyone to use Bazel. They want Nx to support all tools and even Windows.    The panel wonders if Nx is perfect. Victor explains that it nearly there. Nx is pluggable and easy to use. It is easy to learn. Victor explains that they really care about developer experience at Nrwl. Nx is free and opensource so everyone can give monorepos a try.    Resources for learning about monorepos are discussed. Victor invites everyone to watch the ten-minute getting started video on the Nx website. He also lets the listeners know about a new book coming out mid-September and it will be more organizational based than the last. The panel wants to know what comes with Nx. Victor explains that Nx gives you modern tools by setting up Cypress, Jest and other tools for you.   Because Nrwl is a consulting firm, the panel hopes that Victor will have an update on the trends. Victor shares his view that trends don’t really tell you anything about the true status of a framework. How many downloads a framework has doesn’t show the longevity of that framework. Frameworks being used to make large scale apps that will be around for years is how you can tell the longevity of a framework. From that perspective, Victor feels that Angular is doing really well.    To end the episode, Shai Reznik recalls how passionate Victor was about NgRx a few years ago. He asks Victor if he still feels the same way as before. Victor explains that NgRx is pretty well most of the time, has great docs, is well maintained, and he would still recommend it. Panelists Jennifer Wadella Brian Love Shai Reznik Alyssa Nicoll Guest Victor Savkin Sponsors   Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp My JavaScript Story Cachefly Links https://twitter.com/victorsavkin?lang=en Nrwl Nx — An open source toolkit for enterprise Angular applications. Effective React Development with Nx https://connect.nrwl.io/app/books https://nx.dev/angular/getting-started/what-is-nx MAS 040: Victor Savkin 042 AiA Dependency Injection and Change Detection with Victor Savkin 123 AiA Upgrading from Angular 1 to Angular 2 with Victor Savkin https://nrwl.io/ https://nx.dev/ Momentum  https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular https://twitter.com/angularpodcast Picks Brain Love: https://trunkbaseddevelopment.com/ https://www.oreilly.com/library/view/why-angular-for/9781492030294/  Alyssa Nicoll: Caffeine Content Warning! Jennnifer Wadella: The Fall Season NGD Conf Laptop Safety at Conferences Victor Savkin: The Boys Use Less Social Media Freedom App Shai Reznik: https://bit.dev/  True Detective  
September 3, 2019
Sponsors Sentry– use the code “devchat” for two months free on Sentry’s small plan The Freelancers Show My JavaScript Story CacheFly Host: Aaron Frost Joined By Special Guest: Jennifer Wadella Episode Summary This week, My Angular Story welcomes Jennifer Wadella, Founder of Kansas City Women in Technology and JavaScript Developer at Bitovi. Jennifer is also a regular host on the Adventures in Angular Podcast as well as an international speaker and a kombucha brewer. Jennifer talks about her journey as a developer and their meetups in to help support and increase female presence in developer world. Coding & Cocktails and Coding & Cupcakes are two of the regular web development meetups held by Kansas City Women in Technology. Coding&Cupcakes is an introductory session for girls to learn to code. Jennifer talks about how most parents thinks of bringing their sons along when they hear coding instead of their daughters and what they are doing to break that stigma. Coding & Cocktails are web development classes for women learning code where women developers can get together and share cocktails, dinner and web development tips. Links AiA 234: Control Value Accessors on Reactive Forms with Jennifer Wadella Adventures in Angular Podcast Jennifer's LinkedIn Jennifer's Twitter Bitovi Kansas City Women in Technology Picks Jennifer Wadella prAna Halle Pants - Women's https://github.com/johnpapa/angular-styleguide Aaron Frost NG Bolivia 2019 Jorge Cano 2019 UtahJS Conference
August 27, 2019
Sponsors Sentry– use the code “devchat” for two months free on Sentry’s small plan The Freelancer's Show Podcast My JavaScript Story Podcast CacheFly Host: Aaron Frost Joined By Special Guest: Tomas Trajan Episode Summary Tomas Trajan joins Aaron Frost to talk about his journey as a developer consultant. Tomas is a Software Consultant and a Google Developer Expert for Angular based out of Zürich, Switzerland. Tomas and Aaron mention that they are both drop-outs from college and share different sources of self-learning. They both agree they did not learn programming in school. Tomas shares some of the more interesting jobs he did such as selling websites door to door to local businesses. Aaron shares similar stories from his own friends circle. Tomas tells some of the more funny and stressful experiences he had while selling websites. Tomas took a year off traveling with his girlfriend where they traveled without much planning visiting many countries in South East Asia. He talks about some of the funnier instances they had during these travels. Aaron then asks Tomas about some of the challenges he faced when he was learning Angular especially when he was learning Observables. Links AiA 233: Getting Serious with Schematics with Tomas Trajan Tomas LinkedIn Tomas Twitter Angular Zürich https://github.com/tomastrajan/angular-ngrx-material-starter Picks Aaron Frost: People who help their customers get off Internet Explorer Custom Slugbug Car Game - The Game Tomas Trajan: NgRx 8 Angular Elements
August 20, 2019
Sponsors Sentry– use the code “devchat” for two months free on Sentry’s small plan CacheFly Host: Aaron Frost Guest Host: Ryan Frost Joined By Special Guest: Brandon Roberts Episode Summary Brandon Roberts is a Google Developer Expert in Angular and Web Technologies. He specializes in NgRx and has recently joined Narwhal Technologies after working in the Angular team at Google. He joins Aaron Frost at Angular Denver to talk about how he got into Angular. Links NgRx: A Reactive State of Mind (Two Day Workshop) https://www.ng-conf.org/2019/speakers/brandon-roberts/ Brandon Roberts – Medium Brandon (@brandontroberts) | Twitter Picks: Aaron Frost: NOVA: Black Hole Apocalypse | Netflix Brandon Roberts: https://nx.dev/angular Ryan Frost: Fgtv - YouTube
August 13, 2019
Sponsors Sentry– use the code “devchat” for two months free on Sentry’s small plan CacheFly Host: Aaron Frost Guest Hosts: Ryan Connor Frost and Joe Eames Joined By Special Guest: Sam Julien Episode Summary Sam Julien, R&D Content Engineer at Auth0 joins Aaron Frost at Angular Denver. Sam shares his story of how he got into Angular with us. Sam started building websites at 12 years old. Even though he wanted to major in Computer Science and become a developer, because he didn't want to take math classes he majored in Religion instead. While he was working in finance, he wanted to pursue becoming a developer and got his first job as a contractor. Check out Sam's video course on transitioning from AngularJS to Angular. Links MAS 043: Sam Julien Sam's LinkedIn Sam's Twitter Auth0 https://www.upgradingangularjs.com/ Talks - Sam Julien Angular Denver Picks Aaron Frost: Model 3 | Tesla Ryan Connor Frost: Fortnite Joe Eames: Twice As Clever | Board Game Sam Julien: Keyboard Maestro Automators - Relay FM Mac Power Users
August 6, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp CacheFly Panel Aaron Frost Alyssa Nicoll Shai Reznik Joined By Special Guest: Craig Spence Episode Summary Craig Spence was a developer at Trade Me in New Zealand before he moved to Sweden to join Spotify. Trade Me is New Zealand's biggest website and it is similar to eBay where people buy and sell lots of different items. Craig talks about his experiences migrating Trade Me from AngularJS to Angular and the challenges they faced. One of the tips Craig has for the audience is when faced with a problem it is better to ask for help from those who have been in similar situations before, rather that attempting to solve it alone. The panel also agrees that developers should stop writing in AngularJS and make the decision to move forward. Craig recently started working at Spotify in Sweden and is dealing with a challenging bug that has lasted for over 13 days. Links Craig's LinkedIn Craig's Twitter Trade Me Spotify Angular Denver Picks Aaron Frost: OnePlus 7 Pro Chloe Condon - NG-Conf Alyssa Nicoll: Angular Denver Shai Reznik: https://github.com/hirezio/jasmine-auto-spies Craig Spence: Frank Turner
July 30, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp CacheFly Panel Aaron Frost Joe Eames Shai Reznik Jennifer Wadella Episode Summary Much reaction has been received for the tweet about the 10x developers and this week the panel outlines the checklist a 10x developer has to meet in order to be considered a 10x developer (a developer that outputs 10 times more code than the rest of the company). From always having their screen background set to black to their generally toxic attitude that is disliked by the rest of the team, 10x developers are generally a reason for others to quit their job. The panel discusses why managers continue to keep these people on even though they affect the overall team production negatively and how they should be dealt with. Links https://twitter.com/skirani/status/1149302834619248640 https://twitter.com/mike_conley/status/1149851483241947137 Picks Shai Reznik: PubConf Jennifer Wadella: PubConf The Bachelorette Joe Eames: Emotional IQ Aaron Frost: OnePlus 7 Pro Observables Pablo Fransisco Bits and Pieces
July 23, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp CacheFly Panel Aaron Frost Alyssa Nicoll Shai Reznik Joe Eames Brian Love Joined by Special Guest: Minko Gechev Episode Summary Minko from Angular team at Google talks about what's new in Angular v8 and what has changed. Some of the exciting new features include differential loading, dynamic imports for lazy routes and CLI workflow improvements which end up being a large perfomance improvement. The panel comments on the fact that it was effortless to migrate from Angular 7 to Angular 8, and Minko also mentions that they had received feedback that the how to start tutorials were not very clear and so in Angular v8 they made an effort to re-do the tutorials. Links Angular Versioning and Releases - Angular Minko's Twitter Minko's Blog Minko's GitHub https://caniuse.com/#search=modules Picks Aaron Frost: Stranger Things Season 3 Angular Denver Joe Eames: Bonnie Brennan and her daughter Sam Shai Reznik: Dev Ed Podcast: Making Learning Fun Ozark Cobra Kai Getting Out of Your Comfort Zone Alyssa Nicoll: ngAir 211 - Template Streams in Angular & Change Detection Profiling w/ Dominic Elm & Kwinten Pisman Brian Love: https://github.com/cartant/rxjs-spy Go Outside and Hike Minko Gechev: You can use the "safe navigation" operator in Angular templates Hit Fit SF
July 16, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp CacheFly Panel Aaron Frost Joe Eames Jennifer Wadella Brian Love Alyssa Nicoll Joined by Special Guest: Leonardo Zizzamia Episode Summary Leonardo is a Senior Software Engineer, Technical Lead at Coinbase a digital currency exchange headquartered in San Francisco. Leonardo and the panel talk about Perfume.js. Over the past 5 years the Chrome team has been working on standardizing user timings for the web. One of the most recent metric tool the Chrome team has built is the Performance Observer which is an experimental API that observes user metrics. Leonardo explains how Perfume.js helps users so they don't have to worry about not complying with web standards in terms of user metrics. Leonardo then gives some guidelines to the web standards and explains what is considered in the normal range and what needs to be improved. Links Leonardo's Twitter Coinbase CryptoKitties Okurrr2svg Perfume.js Spill The Tea- definition D&Diesel Picks Aaron Frost: Potion of Flying https://www.rxjs.live/ Joe Eames: Being a Guide and Not Being a Leader Jennifer Wadella: The Git Up by Blanco Brown Brian Love: https://github.com/tibing/async-pipeline Alyssa Nicoll: https://www.anxietytech.com/ Leonardo Zizzamia: https://ngrome.io/home https://devfestlevante.eu/
July 9, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus CacheFly Panel Aaron Frost Joe Eames Jennifer Wadella Joined by Special Guest: Alex Eagle Episode Summary Alex Eagle is a Software Engineer on the core Angular team at Google. Alex and the panel talk about Bazel, a a free software tool that allows for the automation of building and testing of software. Links Alex’s GitHub Alex’s Twitter Alex’s LinkedIn Bazel Angular and Bazel Join BazelBuild on Slack! Picks Aaron Frost: Axe Throwing Jennifer Wadella: Drama on the The Bachelor ( TV series) Joe Eames: FIFA Women's World Cup France 2019 Playing Dungeons & Dragons with Aaron Frost Alex Eagle: Firefly (TV Series 2002–2003) - IMDb
July 2, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus CacheFly Panel Aaron Frost Joe Eames Brian Love Joined by Special Guest: Michael Prentice Episode Summary Michael Prentice is the owner of DevIntent and an AngularJS Material Lead Maintainer at Rangle.io. Links Michael’s GitHub Michael’s Twitter Michael’s LinkedIn Picks Aaron Frost: rxjs.live Brian Love: Stephen Fluin - YouTube The Umbrella Academy Joe Eames: https://www.cypress.io/ Michael Prentice: Angular Hispano NG Bolivia 2019 NG Honduras 2019 ngSpain Frontend Masters
June 25, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus CacheFly Panel Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Steve Faulkner Episode Summary Coming to you live from the podcast booth at Microsoft BUILD is Charles Max Wood with Steve Faulkner. Steve is a Senior Software Developer for Azure Cosmos DB at Microsoft. Cosmos DB is a global distributed, multi-model noSQL database. Steve explains the Cosmos DB service and scenarios it can be used in. They discuss how Cosmos DB interacts with Azure functions and how partition keys work in Cosmos DB. Listen to the show for more Cosmos DB updates and to find out how Steve he got his twitter handle @southpolesteve. Links Steve’s GitHub Steve’s Twitter Steve’s LinkedIn Steve Dev.to Microsoft Build 2019   Introduction to Azure Cosmos DB AiA 241: Azure Functions with Colby Tresness LIVE at Microsoft BUILD AiA 242- Azure Functions Part II with Jeff Hollan LIVE at Microsoft BUILD Microsoft Learn Resource Partitioning in Azure Cosmos DB Follow Adventures in Angular on tv, Facebook and Twitter. Picks Steve Faulkner: FINAL FANTASY X/X-2 HD Remaster for Nintendo Switch Overcooked on Steam Fastly  
June 18, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus CacheFly Panel Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Jessica Deen Episode Summary Coming to you live from the podcast booth at Microsoft BUILD is Charles Max Wood with The Deen of DevOps aka Jessica Deen. Jessica is a Senior Cloud Advocate at Microsoft. As an advocate she acts a liaison between developer communities and Microsoft to help understand developer pain points and road blocks especially in areas such as Linux, open-source technologies, infrastructure, Kubernetes, containers and DevOps. Jessica explains how to go about setting up a containerized application, Kubernetes and how to use Dockerfiles. Charles and Jessica then talk about how to get started with a Kubernetes cluster and the resources available for developers that don't have any infrastructure. Jessica advises that developers start with Azure DevOps Services and then go to Microsoft Learn Resource. Charles also encourages listeners to also check out the Views on Vue podcast Azure DevOps with Donovan Brown for further references. Jessica also recommends following people on Twitter and GitHub to find out about solutions and resources. Links Dockerfile and Windows Containers Kubernetes Jessica’s GitHub Jessica’s Twitter Jessica’s LinkedIn Jessica’s Website Microsoft Build 2019   Microsoft Learn Resource HTTP application routing Getting started with Kubernetes Ingress Controllers and TLS certificates Kubernetes Ingress Controllers and Certificates: The Walkthrough  Azure DevOps Services  VoV 053: Azure DevOps with Donovan Brown LIVE at Microsoft Ignite Jessica Deen Youtube Kubernetes in 5 mins - YouTube Follow Adventures in Angular on tv, Facebook and Twitter. Picks Jessica Deen: Lachlan Evenson Cloud Native Computing Foundation Kubernetes Handles on Twitter Shoe Dog Memoir Air Jordan 4 Fire Red Gum Singles Day Charles Max Wood: Real Talk /JavaScript Podcast The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild  
June 11, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus CacheFly Panel Aaron Frost Joe Eames Brian Love Joined by Special Guest: Juri Strumpflohner Episode Summary A fun conversation about how to lazy load Angular modules with Juri Strumpflohner, a software developer with more 10 years of experience in technologies like Java, .Net and Node.js. Juri is also a  Google Developer Expert in Web Tech and an Egghead.io Instructor. With lazy loading, it is possible to defer loading unused portions and load them on demand. The panel discusses what can be lazy loaded in an Angular application and how Aaron's for lazy loading in Angular helps with the process.  Links My Angular Story 045: Juri Strumpflohner Adventures in Angular 193: Angular Libraries with Juri Strumpflohner Juri's Twitter Juri's Website Juri’s GitHub Juri’s Egghead Courses for lazy loading in Angular for lazy loading in Angular https://thinkster.io/ Follow Adventures in Angular on tv, Facebook and Twitter. Picks Aaron Frost: John Wick: Chapter 3 - Parabellum (2019) – IMDb Long Shot (2019) - IMDb Brian Love: Ninebot KickScooter by Segway Ninebot KickScooter by Segway ES1 Joe Eames Joe Eames: Star Wars: A New Hope Symphony Orchestra Anki Vector | The Home Robot With Interactive AI Technology |  Juri Strumpflohner: ng-conf talks Lazy load Angular Components  
June 4, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus CacheFly Panel Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Jeff Hollan Episode Summary Coming to you live from the podcast booth at Microsoft BUILD is Charles Max Wood with Jeff Hollan. Jeff is a Sr. Program Manager for the Azure Functions cloud service. Continuing from where Colby Tresness left off in Adventures in Angular 241: Azure Functions with Colby Tresness LIVE at Microsoft BUILD, Jeff defines what "serverless" really means in developer world. Jeff also talks about various scenarios where Azure functions are extremely useful and explains what Durable Functions are.  Jeff and Charles discuss creating and running an Azure function inside a container and the upcoming capabilities of Azure functions they are currently working on. Links Adventures in Angular 241: Azure Functions with Colby Tresness LIVE at Microsoft BUILD  Durable Functions Jeff’s GitHub Jeff’s Twitter Jeff’s LinkedIn Jeff’s Website Jeff’s Medium Microsoft Build 2019 Follow Adventures in Angular on tv, Facebook and Twitter. Picks Jeff Hollan: Calm App Game of Thrones TV Series Charles Max Wood: Family Tree App    
May 28, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guests:  Brian Love and Kevin Schuchard Episode Summary This episode comes to you live from the podcast booth at ng-conf 2019 where Brian Love and Kevin Schuchard are talking to Charles Max Wood about their experiences at ng-conf. Currently Brian is a Software Architect and a Google Developer Expert in Angular and Kevin is a Senior Software Engineer Technical Lead at BrieBug. Kevin and Brian discuss their favourite parts of the ng-conf 2019 and mention talks they have enjoyed, one of which is A is for Angular by Jo Hanna Pearce.   Links Adventures in Angular 221: Angular Schematics from the Ground Up with Brian Love & Kevin Schuchard Brian Love’s Website Brian Love’s Twitter Kevin Schuchard’s Website Kevin Schuchard’s Twitter BrieBug DigitalGlobe A is for Angular by Jo Hanna Pearce ng-conf 2019
May 21, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest:  Alex Eagle Episode Summary This episode of My Angular Story comes to you live from the podcast booth at ng-conf 2019 where Charles hosts Alex Eagle from the Google Angular team. Listen to Alex on the podcast Adventures in Angular on this episode and on the podcast JavaScript Jabber on this episode. This is Alex’s fourth time at ng-conf where he is one of the speakers. Check out Alex’s talk here. Alex explains what Bazel is and where it’s heading. He talks about the upcoming Angular 8 release and also how he spends his free time when he is not working. Links My Angular Story 027: Alex Eagle Adventures in Angular 177: Angular’s BuildTools Convergence with Alex Eagle JavaScript Jabber 167: TypeScript and Angular with Jonathan Turner and Alex Eagle Alex's Talk at ng-conf https://bazel.build/ Angular 8 Release ng-conf 2019 Alex’s Medium Alex’s Twitter
May 14, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Angular Bootcamp Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus CacheFly Panel Aaron Frost Charles Max Wood Joe Eames Joined by special guests: Bill Odom, Daniel Kilburn, Niall Crosby. Episode Summary This episode of Adventures in Angular comes to you live from ng-conf 2019. Niall Crosby, CEO at ag-Grid, talks about how he started the company and what they work on. The panel then talks to a number of guests at the conference, including the volunteers, organizers and attendees and have interesting conversations about the work they do, what made them come to the conference and what they like about it. They talk about the workshops being conducted, give listeners tips on learning angular and one of the speakers appeals to listeners for help in mentoring and sponsorship. They wrap up the podcast by each stating their favourite talks and moments at the conference and agree on the fact that the community is one of the best parts of Angular. Links Niall’s Linkedin Melina’s Twitter Follow Adventures in Angular on Devchat.tv, Facebook and Twitter.
