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April 9, 2020
Tele-Medicine Gets a Boost from Coronavirus The pandemic is changing how we interact with medical professionals. For instance, Medicare and Medicaid have expanded access to tele-health appointments for their members. This means more elderly and low-income people can now get healthcare from practitioners without visiting a clinic or hospital. Reporter: Nina Sparling, KQED State Cuts Deals to Provide Masks to Hospitals California has started to cut its own deals with manufacturers to dramatically increase the number of N-95 and surgical masks it can provide to hospitals and front line workers during the pandemic. Reporter: Katie Orr, KQED Politics Riverside Skilled Nursing Facility Evacuated Staying in Riverside, a skilled nursing facility there that’s had an outbreak of the coronavirus has been evacuated. That after employees didn’t come to work two days in a row. Reporter: Benjamin Purper, KVCR From Inside a Hospital Bracing for a Surge of COVID-19 Patients Medical centers across the state continue to brace for a surge of COVID19 patients. But predictions on when exactly that peak hits keep changing. Now statistical modeling experts say hospitalizations might not crest until mid-May. But the looming surge weighs heavily on the minds of healthcare workers, especially in large public hospitals who serve the neediest patients. An ER nurse at Highland Hospital in Oakland says hasn’t seen the sharp uptick in visits he expected... at least not yet. Reporter: Lesley McClurg, KQED Science
April 8, 2020
Governor Anticipates Tough Economic Times In California As California responds to the coronavirus pandemic, state and local governments are burning through enormous amounts of money. Governor Gavin Newsom says all that spending now means  painful fiscal times later. Reporter: Scott Shafer, KQED Los Angeles County Rolls Out Self-Administered COVID-19 Tests Los Angeles County has become the center of the coronavirus pandemic in California, If you live  there and think you might have COVID-19 you can now get tested. Formerly, testing was largely reserved for at risk populations like the elderly and those with compromised immune systems.  Reporter: Kathryn Barnes, KCRW After 9-Month Pause, California Issuing Fracking Permits Again California officials are granting fracking permits again. The state had put a hold on applications for the controversial oil extraction technique last July because of growing safety and environmental concerns. Reporter: Ted Goldberg, KQED Zoom-Bombing gives rise to Zoom-Bouncers you’ve heard of “zoom-bombing,” where trolls hijack an online video conference and post awful things. But have you heard of zoom-bouncing? It’s a new word for the coronavirus pandemic lexicon: Reporter: Rachael Myrow, KQED
April 7, 2020
New Rules for Courts in Coronavirus Times The California Judicial Council, which makes the rules for the state’s courts, has enacted a series of sweeping emergency rule changes to slow the spread of COVID-19 in jails and courtrooms, and ease the pressure on families who have to pay rent and mortgages. Reporter: Molly Solomon, KQED Speaker Pelosi on the Next Coronavirus Relief Bill Congress has passed three enormous pieces of legislation to bring relief to Americans who are suffering during the pandemic. But many in and outside of Congress want to do even more, including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. KQED politics editor Scott Shafter interviewed Pelosi. Guest: House Speaker and San Francisco Democrat Nancy Pelosi  Dogs Also Feel Cooped Up Under Stay-At-Home Orders Lots of Californians are feeling cooped up and stressed out due to physical distancing and being stuck at home. But there might be other members of the household whose mental state could be changing: our dogs. Some dogs are acting strangely during the stay-at-home order. Reporter: Sammy Caiola, CapRadio
April 6, 2020
Healthcare Workers Could Lose Immigration Protections There are thousands of immigrants among the healthcare workers fighting the coronavirus pandemic. But for years, the Trump Administration has tried to end the protections that allow many of these immigrants to live and work in the U.S. Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED Food Banks Cope With Surge in New Clients More and more Californians are losing their jobs because of the pandemic. Many are going to rely on the state’s food banks to keep their refrigerators and pantries stocked. But how ready is California’s food security safety net? The L.A. Regional Food Bank is already seeing a surge of people looking for food assistance. Reporter: Michael Flood, President, Los Angeles Regional Food Bank Audio Diary: A Physician Recovers from COVID-19 We've heard a lot about health care workers who've tested positive for COVID-19. One of them is Matt Willis, a physician and the Public Health Officer of Marin County. Willis tested positive about two weeks ago and has been isolated at home ever since, alone in an upstairs bedroom, away from his wife and children. He says he’s been feeling short of breath and running a fever off and on. Reporter: Dr. Matt Willis, Marin County Public Health Officer A Bucket Brigade Born of Natural Disasters Now Fights the Pandemic Residents in lots of California communities have gotten good in recent years at organizing themselves to respond to natural disasters, like wildfires and mudslides. Now near Santa Barbara, those same skills are being used to respond to the coronavirus pandemic. Reporter: Stephanie O’Neill
