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March 7, 2017
  Episode # 46   In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., interviews Scott Temple, PhD about CBT with cancer patients. Some of the items they discuss in this episode include:   The most salient psychological needs of cancer patients Eight organizing principles for a modern CBT  Combining validation strategies with guided discovery Addressing existential issues with CBT Unique considerations surrounding exposure with anxious cancer patients And, more!   Scott Temple, PhD Biography Scott Temple, PhD, is Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Internal Medicine, and is part of the University of Iowa Palliative Care Team. He is on the faculty in the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Iowa and is also a founding fellow and a certified CBT trainer and consultant in the Academy of Cognitive Therapy.   Episode-related links and resources  
September 6, 2016
Episode # 45   Running Time: 48:52   Podcast relevance: Professionals   In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S. speaks with Thomas Ellis, PsyD about the treatment of suicidal patients. Some of the items discussed in this episode include: Whether no-suicide contracts are efficacious and whether they reduce liability Whether suicidality is best seen as a symptom of another illness Developments in the suicidology literature Our ability to predict suicide on an individual basis The important distinction between risk factors and warning signs Minimum competency standards for treating suicidal patients And, more!   Thomas Ellis, PsyD Bio   Thomas E. Ellis, PsyD, ABPP, is Senior Psychologist and past Director of Psychology at the Menninger Clinic, and Professor of Psychiatry in the Menninger Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. He earned his bachelor’s degree at the University of Texas at Austin and his doctorate at Baylor University. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (Clinical and Psychotherapy Divisions) and Diplomate of the American Board of Professional Psychology (Cognitive Behavior Therapy). He is a Founding Fellow of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy and Associate Fellow and Supervisor at the Albert Ellis Institute. His research and publications focus primarily on the problem of suicide, including cognitive characteristics of suicidal individuals and the effectiveness of suicide-specific therapeutic interventions. His books include Suicide Risk: Assessment and Response Guidelines (with W. Fremouw and M. dePerczel, 1990), Choosing to Live: How to Defeat Suicide through Cognitive Therapy (with C. Newman, 1996), and Cognition and Suicide: Theory, Research, and Practice (2006). He is the 2011 recipient of the Roger J. Tierney Award from the American Association of Suicidology, in recognition of distinguished contributions to the organization and the field of suicidology.   Episode-related links and resources   New Harbingerpublications has graciously offered a 35% discount to our colleagues and friends. If you'd like the discount simply follow this link: http://www.newharbinger.com/behavior-therapist   Ellis, T.E., & Newman, C.F. (1996). Choosing to Live: How to Defeat Suicide through Cognitive Therapy. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger. Ellis, T. E., & Rufino, K. A. (2015). A psychometric study of the Suicide Cognitions Scale with psychiatric inpatients. Psychological Assessment, 27(1), 82–89. doi:10.1037/pas0000028 Ellis, T. E., Rufino, K. A., Allen, J. G., Fowler, J. C., & Jobes, D. A. (2015). Impact of a suicide-specific intervention within inpatient psychiatric care: the collaborative assessment and management of suicidality. Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, 45(5), 556–566. doi:10.1111/sltb.12151 Jobes, D. A. (2016). Managing suicidal risk: A collaborative approach (2nd ed.). New York: Guilford. Joiner, T. E. J. (2005). Why people die by suicide. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. doi:10.1037/13748-018 May, A. M., & Klonsky, E. D. (2015). “Impulsive” Suicide Attempts: What Do We Really Mean? Personality Disorders: Theory, Research, and Treatment, (August). doi:10.1037/per0000160 Nadorff, M. R., Ellis, T. E., Allen, J. G., Winer, E. S., & Herrera, S. (2014). Presence and persistence of sleep-related symptoms and suicidal ideation in psychiatric inpatients. Crisis, 35(6), 398–405. doi:10.1027/0227-5910/a000279 Rudd, M. D., Berman, A. L., Joiner, T. E., Nock, M. K., Silverman, M. M., Mandrusiak, M., … Witte, T. (2006). Warning Signs for Suicide : Theory , Research , and Clinical Applications. Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior, 36(3), 255–262. Shea, S. C. (2002). The Practical Art of Suicide Assessment: A guide for mental health professionals and substance abuse counselors. New York: Wiley. Stanley, B., & Brown, G. K. (2012). Safety Planning Intervention: A Brief Intervention to Mitigate Suicide Risk. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 19(2), 256–264. doi:10.1016/j.cbpra.2011.01.001 Wenzel, A., Brown, G. K., & Beck, A. T. (2009). Cognitive Therapy for Suicidal Patients: Scientific and Clinical Applications. New York: Guilford. www.suicidology.org www.afsp.org www.abct.org
August 22, 2016
Episode # 44 Running Time: 52:30 Podcast relevance: Professionals In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., interviews Donna Sudak, MD about training and supervising psychiatric residents. Some of the items they discuss in this episode include: Historical overview of psychiatry training in evidence-based practice Problems with current training protocols in psychiatry Key suggestions for trainers of psychiatric residents to maximize their learning of CBT Obstacles to effective CBT training along with solutions Key findings in the supervision literature   Donna Sudak, MD Bio Donna M. Sudak, M.D., is Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Drexel University College of Medicine. Dr. Sudak is Director of Psychotherapy Training, and lectures widely about topics in Cognitive Behavior Therapy, including topics such as Cognitive Conceptualization, Dialectical Behavior Therapy and training residents in Psychiatry in Cognitive Therapy. Dr. Sudak is a graduate of the Medical College of Pennsylvania, and completed her Psychiatry residency at the University of Washington. She has made a number of significant contributions to the literature in CBT education. In addition to her teaching responsibilities at Drexel University College of Medicine, Dr. Sudak is an adjunct faculty member at the Beck Institute for Cognitive Therapy and Research and teaches residents at Albert Einstein and Thomas Jefferson University. She has a private practice in Philadelphia. She has an active research interest in psychiatric education, and has played a major role in developing suggested curricula and guidelines for resident competency in Cognitive Therapy.   Episode-related links and resources:   Teaching and Supervising CBT     Forthcoming Training:   Empirically Supported Educational Methods: Effective Tools to Teach CBT R. Trent Codd, III, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Center of WNC, P.A. Donna Sudak, Friends Hospital Leslie Sokol, Academy of Cognitive Therapy Marci Fox, Academy of Cognitive Therapy Oct 28, 2016 ABCT Annual Convention - NYC   Teaching and Supervising CBT Donna Sudak Feb 6-8, 2017 Beck Institute
July 2, 2016
Episode #43 Running Time: 36:21 Podcast relevance: Professionals In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., interviews Shannon Wiltsey-Stirman, PhD about D & I. Some of the items they discuss in this episode include: The distinction between diffusion, dissemination and implementation What we currently know about dissemination and implementation of evidence-based practices What one can do at an individual level to encourage dissemination of EBPs Important future directions for this literature   Shannon Wiltsey-Stirman Biography Shannon Wiltsey Stirman received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania in 2005. She completed an internship at the VA Palo Alto Healthcare System, and returned to Philadelphia for postdoctoral training, where she received an NIMH-funded K99/R00 award to study implementation and sustainability of CBT in a partnership between Penn and the City of Philadelphia’s Department of Behavioral Health and disAbility Services to implement cognitive therapy across the city’s network of providers. In 2009, Dr. Stirman joined the VA National Center for PTSD. Her research focuses on training and consultation, the development of scalable and valid measures of fidelity, and the identification of strategies to support the long-term sustainability of evidence-based practices in service settings. Dr. Stirman is now in the Dissemination and Training Division of the National Center for PTSD, and an Assistant Professor at Stanford University’s Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. In addition to leading the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies Dissemination and Implementation Special Interest Group in 2013-2014, she founded a special interest group on Dissemination and Implementation at the International Society of Traumatic Stress Studies, and has served as Advisory Board and Network of Expertise Member of the Society for Implementation Research Collaboration. She has served on the editorial board of Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research. Her research has been funded by the National Institute of Mental Health and the Canadian Institute for Health Research.   Episode-related links and resources:   Stirman, S.W., Gutner, C.A., Langdon, K. & Graham, J.R., Bridging the gap between research and practice in mental health service settings: An overview of developments in implementation theory and research, Behavior Therapy (2015), doi: 10.1016/j.beth.2015.12.001     Aarons, G. A., Ehrhart, M. G., Farahnak, L. R., & Hurlburt, M. S. (2015). Leadership and organizational change for implementation (LOCI): a randomized mixed method pilot study of a leadership and organization development intervention for evidence-based practice implementation.Implementation Science, 10(1), 1.   Creed, T. A., Wolk, C. B., Feinberg, B., Evans, A. C., & Beck, A. T. (2016). Beyond the Label: Relationship Between Community Therapists’ Self-Report of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Orientation and Observed Skills.Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 43(1), 36-43.   Glisson, C., Schoenwald, S. K., Hemmelgarn, A., Green, P., Dukes, D., Armstrong, K. S., & Chapman, J. E. (2010). Randomized trial of MST and ARC in a two-level evidence-based treatment implementation strategy.Journal of consulting and clinical psychology, 78(4), 537.   Hemmelgarn, A. L., Glisson, C., & James, L. R. (2006). Organizational culture and climate: Implications for services and interventions research.Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice, 13(1), 73-89.   Herschell, A. D., Kolko, D. J., Baumann, B. L., & Davis, A. C. (2010). The role of therapist training in the implementation of psychosocial treatments: A review and critique with recommendations. Clinical psychology review, 30(4), 448-466.   Stirman, S. W., Bhar, S. S., Spokas, M., Brown, G. K., Creed, T. A., Perivoliotis, D., ... & Beck, A. T. (2010). Training and consultation in evidence-based psychosocial treatments in public mental health settings: The ACCESS model. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 41(1), 48.   Williams, N. J., Glisson, C., Hemmelgarn, A., & Green, P. (2016). Mechanisms of Change in the ARC Organizational Strategy: Increasing Mental Health Clinicians’ EBP Adoption Through Improved Organizational Culture and Capacity. Administration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research, 1-15.  