May 7, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp TripleByte offers a $1000 signing bonus Cachefly Panel Aaron Frost Shai Reznik Joined by Special Guest: Mike Ryan Summary In this fun episode, Mike Ryan introduces NgRX and gives the backstory of his getting involved with the NgRx Core Team. The panel discusses use cases where using NgRx is the best choice. Shai Reznik wonders where the cult-like loyalty to NgRx comes from. Mike talks about the future of NgRx and the future of state management in general. The panel discusses Ivy and what it means for state management. Links https://githubtwitter.com/MikeRyanDev https://.com/MikeRyanDev https://medium.com/@MikeRyanDev https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular https://twitter.com/angularpodcast Picks Aaron Frost: Biscoff Cookies https://ngvikings.org/ https://angular-up.com/ https://ng-bolivia.org/ https://www.rxjs.live/ http://angulardenver.com/ https://www.angularconnect.com/ https://www.ng-conf.org/ Shai Reznik: Rich Harris - Rethinking reactivity Michel Weststrate - Modern React and the case for Reactive State Management Donuts
April 30, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp TripleByte offers a $1000 signing bonus Cachefly Panel Aaron Frost Shai Reznik Joined by Special Guest: Deborah Kurata Summary Deborah Kurata talks about the benefits of using a reactive approach to developing with RxJS. She explains how to use RxJS to program reactively and shares her vision of patterns everywhere to make reactive programming easier. Shai Reznik asks a lot of great questions about switching to this approach and takes the stance of a new or student developer. Deborah and Aaron advocate for RxJS and debate the best ways to learn RxJs and implement reactive development.   Links https://herodevs.com/ http://textangular.com/ https://school.hirez.io/ https://www.twitch.tv/frostydev https://github.com/DeborahK https://twitter.com/DeborahKurata https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular https://twitter.com/angularpodcast Picks Aaron Frost: https://www.rxjs.live/ Shai Reznik: A Super Ninja Trick To Learn RxJS’s “switchMap”, “mergeMap”, “concatMap” and “exhaustMap”, FOREVER! Deborah Kurata: https://rxjs.dev/
April 23, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp TripleByte offers a $1000 signing bonus Cachefly Panel Aaron Frost Special Guests: Dave Müllerchen and Mike Brocchi Episode Summary Dave Mullerchen is a freelancer from Germany and does a lot of Angular workshops. Mike Brocchi works for Ultimate Software and works with Stencil to provide framework agnostic web components as a design language system. Today the panel is discussing the Angular CLI. Mike talks about exactly what Stencil.js is, a set of tools to spit out raw web components made by the Ionic folks. They discuss how Angular Elements stacks up to Stencil. Dave talks about the most important things the community needs to know about the Angular CLI, most importantly it can save you a lot of money. They each talk about their history with the CLI, and how they found that it increased speed and decreased bundle size. The panel finds Angular is less teachable than other languages, but the CLI is the key to making Angular teachable They go into detail about how the CLI can save money. They talk about some of the schematics available in the CLI and their usefulness, and which are their favorites. They end by mentioning that the schematics work off the file system, so it’s not angular specific, and that the CLI makes discoverable schematics and can run analytics. Links Angular Angular CLI Stencil.js Ionic Gulp Gump Yeoman Broccoli Bundle Basil Jest NDM- Network Data Mover NGX Build Plus Perfume Narwhal Picks Aaron Frost: RXJS Live “Like It Ain’t Nothin” by Fergie Shai Reznik: HBO’s Crashing Dave Müllerchen: NG-DE Conference 2019 JavaScript fuer Kinder YouTube Channel Mike Brocchi: "ng doc ______" to search angular.io docs via the command line Live Share from the Visual Studio team, now out of preview
April 16, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp TripleByte offers a $1000 signing bonus Cachefly Panel Shai Reznik Aaron Frost Joe Eames Joined by Special Guest: Raul Jimenez Summary Raul Jimenez, the CEO of Byte Default, answers the panels many questions on functional programming with NgRx. In this playful interview, Raul defines functional programming and what it is trying to solve. The panel discusses side effects using a Spiderman analogy. Raul shares the benefits of switching to and when to use NgRx. The importance of knowing RxJS in using NgRx is considered by the panel. The episode ends with an in-depth discussion on some the specifics of using NgRx for functional programming. Links https://twitter.com/elecash https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular https://twitter.com/angularpodcast Picks Shai Reznik https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B48Exq57Zg Joe Eames https://thinkster.io/tutorials/five-essential-lessons-for-typescript-competence Aaron Frost https://www.rxjs.live/ The Go-Giver, Expanded Edition: A Little Story About a Powerful Business Idea by Bob Burg Raul Jimenez https://app.quicktype.io/ https://www.ag-grid.com/
April 9, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp TripleByte offers a $1000 signing bonus Cachefly Panel Alyssa Nicoll Aaron Frost Joe Eames Special Guest: Jennifer Wadella Episode Summary In this episode of Adventures in Angular, the panel speaks with Jennifer Wadella, founder of Kansas City Women in Technology and JavaScript Developer at Bitovi. Jennifer is also an international speaker and a kombucha brewer. Jennifer talks about popular events they host at Kansas City Women in Technology like the Coding & Cupcakes | Kansas City Women in Technology and the Coding & Cocktails | Kansas City Women in Technology meetups. They also discuss the Control Value Accessor (CVA) interface and its key concepts as well as best scenarios to use it in. Jennifer has written a blog piece where she describes how to use the CVA interface. Links Jennifer's GitHub Jennifer's Medium Jennifer's Twitter Jennifer's LinkedIN Jennifer's Website Kansas City Women in Technology Bitovi Coding & Cupcakes | Kansas City Women in Technology Coding & Cocktails | Kansas City Women in Technology Kansas City Women in Technology Events Jennifer's Blog Control Value Accessor Use #unJoe hashtag on Twitter https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular/ https://twitter.com/angularpodcast Picks Alyssa Nicoll: Alyssa's Baby Aaron Frost: Model 3 | Tesla Safe Spaces and Friends Joe Eames: Deep Space D-6 Jennifer Wadella: Jennifer's Blog Kombucha 101 Jennifer's Blog 10 Commandments of Community Organizing The Expanse
April 3, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Special Guest: Chaz Gatian Episode Summary In this episode of My Angular Story, Charles hosts Chaz Gatian, Principal Architect at Hyland. Listen to Chaz on the podcast Adventures in Angular here. Chaz’s father was a programmer as well so he wanted to major in Computer Science. When he graduated from college, he didn’t have a very high GPA so got an internship at a startup so he could learn web development. He then re-applied to Hyland after developing himself as a programmer for 4 years, and got a job as a developer. Chaz believes the key to being a good programmer lies in adapting it as a lifestyle. Being a member of the developer community, following podcasts and watching YouTube videos regularly will help a programmer be better. Finally, Chaz talks about how he got into Angular, projects he struggled with and how he got through them as well as what he is working on currently. Links Adventures in Angular: 10 Lessons Learned in Enterprise Angular Development with Chaz Gatian Chaz's Twitter Chaz's GitHub Chaz's Medium Chaz's LinkedIn Chaz Gatian – Angular In Depth single-spa buzzsprout https://devchat.tv/my-angular-story/  Picks Chaz Gatian: single-spa GraphQL Inspector Web Accessibility Guide Charles Max Wood: MicroConf Podcast Booths in Conferences- NG-Conf
April 2, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp TripleByte offers a $1000 signing bonus Cachefly Panel Alyssa Nicoll Aaron Frost Joe Eames Shai Reznik Special Guest: Tomas Trajan Episode Summary In this episode of Adventures in Angular, the panel interviews Tomas Trajan, software developer and Google Developer Expert for Angular from Zurich, Switzerland. Tomas explains what Angular Schematics is and how it simplifies a developer’s life. He goes through cases where Angular Schematics would be great to use. He explains some of the Schematics terminology such as rules and trees. He also explains that Angular CLI uses Schematics as well and that the panel is already using it when they are using Angular CLI. The panel then talks about the setup time and effort it takes to start a project before they can actually code especially when there are other teams involved. Tomas explains that part of this setup effort could be avoided if companies with multiple developer teams used Schematics.Tomas then describes his own experiences using Schematics. As a final note, Tomas talks about some of the areas where Schematics could be improved. Links Tomas' GitHub Tomas' Medium Tomas' Twitter Tomas' LinkedIN Tomas Trajan – Angular In Depth Tomas Trajan - DEV Community Tomas' Blog Post: How to Create Your First Custom Angular Schematics with Ease https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular/ https://twitter.com/angularpodcast Picks Alyssa Nicoll: https://twitter.com/schwarty Schwart Stories by @Schwarty Shai Reznik: NG - BE - YouTube Last Week Tonight with John Oliver Joe Eames: Airtable Aaron Frost: Narwhal Technologies Inc Tomas Trajan: Uphill Conf – Javascript conference in Bern, Switzerland Release Butler  
March 27, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Guest: Ward Bell Episode Summary In this episode of My Angular Story, Charles hosts Ward Bell, President/Co-Founder of IdeaBlade and Microsoft Regional Director in San Francisco. Ward is also a regular panelist on the podcast Adventures in Angular. Ward got interested in computers in high school through IBM’s high school partnership program. Upon graduation he got a job at the Cornell University Medical School as a programmer in New York City. While attending university and then graduate school, he worked as a consultant in the financial district as a programmer, coding in APL. He then decided to be a developer full time and started working for General Electric (GE). Working for GE gave Ward the opportunity to see the business side of developing and he learned that adding value to the business side as a developer was crucial. Ward then co-founded IdeaBlade, delivering development solutions to companies across many industries. During this time, he started working with Angular and later on led the Angular documentation effort. Links Ward's Twitter Ward's GitHub Real Talk JavaScript IBM P-TECH Weill Cornell Medicine - Cornell University The Movie Hidden Figures APL General Electric IdeaBlade AiA: NgRx Tips & Tricks with Adrian Fâciu AiA: NGRX Entities with Jesse Sanders AiA: NGRx with Mike Ryan https://devchat.tv/adv-in-angular/ https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular https://twitter.com/angularpodcast  Picks Ward Bell: Still Alice by Lisa Genova  
March 26, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp TripleByte offers a $1000 signing bonus Cachefly Panel Ward Bell Shai Reznik Alyssa Nicoll Aaron Frost Joe Eames Summary Joe Eames introduces a fun panel only show, “The Show about Nothing”. The panel starts by sharing podcast behaviors that bother the members of the panel. Between anecdotes and humor, the panel shares what they are looking for in a guest to their podcasts. The panel engages in a playful debate about the pronunciation of “angular”. Shai Reznik introduces the more serious topic of state management. The jokes continue as the panel discusses the best way to handle state management and change detection. Links https://www.ng-conf.org/ https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular https://twitter.com/angularpodcast Picks Ward Bell https://netbasal.com/why-its-time-to-say-goodbye-to-angular-template-driven-forms-350c11d004b Shai Reznik Dad breast milk https://blog.angularindepth.com/the-three-pillars-of-angular-routing-angular-router-series-introduction-fb34e4e8758e Alyssa Nicoll https://www.angularconnect.com/ https://angulardenver.com/ Aaron Frost Power Watch 2 Joe Eames Swig The Mentalist
March 20, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Guest: Adrian Fâciu Episode Summary In this episode of My Angular Story, Charles hosts Adrian Fâciu, a system architect from Romania working for Visma Software. Listen to Adrian on the podcast Adventures in Angular here. Adrian got interested in coding through playing video games in high school. He took coding classes in school but believes that for developers, school only teaches problem solving skills. Real life coding skills are improved by talking to other developers and by trial and error. For example, when he was tackling a particularly difficult project at work, he started attending JavaScript meetups in his local community to connect with other developers. Adrian was able to gain experience in Angular by switching to a different project at his company. He believes that when developers feel stuck, they should communicate this to their employers because most companies will give them chances to work on different products in order to keep them employed. Aside from coding, Adrian also writes blog posts on Angular In Depth. Links Adventures in Angular: NgRx Tips & Tricks with Adrian Fâciu Adrian’s Medium Adrian’s Twitter Adrian’s GitHub Adrian’s Blog Post Adrian’s Article: Testing NgRx Effects https://devchat.tv/adv-in-angular/ https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular https://twitter.com/angularpodcast  Picks Adrian Fâciu: revo.js Conference Charles Max Wood: Podfest Charles' Personal Blog https://www.netlify.com
March 19, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp TripleByte offers a $1000 signing bonus Cachefly Panel Charles Max Wood Aaron Frost Joe Eames Joined by Special Guest: Michael Hartington Episode Summary Aaron Frost introduces a RxJS as a trend that is also a fundamental for angular. Aaron Frost shares his experience at ng-conf where the community was polled, and the topic most people wanted to learn was RxJS. Charles Max Wood brings up a previous podcast where Ward Bell predicts this trend, sharing the opinion that angular developers must know RxJS to be successful. The panels discusses the need to be reactive in Angular and the need to react to this trend by learning RxJS. Michael Hartington and Aaron Frost share an examples to show how RxJS simplifies the work.The panel discusses the switch from NgRx or RxJS, and a few things that might help someone looking to switch. Panelists share how they learned RxJS and how it helped them, even if they were reluctant to learn it. They finish by sharing resources they found helpful in learning RxJS. Links https://devchat.tv/adv-in-angular/rxjs-with-angular/ https://thinkster.io/ https://www.ng-conf.org/ https://twitter.com/Michael_Hladky https://rxjs.dev/operator-decision-tree https://github.com/MikeRyanDev https://twitter.com/mikeryandev https://github.com/johnlindquist https://staltz.com/blog.html https://blog.rangle.io/author/yuri/ https://github.com/bent Michael Pearsons Blog https://twitter.com/brandontroberts https://github.com/brandonroberts www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular https://twitter.com/angularpodcast Picks  Michael Hartington Harmonquest Joe Eames Gravity Falls Dungeons and Dragons Charles Max Wood Podfest Go out and meet awesome people in the angular community Aaron Frost Captain Crunch - Crunch Berries
March 13, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Guest: Joe Eames Episode Summary In this episode of My Angular Story, Charles Max Wood hosts Joe Eames, CEO of Thinkster.io and organizer of many different conferences, two of which are the AngularJS conference, ng-conf, and the WordPress developer conference, LoopConf. Joe is a front end web developer and an educator. He has authored over 10 Pluralsight.com courses. He is also a panelist on the JavaScript Jabber podcast and the Adventures in Angular podcast on DevChat.TV. Joe talks about his passion project, being on the organization team of Framework Summit, a two-day conference focused on all front end JavaScript frameworks, the first of which was held in Utah in October 2018. It was a great success and he and the rest of the organization team will be looking to repeat it in January of 2020. Another conference Joe was involved in organizing was React Conf 2018 which took place in October in Henderson, Nevada. He is in the process of organizing the React Conf 2019 with the rest of the organization team. Aside from organizing conferences Joe’s second passion is education. He has started up a podcast called Dev Ed Podcast. Joe has recently become the CEO of Thinkster.io. Thinkster.io is a unique platform where learners can really master web development with a lot of hands on training. Joe wants developers to be able to learn how to "generate" solutions to problems. He explains the concept of “interleaving” while learning a subject which helps students retain more and learn faster. Links https://webflow.com/ https://devchat.tv/my-angular-story/mas-049-joe-eames/ https://twitter.com/josepheames https://medium.com/@josepheames https://github.com/joeeames https://thinkster.io/ https://reactrally.com https://github.com/sveltejs/svelte https://github.com/stimulusjs/stimulus https://www.ng-conf.org/ https://twitter.com/loopconf http://www.pluralsight.com/author/joe-eames https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular https://twitter.com/angularpodcast https://www.frameworksummit.com/ https://conf.reactjs.org/ Dev Ed Podcast Picks Joe Eames: Gizmo Board Game Chronicles of Crime Board Game Deep Space D-6 Board Game https://boardgamegeek.com/ Charles Max Wood: Villainous Board Game Pandemic Legacy Season 2 Board Game Splendor Board Game Harry Potter: Hogwarts Battle Board Game