April 6, 2020
Healthcare Workers Could Lose Immigration Protections There are thousands of immigrants among the healthcare workers fighting the coronavirus pandemic. But for years, the Trump Administration has tried to end the protections that allow many of these immigrants to live and work in the U.S. Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED A Bucket Brigade Born of Natural Disasters Now Fights the Pandemic Residents in lots of California communities have gotten good in recent years at organizing themselves to respond to natural disasters, like wildfires and mudslides. Now near Santa Barbara, those same skills are being used to respond to the coronavirus pandemic. Reporter: Stephanie O’Neill 
April 3, 2020
OC Hospital Using Plasma Treatment For COVID-19 In Orange County a hospital is experimenting with a way to help patients hit hard by COVID-19. They’ve successfully transferred plasma from the blood of someone who’s recovered from the illness into someone who still has it. Reporter: Alyssa Jeong Perry, KPCC Governor Announces Tax Relief For Small Businesses Nearly two million Californians have filed for unemployment benefits over the last three weeks. The state has taken in an average of 111,000 claims each day this past week. A lot of those workers are employed by small businesses which can now apply for tax relief for the year ahead. Reporter: Katie Orr, KQED Transit Agencies Report 90% Drops In Ridership Because of the pandemic and shelter in place orders, California's transit agencies, like L.A. Metro and BART have reported drops in upwards of 90%. In response, the agencies have reduced frequency of service, and cut operating hours for the few remaking passengers. Reporter: Saul Gonzalez, KQED California's Air Has Become Cleaner And Energy Use Is Down The COVID-19 pandemic has left downtown Los Angeles virtually smog free! Is all this staying home and not commuting giving us a leg-up on climate change? We asked a former state energy regulator about energy use and demand. Guest: Steve Weissman, UC Berkeley Center for Law,  Energy, and the Environment Some Hospitals Eerily Quiet As Nurses Wait For 'Tidal Wave' The coronavirus pandemic is hitting hospitals in the Bay Area hyper locally. Medical centers in Santa Clara county are treating the brunt of serious cases. 36 people have died there. Other hospitals are eerily quiet. Douglas Frey, an emergency room nurse at Highland Hospital in Oakland, shared his audio diary with us. Reporter: Lesley McClurg, KQED Campus Life Is Suddenly Over For Graduating Seniors Today, a lot of college students around the state wrap up their first week of doing school online. UCLA senior Noor Bouzidi is one of those students. At this point it’s all but certain she’ll graduate before the campus re-opens.  Guest: Noor Bouzidi, UCLA Senior
April 2, 2020
Street Protest in the Time of Coronavirus Shouting "No to Rent, Yes to Food!" and observing proper social distancing measures, demonstrators in Boyle Heights yesterday called on the City of L.A. to do more to protect renters during the COVID-19 pandemic. Tenants rights activists want to see complete rent forgiveness until the coronavirus crisis is declared over. Guest: Elizabeth Blaney, Union de Vecinos Self-Employed? It's Frustrating to File for Unemployment New data put startling numbers to the insecurity so many people feel right now. In the U.S., 6 and a half million people have filed unemployment claims. As the biggest state, and the first to order residents to shelter-in-place, California had the most claims: nearly 900-thousand. But that might be just the beginning - as people struggle to navigate the process of filing. And the situation’s even more complicated for freelancers and gig workers. They were ineligible before the new coronavirus hit. But they were promised help in that $2 Trillion dollar relief bill Congress passed last week. Guest: Jim Siler, Freelance TV technician Home Healthcare Workers Want Masks and Hazard Pay A lot of workers who are still employed are trying to stay safe during COVID-19 pandemic. Take the half a million in-home supporter service providers here in California. They work for county-run