February 1, 2016
Episode #42 Running Time: 1:18:09 Podcast relevance: Professionals and Consumers   In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S. interviews Tom Dozier, BCBA about Misophonia. In this episode they discuss: The diagnosis and treatment of Misophonia The history of this disorder How Misophonic symptoms differ from the sensitivities present in persons on the Autism Spectrum Resources for professionals and consumers, including websites and apps Tom Dozier, BCBA Biography Thomas H. Dozier is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA). Tom has researched misophonia and worked to develop treatments since 2012, and he has shown that Misophonia includes an acquired physical reflex to the trigger sounds which causes extreme emotions of rage and disgust (a conditioned emotional response).       He developed the Neural Repatterning Technique and the Misophonia Trigger Tamer app to deliver this treatment.  Tom is the director of the Misophonia Treatment Institute, which promotes misophonia research, treatment, and awareness.  He received a Master of Science in Behavior Analysis and the Family from California State University, Stanislaus.     His primary career focus was parenting and parenting skills (see 3LParenting.com, guaranteedpt.com, or LDSParentCoach.org, but Tom became interested in misophonia because he worked with parents of children with misophonia.  He also realized that his adult daughter and one grandchild had misophonia.    Tom is the author of Understanding and Overcoming Misophonia, A Conditioned Aversive Reflex Disorder and had three published journal articles on misophonia in 2015.   Episode-Related Links   Websites:   Misophoniatreatment.com   Misophoniainstitute.org   Apps:   Misophonia Reflex Finder (available on Android and Apple devices)   Misophonia Trigger Tamer (available on Android and Apple devices)   Visual Trigger Tamer (Android only currently, but Apple devices in the works)      
January 10, 2016
Episode # 41 Running Time: 35:50 Podcast Relevance: Professionals   In this episode R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S. interviews Dennis Tirch, PhD about Buddhist Psychology and CBT. They discuss: What Buddhist Psychology is Why Cognitive-Behavioral Therapists should be interested in Buddhist Psychology What aspects of Buddhism remain to be explored by Cognitive and Behavioral researchers/therapists And, much more! Dennis Tirch, PhD Biography   Dr. Tirch is the Founder and Director of The Center for Compassion Focused Therapy, the first clinical training center for Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT) in the USA. Dr. Tirch is also the President of The Compassionate Mind Foundation USA – the North American wing of the training, research and development community for CFT. Dr. Tirch has been described as one of the country's foremost experts on CFT and the contextual psychology of compassion. He has dedicated his research and scholarship to bettering our understanding of how therapies like ACT and CBT can be strengthened and further developed by bringing a compassion focus to our work. Dr. Tirch is the author of  6 books, and numerous chapters and peer reviewed articles on mindfulness, acceptance and compassion in psychotherapy. His books include The Compassionate Mind Guide To Overcoming Anxiety, the first evidence-based self-help book to apply the science of compassion to the treatment of anxiety. Dr. Tirch is also the co-author of the books Emotion Regulation:  A Practitioner’s Guide, Mindfulness in Clinical Practice, and The ACT Practitioner’s Guide to The Science of Compassion. This Autumn, the co-authored book, Buddhist Psychology and CBT: A Clinician's Guide will be released. Dr. Tirch is a New York State licensed clinical psychologist who served as an Assistant Clinical Professor at Weill-Cornell Medical College, and as an Adjunct Associate Professor at Albert Einstein Medical School. Dr. Tirch is an Associate Editor of the Journal for Contextual Behavioral Science.  Prior to founding The Center, Dr. Tirch collaborated with leading CBT therapist, Dr. Robert Leahy, at The American Institute for Cognitive Therapy for 12 years, serving as Associate Director of The Institute. Dr. Tirch has worked closely with CFT Founder, Dr. Paul Gilbert, in the development of compassion focused approaches for anxiety, using elements of ACT, which are currently being researched. Dr. Tirch is a Diplomate, Fellow & Certified Consultant & Trainer for The Academy of Cognitive Therapy. Dr. Tirch is a Founding Fellow and the President of The New York City CBT Association, & The Compassion Focused Special Interest Group of The Association for Contextual Behavioral Science (ACBS). Tirch is also President Emeritus of The New York City Chapter of The Association for Contextual Behavioral Science.Tirch's work has been covered by numerous media outlets, from The Wall Street Journal to O Magazine. Dr. Tirch regularly conducts training workshops globally and serves as an invited speaker for many organizations, such as Columbia University, The University of New South Wales, The University of Hong Kong, The NYC-CBT Association, ABCT, ACBS, New York Univeristy, Cornell University, and the Kagyu Samye Ling Buddhist monastery in Scotland. Dr. Tirch also provides online consultation groups and webinar based trainings, and has delivered these for The Association for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (ABCT)  and The Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy (IMP). Throughout his clinical experience, Dr. Tirch has specialized in the treatment of anxiety, mood disorders, trauma, addictions, and relationship problems. His internship and post-doctoral residency took place at the Veterans’ Affairs Medical Center in Bedford, MA., where he served as the Assistant Director of the Bedford CBT Center, co-authored articles based on research supported by the National Institute of Mental Health, (NIMH) and developed the “Continual Awareness” meditation based group therapy for trauma survivors. Dr. Tirch completed a second year post-doctoral fellowship at AICT with Dr. Leahy. In addition to his training in Western psychology, Dr. Tirch has had extensive experience in Eastern meditative and philosophical disciplines over the past 25 years. This training includes work in Japanese Zen and Vajryana Buddhism, Tibetan Buddhism, and other Central Asian meditative disciplines. Dr. Tirch has benefited by participating in numerous trainings with many mentors, experts, friends and colleagues such as Paul Gilbert, Robert Leahy, Kelly Wilson, Steven C. Hayes, Robert Fripp, Robyn Walser and Zindel Segal.  Dr. Tirch is a founding participant in the ACT peer consultation group for New York City and Environs (ACTNYCE). The primary valued aim of all of Dr. Tirch’s research, writing, training and psychotherapy practice is an expanding sensitivity to human suffering, combined with the development and dissemination of ever more effective, evidence based methods for the alleviation of this suffering. Dr. Tirch received his PhD from Fairleigh Dickinson University.   Episode-Related Links   Websites: The Center for Compassion Focused Therapy   The Compassionate Mind Foundation USA   The Compassionate Mind Foundation    Training: The Center for Compassion Focused Therapy - Training calendar and information on clinical supervision and consultation   BehaviorTherapist.org - 4.5 online Course "Compassion Focused Therapy for Anxiety: Beyond the Basics" APA and NBCC credits available   Book: Buddhist Psychology and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: A Clinicians Guide    
October 18, 2015
Episode # 40 Running Time: 43:27 Podcast Relevance: Professionals In this episode R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S. interviews Massimo Pigliucci, PhD about various Philosophy of Science matters including: Whether Philosophy of Science matters for the practice of science, including psychological science Objections raised by various scientists regarding the importance of Philosophy of Science, and Dr. Pigliucci's responses to those objections Whether Philosophy of Science makes progress What the demarcation problem is and the current status of the literature on demarcation How scientists and philosophers of science might optimize collaboration Massimo Pigliucci, PhD Biography Prof. Pigliucci has a Doctorate in Genetics from the University of Ferrara (Italy), a PhD in Evolutionary Biology from the University of Connecticut, and a PhD in Philosophy from the University of Tennessee. He has done post-doctoral research in evolutionary ecology at Brown University and is currently the K.D. Irani Professor of Philosophy at the City College of New York. His research interests include the philosophy of biology, the relationship between science and philosophy, and the nature of pseudoscience. Prof. Pigliucci has been elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science “for fundamental studies of genotype by environmental interactions and for public defense of evolutionary biology from pseudoscientific attack.” In the area of public outreach, Prof. Pigliucci has published in national outlets such as the New York Times, Philosophy Now and The Philosopher’s Magazine among others. He is a Fellow of the Committee for Skeptical Inquiry and a Contributing Editor to Skeptical Inquirer. Dr. Pigliucci publishes two blogs: Plato’s Footnote (platofootnote.org), on general philosophy, and How to Be a Stoic (howtobeastoic.org), on his personal exploration of Stoicism as practicalphilosophy. At last count, Prof. Pigliucci has published 144 technical papers in science and philosophy. He is also the author or editor of 10 technical and public outreach books, most recently of Philosophy of Pseudoscience: Reconsidering the Demarcation Problem (University of Chicago Press), co-edited with Maarten Boudry. Other books include Answers for Aristotle: How Science and Philosophy Can Lead Us to a More Meaningful Life (Basic Books) and Nonsense on Stilts: How to Tell Science from Bunk (University of Chicago Press).   Episode-Related Links Books: Philosophy of Pseudoscience: Reconsidering the Demarcation Problem   What is this thing called Science?   Answers for Aristotle: How Science and Philosophy can lead us to a more meaningful life   Dr. Pigliucci's websites: Plato's Footnote How to Be a Stoic  
October 10, 2015
Episode # 39 Running Time: 51:16 Podcast relevance: Professionals In this episode R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S. interviews Thomas R. Lynch, PhD about Radically Open Dialectical Behavior Therapy (RO-DBT). Specifically, they discuss: The clinical indications for RODBT The importance of temperament when caring for treatment refractory populations Social signaling. What it is, why it's important and how it's targeted clinically RODBT's Neurobiosocial and Neuroregulatory model What radical openness is The differences between standard DBT and RO-DBT How to pursue training in RO-DBT   Thomas R. Lynch Biography Thomas R. Lynch is Professor of Clinical Psychology in the School of Psychology at University of Southampton. He was the Director of the Duke Cognitive Behavioural Research and Treatment Program at Duke University (USA) from 1998-2007. He is currently the Director of the Emotion and Personality Bio-behavioural Laboratory at the University of Southampton. Professor Lynch is the treatment developer of Radically Open-Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (RO-DBT)—a new transdiagnostic treatment approach informed by 19 years of clinical research—with strong roots in standard DBT.He has been the recipient of multiple large research grants from a range of sources, including the National Institutes of Health, National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression, American Foundation of Suicide Prevention, the Hartford Foundation, the Wellcome Trust, and the National Institute for Health Research. He is currently the Chief Investigator of a multi- centre randomized controlled trial examining the efficacy and mechanisms of RO-DBT funded by the NIHR- Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation programme (http://www.reframed.org.uk/; Lynch). He is a recipient of the John M. Rhoades Psychotherapy Research Endowment and a Beck Institute Scholar. He is recognized internationally as a world-leading expert in difficult-to-treat disorders; such as, personality disorders, chronic depression, and anorexia nervosa and is in frequent demand as a speaker internationally—e.g., Europe, USA, and Canada. He is the author of the RO-DBT treatment manual entitled Radically Open- Dialectical Behaviour Therapy for Disorders of Overcontrol (In press-Guilford Press, New York).   Episode-related links   RadicallyOpen.net   RadicallyOpen.net training page   2015 ABCT Conference RODBT training    