March 12, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Angular Bootcamp TripleByte offers a $1000 signing bonus Cachefly Panel Alyssa Nicoll Aaron Frost Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Vitalii Bobrov Episode Summary The panel interviews Vitalii Bobrov, who recently wrote an article on his blog called “Angular Smart 404 pages”. It is about the Levenshtein distance algorithm and it's uses and implications in working with 404 pages. Vitalii Bobrov explains what a 404 page is and how it is often times due to typos on the users part. He also goes onto explain the Levenshtein distance algorithm and how it can help guide users to the correct site. Vitalii Bobrov shares how he came up with the idea of using the Levenshtein distance algorithm with 404 pages. Charles Max Wood and Aaron Frost ask some very insightful questions on how the algorithm works and how to apply these ideas to their work. They jokingly share ideas on what Vitalii Bobrov could do with this idea. Links https://github.com/vitaliy-bobrov https://twitter.com/bobrov1989 Vitalii Bobrov's Blog https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular/ https://twitter.com/angularpodcast Picks Charles Max Wood: ATR2100 AOC Monitors Alyssa Nicoll: Web Typography Newsletter Aaron Frost: Michael Cohen's Testimony Huawei Mate X Vitalii Bobrov: Trekhleb Javascript Algorithms
March 6, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Guest: Daniel Muller Episode Summary In this episode of My Angular Story, Charles hosts Daniel Muller, who is a member of the NRWL team and who has developed Angular Console. Listen to Daniel on the podcast Adventures in Angular here. Daniel went to university intending to be a doctor, but when he arrived at Carnegie Mellon University he decided to major in Human Computer Interaction. He then started to work as a programmer in various internships. His dream job had always been to work for Google which he did before working as a consultant at NRWL. Links Adventures in Angular 212: “Angular Console” with Dan Muller Daniel's LinkedIN Daniel's Twitter Daniel's Medium Carnegie Mellon University https://devchat.tv/my-angular-story/ https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv  Picks Daniel Muller: Jason Jean Demolition Man by Alfred Bester  Charles Max Wood: City of San Francisco Code BEAM SF 2019 - Code Sync  
March 5, 2019
Sponsors Sentry– use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Triplebyte - offers a $1000 signing bonus Panel Alyssa Nicoll Joe Eames Charles Wood Special Guest – Andrew Evans Episode Summary Charles Wood, Alyssa Nicholl, and Joe Eames discuss guest speaker, Andrew Evans’s article on “How to Deploy to Firebase”.  The article discusses how Continuous Integration and Delivery (CircleCI) and Firebase serve as alternatives to older pipeline technologies such as Jenkins and AWS. Andrew Evans talks about the versatility of Firebase CLI utility and its use as a platform for younger developers with little experience on CI/CD or any type of cloud deployment. It took Andrew a year to get proficient in Jenkins whereas with CircleCI he had a much easier learning curve. Andrew then mentions another article he wrote entitled “How the AngularFire Library makes Firebase feel like Magic”. They also discuss whether CircleCI matches up to Jenkins on a larger scale workflow deployment. Andrew gives the example of a weather app named “Goose Weather” he is working on that uses “NgRx” that has a more robust workflow. He mentions that initially he was working on it for a CapitalOne blog but then took it up as a side project and started working on it by himself. They decide that even though Jenkins owns the market on large scale workflows, CircleCI’s ease of use is a very strong feature. Andrew also mentions that although he didn’t have a chance to test CircleCI on a high-level enterprise project, he feels that it would be a good experience. They also briefly compare the Jenkins and CircleCI on ease of rollbacks and license fees. Shai shares his own experience of how he also really likes Netlify because it automates the commit process like CircleCI. They briefly touch on DevOps. Andrew shares his own experience using CircleCI to do deployments to AWS. He feels the documentation and the blogs really help with the learning process. Andrew explains the meaning of: EWS: Elastic Container Service ALB: Application Load Balancer ELB: Elastic Load Balancer” The panelists jokingly wonder whether Andrew should give them 50% of his profits from the weather app Goose Weather because he basically outed himself to CapitalOne on the show by revealing he was working on it on the side.      Links Deploying to Firebase with CircleCI https://blog.angularindepth.com/how-the-angular-fire-library-makes-firebase-feel-like-magic-1fda375966bb https://goose-weather.firebaseapp.com/weather https://github.com/andrewevans02 https://twitter.com/AndrewEvans0102 https://rhythmandbinary.com/ https://medium.com/@andrew_evans AIA-099-firebase-and-angularfire2-with-david-east-and-jeff-cross/ Picks Shai Resnick: http://exploringjs.com https://youtu.be/gwlevtaC-u0 Joe Eames: Movie: Alita: Battle Angel https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w7pYhpJaJW8 Charles Wood: The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right by Atul Gawandi The Effective Executive by Peter Drucker https://www.2000books.com/-by-Mani-Vaya Andrew Evans: Artemis by Andy Weir https://www.traversymedia.com/  
February 27, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Triplebyteoffers a $1000 signing bonus CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Guest: Neil Brown Episode Summary In this episode of My Angular Story, Charles hosts Neil Brown, a research fellow at Kings College in London where he works in computing education. He helps people teach “how to program” more effectively and efficiently. Check out his social media pages and his research via the web. Listen to Neil on the podcast Adventures in Angular here and on the podcast Ruby Rogues here. Links Adventures in Angular 202: “Programming education/education research” with Neil Brown Ruby Rogues 257: Learning and Training with Neil Brown Neil's Podcast Neil's Article Neil's Twitter Tips for Teaching Programming with Dr. Neil Brown BlueJ https://devchat.tv/my-angular-story/ https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv  Picks Neil Brown: Flash Boys by Michael Lewis  Charles Max Wood: Taking time off when burnt out Podcast management software (side project Charles has been working on) Talking to people in a constructive manner to work through issues  
February 27, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan TripleByte offers a $1000 signing bonus Panel Alyssa Nicoll Joe Eames Charles Wood Episode Summary This weeks panel, Charles Wood, Alyssa Nicholl, and Joe Eames discuss 2 articles: 1st The Great Divide by Chris Coyier and 2nd Tales of a Non-Unicorn by Laura Schenk. These articles tell of the broad meaning for “Front-End Web Developer” talking of how “HTML + CSS along with JavaScript” all fall under the same title causing confusion with job interviews and even once a developer gets into the job. It is neat to hear perspectives of Alyssa Nicholl and Joe Eames together as Alyssa is more on the HTML/CSS side of Web Dev and Joe Eames is more with the JavaScript side. The panel also discusses difficulties with interviewing for jobs. Charles Wood leads a discussion on what the interviewers could improve on in hiring the people they actually want. The panel shares experiences of not getting jobs for reasons that are not super valid. They also touch on the pay difference between the 2 sides of the “WebDev” job description. Links The Great Divide by Chris Coyier The Refactoring UI Youtube Tales of a Non-Unicorn: A Story About The Trouble with Job Titles and Descriptions Why Everyone Is Fighting About CSS/UX and JS Economics CodePen Job Posting Picks Joe Eames: The Refactoring UI Youtube The Refactoring UI Steve Schoger Twitter NestJS Charles Wood: The Checklist Manifesto: How to Get Things Right by Atul Gawandi Alyssa Nicoll: 100 Days CSS Challenge
February 19, 2019
Sponsors Sentry- use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Angular Bootcamp Triplebyte CacheFly Episode Summary   In this episode of Adventures in Angular, the panelists talk with Kevin Kreuzer on source maps. Kevin is a freelance Software Engineer from Switzerland and currently is a part of the frontend architectural team for a company called Schaltstelle. He also regularly writes blog posts on Angular topics, contributes to opensource projects and is the co-founder of a startup – Trasier. Kevin talks about what led to the development of source maps, how they are generated and explains their working in detail. He elaborates on various approaches of deploying source maps to production without revealing the source code and gives tips on solving issues that come up. The panelists discuss about using these maps for templates (CSS, HTML, etc.) and briefly touch on NestJS. Links Kevin on Medium Kevin’s Twitter Kevin’s blog - Angular in Depth Picks Shai NestJS Capturing stage in events Why We Sleep Alyssa Angular Air - Dry Forms with Sander Elias Charles HubSpot Eero Kevin Trasier Uphill Conference - Bern, Switzerland Enhancement for Medium stats
February 13, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Guest: Pete Bacon Darwin Episode Summary In this episode of My Angular Story, Charles hosts Pete Bacon Darwin, a stay at home dad and a self-employed developer contracted to Google from London, UK. Pete is an Angular Developer, known for maintaining AngularJS. Listen to Pete on the podcast Adventures in Angular here. Links Adventures in Angular 168: Angular Connect with Peter Bacon Darwin Pete's Twitter http://www.bacondarwin.com Pete's GitHub Pete's LinkedIN https://devchat.tv/my-angular-story/ https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv  Picks Pete Bacon Darwin: What Doesn't Kill Us by Scott Carney  Charles Max Wood: 165 Best Keto Dairy Free Recipes – Low Carb Cholesterol Clarity by Jimmy Moore and Eric Westman
February 12, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code "devchat" for $100 credit Angular Bootcamp Panel: Alyssa Nicoll Charles Max Wood Special Guest - Mike Hartington In this episode of Adventures in Angular, the panelists talk with Mike Hartington, who is a Developer Advocate at Ionic. They talk in depth about the recently released version of Ionic, future projects the Ionic team is working on and what’s out there for Angular developers. Show Notes: 0:22 - Advertisement - Sentry - Use code “devchat” to get two months free on Sentry’s small plan. 1:21 - Mike introduces himself briefly and explains what exactly Ionic is. 3:15 - Charles asks about the new features of the recently released Ionic version 4.0. Mike explains that even though they love Angular, they wanted to decouple from any full framework like that and ship the components as JavaScript web components and then provide wrappings from any available framework. They spent a year on working on it and tried to double down on framework specific tooling. 5:50 - Charles asks if Alyssa has worked on Ionic. She answers that she hasn’t but has heard a lot of good things about it. She asks Mike if Ionic is the same as NativeScript. While explaining the difference, Mike replies that the team likes to work on the web technologies’ side, so even if Ionic is deployed on any available OS, everything is rendered in the browser. Charles also talks about the differences between NativeScript and Ionic. 7:38 - Alyssa asks if there is any specific popular framework or groups of people using Ionic. Mike answers that a lot of their user base consists of Angular developers, but they are seeing growth elsewhere too. 8:40 - Charles mentions that people like the fact they don’t have to learn different technologies for different platforms while developing apps, and prefer to do it by porting work from one platform to another. Mike agrees while saying that Ionic is a great option for that and it comes with a decent UI. 9:30 - Charles asks about Electron, if it’s the same codebase. Mike answers that Electron is quite new to them, but they are building an option for the native compiler that solves many technical issues and introduces new ideas on how to work with common APIs for IOS, Android and Electron. 12:02 - Alyssa asks how does Ionic compare to various UI themes and whether it can be customized. Mike answers that they have two themes - an iOS theme and a default material design theme. He says that they also have an option of creating custom themes using CSS variables. 13:30 - Charles asks if they have an update to the UI builder as well. Mike answers in affirmative and explains that they are working on a tool called Studio and proceeds to give some historical background on how they got there. He elaborates on the features of Studio. 15:40 - Alyssa asks if the tool is still under development or they are ready to start using it. Mike answers that a small group of users is using it and they are focusing on enterprise users currently. 16:50 - Charles asks about the next steps after Ionic 4.0. Mike explains in detail says that they want to work on some Angular tooling and on maintaining an update schematic. 18:17 - They discuss on how having different options help developers and users make flexible decisions leading to better products. 19:15 - Mike says that he is going to be at VueConf in Florida in March and Ng-Conf in Salt Lake City, and he is active on Twitter, Reddit and Instagram. 22:36 - Charles asks if there is any tutorial on Ionic for beginners. Mike asks users to search for “Ionic 4 Crash Course” - a 15-minute video encapsulating everything that they need to get it up and running. 22:35 - Advertisement - Angular Bootcamp 24:20 - Picks! 28:04 - END - Advertisement - CacheFly!   Picks: Alyssa dto Charles Modern Medicine Keeping perspective on things in general Mike Tidying Up with Marie Kondo  
February 6, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Guest: Juan Herrera Episode Summary In this episode of My Angular Story, Charles hosts Juan Herrera, Google Developer Expert in Web Technologies and Angular. Listen to Juan on the podcast Adventures in Angular here. Juan started programming at age 14 with a mentor. By the time he started college he already knew most of basic programming concepts. For beginner coders Juan recommends finding a mentor through twitter and just pinging them with questions. Charles also recommends sending them a Starbucks card and then asking them for coding advice over virtual coffee. For people who cannot afford a computer science degree in university, Juan recommends online courses or programs that do not charge a tuition but take a percentage of the paycheck upon employment after graduation. Juan offers many more tips on how to start a programming career and how create and run programming communities correctly. Links Adventures in Angular 220: Creating a Great Community with Juan Herrera Juan's Twitter   Holberton | School of Engineering NG-Colombia NG-Rome Juan's Medium Juan's LinkedIN https://devchat.tv/my-angular-story/ https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv  Picks Juan Herrera: She Codes Angular (Medellín, Colombia) | Meetup  Charles Max Wood: Notion The 12 Week Year Book The Dev Rev  
February 5, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Angular Bootcamp TripleByte Panel: Charles Max Wood Joe Eames Ward Bell John Papa Special Guest: Eyas Sharaiha Notes: This episode of Adventures in Angular has the panelists speaking with Eyas Sharaiha, who is a software engineer working for Google, working primarily with Google Maps . Eyas mostly does back end and infrastructure work, which gives him an interesting view of Angular. The panelists and Eyas discuss his article Data and Page Content refresh Patterns in Angular. Eyas talks about the most common mistakes he sees in using Angular, namely transforming observables and then subscribing to them too early or too late, and putting certain kinds of data transformations in places where they end up making the code a lot less clear. His approach in his articles is to walk readers through with trial and error, rather than laying down some sort of law. Eyas lays out how he deals with changes in Angular, naming the three best things to do to use Angular and RXJS correctly, emphasizing the importance of looking for side effects. His rule of thumb is that if the observable does anything other than the data it is admitting, then something is probably wrong.   The panelists go on to discuss the usefulness of observables. The ask Eyas what the most common code smells he finds in angular apps that frequenly use observables and how he would correct people. Eyas again emphasizes side effects or mutation as a sign of a deeper problem, cautions people against bending over backwards to use an observable, and discusses the importance of unpacking an observable at the correct time. He encourages listeners to try out the ergonomics of AsyncPipe to combine observables where possible, and the importance of using observables correctly.   The shift in Angular becoming more about learning RXJS and non-Angular things than it is about Angular is discussed and length, as well as the difficulty to relate Angular to other things. Eyas feels that this trend has taken away some of the magic of Angular. In fact, NG Conf’s annual survey revealed that the top struggles are RXJS and architectural guidance. The panelists emphasize that programmers should ask themselves why they are doing things this particular way, and to seek creative solutions using different types of programming, such as procedural, reactive, idiomatic, and object oriented programming.   Terms: Observables RxJs Async pipe TypeScript Reactive programming Inheritance NGRX Picks: Joe Eames Talk List over at NG Conf Five Minute Marvel John Papa http://realtalkjs.com Ward Bell https://auth0.com/blog/ngrx-facades-pros-and-cons/ Charles Max Wood http://libsyn.com Purple seat pad vrbo.com Eyas Sharaiha Schema-DTS – TypeScript library for Schema.org Bad Blood