programs. Most make around minimum wage, and get only one paid day off a year. Now, they’re asking for help, specifically masks and hazard pay. Reporter: Sam Harnett, KQED Amazon's Warehouse Workers Worry About Infection Amazon warehouse employees who package everything from pasta to toilet paper say the e-commerce giant isn’t doing enough to protect them from COVID-19. Workers at a warehouse in Riverside County are staying home and have signed a petition demanding their health be taken seriously. Reporter: Mickey Capper UC and Other Colleges Relax Admissions Requirements The leaders of California’s biggest university systems are loosening undergrad admissions requirements during the pandemic. It just might ease the anxiety of high school juniors and seniors preparing for college. Reporter: Vanessa Rancano, KQED
April 1, 2020
CA Schools Likely Closed For The Rest Of The Year Across the state the debate about just how long school will be out because of the COVID-19 pandemic is intensifying. California’s superintendent of schools is telling districts to prepare for learning outside the classroom for the rest of the school year. Reporter: Julia McEvoy,  KQED Governor Warns Of Emotional Toll On Isolated Seniors Isolation might be a good way to stay physically healthy but it can take an emotional toll. Governor Gavin Newsom says a call, text, or knock on the door can help seniors get what they need right now, whether that’s food or just someone to talk to. Reporter: Katie Orr, KQED CA Distillery Transitions From Liquor To Sanitizer A California distillery on the central coast has changed its production line from making booze to bottling hand sanitizer. It's made with ethanol and will help with the acute shortage. Reporter: Greta Mart, KCBX Masks: To Wear Or Not To Wear? Who should wear a mask during the COVID-19 pandemic? What kind of mask is most effective?  Should we be wearing masks when outside ? Advice from two experts is don't buy one; but do consider making and wearing one. Guests: Amir Jamali, MD and George Rutherford, Head, Division of Infectious Disease, UCSF ICE Detainees Panic As Coronavirus Appears In Detention Centers As cases of Coronavirus begin to emerge in prisons, jails, and immigration detention centers across the country, the tens of thousands of people who are being held while awaiting immigration hearings are starting to panic. In California lawyers have filed suit demanding the release of thirteen immigrant detainees at high-medical risk. Reporter: Tyche Hendricks, KQED New Federal Standards Will  Increase Fossil Fuel Emissions The Trump administration has gutted one of the U.S’s biggest efforts to fight climate change. Trump’s new standards for auto emissions revoke Obama-era clean car rules and will increase fossil fuel emissions for years to come. Reporter: Kevin Stark, KQED
March 31, 2020
Newsom Asks Medical Workers for Help To deal with an expected surge in hospitalizations for COVID-19, Governor Gavin Newsom is creating the California Health Corps and calling on healthcare workers who may have recently retired or are still in school to join the fight against the coronavirus. Reporter: Katie Orr, KQED California Nurse Heads to NYC to Help The effort to boost the state’s army of healthcare workers already faces competition from elsewhere. Last week, New York’s Governor, Andrew Cuomo, announced a very similar plan. And nurse Robert Bean from the town of Paradise has been deciding whether to help. Bean lost his home in the 2018 Camp Fire. Guest: Robert Bean, registered nurse Will Coronavirus Tenant Protections Really Help Renters? A lot of renters are wondering what help, if any, is coming their way as the coronavirus pandemic upends the economy and the household budgets of many Californians. All this just as we deal with shelter-in-place orders that are lasting longer than anyone ever could’ve imagined just a few weeks ago. Guests: Anna Scott, KCRW, and Erin Baldassari, KQED With Traffic Clear, Garcetti Closes Farmers Markets Mayor Garcetti made a series of announcements yesterday that give a glimpse into just how much daily life has changed. In his daily address on the city’s coronavirus pandemic plans, he named a new target in efforts to control overcrowding. Reporter: Saul Gonzalez, The California Report co-Host Trinity County to Non-Residents: Please Stay Out A handful of California’s counties have had no coronavirus cases so far and are keeping a close eye on the spread of COVID-19. Trinity County is going further with an unusual quarantine order. Reporter: Dan Brekke, KQED Weirdest Coronavirus Coping Strategy Yet: Mill Valley Residents Howl Every Evening We’ve been trying to end on a lighter note, and talk about ways we connect with each other during shelter-in-place. Well, in the Marin County town of Mill Valley, people have taken to howling like coyotes every night at 8 o’clock.