September 1, 2015
Episode #38 Running Time: 45:27 Podcast relevance: Professionals. Continuing education credit can be earned by listening to this episode. To learn more, please visit BehaviorTherapist.org In this episode R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S. interviews Jan Mohlman, PhD about the Neurocognitive Perspective. Specifically, they discuss: What the neurocognitive perspective is and what it adds to traditional clinical work Challenging aspects of adding affective and cognitive neuroscience into clinical settings Emergent methodological and practice standards Patient perceptions of the approach How clinicians can pursue training in this perspective And more!   Jan Mohlman Biography Jan Mohlman, Ph.D. is Associate Professor at William Paterson University. Dr. Mohlman’s research seeks to explain how processes of aging (e.g., hearing loss, progressive brain disease, deficits in cognitive skills) impact the presentation and treatment of anxiety and other mood problems in later life.  Dr. Mohlman’s work also extends to treatment outcome research, applying methodology from affective and cognitive neuroscience to inform studies of cognitive behavior therapy.  Dr. Mohlman has published peer reviewed journal articles and book chapters and won several research grants, teaching and mentoring awards.    Coauthor Biographies Thilo Deckersbach, Ph.D. is Associate Professor of Psychology at Harvard Medical School. He serves as the Director of Psychology in the Bipolar Clinic and Research Program and as the Director of Research in the Division of Neurotherapeutics at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. Dr. Deckersbach’s research has been supported by the National Institute of Mental Health, NARSAD, TSA, OCF, and DBDAT. He has published peer-reviewed papers and book chapters. His neuroimaging research (fMRI and PET) focuses on the interaction of cognitive and emotional processes in bipolar disorder.     Adam S. Weissman, Ph.D. is the Founder & Executive Director of Child & Family Cognitive Behavioral Psychology, PLLC in Scarsdale and Manhattan. Formerly Senior Clinical Consultant at Harvard Medical School, Dr. Weissman is currently on the Clinical Faculty at Columbia University, where he trains and supervises advanced doctoral students in CBT with children and adolescents. He is a nationally-recognized expert in the treatment of a wide range of youth anxiety and mood disorders, ADHD, disruptive behavior problems, tic/habit disorders, and related conditions, and has published peer-reviewed articles, book chapters, and edited books, the majority focusing on cognitive-behavioral therapy and neuropsychological assessment for children and adolescents.   Book Begin reading From Symptom to Synapse by clicking here.    Episode-related Links Personal Zen Neurocognitive Therapies/Translational Research Special Interest Group Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies    
February 7, 2015
Episode # 37 Running time: 1:01:37 Podcast relevance: Professionals and Consumers In this episode, Trent Codd interviews Anthony Biglan, Ph.D. the author of The Nurture Effect: How the Science of Human Behavior Can Improve Our Lives and Our World. Specifically, they discuss: how to create family, school, workplace, and community environments that nurture wellbeing the power a small set of core principles can have in preventing many mental health and behavioral problems why and how capitalism has evolved in a direction that has increased economic inequality and poverty Biography Anthony Biglan, Ph.D. is a Senior Scientist at Oregon Research Institute. He has been conducting research on the development and prevention of child and adolescent problem behavior for the past 30 years. His work has included studies of the risk and protective factors associated with tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use; high-risk sexual behavior; and antisocial behavior. He has conducted numerous experimental evaluations of interventions to prevent tobacco use both through school-based programs and community-wide interventions. And, he has evaluated interventions to prevent high-risk sexual behavior, antisocial behavior, and reading failure. In recent years, his work has shifted to more comprehensive interventions that have the potential to prevent the entire range of child and adolescent problems. He and colleagues at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences published a book summarizing the epidemiology, cost, etiology, prevention, and treatment of youth with multiple problems (Biglan et al., 2004). He is a former president of the Society for Prevention Research. He was a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Prevention, which released its report in 2009 documenting numerous evidence-based interventions that can prevent multiple problems.   To learn more about the book please visit: www.NurtureEffect.com    
February 25, 2013
This episode is primarily relevant to professionals. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S. interviews Rob DeRubeis, PhD about the Dodo Bird Hypothesis.  Specifically, they discuss: What the Dodo Bird Hypothesis is The history of this research literature Whether all psychotherapies have roughly the same outcomes and where this notion comes from The role of allegiance in psychotherapy research And, more! ROBERT J. DERUBEIS, PhD BIOGRAPHY Dr. DeRubeis has been on the Penn faculty since his appointment as assistant professor in 1983 after receiving his doctorate in clinical psychology from the University of Minnesota. He has served as associate dean for the Social Sciences in the School of Arts and Sciences, and director of Clinical Training in the Psychology Department’s doctoral training program in Clinical Psychology. He is currently chair of the Department of Psychology. He has authored or co-authored more than 100 articles and book chapters on topics that center on the treatment of depression. He received the Academy of Cognitive Therapy’s Aaron T. Beck Award in 2004 for his contributions to research on cognitive therapy. His empirical research comparing the benefits of cognitive therapy and medications for severe depression, published in the American Journal of Psychiatry and the Archives of General Psychiatry, has been the subject of media reports in The Economist, The Wall Street Journal, and USA Today. In 2010 he presented a briefing to the Congressional Biomedical Research Caucus on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. Research Interests and Current Projects   Dr. DeRubeis’s research focuses on the processes that cause and maintain disorders of mood, as well as the treatment processes that reduce and prevent the return of mood symptoms. The contexts for this work are randomized clinical trials in which the effects of antidepressant medications are compared with cognitive therapy in people with major depressive disorder. Along with his students and collaborators, he examines the data obtained in these trials to further an understanding of the mechanisms through which these treatments exert their effects.  He also develops and refines the methods that are required for testing hypotheses with longitudinal data.      
May 7, 2012
DSM and the issue of co-morbidity in childhood mental disorders - a functional perspective and proposed solution This episode is primarily relevant to professionals and students. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S. interviews Ennio Cipani, PhD about the DSM system and it’s problem with co-morbidity.  They discuss a number of things including: The difference between a topographic and functional approach to diagnosis and treatment  How the functional approach might be an approach that escapes the DSM problem of co-morbidity  His functional diagnostic system  How an analysis of negative symptoms can have utility for a diagnostic system to discern chronic conditions    References related to this podcast: Functional Behavioral Assessment, Diagnosis and Treatment (2nd Edition, 2011).  Cipani and Schock.  The issue of co-morbidity in DSM-V Childhood Mental Disorders: A functional perspective and proposed alternative diagnostic system. (2012, May 7). CBT Radio Podcast.   ENNIO CIPANI, PhD. BIOGRAPHY   Ennio Cipani, Ph.D., a graduate of Florida State University, is a licensed psychologist  and a full professor at National University- Fresno. He has published numerous articles,  chapters, instructional materials and books (available from amazon.com, search Cipani)  including Classroom management for all teachers: Evidence-based practice (3rd edition, 2008) and Punishment on  Trial (2004). He has given many workshops and continuing education courses focusing on the effective management of problem child behavior. Dr. Cipani has been doing in-home and  school based behavioral consultations for families and school personnel since 1982. He has dealt with many families and a variety of behavior problems, conducting assessment and intervention activities in homes and classrooms. 
March 2, 2012
This episode is primarily relevant to consumers. R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., was interviewed by Orville Williams, DDS on “The Dentist is in the House!” The interview was recorded live as part of Dr. Williams’ weekly radio program focused on dental health.  The show aired 2-21-12 on WRES 100.7 - a radio station serving the Asheville, NC area.
January 9, 2012
This episode is primarily relevant to professionals. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S. interviews Marc Branch, PhD about Null-hypothesis Significance Testing (NHST). Topics they discuss include: Common misunderstandings about NHST  What p really is  Side effects of NHST  Logical problems with NHST  Reasons NHST remains prevalent despite the many known problems  Alternatives to NHST  MARC BRANCH, PhD BIOGRAPHY Dr. Branch is best known for directing one of the country’s active programs in behavioral pharmacology. He has conducted a long line of research on agents such as pentobarbital, d-amphetamine, and cocaine. His research has primarily been concerned with behavioral factors that influence whether and the degree to which tolerance develops in the face of repeated exposure. His work has been supported continuously for 30 years by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and has been published in flagship journals in both behavior analysis and pharmacology. In recognition of this consistent track record of excellence, he has been the recipient of a coveted research career award from NIMH. He is a fellow of both the American Psychological Association and the American Psychological Society.