January 31, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Special Guest: Miško Hevery Episode Summary In this episode of My Angular Story, Charles hosts Miško Hevery, creator of Angular and Senior Computer Scientist at Google. Miško was introduced to computers when his father brought a Sinclair ZX Spectrum home for them to play with. When they moved to the United States from Czech Republic, Miško attended Rochester Institute of Technology and studied Computer Engineering. After working for companies such as Adobe, Sun Microsystems, Intel, and Xerox, he joined Google where created the Angular framework. For more on the story of how Miško created AngularJS, listen to the ‘Birth of Angular’ episode on the Adventures in Angular podcast here. Miško is currently working on Angular Ivy at Google and plans to restart a blog in the future. Links Adventures in Angular: The Birth of Angular JavaScript Jabber: Dependency Injection in JavaScript with Vojta Jína & Misko Hevery Miško's Twitter Miško's GitHub Miško's Medium Miško's LinkedIn How to Talk so Kids Will Listen and Listen so Kids Will Talk https://devchat.tv/my-angular-story/    Picks Miško Hevery: Prusa3D - 3D Printers from Josef Prusa Charles Max Wood: The Kingfountain Series by Jeff Wheeler  
January 30, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Angular Bootcamp TripleByte Cachefly Panel Joe Eames Aaron Frost Alyssa Nicoll Ward Bell Joined by Special Guest: Ben Nadel Summary Ben Nadel introduces the irrational demonization of two-way data-binding in Angular as a topic for the panel. The panel discusses the survey that put Angular in a poor light and favors React; acknowledging that a fair survey is hard to find. The panel considers how technologies that are now out of favor changed the web. The panel compares Angular to other frameworks and considers what to they can do about other frameworks. Ward Bell invites the panel to try other frameworks and find what is beautiful, not just ignore them or diss unknown frameworks. Ben talks about his companies move away from Angular and the opportunity this presents for him to learn about other frameworks. Links https://www.invisionapp.com https://www.bennadel.com/ https://github.com/BenNadel https://twitter.com/BenNadel https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular/ https://twitter.com/angularpodcast Picks Joe Eames https://www.ng-conf.org/ https://elm-lang.org/ Felt https://thinkster.io/ Aaron Frost https://blog.angularindepth.com/connecting-the-dots-where-hard-work-and-dreams-can-lead-you-2e8ef44096b Ward Bell Learn how to sharpen a pencil Ben Nadel http://icon.no.sh/ https://www.netlify.com/ The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel http://freakonomics.com/ https://www.npr.org/podcasts/510308/hidden-brain
January 24, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Special Guest: Asim Hussain Episode Summary In this episode of My Angular Story, Charles hosts Asim Hussain, EMEA Regional Lead for Developer Relations at Microsoft and founder of CodeCraft. Listen to Asim on the podcast Adventures in Angular here. When Asim was 11 years old, his father bought a computer and Asim wrote his first program in Basic. Since then, Asim has been developing for about 20 years, has been working with Angular for about 5 years, and runs the website codecraft.tv. Asim has migrated from AngularJS to Angular and has shared a course  on AngularJS Migration on codecraft.tv. Check out Asim’s free Angular book and his other courses here. Listen to the show to find out more about Asim’s current work on bringing machine learning APIs into the browser natively and other exciting projects. Links Adventures in Angular 201: AI & Angular with Asim Hussain codecraft.tv AngularJS Migration Free Angular book Asim's Twitter Asim's GitHub Asim's Medium Asim's LinkedIn https://devchat.tv/my-angular-story/  Picks Asim Hussain: The Power of Vulnerability by Brene Brown  Charles Max Wood: Purple Seat Cushion modern medicine inflatable donut cushion
January 24, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code "devchat" for $100 credit Angular Bootcamp TripleByte Panel Charles Max Wood John Papa Ward Bell Joined by Special Guests: Uri Shaked and Netta Bondi Episode Summary Netta is a senior web developer at a startup called Reali, although her degree is in social work. She also co-founded the largest community of women in research and Development in Israel. Netta and Uri are here to talk more about the talk they gave at FrontEnd Con about Angular Ivy and React Fiber. They share how this talk came to be. Uri and Netta compare Angular Ivy and React Fiber, which take different approaches to managing the cycle of code. The panel discusses whether or not there is an advantage to digging into the framework. Netta and Uri talk about some of the processes they explored while investigating Angular Ivy and React Fiber. They share techniques for not getting lost in the source code and delve into some of the differences between Angular Ivy and React Fiber. Through their investigations, they learned that the primary difference between the two is in the event delegation pattern. They advise that when deciding which technology to use, companies should consider which one will be easier to hire new employees for. The panel discusses whether or not big tree frameworks have become a commodity. Most new frameworks focus on making builds smaller and faster, but they would like new frameworks to have more benefits than just speed. The show is finished by Uri and Netta sharing how to track features down in Angular Ivy and React Fiber. Links Angular Ivy React Fiber Virtual DOM Incremental DOM Ajax jQuery Lin  Clark - A Cartoon Intro to Fiber - React Conf 2017 Netta Bondy & Uri Shaked - React Fiber vs. Angular Ivy / FRONTEND CON 2018 Follow DevChat on Facebook and Twitter Picks Charles Max Wood: Package Thief vs. Glitter Bomb Trap Help Charles move Devchat from WordPress to Eleventy and get an hour of coaching. Write show notes for 3 episodes and tag it, Charles will do an hour of coaching with you. John Papa: NG Atlanta Ward Bell:   BlacKkKlansmen   Uri Shaked: NG Atlanta Why We Sleep Uri is on Twitter as @UriShaked and github (urish) Netta Bondi: Hassan Minaj: Homecoming King Iliza Shlesinger: Elder Millennial Netta is on Medium and Twitter (@_bondit_)    
January 15, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code "devchat" for $100 credit Angular Bootcamp TripleByte Panel John Papa Alyssa Nichol Joe Eames Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Chaz Gatian Summary Chaz Gatian joins the show to discuss his blog post, “10 Lessons Learned in Enterprise Angular Development”. He starts by defining enterprise and the panel dives into the first point of his blog post about not making boneheaded mistakes. Next, the panel discusses utilizing view components and compare the ways they organize their code. Which touches on a couple more points, bubbling your components and packaging only if you are going to share. Alyssa Nichol asks Chaz about teams developing a fun application and breaking out of the research loop. Links https://blog.angularindepth.com/@Cgatian https://blog.angularindepth.com/10-lessons-learned-in-enterprise-angular-development-cc4bd194fcb7 https://twitter.com/Cgatian https://twitter.com/angularpodcast https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular Picks John Papa https://medium.com/ Alyssa Nichol 8th anniversary today! Blow up Christmas At-at Joe Eames The Quacks of Quedlinburg Renegade Game Studios Spell Smashers, Game Charles Max Wood https://mckirdytrained.com/ Garmin Forerunner 235 Watch https://www.stgeorgemarathon.com/ Chaz Gatian Improved UX with Ghost Elements + Angular 7 Animations
December 25, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Joe Eames Aaron Frost Alyssa Nicoll Special Guests: Brian Love & Kevin Schuchard In this episode, the panelist talk with today’s special guests Brian Love & Kevin Schuchard! Brian and Kevin work at BrieBug – check out their employee profiles here! The panelist and guests talk about schematics, Angular, AST, and much more! Show Topics: 0:00 – Advertisement: Get A Coder Job! 0:50 – Chuck: Hello! Our panel today is Joe, Aaron, Alyssa, and myself. We have two guests today, and we are going to talk about schematics. Let’s dive into that! 1:46 – Guest: Schematics is a library that is coming out of Angular and the Angular Team. The guest gives a definition of Angular Schematics. 2:26 – Alyssa. 2:31 – Kevin: The functionality that you are hoping for depends on the CLI that you are on. 3:00 – Alyssa: Sorry for diving into the juicy stuff but we forgot to talk about your introductions! 3:19 – The guests talk about their backgrounds and introduce themselves to the panel and the listeners. 3:49 – Alyssa. 3:54 – Guest continues. 4:21 – Panel: Crazy and busy! 4:28 – Alyssa. 4:31 – Kevin: I am Senior Developer, and I have worked here for a few years. I have had the opportunities to write some schematics for the company and some of my own schematics. 4:53 – Alyssa: Aren’t you so proud that you are a “Senior Developer”?! 5:10 – Guest and panelists go back-and-forth. 6:23 – Guests: We want people to be familiar with schematics and start their journey with schematics. 6:50 – Panel: It’s kind of trippy isn’t that right? 7:00 – Guest: Yeah there are hurdles to learning schematics at first – for sure. 7:22 – Alyssa: What is AST? 7:29 – Guest gives a definition of AST and goes into much detail about this. 10:00 – Alyssa: I think I understand, now, what AST is. Thanks. Alyssa asks the guests a question. 10:14 – Guest answers the question about AST. 10:51 – Guest continues. 11:27 – Panelist is talking about the AST and schematics. 12:03 – Guest: You can read the whole file and using the AST you can figure out where you went to enter the text. 12:25 – Alyssa asks a question. 12:28 – Guest: We are not the developers of schematics, but we are just here to share our knowledge. I want to be super clear here. 13:39 – Panelist talks about schematics, CLI, and AST. 14:18 – Guest: You don’t have to know all about AST and everything there is to know to get into it. You can build schematics w/o getting into AST. Just to be clear. 14:39 – Alyssa asks a follow-up question. 14:41 – Guest continues. 15:57 – Guest: AST has been around for a while – it’s not a new thing it’s kind of an old thing. Guest talks about tools (Code Shift) that Facebook has built that is related to this topic. 17:22 – Guest: Yeah AST has been around for a while. 17:28 – Alyssa asks a question about Code Shift. 17:36 – Guest. 18:21 – Panel and guest go back-and-forth. 19:51 – Alyssa: You said you really don’t need to get into AST to do schematics – right? (Yes.) Alyssa asks a question. 20:19 – Guest: There are two pieces with schematics and that’s adding of new files and you can decide which pieces of the templates you want to be compiled. 21:58 – Chuck: For schematics you mentioned you could drop strings in. Chuck asks a question. 22:29 – Guest answers the question with a hypothetical situation. 23:09 – Chuck: I read the article you wrote and I have a question about your article. Tell me about the tree? 23:29 – Guest talks about the tree or aka the host. 25:40 – Guest: The tree is a virtual kind of context and it’s not committing all of the changes to the file system. Whether that is adding, deleting, or updating these files. 26:10 – Chuck: Makes sense to me. 26:15 – Guest continues talking about schematics. 26:53 – Alyssa: Yeoman is a replacement for schematics? 27:05 – Guest: It’s a lightweight alternative. 27:33 – Advertisement: Angular Boot Camp 28:10 – Chuck: How does one build a schematic? 28:16 – Guest answers the question. 30:34 – Panel: What’s the latest thing you’ve built? Talk about that, please. 30:40 – Guest: It’s a schematic and took what we’ve learned to set you up for a starter project. It starts with a blank project. 32:57 – Panel: You are just talking some lessons learned and you are saying this is how Kevin says to do it. You’ve packaged that up 33:26 – Guest: Yep I have found things that work and there isn’t any magic but put these practices together and made a repository to help testing and making schematics. 33:55 – Panel and guests go back-and-forth. 34:20 – Chuck: Let’s say I’ve built this schematic and Frosty wants to share it with his friends. How do we do that? How do you share it? Is there some component that you’ve built? 35:06 – Guest: It depends on what you are doing with it. 36:14 – Chuck: For mass production, though? 36:25 – Guest: I think Chuck is wondering about discoverability. Guest continues and he mentions prettier, extensions, among other things. 37:18 – Guest: I think it’s my favorite about schematics and it’s Kevin’s. 37:40 – Guest. 38:20 – Guest continues talking about schematics and ng-conf. 38:57 – Guest talks about libraries. 40:12 – Chuck: Anything else? Do you NPM install it and it’s just there? 40:29 – Guest: There are 2 ways to go about it. 53:05 – Fresh Books! END – CacheFly! Links: Vue jQuery Angular JavaScript Python React Cypress Yeoman Apache Groovy GitHub: prettier NG Conf Brian Love’s Website Kevin Schuchard’s LinkedIn BrieBug Blog Angular Schematics Tutorial Testing Schematics with a Sandbox + starter project GitHub: Schematic Starter Getting started blog post by Hans Schematics by Manfred Steyer Angular and Material CLI schematics 1 Angular and Material CLI schematics 2 AST Explorer Evening of Angular Example Schematic project with Sandbox: (Written by Kevin) https://github.com/briebug/jest-schematic https://github.com/schuchard/prettier-schematic https://github.com/briebug/ngrx-entity-schematic https://github.com/blove/schematics Sponsors: Angular Boot Camp Cache Fly Get A Coder Job Picks: Joe Brian Love BrieBug Schematics NGConf. Minified Aaron Ice Fishing Smoking Trout Joe Eames as Dungeon Master for DND NPM JS Survey Charles Alexa Briefing EntreProgrammers.com KanBanflow Pomodoro Technique Kevin Angular Material Open Source Projects Brian Angular.io Visits on Twitter Angular Community Jesse Sanders An evening of Angular Event
December 19, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Sharon DiOrio This week on My Angular Story, Charles speaks with Sharon DiOrio who is a lead software engineer at Achievement Network (ANet) and lives in Massachusetts! Chuck and Sharon talk about how she got into programming, her education, career highlights, and more! Check it out. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: 0:00 – Advertisement: Get A Coder Job! 0:41 – Chuck: Say “hello!” You were on episode 2 back in the day! 1:16 – Chuck: Can you tell people what you are up to? 1:19 – Sharon: The Angular landscape has changed quite a bit in the past 4 years. I am still using Angular! 1:37 – Chuck: It’s nice to hear people’s backgrounds and their thought process. Let’s talk about your story. To start out how did you get into programming? 2:03 – Sharon: I have a Bachelor’s of Fine Arts. The web wasn’t a thing, yet, and it wasn’t an option. 4:04 – Chuck: How did you go from there to Angular and JavaScript? 4:12 – Sharon: I have a soft spot in my heart for Code Fusion. I did Code Fusion and PHP and that paid the bills for a long time. In the mid-2000’s that some of this stuff was going away and the idea of “old is new.” What is going to be my evolution of a developer? The frameworks (at this time) were starting to mature. 8:01 – Chuck: You run an Angular Meetup, so how did that get started? 8:05 – Sharon shares her story. 9:25 – Chuck: I would like to find a group that does this or that – and people find their niche and get together. If it grows great – if not then you begin some great friendships. I would like room for more intimate Meetups. 10:18 – Chuck. 10:23 – Sharon. 10:27 – Chuck: You spoke at NG-Conf in 2014 and what are your tips for people who want to speak at these conferences. 10:50 – Sharon: Get experience talking in front of large audiences before the ACTUAL conference! Also, start with Meetups! 12:29 – Chuck: Just the practice of building good habits and making sure that you are really prepared. Don’t they offer coaching now? 12:45 – Sharon: Yep! 12:53 – Chuck: What other things have you done with Angular? 13:01 – Sharon: I have been mostly in applications. Then I moved into educational technology. 13:55 – Chuck: Yep I identify with that a lot – getting a better career, making a better life for yourself, etc. 14:15 – Sharon: Yep! 15:34 – Chuck: I have seen things like Common Core and seeing what my kids are doing in school. 16:00 – Sharon: Most of the criticisms that people have about Common Core are... 16:35 – Sharon: I have been working in the educational space, too, yes! I have been here for 3 years now and I have “tenure” in technology. 17:18 – Chuck: What are the things that you are most proud of? 17:21 – Sharon answers the question. 19:37 – Chuck: We have shows on React, Angular and others. It’s interesting to see how people are assessing these things. 19:56 – Sharon: Yeah the landscaping is so different from not that long ago! 20:10 – Chuck. 21:03 – Sharon: Yeah our management is using version 6. I am going to do it and not tell them. 21:35 – Chuck: Anything else that you want to shout-out about? 21:37 – Sharon: How you get answers to questions will shift in your life. Learning how to ask a question well is underestimated – it’s an art. What to provide, so you know exactly what to provide to him/her. 22:21 – Chuck: Yeah my brothers 22:47 – Sharon: My father told me the same thing: you need to speak well and write well. No matter what field you are going into. Also, empathy and soft skills are great skills to have, too. 23:35 – Chuck: It is easy to work on the technology b/c it’s either right or wrong. 23:48 – Sharon: I would love to see people wanting those skills within job posts. 24:20 – Chuck: I agree! It makes a big difference. Let’s do picks! 24:35  – Fresh Books! END – CacheFly Links: jQuery Angular JavaScript Vue React Chuck’s Twitter Chuck’s E-mail: chuck@devchat.tv JSJ 335 episode AiA 002 episode Sponsors: Get A Coder Job Fresh Books Cache Fly Picks: Chuck Interview Cake – use our code, please. Marathon (John Sonmez, friend) – St. George Marathon McKirdy Trained Garmin Watches Sharon Brave Browser DevChat TV Programming for people who didn’t go the traditional way!