March 30, 2020
COVID-19 Medical Supply Shortages: Why and What to Do? This weekend, we learned from Governor Gavin Newsom that the federal government sent 170 ventilators from the national stockpile to L.A. County. But they didn't work. How California's Medical Supply Stockpile Was Dismantled California once had a plan for a pandemic like this one. In 2006, coming off the avian flu scare, the state invested hundreds of millions of dollars in a stockpile and three fully-equipped mobile hospitals. But during the 2008 recession, the state slashed the funding to maintain the stockpile. Guest: Will Evans, Reporter, Center for Investigative Reporting Silicon Valley Re-Tools To Meet Needs of Medical Workers Treating COVID-19 One Silicon Valley manufacturer that’s made big changes to what they produce because of the COVID-19 outbreak is Carbon 3D. The Redwood City company is using their 3D printers to make test swabs and face shields. Guest: Ellen Kullman, CEO, Carbon 3D
March 27, 2020
Daycare Workers Are Essential for Medical Staff to Work A lot of California day care centers are dealing with more kids, even as the preschools have fewer resources, like toilet paper. Reporter: Benjamin Purper, KVCR Restaurant Industry Reels from Pandemic Closures Restaurants have been ordered to close for in-house service to slow the virus’ spread. That’s led to the layoffs of countless restaurant workers. Evan Kleiman, a chef, former restauranteur, and the host of KCRW Santa Monica’s weekly food show, "Good Food," has been watching this with a heavy heart. We talked to her about what she’s been hearing from friends and colleagues in the restaurant industry. Guest: Evan Kleiman, Host of KCRW's "Good Food"
March 26, 2020
More Covid-19 Tests Coming to California California appears to be making progress when it comes to virus testing. Governor Gavin Newsom says as of Tuesday, nearly 67,000 tests have been done in the state. And thousands more will soon be completed. Reporter: Lily Jamali, The California Report co-Host State Finances Upended by Coronavirus Pandemic California’s response to the pandemic is upending the state’s finances. The state Department of Finance has transferred $1.3 billion dollars from its budget reserve account to help fight COVID-19. There’s still a lot of savings to draw on, but that money has strings attached. Reporter: Scott Shafer, KQED Politics Editor This Is Not the Time for a Coronavirus Vacation With pandemic shelter in place orders in effect, a lot of people are getting a little stir crazy at home. You might be thinking about just getting out of town and heading up to the mountains or the desert. But this is not such a great idea. Guest: Lesley McClurg, KQED Science
March 25, 2020
How to Protect Farmworkers During Pandemic California’s agricultural land grows about a third of the nation’s vegetables and nearly two thirds of its fruits and nuts. This production is essential to America’s food supply. So during the coronavirus pandemic, what safety measures are in place to stop the spread of COVID-19 among the state’s hundreds of thousands of farmworkers? Reporter: Kathryn Barnes, KCRW How Much Isolation Is Needed for COVID-19? A lot of Californians who have tested positive for COVID-19, or are worried they might be infected, are self-quarantining themselves. But it’s not always so clear how long you have to stay isolated from others. Reporter: Laura Klivans, KQED State Anticipates Tighter Budgets Due to Coronavirus Slowdown The Newsom Administration is telling state agencies that the economic fallout from the COVID-19 crisis could have a big impact on the money the agencies have to spend. Reporter: Scott Shafer, KQED Politics Editor Working Overtime to Process Unemployment Claims The coronavirus pandemic is putting a lot of Californians out of work. To help cover the bills, many people are applying for state unemployment insurance, and they are doing it in record numbers. Guest: Loree Levy, Employment Development Department
March 25, 2020
State Anticipates Tighter Budgets Due to Coronavirus Slowdown The Newsom Administration is telling state agencies that the economic fallout from the COVID-19 crisis could have a big impact on the money the agencies have to spend. Reporter: Scott Shafer, KQED Politics Editor Working Overtime to Process Unemployment Claims The coronavirus pandemic is putting a lot of Californians out of work. To help cover the bills, many people are applying for state unemployment insurance, and they are doing it in record numbers. Guest: Loree Levy, Employment Development Department
March 24, 2020