November 8, 2011
  This episode is relevant to consumers and professionals. In this episode R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., LPC interviews Ennio Cipani, PhD about the use of punishment with child behavior problems.  This episode was constructed as a service to parents and professionals following the well-publicized mother who appeared on the Dr. Phil show who resorted to making her step son drink hot sauce as a punishment.  A video clip of this can be found here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=frbg732G4ts They discuss a variety of topics related to the use of punishment including: Different types of punishment methods  Effects of punishment  Effective methods for addressing child misbehavior  Guidelines for determining whether a punishment has crossed the line to abuse  A strategy for dealing with sibling rivalry  And much more!    ENNIO CIPANI, PhD BIOGRAPHY   Ennio Cipani, Ph.D., a graduate of Florida State University, is a licensed psychologist  and a full professor at National University- Fresno. He has published numerous articles,  chapters, instructional materials and books (available from amazon.com, search Cipani)  including Classroom management for all teachers: Evidence-based practice (3rd edition, 2008) and Punishment on  Trial (2004). He has given many workshops and continuing education courses focusing on the effective  management of problem child behavior. Dr. Cipani has been doing in-home and  school based behavioral consultations for families and school personnel since 1982. He has dealt with many families and a variety of behavior problems, conducting assessment and intervention activities in homes and classrooms.   
September 6, 2011
This episode is primarily relevant to professionals. In this important discussion Dr. Judith Beck discusses important criteria agencies should consider when looking for and hiring a Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy trainer. JUDITH S. BECK, PhD. BIO Judith S. Beck, Ph.D., is the Director of the Beck Institute for Cognitive Therapy and Research, a non-profit organization in suburban Philadelphia that trains mental health professionals, nationally and internationally, in Cognitive Therapy. She is also Clinical Associate Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania. She received her doctoral degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1982 and currently divides her time among teaching and supervision, administration, clinical work, program development, research, and writing. Dr. Beck has written nearly 100 articles and chapters and made hundreds of presentations, nationally and internationally, on a variety of topics related to cognitive therapy. 
September 4, 2011
This episode is primarily relevant to professionals. In this episode R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., interviews Ennio Cipani, PhD about his function based diagnostic system.  Specifically, they discuss: Function versus topography  An overview of his function based diagnostic system  The utility of a function based diagnostic system  The advantages of a function based diagnostic system relative to the DSM taxonomy    ENNIO CIPANI, PhD BIOGRAPHY   Ennio Cipani, Ph.D., a graduate of Florida State University, is a licensed psychologist  and a full professor at National University- Fresno. He has published numerous articles,  chapters, instructional materials and books (available from amazon.com, search Cipani)  including Classroom management for all teachers: Evidence-based practice (3rd edition, 2008) and Punishment on  Trial (2004). He has given many workshops and continuing education courses focusing on the effective  management of problem child behavior. Dr. Cipani has been doing in-home and  school based behavioral consultations for families and school personnel since 1982. He has dealt with many families and a variety of behavior problems, conducting assessment and intervention activities in homes and classrooms. 
May 10, 2011
This episode is relevant to professionals and consumers. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., interviews Patrick C. Friman, PhD about Boys Town.  Some of the  items discussed include: The history of Boys Town  The behavioral underpinnings of the Boys Town approach to intervention  The Teaching Family Model  Clinical outcomes realized at Boys Town  PATRICK C. FRIMAN, PhD BIO Dr. Patrick C. Friman is Director of Clinical Services at Father Flanagan’s Boys’ Home (Boys Town) and a Clinical Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Nebraska School of Medicine.  He also served as Director of Clinical Training and Associate Chair of the Department of Psychology at the University of Nevada at Reno and formerly held faculty positions at the University of Pennsylvania, Johns Hopkins, and University of Kansas Schools of Medicine.  He is an internationally recognized expert in the application of behavior analytic methods to behavioral medicine.  
May 5, 2011
This episode is primarily relevant to professionals. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., interviews Elizabeth Loftus, PhD about her research.  Some of the items they discuss include: An overview of her research program  The misinformation effect  The relationship between one’s confidence in a memory and it’s accuracy  How false memories are constructed  Implications of her work for psychotherapy  ELIZABETH LOFTUS, PhD BIOGRAPHY Dr. Loftus attended UCLA and originally majored in Mathematics. Dr. Loftus was planning on being a math teacher when she discovered psychology while attending UCLA. In 1966, she received her Bachelor of the Arts in Math and Psychology from UCLA. After graduating from UCLA Dr. Loftus enrolled at Stanford in the Master's program. While attending Stanford, Dr. Loftus became interested in long term memory. There is a story that Dr. Loftus mentions in, The Myth of Repressed Memory, having to do with her mother's death. Some 20 years after her mother drowned in a swimming pool her family was having a get together at her Uncle's house and a relative mentioned to Dr. Loftus something about her having been the one to find her mother in the swimming pool. After that moment Dr. Loftus began remembering things about finding her mother in the pool, several memories flooded back to her that she did not know that she had in her memory. A few days after being told that she had been the one to find her mother, her brother called and told her that the relative had gotten the information wrong and that her uncle, not her, had been the one to find their mother in the swimming pool. This event in Dr. Loftus' life gives more fuel to the battle she is fighting about memory and how easy it is to create false memories. Until that day, Dr. Loftus had no memories of finding her mother in the pool, but as soon as she was told that it had been her, all kinds of memories of the event were "recovered."  In 1967, Dr. Loftus received her M.A. in psychology and then in 1968 she married her now ex-husband, George Loftus. Dr. Loftus received her Ph.D. (also from Stanford) 1970 (Born, 1997). From 1970 to 1973 Dr. Loftus was an Assistant Professor and Graduate Faculty at New School University. From 1973 to 2002, Dr. Loftus has been employed with the University of Washington holding such titles as Assistant, Associate, and Full Professor. Dr. Loftus was also an Adjunct Professor of Law for the University of Washington between 1984 and 2002. Between 2002 and the present Dr. Loftus has been an Affiliate Professor at the University of Washington for the Psychology department as well as the School of Law. Dr. Loftus received grants from the National Institute of Mental Health between 1971 and 1974 for her reseearch and in 1973 Dr. Loftus published her first book, Human Memory. For Dr. Loftus 1974 was a busy year, she worked for the Department of Transportation (until 1976) was a member of the editorial boards for the Journal of Experimental Psychology, and she published an article on memeory which thrust her into the courtroom as an expert witness. For one year (1975-1976) Dr. Loftus was a fellow of the American Council on Education and in 1976 Cognitive Processes was published. Dr. Loftus has been a member of the National Science Foundation and a fellow of the Center for Advanced Study in Behavioral Science (Loftus, 2008). Eyewitness Testimony was published in 1979 and also that year Dr. Loftus became Professor of Psychology at the University of Washington. Also during 1979, Dr. Loftus began her research on repressed memories and eyewitness account due to the alarmingly high rates of childhood abuse and trauma. In 1980, Dr. Loftus published Law and Human Behavior and in 1981 Dr. Loftus found surprising information into how we remember and also why we forget. In 1983, Dr. Loftus was honored by being invited to present her work on memory to the Royal Society in London. Dr. Loftus and her husband Geoffrey Loftus were divorced in 1991. The Myth of Repressed Memory was published in 1994 with Remembering Dangerously right behind it in 1995. Dr. Loftus received the Distinguished Contribution Award from the American Academy of Forensic Psychology also in 1995 (Loftus, 2008). Dr. Loftus has been awarded six different honorary doctorates beginning in 1984 and receiving the last in 2006. She received her first honorary doctorate in 1982 from Miami University in Ohio. The second was received from Leiden University in the Netherland in 1990. Her third honorary doctorate, in 1994, came from John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York and was an honorary doctorate of laws. In 1998, she received her fourth honorary doctorate from the University of Portsmouth in England. The fourth and the fifth honorary doctorate were in 2005 and 2008, respectively and were from the University of Haifa in Israel and the University of Oslo, respectively. Dr. Loftus has been of service to many different societies and has also served as President of many of these organizations. In 1984, she served as President of the Western Psychological Association (she also served as President for this organization in 2004-2005). She served as President of the American Psychology-Law Society in 1985 and as President of Division 3 (Experimental) of the American Psychological Association in 1988. From 1998 to 1999, Dr. Loftus served as President for the Association of Psychological Science (APS). Dr. Loftus has received many awards due to her work, in fact she has received so many that I am only able to mention a few of them here. In 1996, she received the American Association of Applied and Preventative Psychology (AAAPP) Award for Distinguished Contributions to Basic and Applied Scientific Psychology (Loftus, 2008). She received the James McKeen Cattell Fellow from APS in 1997 for "a career of significant intelletual contributions to the science of psychology in the area of applied psychological research." In 2001, Dr. Loftus received the William James Fellow from APS for "ingeniously and rigorously designed research studies...that yielded clear objective evidence on difficults and controversial questions." The National Academy of Sciences bestowed the inaugral Henry & Bryna David Lectureship award in 2002. This is an award for the "application of the best social and behavioral sciences research to public policy issues." In 2004, Dr. Loftus was elected to the National Academy of Sciences, then in 2005 she was elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh. Also in 2005, Dr. Loftus won the Grawemeyer Prize in Psychology with a gift of $200,000. The prize was to honor ideas of "great significance and impact." Dr. Loftus was elected tothe American Philosophical Society in 2006. Most recently Dr. Loftus was named the 58th of the 100 Most Eminent Psychologists of the 20th century and was also the top ranked woman.