December 18, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood John Papa Aaron Frost Special Guest: Juan Herrera In this episode, the panelists talk with today’s special guest, Juan Herrera. The guys talk about community and how the Angular community is different than others out there. The following topics are discussed: calls for proposals (CFP), talking at conferences, Meetups, and reaching out to others within the same field as yours. The team emphasizes how meeting and networking not only creates great business connections, but great lasting friendships, too! Check it out! Show Topics: 0:00 – Advertisement: AngularBootCamp.Com 0:52 – Chuck: Hello! Our panel is Eric, John, and myself. Our special guest today is Juan Herrera! 1:00 – Panel and guest go back-and-forth. 2:28 – Chuck: Let’s discuss how to think about community locally, nationally, and internationally! 2:39 – Guest talks about his background and his work in Columbia. 4:00 – Aaron: I will give my talk in Spanish and it will be epic. I think we should start a hashtag “bonniemademedoit.” Aaron is talking about Bonnie and how she’s inspired Juan and many, many people.  5;18 – Chuck: She is so enthusiastic about this stuff you have a hard time telling her “no.” 5:32 – Guest. 6:00 – Panel: I am proud that she is apart of our community, which is our topic today. 6:26 – Guest: Yes, I think these conferences help make people pumped-up about these sort of things. 6:53 – Chuck: I am curious when talk about community – talking about global communities they are similar to other Meetups and incorporate their own way of doing things. How do you find that your particular area is unique in its own way? 7:32 – Guest: When we start this community I want to see what’s already out there? Once I know that I was trying to mimic what was already out there. In addition to that I went out of my way to figure out how to make people feel welcomed and find our own niche. 10:27: Panel: Hey – let’s create a community! I think sometimes it’s deliberate and other times it just happened. It sounded like you were very intentional. How did you get people involved? How did you get the word out? How did you get people to give talks? 11:10 – Guest: Yes that is a great challenge for us. Great question! I wanted to help people gain exposure and to help them participate at the conference. After giving their talk we give them a special gift. It can be a shirt or sticker or something. It seems enough for people to come and participate. We realized some people were scared to participate b/c imposter syndrome kicked-in. We made sure they felt comfortable and it helped them to participate. 15:00 – Panel: Yeah it sounds like 300 is a very solid conference. Good job! 15:18 – Chuck: Yeah they compare it to the bigger conferences when the local conferences are just as strong and good. Sometimes the smaller conferences are really nice b/c they are more intimate. 16:05 – Panel: I am not a fan of these massive conferences. Great, but you can’t have conversation with 50,000 people. You go to the vendor floor – it’s loud and dark. I go to conferences to talk and listen to them. I like to listen to their challenges and hear stories. 17:01 – Panel: I enjoy the variety. 17:48 – Panel: Just the quality of people that were there was fantastic. NG VIKINGS is a great one to go to! 18:10 – Panel: I saw the conference for New Zealand? And the one that is in Antarctica?! 19:10 – Panel: Some people say: I don’t know how to get involved with X conference? I have a hard time giving advice b/c we all have different backgrounds. Who wants to present on Chrome Frame? Or... 21:07 – Guest: Not everyone is outgoing nor comfortable being in front of an audience. However, just practicing helps! 21:33 – Advertisement: Get A Coder Job! 22:12 – Panel: Chuck, I want to hear about your community! 22:25 – Chuck: I can’t go to a development conference that doesn’t know who I am. I thrive off of people and connecting with them. There are a lot of great opportunities from learning from folks. The email went out this morning and get in the general channel and say: What do you listen to? What are you up to? It’s nice to hear feedback. 25:54 – Panel: I appreciate the work you’ve done within the community, too, Chuck! 26:08 – Panel: My community I’ve been around the block for about 20+ years. I get into one technology and then bounce from one to the other. I’ve had the blessing to be apart of many different communities. I did a lot of JavaScript back in the day and then left when it was a mess. These communities all have something similar: people come together. They want to find others who look/act like them! These experiences change people’s lives! 28:11 – Guest: Through these communities I’ve made a lot of friends and great colleagues. Not just professional but also personal. 28:44 – Panel: Yep the people that I’ve met through Twitter and conferences. 29:00 – Panel. 29:33 – Panel: I was in Poland a few weeks ago and I met some guys – two different Mike’s. I love how down-to-earth these guys are and I think it’s awesome to meet these great people at these conferences! 30:11 – Panel: Go to Angular conferences if you can! 31:25 – Panel: I tell people to do the same thing! 33:17 – Guest: Yeah there are people out there that are introverted, but know that other people are like you, too! Reach out to people before the conference and Tweet at them! Invite people to your group and meet-up at conferences and have a coffee! 34:55 – Panel: I meet a lot of people on Twitter. 35:51 – Panel: I think we are getting to the end and I need to say this. The angular community is a bit different compared to other communities. One thing that this community doesn’t have is the focus of the community. On top of the community are Rob, Steven, Jewels and Naomi and others! I think the Angular team themselves really care! I know they care. 38:09 – Guest: I completely agree with you, Aaron! We appreciate it! 38:25 – Chuck: To wrap-up let’s talk to you, Juan, about where communities should be going to take care of the people 38:45 – Guest: Yeah, what are we going to do next year? Are we going to do Meetups? Do they need something else? What are the needs of our members today and tomorrow? We decided to change the format. We realized that Meetups are great but they are 20-minute talks and they aren’t enough for our members. We do 4 hour Meetup that is called the MEGA MEETUP! 41:00 – Fresh Books! END – CacheFly! Links: Vue jQuery Angular JavaScript Python React Cypress Meetup Conference in Antarctica! Guest: Juan Herrera – Twitter Guest: Juan Herrera – GitHub Sponsors: Angular Boot Camp Cache Fly Picks: Aaron Harry Potter Play Talk from Angular Connect – Grant Timmerman – Google Team CFP: ngVikings 2019 CFP: ngConf @aaronfrost – Twitter! Chuck DevChat TV transferring from WordPress to a static site. Guest JS – library CFP in Columbia! (2019 conference) @jdjuan – Twitter! John Forbes Article: How to start a conversation...
December 12, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Joel Tanzi This week on My Angular Story, Charles speaks with Joel Tanzi who is a software engineer who currently resides in the Kansas City, Missouri metropolis. He has a degree from KU in computer engineering. They discuss how Joel made a career change in his mid-thirties and hasn’t looked back since! Listen to today’s episode to hear more about Joel’s background and current projects! In particular, we dive pretty deep on: 0:00 – Advertisement: Get A Coder Job! 0:51 – Chuck: I am talking with Joel – introduce yourself, please! 1:00 – Joel: I am an Angular developer on the front end. I am employed with a company and working on a new app that has to do with security. I am building the front end to that product. I was studying computer engineering at KU, and Angular is my favorite. 2:00 – Chuck: How did you get into programming? 2:04 – Joel: I have always been fascinated with computers. I struggled with mathematics and science in primary school and so I steered away from those topics; therefore my first degree is English literature. Then I fell intro IT support accidentally. Back in 2006 I went through my 2nd layoff in my career. My friend asked whether or not I would go back to school, so I did! I went to get my engineering degree and relocated to KU. It took 9 years to get my 2nd degree, because I was working fulltime. When I was graduating I talked to an instructor; he mentioned JavaScript at that time. It was exploding in the world at that time. Then I got my first job downtown Kansas City. I haven’t looked back ever since. Have you heard about Knockout? I don’t get the impression that Knockout is popular anymore? (Chuck: No it’s not popular anymore.) I learned Angular and what I like the most about it is that I love how flexible and robust it was/is. 6:32 – Chuck: You found JavaScript and then found Angular – first people to get to Ionic from Angular. How did you get to that point? 6:54 – Joel: Good question! I was fairly new to that job. People already had exposure to it throughout the team/team members. 7:57 – Chuck: How was your transition from Angular 1 to Angular 2? 8:04 – Joel: I was never married to it. I do think that Angular 2 was a major step-up for me and was an important change that needed to happen. It was based on the same concepts. 8:39 – Chuck: What work in Angular are you most proud of? 8:42 – Joel: I think the application I am working on now b/c it looks THE best! Among other things, too. I volunteer through an organization that puts together tech projects for local governments. I got involved with them b/c I wanted more real world experience. It revolves around city streetlights. 11:03 – Chuck: Yeah, Code for America I’ve heard before! Sounds neat! 11:18 – Joel: I would recommend it especially if you are trying to break-into the field. I think community outreach is honorable and it shows initiative. 12:06 – Chuck: Yeah I need to put this into my Get A Coder job 12:23 – Joel: I have met coders within this realm and it’s a great networking opportunity! 12:35 – Chuck: What are you working on now? 12:37 – Joel: WordPress development! 13:46 – Joel (continues): Most lawyers don’t have a website b/c they don’t want to dabble with the technology. 13:59 – Chuck: Cool! I think it’s important to note that your 1st degree was literature and you went back to school. For my mom she went back, too. Were you older than the other students? 14:35 – Joel: I have a lot of things that went my way, which I was very blessed. The law firm that I worked for they had a huge support for people getting their degrees. They also gave me the flex hours, too! I am glad that I had that set-up and I know I was extremely blessed to have that support. It’s hard for people to work fulltime and to go to school – it’s definitely a challenge! I am stoked about veterans getting into the coder field and people with diverse backgrounds into this field; it’s very neat! 18:23 – Chuck: How old were you when you made that career change? 18:36 – Joel: In my mid/late thirties! 18:39 – Chuck: People think that they CAN’T go back to school b/c they are too “old” – when that’s not the case! I encourage people to give it a shot.  19:33 – Joel: There is never a better time to get into this work than now. 20:39 – Chuck: Where can people find you online? 20:45 – Joel: At my website – Stringly Typed! My LinkedIn! 21:45 – Fresh Books! END – CacheFly Links: jQuery Angular JavaScript Vue React Chuck’s Twitter Chuck’s E-mail: chuck@devchat.tv Joel’s LinkedIn Stringly Typed Sponsors: Get A Coder Job Fresh Books Cache Fly Picks: Joel Tanzi Code America Operation Code RxJS Chuck Max Wood Mastodon HubSpot
December 11, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Joe Eames John Papa Alyssa Nicoll Special Guest: Michael Giambalvo In this episode, Chuck talks with special guest Michael Giambalvo who is an author of the book titled, “Testing Angular Applications.” This book can be purchased through Amazon, Manning Publications, among other sites, too. The panelists and the guest talk about different types of tests, such as end-to-end testing and unit testing. They also talk about Angular, Java, Mocha, Test Café, and much more! Check it out! Show Topics: 0:00 – Advertisement: AngularBootCamp.Com 0:53 – Chuck: Our panel is John Papa, Joe Eames, Alyssa Nicoll, and myself. My new show is the DevRev – check it out, please! 1:26 – Guest: I am a contributing author to our new book, which is about Angular. 1:56 – Chuck: How is it like to write with multiple people? 2:04 – Guest: Yep it’s hard b/c we are in different areas. Back in the 2.0 days, Jesse was writing a book. He was talking about typescript and components. Craig made friends with Jesse and they were talking about the book he was writing. Then we all jumped in to get in finished. We all had areas that we were specialists in! 3:21 – Alyssa: If you break it up that makes sense. 3:31 – Guest. 3:40 – Panel: Pick different words and go around the room. 3:51 – Panel: You write the first ½ of a sentence and then you write the other ½ of the sentence! 4:10 – Guest: You have these big word documents and go back-and-forth. 4:36 – Alyssa: Editing and then pass it back-and-forth – how does that work? 4:46 – Guest: It’s like 8 pass backs-and-forth. 5:35 – Guest: The editing was the main issue – it took forever! 5:50 – Chuck: We were going to co-author a book and we didn’t. Chuck: If you could break down the book in 4 core topics what would they be? Elevator pitch? What is the starting knowledge? 6:18 – Guest: We expect you to know Angular Intro and that’s it! 6:43 – Chuck: What are the principles? 6:50 – Guest: We talk about the testing component. We highlight the benefits of using Angular vs. Angular.js. That shows up in the book a lot. It’s very example driven. 7:28 – Chuck: We have been talking about testing quite a bit on the show lately. 8:22 – Chuck: Do you see people using the testing in regards to the pyramid? 8:33 – Guest: I am not a huge fan of the pyramid. Some questions I ask are: Does it run quickly? Is it reliable? To give you some background I work on Google Club Platform. 10:21 – The guest talks about “Page Level Integration Tests.” 11:31 – Alyssa. 11:50 – Chuck: After your explanation after writing your book I’m sure it’s a breeze now. Knowing these tests and having the confidence is great. 12:13 – Guest: Tools like Cypress is very helpful. Web Driver Testing, too. 12:43 – Chuck: Where do people start? What do you recommend? Do they start at Protractor or do they come down to unit tests? 13:02 – Guest: Finding the balance is important. 14:30 – Chuck: Check out a past episode that we’ve done. 14:40 – Panel asks a question about tools such as Test Café and Cypress. 14:50 – Guest: I really don’t know Test Café. There is a long story in how all of these fit together. The guest talks about Selenium, Cypress, Safari, Edge, Chrome, Firefox, and Puppeteer! 19:24 – Chuck: Does it work in Electron as well, too? 19:26 – Guest: Good question but I don’t know the answer. 19:39 – Chuck: Maybe a listener could write a comment and tell us. 19:43 – Panel: I’ve used Protractor for many years. I like the explanation that you just gave. The great thing about Protractor is that you can... 20:29 – Guest: We wanted to explain the difficulty of Protractor in this book. Guest: You have this test running in Node but then you have your app running in the browser. You have these 2 different run times. You might have to run them separately and there is tons of complexity. 21:15 – Panel: As I am coding you have this visual browser on one side, and then on the other side you have... 22:22 – Guest asks the panelists a question. 22:32 – Panel: I have only used it for a few months and a few several apps but haven’t had those issues, yet. 22:55 – Guest: I haven’t heard of Test Café at all. 23:05 – Alyssa: Is the book online? 23:13 – Guest: It’s available through Manning Publications and Amazon. I think we have some codes to giveaway! 23:34 – Chuck: Yeah, we are working on those codes and giveaways. We have mentioned about 5 or 6 tools – are you worried about your book going out of date? 24:05 – Guest: Sure that is something we are worried about. When editing took a long time to get through that was one of my thoughts. The guest talks about Selenium, control flow, Protractor, 25:45 – Guest (continues): These new features were coming out while the book was coming out – so there’s that. What’s this thing about control flow and why this matters to you, etc. We were able to add that into the book, which is good. We were able to get those instructions out there. Books have a delay to them. 26:47 – Chuck: We talked about this in JavaScript Jabber. This guest talked about this and he is from Big Nerd Ranch. At what point do you have this breaking point: This isn’t a good fit for Test Café or Selenium BUT a good fit for Mocha or Jest? 27:27 – Advertisement: Get A Coder Job! 28:04 – Guest: Do you have a reason why you would switch testing tools? 28:12 – Chuck. 28:41 – Guest: That’s the tradeoff as you move down the ladder. 29:43 – Panel: If you want to trigger an action that isn’t triggerable? 29:50 – Guest answers the question. 30:07 – Panel. 30:20 – Chuck. 30:33 – Guest: You can access code. Usually something in a workflow will make it happen. You have to fall back on some type of UI sort of thing. It’s almost like doing Tetris! I’ve never had to directly call something. I am not the best one to answer that. 31:16 – Panel: It’s like a weird mix of tests. 31:29 – Panelist is talking about unit testing and other tests. 31:55 – Chuck asks a question. 32:02 – Guest: It depends on the scale of your project. 32:28 – Chuck: Do you guys use a test coverage tool or on the side of: everything should run and then test if there is a bug. 32:43 – Guest: Coverage isn’t the full story. 33:26 – Panel: You said you weren’t a fan of the testing pyramid – can you explain why? 33:43 – Guest: I think it turns too much prescriptive. Guest: I think there are bigger concerns out there and the test pyramid is an over-simplification. 35:22 – Panel: What’s the difference between fast and slow testing? 35:28 – Guest: It really depends on your level of knowledge. If your test suite runs more than twenty minutes to an hour that is probably too slow! 36:03 – Alyssa. 36:09 – Chuck. 36:16 – Alyssa: There is no way that 20 minutes equals that! 36:26 – Guest: 20 minutes is the extreme limit.  36:51 – Chuck. 37:11 – Panel: Any new Twitter news on Trump? 37:21 – Panelist talks about test suites! 37:40 – Panelists and guests go back-and-forth. 38:11 – Chuck: Do you have any recommendations for the unit testing? Keeping it small or not so much? 38:29 – Guest: Think: What is this test asking? Don’t write tests that won’t fail if some other tests could have caught them. 39:04 – Alyssa: That’s smart! 39:09 – Guest continues. 39:28 – Chuck: What else to jump on? Chuck: Do you write your tests in typescript or in Java? 39:48 – Guest answers the question. He mentions Python, typescript, and more! 40:17 – Alyssa. 40:22 – Guest continues. 40:46 – Alyssa: How many people worked on that project? 40:50 – Guest: 2 or 3 framework engineers who did the tooling. About 20 people total for tooling to make sure everything worked. 41:18 – Panelist asks a question. 41:22 – Guest: About 20 minutes! 42:35 – Guest wants to talk about the topic: end-to-end testing! 44:59 – Chuck: Let’s do picks! 45:09 – Fresh Books! END – CacheFly! Links: Vue jQuery Angular JavaScript Python React Cypress Puppeteer – GitHub Protractor Test Mocha.js Selenium C# GitHub: testcafe Istanbul “Protractor: A New Hope” – YouTube Video – Michael Giambalvo & Craig Nishina Book: “Testing Angular Applications” – Manning Publications Michael’s GitHub Michael’s Twitter Sponsors: Angular Boot Camp Cache Fly Picks: Alyssa Fantastic Beasts Joe Skyward War of the Spider Queen Luxur - board game Testing Angular with Cypress.io Space Cadets Sonar Family Charles The DevRev Podcast Gary Vee Audio Experience Michael Scale Captain Sonar