Health Insurance Rates Could Rise After Pandemic Health insurance costs could soar in the coming year because of the price of treating coronavirus and taking other health care measures. Reporter: April Dembosky, KQED Citizenship Ceremonies Cancelled The pandemic is making it harder for people to become naturalized Americans, affecting everything from citizenship classes to oath of allegiance ceremonies. Reporter: Michelle Pitcher College Kids Head Home, But What About Foster Kids? Across the state, college students are returning home as their campuses close, but students who came out of the foster care system don't have have a permanent home to return to. Reporter: Alice Daniel, Valley Public Radio Will High School Seniors Move On to College Amid Pandemic Many high school seniors are worried that delaying graduation because of the pandemic might keep them from attending college this fall. State officials are trying to figure out solutions. Reporter: Julia McEvoy, KQED Camp Fire Survivors Size Up PG&E's Guilty Plea PG&E has pleaded guilty to multiple counts of manslaughter related to the Camp Fire. Residents in Paradise want to know, will anyone go to jail? How does this impact the utility's strategy to emerge from bankruptcy? Guest: Lily Jamali, The California Report co-Host
March 23, 2020
PG&E Pleads Guilty to Involuntary Manslaughter for Camp Fire PG&E said Monday that it is pleading guilty to 85 criminal counts in connection with the 2018 Camp Fire in Butte County, a blaze that killed 85 people and destroyed nearly 14,000 homes in and around the town of Paradise. Reporter: Lily Jamali, The California Report co-Host Hospitals Brace for Wave of COVID-19 Patients California hospitals are preparing for a surge of coronavirus patients. Governor Newsom has directed more than 42 million dollars in emergency funding to California’s health care system. part of that money will be used to lease a hospital in Daly City in Northern California and reopen a recently closed hospital here in L.A. Together, that should add a thousand more hospital beds...but that likely still won’t be nearly enough. Guest: Jorge Reyno, Vice President, Martin Luther King Hospital International Aid Groups Help Hospitals At L.A.’s Martin Luther King Hospital, the humanitarian aid group International Medical Corps, which usually operates in war and disaster zones abroad, assembled a huge tent that will operate as a field triage facility next to the hospital’s emergency room. Guest: Margaret Traub, International Medical Corps
March 20, 2020
Governor Newsom: Californians Should Stay Home The governor asked all Californians to stay home and leave only for essential trips, to slow the spread of the coronavirus. State officials estimate could infect more than half the population without collective action. Hygiene and Risk Are Part of Life for Immuno-Compromised People We’ve all been trying to avoid a trip to the hospital, keeping our distance, trying to stay germ free. But that was already the daily reality of many who suffer from immune disorders like HIV/AIDS and some cancers. They’re also among the most at risk during this outbreak. Reporter: KQED’s Laura Klivans Coronavirus Disruption: From Anxiety to Grief A lot of what makes this hard is what we don’t immediately understand. It's not just the anxiety about our health and our jobs. It's the less obvious stuff like the loss of our routines and social connections. Here’s a guide to weathering these uncertain times. Reporter: Stephanie O’Neill Rural Californians As the shutdown has gone statewide this week, it feels different in rural parts of California, where residents are already far from a grocery store or even the closest neighbor. We hear what the threat of coronavirus means in Boonville in Mendocino County. Guest: Alice Woelfle, KQED
March 19, 2020
What the Coronavirus Pandemic Means for Children's Courts In Los Angeles, the Edelman Children’s courthouse has been closed for most of the week because of the outbreak. It handles some of our state’s most delicate cases, those of children allegedly abused or neglected. The courthouse is set to reopen Friday. But like so much this week, that could change. Reporter: Deepa Fernandes Judges Ask Justice Dept. to Close Immigration Courts It’s a different story in another corner of our justice system: immigration courts. Immigration udges are calling for the Department of Justice to shut down them down to protect staff and immigrant defendants from coronavirus. Guest: Judge Ashley Tabaddor, President of the National Association of Immigration Judges What To Do With Detained Migrants During the Outbreak Immigrant advocates say detained migrants should be released because it's risky to hold them in close quarters in I.C.E. facilities during an outbreak. The Trump administration's plan is to turn away asylum seekers and other undocumented immigrants trying to enter the U.S. at the southern border. Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero
March 18, 2020
Farmworkers and Growers Brace for Impact of Coronavirus on Agriculture Industry There might be some trouble coming to a produce aisle near you. Many farmers and migrant fieldworkers who pick, process, and pack so much of our food are worried about how coronavirus is upending this very important corner of our state’s economy. Guest: Alex Hall, Fresno reporter, KQED Lawsuit Alleges Daly City Violated State's Sanctuary Laws An undocumented immigrant from El Salvador has sued Daly City, saying police violated the state’s sanctuary law by turning him over to Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED
March 17, 2020
Social Distancing Escalates to Shelter-in-Place As of midnight, the Bay Area has the nation’s strictest policy aimed at stopping the spread of the coronavirus. Residents are being instructed to not leave the house for the next three weeks unless it's essential. Legislature Passes Emergency Funding The California Legislature took emergency action Monday night to address the coronavirus, and then it took a break. Reporter: Katie Orr, KQED Food Delivery Workers Hustle to Keep Restaurants Alive In Los Angeles, Mayor Eric Garcetti has ordered restaurants to stop serving in-house meals as a public safety precaution, but ordering out is still allowed. That's made food delivery people very important, both to keep people fed and to keep restaurants going. Reporter: Saul Gonzalez, The California Report co-Host Inspections of Nursing Homes on Hold Regulators charged with overseeing nursing homes aren't inspecting nursing homes or assisted living facilities. Advocates for this population, the most at risk of dying of COVID-19, aren’t able to access patients either. Reporter: Molly Peterson, KQED Science Dancing Through the Pandemic, Online The mayor of San Luis Obispo is trying to help others in her community cope in her official capacity. And in her side-gig, which is teaching music to preschoolers. She's taking that project online during the coronavirus crisis. Guest: Heidi Harmon, Mayor of San Luis Obispo
March 16, 2020
Governor Advises Seniors to Stay Home Governor Gavin Newsom has called for nightclubs, bars, and wineries to shut down for now. Restaurants are to cut their occupancy in half. And, everyone 65 and older, and those with chronic health issues, is being told to stay home. Reporter: Sharon McNary, KPCC First Week of Coronavirus Closures for California's Schoolkids For students, parents, and teachers throughout California, this is Day One of no school. Late last week, one after another, districts around the state announced closures as a way to help slow the spread of the coronavirus. Guest: Erica Pan, Interim Health Officer, Alameda County Millions of Students Will Miss School for Weeks So just how many kids will be out of school this morning? For that, I spoke with KQED Education Reporter Vanessa Rancano. Reporter: Vanessa Rancaño, KQED Anaheim Merchants Reeling from Disney Closure Theme parks shut down all around the state, including, most famously, Disneyland in Anaheim. That affects a lot of small independent stores, motels, and restaurants around the park that depend on "the Mouse" to bring in business. Guest: Leslie Wei, souvenir shop owner Parents Brace for Involuntary Homeschooling Whether the next few weeks mean more learning time, more quality time, or just more screen time, parents are bracing to be hard for so many of us. Guests: Eliza and Tim Sears, Albany parents Nurses are Nervous About Safety Around Coronavirus Patients Two healthcare workers at UC-San Francisco are the latest to test positive for COVID-19. Nurses battling the outbreak are calling for stronger safety measures. Reporter: Raquel Maria Dillon, KQED Life in Quarantine at Travis Air Force Base Last week at this time, a Princess Cruises ship docked in Oakland. On board were nearly two dozen people infected with the coronavirus. Fast forward a week, and almost nine hundred people who were on that cruise ship are under quarantine at Travis Air Force Base in Solano County. They’ll be staying there for at least a week longer. But their treatment so far leaves much to be desired, Reporter: Mary Franklin Harvin, KQED
March 13, 2020