April 7, 2011
This episode is relevant to professionals, students and those with an interest in the real world applications of the science of human behavior. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., interviews Alan Poling, PhD about his work training African giant pouched rats to detect landmines and tuberculosis.  Some of the items they discuss include: The extent of the world’s landmine problem  Why it’s advantageous to train rats to detect landmines and tuberculosis relative to other procedures  The behavioral procedures involved in training rats for this work  The economic impact of his work in this area  And more!  ALAN POLING, PhD BIOGRAPHY Dr. Poling received his B.A. in 1972 from Alderson-Broaddus College, his M.A. in 1974 from West Virginia University, and his Ph.D. in 1977 from the University of Minnesota. He joined the faculty at Western Michigan University in 1977 and earned the rank of Professor of Psychology. Dr. Poling began serving as an Interim Associate Dean in the College of Arts of Sciences in 2003 and was named Interim Chair of the Department of Mathematics in 2004. His primary research interests are in psychopharmacology and behavior analysis; grants from the National Institutes of Health and Department of Education have supported much of his work. A Fellow of Divisions 3, 25, and 28, Dr. Poling has published 11 books and over 250 articles and book chapters and served as the research advisor of 28 Ph.D. recipients. He was recognized as a Distinguished Alumnus of West Virginia University in 1999 and a Distinguished Faculty Scholar at Western Michigan University in 1996. In 2003, Dr. Poling received the Western Michigan University College of Arts and Sciences Outstanding Achievement in Research and Creative Activity Award.
February 17, 2011
This episode is primarily relevant to consumers. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S. interviews Drs. Susan Orsillo and Lizabeth Roemer about their mindful approach to anxiety.  They are the authors of the new book :The Mindful Way Through Anxiety: Break Free From Chronic Worry and Reclaim Your Life," just published by Guilford. Guilford is pleased to offer our listeners a 20% DISCOUNT on the book.  Simply visit www.guilford.com/p/orsillo for more details about the book and to order, and use promotional code 4P at checkout. While on www.guilford.com you can search and browse more than 1,000 titles on a wide range of topics–including CBT, mindfulness, and much more.  Promotional code 4P saves you 15% on all titles when you order online! Topics discussed in this episode include: What mindfulness is and how it can be helpful to those struggling with anxiety  Practical strategies for those struggling with anxiety  How those struggling with anxiety can integrate mindfulnes  BIOGRAPHIES Susan M. Orsillo, PhD is Professor of Psychology at Suffolk University in Boston. In collaboration with her doctoral students in clinical psychology, she has developed a number of prevention and treatment programs that integrate acceptance and mindfulness with evidence-based behavioral approaches. She lives in the Boston area with her husband and two children. Lizabeth Roemer, PhD is Professor of Psychology at the University of Massachusetts Boston, where she is actively involved in research and clinical training of doctoral students in clinical psychology. With her doctoral students, she explores the role of mindfulness, acceptance, and skillful action in promoting optimal functioning in response to external and internal stressors. She lives in the Boston area with her husband.  
December 31, 2010
This episode is primarily relevant to consumers. Beginning today, and over the next five days, Dr. John Ludgate will have one conversation per day with Dr. Mark Reinecke, author of “Little ways to Keep Calm and Carry On: Twenty Lessons for Managing Worry, Anxiety and Fear,” published by New Harbinger 2010. In each of these brief segments, Dr. Reinecke will offer practical techniques and strategies for dealing with worry and anxiety. The aim of these five brief podcast episodes is to provide tools to individuals to help make 2011 a time of less worry and better living. Today’s discussion will focus on living wisely - a lifestyle incompatible with anxiety and worry. MARK A. REINECKE, Ph.D. BIO Mark A. Reinecke, PhD,, is professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and chief of the division of psychology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. He is a distinguished fellow and past president of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy, a diplomat of the American Board of Professional Psychology, and a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Association for Psychological Science. He lives in Chicago, IL. 
December 30, 2010
This episode is primarily relevant to consumers. Beginning today, and over the next five days, Dr. John Ludgate will have one conversation per day with Dr. Mark Reinecke, author of “Little ways to Keep Calm and Carry On: Twenty Lessons for Managing Worry, Anxiety and Fear,” published by New Harbinger in 2010. In each of these brief segments, Dr. Reinecke will offer practical techniques and strategies for dealing with worry and anxiety. The aim of these five brief podcast episodes is to provide tools to individuals to help make 2011 a time of less worry and better living. Today’s discussion will focus on cognitive avoidance and the role it plays in maintaining anxiety. MARK A. REINECKE. PhD BIO Mark A. Reinecke, PhD,, is professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and chief of the division of psychology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. He is a distinguished fellow and past president of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy, a diplomat of the American Board of Professional Psychology, and a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Association for Psychological Science. He lives in Chicago, IL.
December 29, 2010
This episode is primarily relevant to consumers. Beginning today, and over the next five days, Dr. John Ludgate will have one conversation per day with Dr. Mark Reinecke, author of “Little ways to Keep Calm and Carry On: Twenty Lessons for Managing Worry, Anxiety and Fear,” published by New Harbinger in 2010. In each of these brief segments, Dr. Reinecke will offer practical techniques and strategies for dealing with worry and anxiety. The aim of these five brief podcast episodes is to provide tools to individuals to help make 2011 a time of less worry and better living. Today’s discussion will focus on cognitive avoidance and the role it plays in maintaining anxiety. MARK A. REINECKE. PhD BIO Mark A. Reinecke, PhD,, is professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and chief of the division of psychology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. He is a distinguished fellow and past president of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy, a diplomat of the American Board of Professional Psychology, and a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Association for Psychological Science. He lives in Chicago, IL.
December 28, 2010
This episode is primarily relevant to consumers. Beginning today, and over the next five days, Dr. John Ludgate will have one conversation per day with Dr. Mark Reinecke, author of “Little ways to Keep Calm and Carry On: Twenty Lessons for Managing Worry, Anxiety and Fear,” published by New Harbinger in 2010. In each of these brief segments, Dr. Reinecke will offer practical techniques and strategies for dealing with worry and anxiety. The aim of these five brief podcast episodes is to provide tools to individuals to help make 2011 a time of less worry and better living. Today’s discussion will focus on cognitive avoidance and the role it plays in maintaining anxiety. MARK A. REINECKE. PhD BIO Mark A. Reinecke, PhD,, is professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and chief of the division of psychology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. He is a distinguished fellow and past president of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy, a diplomat of the American Board of Professional Psychology, and a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Association for Psychological Science. He lives in Chicago, IL.
December 27, 2010
This episode is primarily relevant to consumers. Beginning today, and over the next five days, Dr. John Ludgate will have one conversation per day with Dr. Mark Reinecke, author of “Little ways to Keep Calm and Carry On: Twenty Lessons for Managing Worry, Anxiety and Fear,” published by New Harbinger in 2010. In each of these brief segments, Dr. Reinecke will offer practical techniques and strategies for dealing with worry and anxiety. The aim of these five brief podcast episodes is to provide tools to individuals to help make 2011 a time of less worry and better living. Today’s discussion will focus on cognitive avoidance and the role it plays in maintaining anxiety. MARK A. REINECKE. PhD BIO Mark A. Reinecke, PhD,, is professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and chief of the division of psychology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. He is a distinguished fellow and past president of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy, a diplomat of the American Board of Professional Psychology, and a fellow of the American Psychological Association and the Association for Psychological Science. He lives in Chicago, IL.
December 6, 2010
This episode is primarily relevant to professionals. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S. interviews Steven C. Hayes, PhD about several aspects of his work. Some of the topics they discuss include: Functional Contextualism Exposure conceptualized from a habituation model vs. a psychological flexibility model Whether Cognitive Therapists interested in ACT need to abandon cognitive restructuring The importance of Philosophy of Science The influence of JR Kantor in the ACT/RFT work The dissemination of ACT in the 3rd World Mediation Analysis STEVEN C. HAYES, PhD BIO Steven C. Hayes, Ph.D., is Nevada Foundation Professor and Director of Clinical Training at the Department of Psychology at the University of Nevada. An author of 36 books and over 500 scientific articles, he has shown in his research how language and thought leads to human suffering, and has developed "Acceptance and Commitment Therapy" a powerful therapy method that is useful in a wide variety of areas. His popular book Get Out of Your Mind and Into Your Life (New Harbinger, 2005) was featured in Time Magazine among several other major media outlets and for a time was the number one best selling self-help book in the United States. Dr. Hayes has been President of several scientific societies and has received several national awards, such as the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy.
December 2, 2010
This episode is primarily relevant to professionals. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S. interviews Rob Zettle, PhD about Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in the treatment of depression. Some of the topics they discuss include: His early work with Steve Hayes and the initial development of ACT and RFT  The comparative trials of CT vs. ACT in the treatment of depression  The ACT approach to depression as well as current directions in this area  And much more!  ROB ZETTLE, PHD BIOGRAPHY Dr. Zettle is a tenured professor in the clinical psychology program at Wichita State University. Dr. Zettle was Steven Hayes' first doctoral student and thus has had extensive training in ACT (>20 years). Students who enter the clinical psychology doctoral program at Wichita State University and work with Dr. Zettle can receive training in ACT. The common thread running through Dr. Zettle's research is an attempt to better understand the roles that languaging and verbal behavior play in the initiation, maintenance, and alleviation of human suffering from a functional contextualistic perspective. Some of the research projects are more basic in nature, while others are more explicitly applied and clinical in their focus. More basic research projects focus on the development of both self-report and behavioral ways of assessing processes that contribute to psychological flexibility/rigidity as well as experimentally manipulating these same processes in impacting analogues of clinical forms of human suffering, such as anxiety and mood disorders. More applied research projects compare the clinical outcomes and related processes associated with traditional cognitive-behavioral interventions in treatment of depression versus ACT and related acceptance and mindfulness-based approaches.