December 5, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Ryan Chenkie This week on My Angular Story, Charles speaks with Ryan Chenkie (Canada). He is a developer who uses JavaScript with Angular and Node and he does screencasting at angularcasts.io. They talk about Ryan’s background, his current projects, and getting over imposter syndrome! Check it out! In particular, we dive pretty deep on: 0:00 – Advertisement: Get A Coder Job! 0:47 – Chuck: Today our guest is Ryan Chenkie! 0:55 – Guest: Hello! I’m excited! 1:02 – Chuck: What are you doing now? 1:10 – Guest: I spent 2.5 years at Auth0 and learned a ton there. I was doing some side work and then figured out I had to focus on one thing or the other. Now I have been a consultant fulltime and also teaching, too. AngularCast.io I teach there. 1:56 – Chuck: Sounds like people are excited about GraphQL. I’ve been there, too, and make a similar decision. 2:19 – Guest: It was a hard decision b/c I liked all of my colleagues there. I always had the itch to be self-employed. 2:42 – Chuck: You figure out of it’s for you or not. 2:51 – Guest: Yep! I am happy to be another year of it. 3:00 – Chuck: I went free-lanced about a year ago b/c the decision was made for me. 3:29 – Guest: I am grateful for it. 3:40 – Chuck: Yeah, we talk about this a lot on one of my podcast platforms. If you can make a connection with people then you’ll be god. 4:07 – Guest: Yeah I had to figure out if I would have to focus on the marketing side of things or not. Right now the projects are coming to me – right to my front door, which is great! It’s this ever-expanding web. 4:55 – Chuck: Yeah where people tend to show-up. Let’s talk about your story! How did you get into programming? 5:30 – Guest: It was a little less typically at the time. I was fully self-taught. I went to school for a somewhat Geography degree. It got boring for me at some point. I had to do one programming course while in school and it was in Java. I was terrible at it and I didn’t have a clue what I was doing. It didn’t help that the instruction wasn’t great. I was terrible I didn’t understand a thing. I was scared that I was going to fail the course. I came out of there feeling like I didn’t have the chops to be a programmer. I was doing Geomantic-stuff. I learned that the further you get into this programming stuff you would make better money – better job, etc. I was trying to put this map/graph into a website and it said that I had to learn Java. This time, though, the material was taught to me in these small increments. I got into it more and I was more attracted to the idea of programming. 10:00 – Guest continues. 10:32 – Guest: I was learning Angular and JavaScript better. 10:35 – Chuck: Yeah it makes you think through it. You have to go deep. 10:47 – Guest: I would make a sample packet. I would get to certain points and get to a point and I couldn’t explain what I did. I would get to a roadblock and I couldn’t explain it. I would be on this tangent for a while and have to figure this out. I was working with the government, at this time, but I thought: maybe I could try this programming thing for a while. Did you go to NG Vegas conference? 12:20 – Chuck: Nope. 12:25 – Guest: There is this conference in Las Vegas – I am going to go and hang out with people. At this conference I met some important people. This company posted that they needed someone and I thought: this is the job for me. I sent an email – went to an interview – and did an example. I got the job and freaked out because I wasn’t a “real” programmer. I wrote some content for them and it’s been all good. 14:07 – Chuck: Let me back-up real quickly. How did you find Angular? 14:18 – Guest: It’s hard to pinpoint the “moment” I had found Angular. As I am learning through Code Academy I am reading articles and stuff. I heard about Angular.js and watched some online tutorials and watched all of the talks from the conference. I thought that I needed to learn it b/c it was pretty popular at the time. I knew how to write JavaScript, but made me clearly see with Angular.js app I had to back up and learn it. 15:34 – Chuck: Yep! 16:05 – The guest mentions Hacker News among other things. 16:22 – Chuck: Angular and Electron is what we brought you on for – is that what you are doing? 16:36 – Guest: The guest talks about his experiences with Angular and Electron. 18:26 – Chuck: Let’s backup some more – didn’t sound like you worked with a lot of tech companies right? 18:51 – Guest: Yep that was my only one. 18:57 – Chuck: I hear a lot of complaints from people having this imposter syndrome. You only being in the industry for a short amount of time – how did you overcome the imposter syndrome? 19:34 – Guest: Imposter syndrome has been an issue for me – I wasn’t crippled – but it’s debilitating. “Who am I to teach on this subject?” – but I think I’ve made conscious efforts to ignore that and to use it as a little bit as fuel. I remember, man, of being scarred! I remember being terrified to see the online comments – b/c they are going to “know” that I don’t know what I am talking about. Funny thing is that I had a lot of positive comments. Little-by-little, those positive pieces of feedback were good for me. I thought: At least I am helping people (like I said, little-by-little!). I think there has been a part of a loop there. If you can look for that feedback it can help overcome imposter syndrome. The things of value are the things that scare you. 22:41 – Chuck: Yeah, I talk about this all the time to people. I have been self-employed for 8.5 years. I am not going to starve. If I had to, I could go and find a “normal” job. 23:20 – Guest: I agree. One piece of feedback that I got from a colleague is that she said: you are very resourceful! Knowing that it helped b/c it was a boost of confidence. If I had this capacity of being resourceful that helped me make my decision. It wasn’t a good time in the sense that we just had a baby. If it went south then I could always go back and get a “normal” job. 24:43 – Chuck: Yeah we talk about that in Agile development – the further you go the more information you get. 24:58 – Guest. Yep 25:03 – Chuck: What are you doing now? 25:07 – Guest: I’ve had a few large clients these past few years. I have current projects going now one is with a museum. I am speaking at a few conferences – one of them was in San Francisco and Prague. Now I am planning for next year and figuring out what my teaching and speaking plans will be. It looks like I am focusing on Graph QL content. Lots of Angular, too! 26:32 – Chuck: You are web famous! 26:35 – Guest: I don’t know about that, but I do have some things out there. 26:42 – Chuck: How can people find you? 26:49 – Guest: Twitter! Website! GitHub! 27:18 – Chuck: Picks! 27:25 – Fresh Books! END – CacheFly Links: jQuery Angular JavaScript Vue React Chuck’s Twitter Chuck’s E-mail: chuck@devchat.tv Code Academy Auth0 Scotch.io Ryan’s LinkedIn Ryan’s Packages Ryan’s Website Ryan’s Twitter Ryan’s GitHub Sponsors: Get A Coder Job Fresh Books Cache Fly Picks: Ryan Security Headers Try to push past the fear of being an “imposter”! Chuck Dungeons & Dragons Take time with family! Being handy around your home. Lowes. Surprise yourself and go beyond the imposter syndrome!
December 4, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood In this episode, Chuck discusses his new podcast show titled the DevRev. Chuck also asks you very honest questions that will get you thinking; such as: What does freedom mean to you? How do you want your life and career to unfold? How can we (at the DevRev) help you with your career decisions? Check out today’s episode to hear about this and much more! Show Topics: 0:00 – Advertisement: AngularBootCamp.Com 0:52 – Chuck: Welcome! The panel is myself! I had this idea bouncing in my head for a while and I got some verification while waiting for my guest and panelists to show up. The show that I am producing is called, DevRev and it’s based on developer freedom. 2:22 – Chuck: Some developers love to contribute to open source. Some developers say that they don’t get along with their boss or coworkers. Others will say that they aren’t learning and feel like they are falling behind. I am on the B team and want to be on the A team. It boils down to: are they getting the freedom to do what they want to do. 3:45 – Chuck: I haven’t been happier with my job since I’ve gone self-employed. Having a sense of freedom could have a different definition for you. Perhaps you are looking for time to go hiking, skiing, and so on. For you it could be programming is to help you with your hobbies. What kind of opportunities can YOU create for yourself in programming? 5:32 – Chuck: When I got into programming (at first) I didn’t have a real clear idea. My old boss would have these ideas and would change the day after our meeting, which was frustrating. Freedom could be things from the things that don’t make you happy. Maybe an office space for you doesn’t work for you. 6:41 – Chuck: 1.) Freedom in life to do what you want! 2.) Freedom in your career to elevate you where you want to be. Chuck: Freedom to pursue the things that I care about vs. not pursue the things I don’t care about. First of all how do we take care of the big things? How do we reach our long-term goals? Finally, how do we remove all of the other interrupts and optimize our experience day-to-day to achieve things we want to achieve? 8:48 – Chuck: I was talking with Chris and his ideas are centered on with helping the community. We talked about the things that hang him up, too? 9:26 – Chuck: “I am swamped at work – what do I do?” I want to help you solve your issues. What’s your idea of freedom? 10:15 – Chuck: How do you feel fulfilled? Let’s find you a place that will payoff for you. There are all kinds of ideas around this. That’s where I want to dive-into! 11:11 – Chuck: If there are any questions that you have in particular – shoot me a message! I will gladly answer your questions and check out TheDevRev.com! I have some friends who run a financial podcast – 2 Frugal Dudes. I want you to ask the questions that are irking you. 12:36 – Chuck: I feel like there are tons of opportunities for developers out there that we can help you find what’s a good place for you. Find what you want out your career and life – find something that will line-up for you. Even if you are trying to find your first job! There are a lot of options out there. I am putting the show out on YouTube and Facebook! END – Advertisement – Cache Fly! Links: Discord App Discord App – DevChat TV TheDevRev.com Sponsors: Angular Boot Camp Cache Fly Picks: Charles zoom.us repurpose.io
November 28, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Travis Tidwell This week on My Angular Story, Charles speaks with Travis Tidwell (Dallas, TX) who is CTO and co-founder of Form_IO! Chuck and Travis talk about his background, open source struggles, and more. Check it out! In particular, we dive pretty deep on: 0:00 – Advertisement: Get A Coder Job! 0:49 – Chuck: Welcome! We had you on Episode 125. A lot has changed huh? The nice thing, though, about these changes is that we seem to be tackling different problems. 1:42 – Guest: They are stabilizing on the same on the same design patterns. I think that’s refreshing. Back in the day, everyone had their own way of doing it. It was difficult to find which one is the RIGHT one. 2:05 – Chuck: Yes, I agree. Gives us your background, please! 2:20 – Guest: I am still doing Form IO, and the co-founder and CTO of the company. My Angular Story is MY story on how the company evolved. 3:05 – Chuck: How did you get into programming? 3:09 – Guest: I am going to be 40-years old in May! I am getting up there. Everyone who I am talking to (in my age) it seems like we have the same story. We have this story of having that REALLY old computer. Parents bring home the IBM or the Commodore 64 and that really is my story. At the time, the only thing you could learn with it was to program – there weren’t any video games, etc. A book that I geeked-out about was: “DOS for Dummies.” The guest talks about his senior year in college and how he came to fall in-love with programming. 6:28 – Guest: After college, I got a job for working for a company that used C++ code. People ask: How the heck did you get into Web? My background, too, was tap dancing and in the arts. Most people don’t know that. I was giving these tap lessons to kids – and around that time YouTube was just for cat videos. At the time, I thought it would be great to teach these tap video lessons online. I found a CMS at the time that would help me with my teaching intent. Drupal took me into the frontend libraries. PHP is a backend language, and Drupal was based entirely on PHP. There was this huge paradigm-shift within my career. I really got into these tools not knowing that it would change my career. My open source has taken me to tutorial videos. Eventually, a light bulb went off and I found a solution that needed to be solved within Angular. 12:21 – Guest. 12:28 – Chuck: I love the side hustle description: I saw a need out there and we solved it! 12:40 – Guest: Side hustle is great to talk about. Open source is a bit of a struggle (at that time) it was really hard to maintain open source and providing for your family at the same time. Open source is hard b/c you work your butt off, but you aren’t getting paid for it. It’s really, really difficult. I’ve had ups-and-downs actually with open source. You have to get innovative with it. I am really big on and supportive of people who are monetizing off of open source. 14:58 – Chuck: Open source – for me – I got burned out in June. Sometimes you are putting in a lot of time and not seeing any benefit from it. You have all of these things and something changes, something is different – I can’t take another night not seeing my kids. 16:06 – Guest: You have this original motivation as an open source developer – and you build something rally cool. You share with the world, but a lot of people don’t realize the tail of it. Come to realize it worked well for you – but not for everyone! It makes your stock price go out – contributing to open source – especially if you have a popular open source library. Most of the jobs I would apply to I would just give them my GitHub repertoire. People are figuring out ways they can support themselves and monetize. The ones that can figure that out don’t burnout. 19:44 – Chuck: Babel – Henry Zhu. (See his Patreon account.) 20:08 – Guest: How does he do it? 20:20 – Chuck: It’s mostly contributions. 20:35 – Guest: I see that you are on Patreon. I urge people to go there and help support those open source people. It’s such a great thing and it’s becoming a trend. That’s one thing that drew me away from Drupal b/c at the time it had this negative connotation of monetizing on your open source. The spirit of the open source is THAT. It gives support to open source folks in order to provide for their families. 22:00 – Chuck: I talk a lot with Eric through CodeFund. It’s important to know these options. 22:24 – Guest: That is my road of open source and in creating IO. 24:01 – Chuck: You are the CTO and not the CEO. How did you wind up and forming IO? 24:15 – Guest: There were a lot of pain points. It all started with the prototype. The guest talks about the background. Travis mentions FormBuilder among other things. 30:00 – Chuck: What are you working on now? 30:05 – Guest: The Vanilla Core Renderer! It doesn’t care what framework it gets attached to. We are working on a new template engine.  31:55 – Chuck: I wish I had more time to code. 31:58 – Guest. 33:08 – Chuck: How can people find you? 33:10 – Guest: GitHub! Training YouTube Videos! Twitter! 34:56 – Fresh Books! END – CacheFly Links: jQuery Angular JavaScript Vue React Chuck’s Twitter Chuck’s E-mail: chuck@devchat.tv Travis Tidwell’s Book: Flash With Drupal “How to Build a M.E.A.N. Web Application” by Travis Tidwell Angular-Formly Angular Angular – FormBuilder Patreon Travis’ YouTube Videos Episode 125 with Travis! Travis’ LinkedIn Sponsors: Get A Coder Job Fresh Books Cache Fly Picks: Travis Technology: Minio.io T.V. Show: Rick & Morty AI Movie (listen for title) Chuck T.V. Show: Last Man Standing