Health Officials Monitor Sacramento Senior Living Facility State health officials are keeping a close eye on a senior living facility near Sacramento after one of its residents died this week from complications related to the COVID 19 virus. Reporter: Katie Orr, KQED Desert Residents Cope with Cancellation of Festivals Both the Coachella and Stagecoach music festivals in Riverside County have been postponed because of coronavirus fears. And that will affect way more than music superstars and their fans. It’s a big blow to people’s livelihoods in surrounding desert communities. Reporter: Benjamin Gottlieb, KCRW ACLU: Release Detainees at Risk of Illness The American Civil Liberties Union is calling on immigration authorities to release some people from detention facilities in California, especially those who are at high risk of COVID-19 infection. Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED Desert Residents Cope with Cancellation of Festivals Both the Coachella and Stagecoach music festivals in Riverside County have been postponed because of coronavirus fears. And that will affect way more than music superstars and their fans. It’s a big blow to people’s livelihoods in surrounding desert communities. Reporter: Benjamin Gottlieb, KCRW Small Businesses Suffering in Outbreak The California Report's Lily Jamali has another story about the economic effect of the coronavirus. She spoke to the founder of Andytown, a chain of coffee shops in San Francisco. Reporter: Lily Jamali, The California Report co-Host Supermarkets Slammed with Nervous Shoppers Last night, Saul visited at a supermarket in the city of Glendale. Like so many grocery stores across the state, it was packed with shoppers loading up on food and essentials. With the coronavirus outbreak, they just didn’t know what the future might bring. Guest: Ricky Valenzuela, nervous shopper
March 12, 2020
Governor Newsom Issues New Guidelines on Preventing Spread of COVID-19 In response to the novel coronavirus, Governor Gavin Newsom’s office has released new state guidelines for how Californians should interact with one another and in what number: advising specifically that all non-essential public gatherings in the state should be limited to no more than 250 people. Grand Princess Passengers Arrive at Air Station in San Diego Hundreds of passengers from the Grand Princess cruise ship, which was hit with a coronavirus outbreak, have been flown to Marine Corps Air Station Miramar in San Diego. They’re being held there under quarantine. Reporter: Matt Hoffman, KPBS Ventura Congresswoman Self-Quarantines Across the country, the novel coronavirus is also compelling many people to self- quarantine as a precautionary measure. That includes Democratic Congresswoman Julia Brownley from Ventura. She decided to quarantine herself after a person she met in Washington last week was diagnosed with coronavirus. Sacramento County Changes Strategy to Mitigate COVID-19 Spread As the novel coronavirus continues to spread across the state and the nation, conferences have been canceled, universities are moving to online instruction, and cities are banning large gatherings. The World Health Organization declared the virus a pandemic. But Sacramento County is dialing back community-wide efforts to contain the disease. Reporter: Nina Sparling, KQED ​ Some Contractors Must Remain in Offices That Have Gone Remote Because of the coronavirus, Silicon Valley companies like Google and Facebook are telling employees to work from home. But nearly half of Google’s workforce is reportedly made up of contractors. Now, contractors say they're the only ones working in their offices. Reporter: Sam Harnett, KQED COVID-19 Could Impact Census Count The 2020 census documents are going into the mail starting today, but as coronavirus concerns increase, some are worried it could impact the process, since historically hard to count populations may be affected. Reporter: Sarah Mizes-Tan, CapRadio New Fesno Mayor Outlines Plan Former Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer will be the city’s next mayor. In a press conference yesterday, Dyer reiterated his wish to unite the city, and create “one Fresno.” California May Allow Appeals Regarding Racial Bias A state lawmaker wants to make it easier for people to challenge criminal charges and convictions in California on the basis of racial bias. The change would nullify a 1987 Supreme Court decision Reporter: Marisa Lagos, KQED
March 11, 2020