November 6, 2010
This episode is relevant to professionals. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S. LPC interviews Theresa McKeon about TAGteaching.  Items discussed include: An overview of TAGteaching  The range of applications for this technology  The research base  The relationship between TAGteaching and Precision Teaching  Current directions in TAGteaching  And more!  THERESA MCKEON BIOGRAPHY Theresa is a co-founder and senior vice president of TAGteach International, LLC. She has introduced TAGteach to groups around the world, including gymnasts in Iceland, commercial fishermen in Washington State, military personnel in Norway, college professors in California, and specialists in the field of autism in Boston. Theresa has authored several articles, and continues to create individual presentations for TAGteach seminars and workshops in a wide variety of applications.
October 17, 2010
This episode is primarily relevant to consumers. In this episode R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., LPC interviews Jeffrey Brantley, MD, DFAPA about mindfulness meditation. Some of the items they discuss include: What mindfulness meditation is  Why consumers of mental health services should be interested in mindfulness  The types of difficulties mindfulness has been applied to  A brief discussion of the research base in the area of mindfulness  Current directions in mindfulness research and application  Dr. Brantley also takes listeners through a brief mindfulness exercise  JEFFREY BRANTLEY, MD, DFAPA BIOGRAPHY Jeffrey Brantley, MD, DFAPA, trained in and practiced psychiatry, in both community mental health settings and in private practice for approximately 18 years. He became Board Certified in psychiatry in 1984, and was elected as a "Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association" in 2008. He is a Consulting Associate in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke Medical Center. Dr. Brantley was trained in mindfulness as a resident in psychiatry at the University of California at Irvine Medical Center, and has been practicing mindfulness for 30 years. He began teaching mindfulness meditation to health professionals and others in 1990. Dr. Brantley is one of the founding faculty members of Duke Integrative Medicine, where he started the Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction program in 1998. He has participated in many intensive meditation retreats, practicing with a variety of teachers, including Joan Halifax, Thich Nhat Hanh, Larry Rosenberg, Christina Feldman, and members of the Amaravati Buddhist monastic community. He has also completed the professional training for Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction offered by Jon Kabat-Zinn and Saki Santorelli. Dr. Brantley is the author of Calming Your Anxious Mind: how mindfulness and compassion can free you from anxiety, fear, and panic and is the co-author, with Wendy Millstine, of the Five Good Minutes series (www.fivegoodminutes.com) His most recent books, with Wendy Millstine, are Daily Meditations for Calming Your Anxious Mind and Five good minutes in your body: 100 mindful practices to help you accept yourself & feel at home in your body.
October 14, 2010
This episode is relevant to both consumers and professionals. In this episode, R. Trent Codd,III, Ed.S., interviews Lee Kern, LCSW about the behaviorally-based residential weight loss program, Structure House, and issues related to the behavioral treatment of obesity.  A sampling of the topics they discuss include: · The Structure House approach to treating obesity The research base supporting this approach Practical strategies for weight loss  Reasonable weight loss goals The importance of exercise and methods of exercising when one has physical limitations which interfere with exercise Causes of obesity Resources for listeners  LEE KERN, MSW, LCSW BIOGRAPHY Lee Kern, MSW, LCSW, is the Clinical Director at Structure House, a nationally recognized psychologically based residential weight control center in Durham, NC. 
August 31, 2010
This episode is primarily relevant to consumers and professionals. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S. interviews Marolyn Morford, PhD about Reactive Attachment Disorder. Specifically, they discuss: What Reactive Attachment Disorder is  Difficulties with the RAD Diagnosis  What Attachment is  The weak relationship between attachment treatment and attachment research  The dangers associated with many of the “specialized” treatments for RAD  “Thinking Errors” that lead clinicians and parents to make faulty conclusions about extreme behavior problems  Effective treatments for extreme behavior problems  MAROLYN MORFORD, PhD BIOGRAPHY Marolyn Morford is a clinical and developmental psychologist with over 25 years of experience working with individuals in a variety of contexts.  Dr. Morford is past president of the Central Pennsylvania Psychological Association, a member of the American Psychological Association’s Division 53 (Clinical Child Psychology), Pennsylvania Psychological Association’s (PPA ) Committees on Ethics, Continuing Education, the Practice-Research Network, PPA’s E-newsletter and is chair of PPA’s Child Custody Committee. She has testified before legislative committees and in several Pennsylvania counties (Allegheny, Blair, Bucks, Centre, Clinton, & Mifflin) on child related matters. She likes summarizing current research to the public to increase awareness of development, behavior, and emotional health needs of children and adults.
August 17, 2010
This episode is primarily relevant to professionals. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., interviews Donna M. Sudak, M.D. about combining CBT with medication. In this episode they discuss : When a prescriber should consider CBT  Essential things prescribers should know about using medication alongside CBT  Whether anxiolytics interfere with exposure therapy  How cognitive-behavioral therapists can better communicate with prescribers  CBT in brief formats  Her work with training psychiatric residents in CBT  And much more!  DONNA M. SUDAK, M.D BIOGRAPHY Donna M. Sudak, M.D., is Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the Drexel University College of Medicine. Dr. Sudak is Director of Psychotherapy Training, and lectures widely about topics in Cognitive Behavior Therapy, including topics such as Cognitive Conceptualization, Dialectical Behavior Therapy and training residents in Psychiatry in Cognitive Therapy. Dr. Sudak is a graduate of the Medical College of Pennsylvania, and completed her Psychiatry residency at the University of Washington. She has made a number of significant contributions to the literature in CBT education.In addition to her teaching responsibilities at Drexel University College of Medicine, Dr. Sudak is an adjunct faculty member at the Beck Institute for Cognitive Therapy and Research and teaches residents at Albert Einstein and Thomas Jefferson University. She has a private practice in Philadelphia. She has an active research interest in psychiatric education, and has played a major role in developing suggested curricula and guidelines for resident competency in Cognitive Therapy.
July 30, 2010
This episode is primarily relevant to professionals. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S. interviews Irving Kirsch, PhD about his research on antidepressant effectiveness.  In this episode they discuss: An overview of the current controversy pertaining to the effectiveness of antidepressants  How antidepressants perform relative to placebo A summation of Dr. Kirsch’s research in the area  Criticisms leveled at Dr. Kirsch’s conclusions as well as Dr. Kirsch’s responses to those criticisms Effective treatments for depression  IRVING KIRSCH, PHD BIOGRAPHY Irving Kirsch is Associate Director of the Program in Placebo Studies at the Harvard Medical School, lecturer in medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Professor of Psychology at the University of Plymouth (UK), and Professor Emeritus at the University of Hull and the University of Connecticut.  He has published 10 books and more than 200 scientific journal articles and book chapters on placebo effects, antidepressant medication, hypnosis, and suggestion.  He originated the concept of response expectancy and his meta-analyses on the efficacy of antidepressants were covered extensively in the international media and influenced official guidelines for the treatment of depression in the United Kingdom.  His book, The Emperor’s New Drugs: Exploding the Antidepressant Myth was shortlisted for the prestigious Mind Book of the Year award. It has been published in English, French, Japanese, and Polish and is currently being translated into Italian and Turkish.
July 19, 2010
This episode is primarily relevant to consumers. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., interviews Anne Marie Albano, PhD about Child Anxiety Disorders. In this episode they discuss: The major child and adolescent anxiety disorders  Whether parents should be concerned about shyness  Steps parents can take to prevent the onset of anxiety disorders in their children  Risk factors for the development of anxiety disorders  When parents should consider seeking professional help and where they might go to locate appropriate help ANNE MARIE ALBANO, PhD BIOGRAPHY Dr. Anne Marie Albano is associate professor of clinical psychology in psychiatry within the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, and Director of the Columbia University Clinic for Anxiety and Related Disorders. Dr. Albano received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Mississippi and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Phobia and Anxiety Disorders Clinic of the Center for Stress and Anxiety Disorders at SUNY-Albany, under the mentorship of David H. Barlow, Ph.D. She has held past positions as the Assistant Director of the SUNY Phobia Clinic, Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Louisville, and the Recanati Family Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at the New York University School of Medicine. Among her professional activities, Dr. Albano is past president of the Society for Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology of the American Psychological Association and past president of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. She is Associate Editor of the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology and a past Editor of the journal Cognitive and Behavioral Practice. Dr. Albano is a Founding Fellow of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy and a Beck Institute Scholar. She is board certified in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. Dr. Albano devotes her career to the study of anxiety and mood disorders in children, adolescents, and young adults. She has been a principal investigator on two of the largest clinical studies funded by the National Institutes of Mental Health, examining treatments for children and adolescents with anxiety and depression. In the Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Treatment Study (CAMS), 488 children ages 7 to 17 years with separation anxiety, social anxiety, and generalized anxiety disorders were treated with either cognitive behavioral therapy, medication, their combination, or pill placebo. Results indicated that all three active treatments were superior to pill placebo, with the combination treatment having the greatest advantage. These results tell us that anxiety in children and adolescents is highly treatable and that children do not need to suffer with these disorders. Dr. Albano is also a member of the Treatments for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS) Team, having served as a contributor to the TADS Cognitive Behavioral Therapy manual and also as a principal investigator for this monumental research study. The TADS results found that for adolescents ages 12 to 17, the combination of cognitive behavioral therapy and medication results the greatest response rate in recovery from moderate to severe depression, followed by medication alone. Cognitive behavioral therapy alone takes several weeks longer to reach an effect, suggesting that use of CBT alone in milder cases is indicated. Overall, Dr. Albano's clinical and research careers have centered on developing and disseminating effective treatments for anxiety and depression in children, adolescents, and young adults.