November 27, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Aaron Frost Shai Reznik   Divya Sasidharan Joe Eames Lucas Reis Special Guest: Sean Merron In this episode, The panelist of Adventure In Angular, View on Vue, React Round-Up, and Ruby Rogues and JavaScript Jabber speak with Sean Merron about Mastermind Groups of Startups and much more. Sean is the founder of today's topic and product “Mastermind Hunt.” This product is design to skillfully find a mastermind to take your business and skills to the next level. Show Topics: 0:00 – Advertisement: AngularBootCamp.Com 3:00 – Webinar announcement January 3rd, 2p EST. 4:10 - Sean talks about the importance of a Mastermind and his evolvement in mastermind groups. Sean breakdowns what exactly what a mastermind is about. 6:10 - Charles ask the panelist if they have engaged in Masterminds. Shai talks about his experience and seeing one-sidedness in Masterminds. Sean talks about how to avoid this issue and staying on track. Sean shares on how to keep the meeting moving forward and meet accountability tasks. 10:10 - Joe asks about examples of chatting on topics with co-workers and how is this different from masterminds. And how to keep topics on track. Sean provides using the round robin method to give each person a chance to bring their needs to the table. Sean talks about how developers share advice and topics in Masterminds. 14:43 -  Charles shares about how this works in using exercise workbooks as a group and who the rotation works for the hot seat. Sean explains that this is used to find others at your same level to help one another. 16:50 - Shai ask about the benefits of mastermind, but how can we integrate higher level issues among a group. Sean shares a story about meeting and benefits of networking in Masterminds. Sean and Chuck continue with the power of networking among these types of groups. 22:00 -  Charles talks about the complexity of personal issues. Shai asks about how to build a mastermind. Sean gives examples of formats and schedule, number of people, and how to conduct successfully. Sean gives examples of technologies to use to help conduct masterminds, like Facebook groups, Skype, Zoom.  Sean explains how this led to building  mastermindhunt.com 27:00 – Advertisement: Get A Coder Job! 27:00 -  Charles talks about how he did a lunch meetup as a mastermind. Lucas gives examples of guilds in his job. Lucas explains the guilds and how this works among the software development team. Lucas shares about presenting in a guild. Lucas says this is great for accountability and success. 30:00 -  Sean asks about the size or how many people are in the guild. Lucas mentions that if you do not understand something, bring it to the guild. Sean mentions how this could help shy people and build trust. Sean talks about “Friend D A” 34:00 -  Charles again talks about that BrownBag lunch mastermind. Charles talks about how to keep masterminds on track and not a chatfest. Joe asks about the accountability goals. Sean talks about how this works in Mastermind Hunt.  Sean gives examples of how to keep people accountable in fun ways. 37:00 -  Shai talks about having to shave his head when he was not meeting accountability goals.  Sean continues about respecting people’s time and keeping on topic with hot seat questions. 39:00 -  Shai asks about how to approach people who are not meeting goals and take-up to much time. Sean says the person with the best relationship should approach the person before they have to bump them out of the mastermind spot. 42:00 - Charles talks about EntreProgrammers as a mastermind and the freeform style of the format. Charles talks about leaving the group if it is not meeting your value needs. 44:00 - Sean talks about the introduction and application programs to enter into a mastermind. Lucas talks about diminishing quality of a mastermind, and how he raised the quality of engaging in a way that heightens the program. Sean shares more aobuu the initial attitude of the person who starts the meeting. 49:00 -  Divya ask about those who are not hitting their goals, but how do you keep them engaged without leaving the group. Sean mentions breaking down the goals or create achievable goals. Sean talks about figuring out the organization and finding where the issues are at that might be the problem to hitting goals. 51:00 - Divya ask about how enthusiasm can diminish about how to keep that from happening in masterminds. Sean says you have to be consistent with your goals and make it fun. 55:00 - Shai gives a quick recap of masterminds. Shai ask about how to rotate the hot seat. Sean give a webinar link for mastermindhunt.com/devchat on January 3rd, 2pm EST. 57:30 – Advertisement – Fresh Books! 30-day free trial! END – Advertisement – Cache Fly! Links: Sean’s Twitter 2frugaldudes  podcast Sean’s LinkedIn mastermindhunt.com mastermindhunt.com/devchat Sponsors: Angular Boot Camp Fresh Books Get a Coder Job Course Cache Fly Picks: Shai Bob Proctor Joe  Coolstuffinc luxor NG Conf Minified Lucas Radical Candor Divya Alan Watts Framework Summit Videos Several Short Sentence about Writing Charles CES - devchat.tv/events Modern Medicine Sean (757) Area Code RevolutionConf.com
November 21, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: James Shore This week on My Angular Story, Charles speaks with James Shore who is the author of the book, “The Art of Agile.” James is a thought leader in the Agile software development community. He combines deep technical expertise with whole-system thinking to help development teams worldwide achieve great things! Check out his complete biography here! Chuck and James talk about Agile development, James’ background, and future projects! In particular, we dive pretty deep on: 0:00 – Advertisement: Get A Coder Job! 0:48 – Chuck: Welcome! James was on a past episode, which was show 205! Give us an introduction, please! 1:05 – James: I have been involved with the software industry since 1991. I have written a book and it’s fairly evergreen. 1:30 – Chuck: Yeah, I remember that’s when the Agile development was getting really, really hot! 2:09 – James: Yeah in the early 2000s there was this energy to do software really well, and it seems like it’s turned into this bureaucracy. I find that to be depressing a tiny bit. 2:50 – Chuck: Yeah, I agree. 3:01 – James: Going back to a perspective where excellence is no longer the priority; excellence in your craft. 3:31 – Chuck. 3:34 – James: Yeah that was Bob Marten. James talks about the Agile movement. 4:22 – Chuck: This show is a walk back throughout your story. Let’s talk about HOW you got into this stuff. 4:40 – James talks about his background. 4:58 – Chuck talks about his Grandpa and his experience with technology when he was young. 5:10 – James: ...it had a whopping 2K of memory! That’s really how I got involved into programming. Later on I got a Trash 80 then an Apple 2, so I had programming in through my blood. 6:01 – Chuck. 6:08 – James talks about switching between computer and antenna, and his black and white T.V. He also talks about the electrical engineering program at the university. 7:16 – Chuck: I studied ad received my computer science degree. 7:28 – James. 7:34 – Chuck: You have been in the industry since 2001 and you are a bit older than me. 7:50 – James: My first job was in 1994. Then I wrote some things with Fido Net. Fido Net was this early online form thing. Sort of like Used Net / Used Groups (online bulletin web forms) via the telephone dial-up. They were hobbyists running this out from their home. It was basically chat forms. Once you have some experience (doesn’t matter your degree) – it’s...have you done this before? 9:30 – Chuck: This is RIGHT in-line with what I say in my eBook that I am developing now. 10:00 – James: I didn’t even post that I was looking for a job, but I got very lucky. 10:15 – Chuck: What is your journey look like and how did you get into Agile development? 10:30 – James talks about his Kickstarter, knowledge in JavaScript, programming experience, and more here – check it out! 13:16 – Chuck: How did you get to Agile development? 13:31 – James: I was programming throughout my teens. I was working on a really complicated project. I still play Dungeons and Dragons (D&D). It was the most complicated program that I built at that point. I had it in my head and then I didn’t understand it anymore. The program collapsed. To me that was really transformative b/c it’s not writing the algorithms but how it all works together. Then this taught me how to communicate the design to the other members on the team to make it work. 15:50 – James: Have you heard of Rational Rose? You don’t hear about it anymore b/c it was a complete flop. 17:20 – Chuck: Wow! 17:33 – James: It was actually detrimental to get it done. It really was a crisis of faith. I ran into this book: Object Modeling in Color by Peter Coad. Extreme Programming is mentioned, too, by James’ coworker! 21:10 – Chuck: It’s so interesting to me. We focus so much on the technological side, we forget to talk about the people, and the other sides to this. It’s easy to overlook this other stuff. 21:47 – James: There is so much silver bullet thinking within this industry. The original communication from person-to-person is so crucial. It’s so important to software development. Ultimately, the computer doesn’t care, but the collaboration is the real trick and the real challenge. 23:10 – Chuck talks about his brother and his computer science courses experience. 24:27 – James: It could be that 1 team could solve a problem but nowadays it’s working with multiple teams. People want to water things down to help facilitate – but don’t do that. There is a huge large scale Agile that is large interdependent teams. 25:19 – Chuck: MFCEO is a podcast that I am listening to now. He says that nobody wants to sit down and dictate what each member will be responsible for. Chuck reads a quote from an episode from MFCEO – check it out! 26:54 – James: It’s something that people have lost track of. I still program daily even though I do this Agile stuff as well. I have been programming for 25 years and Extreme Programming was the most effective thing for me throughout my career. James: I think XP is the time (now) to have a comeback! 29:41 – Chuck: That was my experience, too. We pushed one team to go to Agile, and then we went to our boss. Chuck: We’d sit down every two weeks and have an Agile-Perspective (what is working and what isn’t working). We are talking about HOW we are writing the software, and that is really what we are after. 30:54 – James: You are building the TEAM that builds the project. Of course, you need to have consistencies across the team, and every team is different b/c every member has different personalities. Mod Programming is we are going to work as a whole group around a screen. Personally, that is not my style but I would TRY it. If it worked for that team then I would do it. 32:00 – Chuck: That is the beauty of it. With this set of programmers x, y, and z may or may not work, and that is O.K. 32:25 – James: I heard about Extreme Programming and I thought it was nuts!! 32:40 – Chuck. 32:44 – James: The more I tried it, and the more it worked. Try Extreme Programming b/c it’s totally a different experience. It’s my book that I wrote 10 years ago but it still is applicable today. Try it for a few months (3 months) or so, b/c it takes time to figure out the different terms and such. Go try out a bunch of new different things, but figuring out HOW to make it work for me. 34:05 – Chuck: Yeah, you need data. Look at the data. Go experiment. 34:47 – James: Try it for real. Check out this essay: “We tried baseball, and it didn’t work.” James: Many things only work in context!  What we do is we change the context in Agile. 35:58 – Chuck: What are you working on now? 36:00 – James: I am actually working on AgileFluency.org. It’s a set of tools for coaches and leaders to CHANGE their context. How can you find those constraints and invest on changing those. 36:31 – Chuck: Where do they go to find you? 36:40 – James: My website - it’s the ugliest website, but it’s been working since 2003. 36:54 – Picks! 37:05 – Fresh Books! END – CacheFly Links: jQuery Angular JavaScript Vue React Slack Zone.js GitHub – Zone.js Chuck’s Twitter Chuck’s E-mail: chuck@devchat.tv Timex Sinclair FidoNet VHDL Book: Java Modeling Color with UML Pivotal Labs Book: The ART OF AGILE DEVELOPMENT BY JAMES SHORE James Shore’s Website Sponsors: Get A Coder Job Fresh Books Cache Fly Picks: Chuck Podcast: MFCEO James Package Management Tool: Nix.org
November 20, 2018
Panel: Aaron Frost Brian Love Special Guest: Amir Tugendhaft In this episode, Aaron and Brian talk with Amir Tugendhaft who is a web developer who is located in Israel. He finds much gratification developing and building things from scratch. Check out today’s episode where Aaron, Brian, and Amir talk about just that. Other topics include UI Design, Flexbox, UX design, PrimeNG, and ag-Grid. Show Topics: 0:00 – Advertisement: AngularBootCamp.Com 0:52 – Host: Welcome! Today’s panel is myself, Brian, and our guest is Amir Tugendhaft! 1:13 – Guest: I am a developer and experience with Angular and React. 1:56 – Host: You spend your days/nights there? 2:03 – Panel: He is committed. 2:08 – Host: I am going to back up a second, and Brian could you please introduce yourself, please? 2:26 – Brian: I am the CETO at an Angular consulting firm (Denver, CO). We have the pleasure with working with Aaron from time-to-time. My Twitter handle is @brian_love – check it out! 2:52 – Host: What is CETO stand for? 2:59 – Brian answers the question. Brian: I oversee the crew among other things. 3:31 – Host: What do you want to talk about today, Amir? You are the guest of honor today! 3:40 – Guest. 4:00 – Host: That is a lot of information – that might be more than 1 episode. We have to stay focused! 4:14 – Host: I read one of your recent blogs about Cross Filled Violators. I met you through your blog before we did the Host: Give us your own ideas about starting your own app. 4:50 – Guest answers the question. 6:17 – Host: I am biased. But here is a fact. I used to work on a large team (60 people) and everyone committing to the same page app. We were using Angular.js 1.5, which I think they are still using that. I know that it worked but it wasn’t the easiest or fastest one to maintain, but it worked. 7:05 – Brian. 7:10 – Host: What are you trying to do? React doesn’t fulfill that need. I think you are being hyperballic and using extreme cases as the norm. Let’s be honest: we do cool stuff with jQuery plugins when we didn’t have a framework. When they say that the framework is stopping them then I say: I agree to disagree. 8:00 – Host: What do you think, Amir? 8:04 – Guest: I don’t have preferences. I try to build applications through the technologies and create components and simple applications. 8:30 – Brian. 8:33 – Guest: You create the component, and then... 9:21 – Brian: You don’t have to have a template file and another file – right? 9:35 – Guest. 9:48 – Host: I do in-line styles and in-line templates. One thing I learned from React is that I like my HTML, style and code. I like it being the same file as my component. I like that about that: I like single file components. This promotes getting frustrated if it gets too big. Yeah if it’s more than 500 lines than you have to simplify. That’s one of the things that l like. 10:47 – Brian: Modules versus... 10:55 – Guest. 11:07 – Host: I think in React and Vue you have the word module but in JavaScript you have a file that exports... 11:26 – Host: I have my opinion here and talking with Joe. He made a good point: at a certain level the frontend frameworks are the same. You could be doing different things but they basically do the same thing. 13:57 – Guest: Basically what that means is that the technology used it will do the same thing. Your patterns and practices are huge. 14:17 – Brian: If you are talking about the 3 popular frameworks out there – they are basically doing the same thing. I like Angular a little big more, though. Like you said, Aaron, people tend to pick the same one. I like the opinionated things about Angular. You get properties, components or called props or inputs you are getting a lot of the same features. It comes down to your personal preference. 15:31 – Host: What else Amir? 15:35 – Guest: Let’s talk about the UI. 16:05 – Brian. 16:08 – Guest asks a question. 16:25 – Brian: How have you tackled this problem? 16:34 – Guest: I kind of ran with it. If there wasn’t something that I liked I started from scratch, because it really didn’t feel right. 