July 12, 2010
This episode is primarily relevant to professionals. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S. interviews Abigail Calkin, PhD about Ogden Lindsley.  In this episode they discuss:  Ogden Lindsley’s life and his research  Standard Celeration Charting and Precision Teaching  The application of SCC to private events or “inner behavior”  The Lindsley archive  And more!  ABIGAIL CALKIN, PhD BIOGRAPHY An educational psychologist and educator who specializes in behavioral science and precision teaching research, author Abigail B. Calkin also has the pioneering, adventuresome stock to write a real life drama like The Night Orion Fell, her newest book. Dr. Calkin lives in a remote southeast Alaskan town of 426 people from whence she writes, kayaks, cross country skies and works as a school psychologist at several isolated community schools, some of which are accessible only by plane. A one-time urbanite born in Boston, her home now is surrounded by two extraordinary wonders—Tongass National Rainforest and Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve. Her home on nine acres, shared with her husband, is inspirational to her work and endows her with an appreciation for nature's harshness that is at the core of The Night Orion Fell. She is the author six other books, 40 pieces of published poetry and 40 professional articles, and is in various stages of preparation on several new fiction and nonfiction works. Her education includes a B.A. from the University of Colorado with a double major of psychology and philosophy, two years at the University of Edinburgh (Scotland), an M.A. in special education from the University of Oregon and a Ph.D. from the University of Kansas. She began her professional career in Colorado working with exceptional children. She moved to Oregon where she set up the state's first classroom for students with learning disabilities in 1965. She was on the faculty of Western Oregon College, then worked as a school psychologist and then principal in the Topeka Public School System (1978-1996), and later developed a technique to improve self-esteem.
July 7, 2010
This episode is primarily relevant to consumers. In this episode, John Ludgate, PhD interviews Leslie Sokol, PhD about the new book “Think confident, be confident: A four-step approach to eliminate doubt and achieve lifelong self-esteem.” Dr. Sokol is co-author of this book along with Marci G. Fox, PhD. In this episode they discuss: Why people have issues with doubt  The effects of doubting  The difference between doubt based on competence and doubt based on desirability  Doubt distortions and how they operate  Steps people can take to deal with doubt  LESLIE SOKOL, PhD BIO Dr. Sokol is a licensed psychologist and distinguished founding fellow, past president, treasurer, and credentials chair in the Academy of Cognitive Therapy. She is the director of education at the Beck Institute for Cognitive Therapy and Research, lectures nationally and internationally, and maintains a private practice in the Philadelphia suburbs. 
June 27, 2010
This podcast is primarily relevant to consumers. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., interviews journalist Maia Szalavitz about her work in the area she calls the “Troubled-Teen Industry.” In this episode they discuss: What the “Troubled-Teen Industry” is  What the research has to say about the effectiveness of “wilderness treatment” programs  Dangers associated with some of these programs  The problem of “peer deviancy training”  Suggestions for parents with out-of-control and substance abusing teens  MAIA SZALAVITZ BIOGRAPHY Maia Szalavitz is a journalist who covers health, science and public policy. She is co-author, with leading child trauma expert Bruce D. Perry, MD, PhD, of Born for Love: Why Empathy is Essential– And Endangered (Morrow, 2010) and The Boy Who Was Raised as a Dog and Other Stories from a Child Psychiatrist’s Notebook: What Traumatized Children Can Teach Us About Loss, Love and Healing (Basic, 2007). 
June 8, 2010
This episode is relevant to consumers and professionals. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., LPC, LCAS interviews Doug Woods, PhD about the behavioral treatment of Tourette Syndrome. In this episode they discuss: What Tourette Syndrome is  The behavioral approach to treating Tourette Syndrome along with the research base supporting this approach  The research on other psychosocial treatments for this disorder  Myths surrounding the behavioral treatment of Tourette Syndrome with an emphasis on what the research says about the myths discussed  DOUG WOODS, PhD BIOGRAPHY Douglas W. Woods, PhD, received his doctorate in clinical psychology from Western Michigan University in 1999. He is a recognized expert in the assessment and treatment of tic disorders and trichotillomania and is currently associate professor and director of clinical training in the Department of Psychology at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. Woods has authored or coauthored more than ninety papers and chapters and has edited two book describing behavioral interventions for tic disorders, trichotillomania, and other repetitive behavior problems. He has presented his work nationally and internationally with over 100 conference presentations and numerous invited talks. Woods is a founding member of the Tourette Syndrome Association’s (TSA) Behavioral Sciences Consortium, is a member of TSA’s Medical Advisory Board, and serves on the Scientific Advisory Board of the Trichotillomania Learning Center. He has been funded by the TSA Grants program, Trichotillomania Learning Center Grants program, and is currently funded by the NIH as part of two separate multisite research projects investigating the efficacy of behavior therapy for children and adults with Tourette Syndrome.
May 17, 2010
This episode is relevant to professionals and consumers. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., LPC, LCAS interviews Neal Stolar, MD-PhD and Paul Grant, PhD about cognitive-behavioral therapy for psychosis. In this episode they discuss: The cognitive-behavioral therapy approach to treating psychosis  How CBT may be used with persons at high risk for developing psychosis  An overview of the research base pertaining to CBT and psychosis  Current directions in this literature  DRS. NEAL STOLAR AND PAUL GRANT BIOGRAPHIES Neal Stolar, MD-PhD, is a Medical Director and Director of the Cognitive Therapy for the Treatment of Psychosis Special Project at Project Transition in the Philadelphia area; a psychiatric consultant for Creative Health Services and Penn Behavioral Health; a researcher at the University of Pennsylvania's Psychopathology Research Unit and Schizophrenia Research Center; and is in private practice.  Dr. Stolar is a Founding Fellow of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy.  He has lectured on cognitive therapy of schizophrenia in the United States, China, and Brazil. Paul Grant, PhD, is Director of Schizophrenia Research and a Fellow in the Psychopathology Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Grant’s research interests include cognitive psychopathological models of positive and negative symptoms as well as cognitive therapy of schizophrenia. He is the author of several journal articles and book chapters.
April 28, 2010
This episode is primarily relevant to professionals. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., LPC, LCAS interviews Howard Rachlin, PhD about his work in the area of self-control. In this episode they discuss: How self-control and willpower are conceptualized from a behavioral perspective  An overview of the research literature pertaining to discount functions  Applied implications of this experimental work for helping clients with addictions and other behavioral problems involving self-control  HOWARD RACHLIN, PhD BIOGRAPHY Dr. Rachlin obtained a PhD at Harvard University in 1965. He is currently a Research Professor and an Emeritus Distinguished Professor of Psychology at Stony Brook University. He has written six books including Behavior And Mind ( 1994) and The Science of Self-Control (2000) and published more than 100 journal articles. His research focuses on self-control and social cooperation in humans and nonhumans from the perspective of teleological behaviorism. 
April 5, 2010
This episode is relevant to professionals. In this episode, John Ludgate, PhD interviews Frank Dattilio, PhD about cognitive-behavioral therapy with couples and families. Some of the items they discuss include: How CBT for couples and families has evolved over the  past two decades  How CBT can be integrated into a family systems approach  Strategies for working with couples who have an unequal commitment to continuing the relationship  How behavioral and cognitive techniques can be balanced in CBT couple or family therapy  DR. DATITILIO BIOGRAPHY FRANK M. DATTILIO, Ph.D., ABPP , maintains a dual faculty appointment in the  Department of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and the University of Pennsylvania School  of Medicine. He is a licensed psychologist in the states of PA, NJ, NY and DE and is listed in the  National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology.    Dr. Dattilio is board certified in both clinical psychology and behavioral psychology through the  American Board of Professional Psychology (ABPP) and received a Certificate of Training in  Forensic Psychology through the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania  School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He is also a founding fellow of the Academy of  Cognitive Therapy. Dr. Dattilio has been a visiting faculty member at several major universities  and medical schools throughout the world.    Dr. Dattilio is the recipient of numerous awards, including the award for Distinguished  Psychologist by the American Psychological Association's Division 29 and the award for  Distinguished Contributions to the Science and Profession of Psychology by the Pennsylvania  Psychological Association. He is also an inductee of the prestigious College of Physicians of  Philadelphia for his many contributions to medicine and science, and is the recipient of the 2005  AABT award for "Outstanding Contribution by an Individual for Clinical Activities." He was  recently selected to receive the 2007 Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology and  Humankind by the Philadelphia Society of Clinical Psychology.    Dr. Dattilio has over 200 professional publications and 15 books in the areas of anxiety  disorders, forensic and clinical psychology, and marital and family discord. He has also  presented extensively throughout the United States, Canada, Africa, Europe, South America,  Australia, New Zealand, Mexico, Cuba, and the West Indies on both cognitive-behavior therapy  and forensic issues. To date, his works have been translated into 25 languages. 
March 22, 2010
This episode is relevant to both consumers and professionals. In this episode R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., LPC, LCAS interviews Dr. Barry McCarthy about the difficulties of low-sex and no-sex couples as well as strategies for rekindling desire including: The normative range of sexual activity among couples  The prevalence of low sexual desire among couples  Factors contributing to low sexual desire  The difficulty of marital sex not being valued in our culture  Practical tips for couples experiencing low sexual desire  The difficulties related to one partner desiring sex more than the other  Research related to the treatment of low sexual desire  And much more!  BARRY W. MCCARTHY, PhD, ABPP BIOGRAPHY Barry McCarthy, Ph.D., is a certified sex therapist and Professor of Psychology at American University. He has published extensively on couples and sexuality and given more than a hundred workshops around the world.
March 11, 2010
This podcast episode is relevant to both consumers and professionals. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., LPC, LCAS interviews Robert J. Meyers, PhD about Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT). Topics discussed include: What Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT) is  What a concerned significant other (CSO) can do to get their loved one into substance abuse treatment  Whether a substance abuser has to “hit bottom” before they can be persuaded into treatment  The research base for CRAFT  How CRAFT impacts the emotional well-being of concerned significant others  How the CRAFT approach differs from other approaches such as the Johnson Intervention approach  How CRAFT impacts domestic violence  And more!  ROBERT J. MEYERS BIOGRAPHY Dr. Meyers has been in the addiction field for 37 years with 23 of those years being at the University of New Mexico.  He is currently the director of Robert J. Meyers, Ph.D. & Associates and a Research Associate Professor Emeritus in Psychology at the University of New Mexico's Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse and Addiction.  He has been involved in over a dozen clinical trials funded by the National Institutes of Health, including Project Match and the Clinical Trials Network.Dr. Meyers began his work with the Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA) in 1976.  At that time he helped develop the first CRA outpatient procedures, which were used in the seminal study published by Dr. Nathan Azrin and colleagues in 1982.  In the late 1990's Dr. Meyers helped design and evaluate the adolescent version of CRA (A-CRA).  Dr. Meyers also developed the new innovative "intervention" program used to engage resistant substance abusers to enter treatment.  This new intervention called Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT), an evidence-based protocol, has been shown to be superior to more traditional interventions in several randomized clinical trials.  His CRAFT work has led Dr. Meyers and CRAFT to be one of the 14 featured segments of the Emmy Award-winning HBO Addiction series. Dr. Meyers has also been featured in Oprah magazine for his outstanding work using the Community Reinforcement Approach.Dr. Meyers is an internationally known speaker and trainer who has delivered trainings throughout the USA and in 12 countries around the world. Dr. Meyers has trained therapist from 6 of the worlds 7 continents.  He has published over 100 scientific articles or chapters and co-authored 5 books and one manual on addiction treatment, including "Get Your Loved One Sober: Alternatives to Nagging, Pleading and Threatening" and "Motivating Substance Abusers to Enter Treatment: Working with Family Members". Several of his books are also available in Dutch, Finnish, German and Korean.  The book "Get Your Loved One Sober: Alternatives to Nagging, Pleading and Threatening" is currently being published in Dutch, Japanese and Spanish.
March 3, 2010
This podcast is relevant to both professionals and consumers. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., LPC, LCAS interviews Michael P. Twohig, PhD about Pornography addiction. Topics discussed include: Definitional matters pertaining to the definition of pornography addiction  The first controlled outcome study for the treatment of this problem  An Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) approach to treating pornography addiction  His research program as it pertains to the treatment of pornography addiction  DR. TWOHIG BIOGRAPHY Michael P. Twohig, Ph.D. is an assistant professor in the Combined Clinical, Counseling, School Ph.D. program in the Department of Psychology at Utah State University. The focus of his research is to develop effective treatments for problems of social importance. Therefore, his clinical interests are wide and not topographically based. He predominantly researches treatments for adults but also works with children. To date, his research has focused on anxiety disorders, especially obsessive compulsive disorder and OC-spectrum disorders including Tourette’s Disorder, Trichotillomania, and chronic skin picking. He works in the areas of developmental disabilities, substance abuse, eating disorders, problematic pornography viewing, stigma and prejudice, and multicultural issues. He generally researches treatments that are in the behavioral tradition, including contingency management and exposure-based therapies, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. His work has two immediate aims: 1) to determine the effectiveness of particular treatment modalities, and 2) to determine the processes (mechanisms of action) through which treatments produce their effects. Dr. Twohig completed his B.A. and M.S. at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee where he specialized in behavior analysis. He earned his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Nevada, Reno, and completed his clinical internship at the University of British Columbia Hospital. He has an impressive scholarly record of publications, books, presentations, grants, and awards.
February 17, 2010
This episode is relevant to consumers. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., LPC, LCAS interviews Dr. Jonathan Abramowitz about Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder. Topics discussed include: What Obsessive-Compulsive Disoder (OCD) is  Common presentations of OCD including common obsessional categories – it doesn’t always involve fear of germs and hand washing!  Treatments available for OCD and their relative effectiveness  What Exposure and Response Prevention (ERP) entails - it’s not as bad as it sounds!  Resources for OCD patients and their families  And more!  DR. ABRAMOWITZ BIOGRAPHY Dr. Abramowitz joined the Clinical Psychology faculty at UNC-Chapel Hill in 2006. He is currently Professor and Associate Chair of Psychology, as well as Director of the UNC  Anxiety and Stress Disorders Clinic. His previous positions include Associate Professor at the Mayo Clinic and Mayo School of Medicine, and Instructor at the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests focus on anxiety disorders (mainly obsessive-compulsive disorder [OCD]). He teaches graduate and undergraduate courses at UNC and also trains clinical psychology graduate students in how to implement state-of-the-art assessment and treatment techniques for anxiety/OCD. He has published over 150 research articles, book chapters, and encyclopedia entries, along with 12 books on anxiety, OCD, and related topics. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders, and Associate Editor of Behaviour Research and Therapy. He is a member of the International OCD Foundation Scientific and Clinical Advisory Board.
February 5, 2010
This episode is relevant to both consumers and professionals. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., LPC, LCAS interviews Jeff Lohr, PhD. They discuss many issues, including: The importance of scientifically-driven psychotherapy  The role of the therapeutic relationship in psychotherapy outcome – is it all that’s important?  How consumers can locate a competent psychotherapist who provides scientifically-based psychotherapy  Why consumers should be concerned about practitioners who self-identify their approach to psychotherapy as “ecclectic” Critical Incident Stress Debriefing (CISD) and the concerns research has identified with this approach  Things consumers should be cautious of when seeking a psychotherapist  And more! JEFF LOHR, PhD BIOGRAPHY Jeffrey M. Lohr, PhD, is Professor of Psychology at the University of Arkansas-Fayetteville. He has been a licensed psychologist in Arkansas with a part-time independent practice since 1976. Dr. Lohr’s research interests focus on anxiety disorders, domestic violence, and the efficacy of psychosocial treatments. 
January 19, 2010
This podcast is relevant to consumers. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S., LPC, ACT interviews Dr. Judith Beck about: The basics of the Cognitive Model  Her recent work with Cognitive Therapy and weight loss  The Academy of Cognitive Therapy  How to find a competent Cognitive Therapist  Current directions in Cognitive Therapy  JUDITH S. BECK, PhD BIOGRAPHY Judith S. Beck, Ph.D., is a world expert in Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) and author of the basic text in the field, Cognitive Behavior Therapy: Basics and Beyond, which has been translated into 20 languages. She is president of the non-profit, Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy in Philadelphia, which she co-founded with her father, Aaron T. Beck, M.D., in 1994. The Beck Institute is renowned nationally and internationally as perhaps the premier training facility in Cognitive Behavior Therapy for health and mental health professionals and educators.Dr. Beck is also Clinical Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania. She travels extensively, nationally and internationally, to present on various applications of CBT. She has nearly 100 publications to her name, including professional books (Cognitive Therapy for Challenging Problems, the Oxford Textbook of Psychotherapy and Cognitive Therapy for Personality Disorders) and books for consumers (The Beck Diet Solution: Train Your Brain to Think Like a Thin Person and workbook, and The Complete Beck Diet for Life).  Dr. Beck currently divides her time among teaching and supervision, administration, clinical work, program development, research and writing. She is a founding fellow and past president of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy, a non-profit organization that certifies mental health professionals in cognitive therapy, and has been a consultant for several NIMH research studies.
January 7, 2010
This podcast is relevant to professionals. In this episode R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S. interviews Dr. Marc Branch about Behavioral Pharmacology. Some of the topics discussed in this episode include: Behavioral Pharmacology’s views on addiction  Discussion of Peter Dews and his research program Behavioral factors related to tolerance  Exposure and anti-anxiety agents  MARC BRANCH, PhD BIOGRAPHY Dr. Branch is best known for directing one of the country’s active programs in behavioral pharmacology. He has conducted a long line of research on agents such as pentobarbital, d-amphetamine, and cocaine. His research has primarily been concerned with behavioral factors that influence whether and the degree to which tolerance develops in the face of repeated exposure. His work has been supported continuously for 30 years by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) and National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) and has been published in flagship journals in both behavior analysis and pharmacology. In recognition of this consistent track record of excellence, he has been the recipient of a coveted research career award from NIMH. He is a fellow of both the American Psychological Association and the American Psychological Society.
December 14, 2009
This podcast is relevant to both consumers and professionals. In this episode R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S. interviews Dr. Daniel Willingham about learning styles and other contemporary educational theories. As always, the focus is on what the research has to say. Some of the topics discussed include: The learning styles literature including the lack of empirical support for this popular educational notion and why it is so popular despite its weak research base  Gardner’s theory of Multiple Intelligences including misunderstandings surrounding what the theory is  Mel Levine’s neurodevelopmental theory  DANIEL WILLINGHAM, PhD BIOGRAPHY Daniel Willingham earned his B.A. from Duke University in 1983 and his Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology from Harvard University in 1990. He is currently Professor of Psychology at the University of Virginia, where he has taught since 1992. Until about 2000, his research focused solely on the brain basis of learning and memory. Today, all of his research concerns the application of cognitive psychology to K-16 education. He writes the “Ask the Cognitive Scientist” column for American Educator magazine, and is an Associate Editor of Mind, Brain, and Education. He is also the author of Why Don't Students Like School?, When Can You Trust the Experts?,  andRaising Readers in an Age of Distraction (forthcoming). His writing on education has appeared in twelve languages.
December 8, 2009
This podcast is relevant to consumers. In this episode, R. Trent Codd, III, Ed.S. interviews Dr. Jodi Polaha about childhood sleep remedies.  Some of the topics discussed include: The impact of sleep loss on children How much sleep children should be getting The most common problems parents deal with as well as strategies for addressing those problems Special strategies for parents with infants JODI POLAHA, PhD BIOGRAPHY Jodi Polaha, PhD is a licensed pediatric psychologist and Assistant Professor of Psychology at East Tennessee State University. She has over ten years’ experience working in pediatric primary care settings where, by some reports, concerns about development and behavior are more common than ear infections with top concerns including behavior problems, toileting, and sleeping. In addition to her clinical background, Dr. Polaha published over 20 research articles and book chapters relating to childhood behavior. 
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