16:51 – Brian: I am an enemy of starting over type of thing. You have a lot of engineers who START projects, and they can say that they start this piece, but the experts and choice team members have what it takes to ship a feature. I mean fully ship it, not just 80%, but also the final 20%. I think it takes a lot of pose decision making to say I want to rewrite it but not right now. I still need to ship this code. I have always been a bigger fan as not rewriting as much as possible; however, if you started with good patterns then that’s true, but if you are starting off with bad patterns then maybe yes. I like that opinion b/c you have to start right. Brian: How do you do your CSS? 19:05 – Guest. 19:52 – Advertisement: Get A Coder Job! 20:30 – Brian: How do you make those decisions, Amir? 20:39 – Guest: I see something that I like and ask myself how do I apply this to my design and I start scaling things. 21:50 – Host: Are you using a tool like Sketch for your initial UI design? 22:05 – Guest. 22:54 – Host: I worked on a project where the client had a designer (UX). 24:00 – Host and Guest go back-and-forth. 24:51 – Host: I am sure it’s all about the quality from your designer, too. Hopefully it works well for you and it’s quality. 25:18 – Host: There is a lot to building an app from scratch. I am not a good designer. I am not a designer – I mean straight-up. I got nothing. I appreciate team members that can do that. 26:06 – Guest: Do you write...? 26:35 – Host: Only on the most recent project. The designer didn’t own the HTML CSS but he initially wrote it and then gave it to me and now I own it, and it’s in components. If he wants updates then I have to go and make changes b/c he doesn’t know Angular. If it’s a sketch or a PNG you have to make it look like that. That’s what most of my career has been. Host: HTML and CSS got me 762x easier once Flexbox came around! I know there is a decimal there! 28:23 – Host talks about Flexbox some more. 28:42 – Guest asks a question. 28:50 – Host: I suppose if I really had heavy needs for a table then I would try CSS grid could solve some problems. I might just use a styled table. 29:12 – Brian: ag-Grid or something else. 29:21 – Host: On this recent project...I’ve used in-house design and other things. If I ever needed a table it was there. I don’t rebuild components b/c that can get expensive for me. 30:50 – Brian: Accessibility. 31:00 – Host: Your upgrade just got 10x harder b/c you own the component loop. I really don’t build tables or drop-downs. Only way is if I really need to build it for a specific request. 31:30 – Brian. 31:58 – Host: Let me give you an example. You can think I am crazy, but a designer gave me a drop-down but he told me to use PrimeNG. I had the chose of building my own drop-down or the designer has to accept whatever they gave him. I made the UI make what he wanted and I made the drop-down zero capacity and then... Host: When you click on what you see you are clicking on the... Host: Does that make sense? 33:35 – Guest. 33:50 – Host. 34:25 – Brian: That is interesting; remember when... 34:58 – Host: We will send this episode to Jeremy – come on Jeremy! Any last ideas? Let’s move onto picks! 35:20 – Advertisement – Fresh Books! 30-day free trial! END – Advertisement – Cache Fly! Links: Vue jQuery Angular React C# What is a UX Design? UI Design Flexbox Sketch ag-Grid PrimeNG Brian Love’s Twitter Aaron Frost’s Medium Amir’s Medium Amir’s Twitter Amir’s GitHub Amir’s LinkedIn Amir’s Facebook Sponsors: Angular Boot Camp Fresh Books Get a Coder Job Course Cache Fly Picks: Aaron Movie: “A Star Is Born” Concept - Model Driven Forms Amir Puppeteer Arrow Function Converter Brian TV Series: “The 100” Angular Schematics
November 14, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Jia Li This week on My Angular Story, Charles speaks with Jia Li who is a passionate programmer, a Zone.js guy, and a full-stack developer at Sylabs.io. Chuck and Jia talk about Zone.js, Jia’s background, and the current projects that Jia is working on right now. Check out today’s episode! In particular, we dive pretty deep on: 0:00 – Advertisement: Get A Coder Job! 0:51 – Chuck: You were on the past AiA Episode 210. Why are you famous? 1:04 – Jia: I have been working on Angular JS for 4 years, and I am from China. I have been working on Zone.js for the past 2½ years. I basically handle everything with Zone.js. That kind of makes me famous in the community. 1:50 – Chuck: It’s the library that... 1:58 – Jia: Yes that is correct. 2:19 – Chuck: Let’s rollback a little bit and talk about your journey into programming? 2:32 – Jia: My major is not Computer Science it’s Communication. My first job, my classmate introduced me to a company that had 5 employees, which was a software company. About 15 years ago, back in China, they were using old software. The founder is using new technologies. So this is cool. That’s how I entered into the development world. 4:15 – Chuck asks a question. 4:22 – Jia: My focus, at the time, was the frontend. 5:10 – Chuck: How did you get into Angular? 5:12 – Angular, React, and jQuery are mentioned by Jia. 6:20 – Jia: We did a big project for 1½ years with a huge team of 500 people. We used...to build the applications. 6:51 – Chuck: How was the transition from Angular to Angular 2? 6:58 – Jia: At first the company had some reservations b/c everything is new. Jia talks about an architect of the company and the knowledge that he offered, at the time, to help. 8:17 – Chuck: You have contributed to Zone.js. People think that they have to be a genius in order to contribute. How did you start contributing to it? 8:44 – Jia: Between Angular 1 to Angular 2 was about a few months in-between. Jia continues to talk. 9:28 – Jia: We get a request from the client and get a certain zone. Each request is managed. Jia talks about his contributions to Zone.js and how he offered his insights, in the beginning, during his spare time. 12:12 – Chuck: This is a project that is used across thousands of Angular applications. And here we are talking about your journey to this open-source. You started off with a bug fix and this leads to helping with code, and finally you are one of the major contributors now! People think they cannot contribute to open-source b/c they aren’t a “genius.” They think that they “aren’t that good.” 13:16 – Jia: I never thought I could do it – meaning contributing to open-source work. I thought you had to have very strong coding skills, but it’s really just starting with the first step. True, you need to start with the code, but you don’t have to have a very strong background. I didn’t have (at the time) a strong JavaScript background, and look...I was able to do it! If you really love it – you can contribute to it. 15:11 – Chuck: You fixed a bug b/c you were using it. There is a difference between people writing it vs. people who are using it. You were fixing a bug b/c you were actually using it. “It should work this way under these circumstances.” If you are using the library then you will find those bugs. 16:35 – Jia: Yes, exactly. Some people are using Zone.js, but they don’t know what it does. 17:24 – Chuck: What are you currently working on now and/or what are you proud of? 17:29 – Jia: I am still working on the Zone.js project. I just changed my job a few months ago. I am starting a startup company to help with technological solutions. I am working (right now) on frontend. It’s very interesting to do some Cloud stuff. 18:50 – Chuck: Where can we find you? 18:55 – Jia. 20:50 – Chuck: What social media platforms do you use? 21:00 – Jia: Twitter! Blog! Jia talks about his current proposal that he is working on. 24:20 – Chuck: Let’s go to Picks! 24:26 – Fresh Books! 25:30 – Picks END – CacheFly Links: jQuery Angular JavaScript Vue React Slack Zone.js GitHub – Zone.js Chuck’s Twitter Chuck’s E-mail: chuck@devchat.tv AiA 210 – Past Episode with Jia Li Jia Li LinkedIn Jia Li Twitter Jia Li Blog Sponsors: Get A Coder Job Fresh Books Cache Fly Picks: Charles Podcast: MFCEO Audible: Extreme Ownership by Willink and Babin Audible: Traveler’s Gift by by Andy Andrews Jia Slack group – posts on Angular – check them out! Angular In-Depth
November 13, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood (DevChat T.V.) Special Guests: Aaron Gustafson In this episode, the Chuck talks with Aaron Gustafson who is a web-standards and accessibility advocate working at Microsoft. Aaron and Chuck talk about PWAs and the ins and outs of these progressive web apps. Check out today’s episode to hear more! Show Topics: 0:36 – Chuck: Our guest is Aaron, say HI! 0:41 – Aaron: Hi! I have been working on the web for 20 plus years. I am working on the Edge team for accessibility among other things. I have done every job that you can do on the web. 1:08 – Chuck: That is one of OUR publications? 1:14 – Aaron: No the communities. I joined the staff as editor in chief for 1.5 year now. It’s a nice side project to do. 1:36 – Chuck: I thought it was a commercial thing. 1:40 – Aaron: No it’s volunteer. 1:52 – Chuck: Talk about your web background? 2:02 – Aaron: I remember the first book I got (title mentioned). My first job on the web (cash) I was the content manager in Florida and this was in 1999. Gel Macs just came out. I relocated from FL to CT and worked for other companies. I got into CSS among other things. It’s been a wild ride and done it all. 3:52 – Chuck: Let’s talk about web standards? 4:05 – Aaron: It depends on the organization and what the spec is and where it originates. It’s interesting to see how HTML developed back in the day. When standardization started working then everything started to converge. Everything is a little different now. Some specs come out from companies that... (Apple, Responsive Images, and Grid are mentioned among other things.) 7:37 – Chuck: We set up to talk about PWAs. Where did PWAs come from? 7:57 – Aaron: Modern web design, best web applications. Being secure. One of the underpinnings came out from Google and they have been supporters of that. Firefox is working on installation as well. The Chrome implementation is weird right now, but it becomes an orphaned app. It’s like the old chrome apps where in Windows you can install from the Microsoft store. But the case of Chrome you don’t have to go through the store. 10:14 – Chuck asks a question. 10:24 – Aaron answers. 11:53 – Chuck: What makes it a progressive web app rather than a regular website? 12:05 – Aaron: The definition is running on HTPS and... Aaron defines the terms that Chuck asks at 11:53. 12:43 – Aaron: Of course you can push forward if it makes sense from the baseline. 12:56 – Chuck: We have an Angular podcast, and we talked about PWAs and nobody had a good definition for it. 13:18 – Aaron. 13:22 – Chuck: What are the pros of having a PWA? Let’s start with the basics first. 13:33 – Aaron: The ability to control how you react to the network. We development is challenging maybe in other areas because of the lack of control and how your code gets to your users. Any special needs that YOU might have. Aaron goes into detail on this topic. 17:14 – Chuck: Is the service worker the star for PWAs? 17:20 – Aaron: In a way, kind of. Aaron goes into detail on this topic. Share 2 is mentioned, too. 19:42 – Chuck: If the service worker intermediates between the browser and the page / Internet would it make sense to have your worker have it load and then load everything else? Cause you have those Web Pack now. 20:14 – Aaron: Some people would consider it but I wouldn’t necessarily. I am not a fan for that. If anything goes wrong then nothing loads. I remember back when... 22:23 – Aaron: That is a lot of overhead. 22:34 – Chuck: I am wondering what is the best practice? How do you decide to pull in a service worker and then move into more complicated issues? 22:53 – Aaron: Progressive Web App where they talk about their evolution about this. 25:17 – Advertisement – Fresh Books! Code: DEVCHAT. 26:25 – Chuck: In order to be a PWA you don’t need to have a push notification. 26:38 – Aaron: I don’t think anyone would want a push notification from me. 27:12 – Chuck: What features do PWAs have? 27:18 – Aaron: Features? None of them really, other than push notifications, it’s just standard it’s going to make an App feel more App “y”. If that’s something you want to do. It’s up to you to determine that. There is going to be like push notifications – sending person new updates about the order. If you were a new site you want to make sure you are not doing a push notifications on everything cause that would be too much. Exercising care with the capabilities with what the users are doing on your computer. This is a person that you are dealing with. We need to seem less needy. Give users control of how they want to use it. For example, Twitter will give you that control per user. 30:56 – Chuck: Could you also do it for different parts of the page? 31:01 – Aaron: It’s different scopes. Your servicer worker has different scopes and it needs to be in the root folder or the JavaScript folder. You can have different workers but they will come from different scopes. 31:32 – Chuck gives a hypothetical example. 31:50 – You can do a bunch of different service workers. 32:11 – Chuck: This is why we create different hierarchies in our code. 32:26 – Chuck: Is there a good point where people can be more informed with PWAs? 32:40 – Aaron: PWA stats website and Twitter account with Cloud 4. 33:22 – Chuck asks a question. 33:26 – Aaron: Yes. If you are a photographer you don’t want to cash all of your photos on someone’s hard drive. We have to be good stewards of what is operating on people’s hard drives. Even something as simple as a blog can benefit from being a PWA. 35:01 – Chuck: Are there new things that are being added to a PWA? 35:12 – Aaron: A new feature is the background sync. Aaron: What is native and what is web? 36:33 – Chuck: Yeah it can detect a feature in your machine. Dark mode is... 36:48 – Aaron: It would be nice to see things standardized across the board. 37:00 – Chuck: How does this play into Electron or Android or...? Do those need to be PWAs? 37:16 – Aaron: It depends on what you are building. So I talked with people through Slack and they want total control. If you r desire is to shift the same experience then Electron can make a lot of sense. They will have to pay a premium, though, your users. If you are aware of that then go the Electron route. But for most cases then Electron might be overkill for you. You don’t need that extra overhead. 39:55 – Aaron continues. Aaron: I think the major benefit of PWA is... 41:15 – Chuck: The other angle to that is that in an Electron app does it make sense to use a PWA things? 41:23 – Aaron: Yes that makes sense. 41:34 – Unless for some reason you need to unlock into an older version, which I hope is not the case b/c of security reasons. 41:55 – Aaron continues. 42:34 – Chuck: Where can we find you? 42:35 – Aaron mentions Twitter and other sites. See Links! 43:02 – Advertisement – Get A Coder Job! Links: Ruby on Rails Angular PWA States Website PWA Twitter Electron Aaron’s Website Aaron’s LinkedIn Aaron’s Twitter Aaron’s GitHub Aaron’s YouTube Channel Aaron’s Medium Get A Coder Job Charles Max Wood’s Twitter Sponsors: Get a Coder Job Cache Fly Fresh Books Kendo UI Picks: Aaron Home Going by Yaa Gyasi Zeitoun What is the What Affect Conf. Charles Armada
November 7, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Bonnie Brennan This week on My Angular Story, Charles speaks with Bonnie Brennan who is in web technologies and uses Angular. She currently resides in Houston, Texas and Chuck and her discuss her background, past and current projects, ngHouston Meetup, and much more! Check-out today’s episode! In particular, we dive pretty deep on: 1:00 – Chuck: We’ve talked with you in the past, Bonnie. So listeners, check-out those past episodes if you are interested (see links below). There were various topics that we discussed. It’s been a few months since we’ve talked. Tell us how you got into Angular among other things? 1:50 – Guest. 3:19 – Chuck: I want to get a feel for how you got into programming, so tell us about that. 3:40 – Guest: I didn’t start coding until my 30’s. 3:50 – Chuck: Here is a dirty little secret: most people get into coding later in life. 4:25 – Guest. 25:07 – Chuck: Let’s get back on track - How did you get into Angular? 25:10 – Guest. 32:26 – Chuck: I completely agree. As you’ve gone into Angular you’ve done things in the community that makes you well-known. We’ve talked with your child-component, and how she got into coding. Listen back to that. You mentioned NG Houston, how did you get that going? 32:56 – Guest: I was here in Houston... 39:26 – Chuck: I want to change topics here. You mentioned in your consulting that people are running into certain issues. Most consultants that I know, they make a plan and they just build stuff. Seems like you are talking with them and showing them how to make things work better. 39:54 – Guest. 45:11 – Chuck: I have been a freelancer, and how do people hire you? 45:23 – Guest: Twitter is the best way to reach out to me, also my e-mail. 46:59 – Chuck: You have been a GD – how has that been? 47:10 – Guest: I actually love it! GOOGLE DEVELOPER EXPERT = GDE. 49:07 – Chuck: You had a unique experience at the last Summit. Can you talk about that for a minute? 49:17 – Guest. 59:17 – Chuck: We are at the end of our time. Where can people find you? 59:30 – Guest: The YouTube Channel and Twitter. 1:00:54 – Chuck: Let’s do some picks! 1:01:00 – Fresh Books! Links: jQuery Angular JavaScript Vue Chuck’s Twitter Chuck’s E-mail: chuck@devchat.tv Scott Moss’ Twitter Bonnie’s Twitter Bonnie’s GD ngHouston AiA 184 show AiA 146 show MAS 042 show with Sam Brennan Sponsors: Get A Coder Job Fresh Books Cache Fly Picks: Charles Sasqwatch is Real New Show – The DevRev DevChat.Tv Bonnie Blog – ThoughtRam Angular In-Depth NG Houston Angular for the Visual Learner
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