What Legal Powers do Local Governments Do Have During Outbreak? In response to COVID-19, counties across the state are declaring public health emergencies. But what real world powers do such declarations give local governments? Reporter: Robert Garrova, KPCC Tracking Cases, Bracing for Stretched Healthcare Resources in Rural California So far, only two COVID-19 cases have been confirmed in the San Joaquin Valley: one each in Madera and Fresno counties. The people were both aboard cruise ship. But that doesn’t mean rural California is off the hook when it comes to the outbreak. Reporter: Laura Tsutsui, Valley Public Radio Gig Workers Face Tough Decisions On Money and Health Across California, many companies are encouraging their workers to work from home if they’re sick or worried about the new coronavirus. But workers in the gig economy, like drivers for Lyft or Uber, just can’t do that and still earn a living. We meet one driver who's scared to be on the road, but says she has no other choice. Reporter: Sam Harnett, KQED PG&E Resolves Dispute with FEMA Pacific Gas & Electic has resolved a dispute with the Federal Emergency Management Agency over money the government agency spent helping victims of wildfires caused by the utility. FEMA's claim against PG&E was threatening to derail a settlement. Reporter: Lily Jamali, The California Report Lawmakers Consider Retiring Prop 13 California voters have a pretty good track record of passing school bond measures. But while there are still millions of ballots left to count, it appears voters will reject Prop 13. It was the 15 billion dollar school bond on last week’s March primary ballot. Some are wondering if voters confused it with another Proposition 13 -- the landmark property tax cutting measure from 1978. Reporter: Katie Orr, KQED Politics
March 10, 2020
What's Next for Passengers on Grand Princess Cruise Passengers are disembarking from that Grand Princess cruise ship which was held off the California coast for days to contain an outbreak of the novel coronavirus. Reporter: Kate Wolffe, KQED Homelessness Meeting Turns to Coronavirus in Sacramento The mayors of California’s largest cities say the state needs more coronavirus testing, and they’re especially worried about vulnerable populations, like the unsheltered. Reporter: Katie Orr, KQED How Schools Would Go Online During an Outbreak State education officials and Governor Gavin Newsom are talking with school districts about what would happen if these closures become more widespread. Reporter: Julia McEvoy, KQED World Central Kitchen Helps Quarantined Cruise Ship Passengers At the Port of Oakland, passengers continue to disembark today from that cruise ship that was quarantined off the coast. One immediate challenge is how to make sure everybody on the ship eats. So in stepped World Central Kitchen, the non-profit founded by renowned chef Jose Andres. It provides food relief to people in emergencies. Reporter: Mary Franklin Harvin, KQED One More Try for Wiener's Housing Density Bill State Senator Scott Wiener from San Francisco believes if California is going to solve its housing crisis it has to change zoning in single family neighborhoods. Legislation Wiener has introduced in the past to do that has failed, but now he’s taking another swing at it with a new bill. Reporter: Erin Baldassari, KQED 'Un Dia Sin Mujeres' in Tijuana Across Mexico on Monday, women refused to go to work as a way to protest an alarming rise in violence against women. The protest was called a “Day Without Women.” We get a glimpse of what it looked like in the border city of Tijuana. Reporter: Max Rivlin-Nadler, KPBS
March 9, 2020
Quarantined Cruise Ship to Dock in Oakland The Grand Princess Cruise which has been circling off the California coast after 21 people aboard tested positive for the new coronavirus, is expected to dock at the Port of Oakland later this afternoon. Mayor Libby Schaaf assured Oakland residents that everything will be done to protect their safety once the ship docks.  LA County Public Health Workers Prep for Outbreak Across the state, counties have declared public health emergencies in response to the threat of COVID-19… most recently Riverside County  in Southern California. But what does that really mean when it comes to the day-to-day work of public health departments in those places?  Guest: Barbara Ferrer, Director, Los Angeles County Public Health Department Entire School District Cancels Classes Due to Outbreak Elk Grove Unified, the largest school district in Northern California and the fifth-largest in the state, is closing schools this week amid coronavirus concerns.  Reporter: Sara Hossaini, KQED The Effect of Coronavirus on California's Economy U.S. stocks, sparked by coronavirus fears, went briefly into a free fall as the trading day began. It got so bad, the New York stock exchange temporarily halted. All this underscores the economic toll the virus is taking on the global economy including California’s, the fifth largest economy in the world. Guest: Chris Thornburg, Economist, Beacon Economics San Diego Lab’s Potential Coronavirus Vaccine Could Help Beyond Outbreak Researchers around the world are trying to produce a vaccine for the new coronavirus including a lab in San Diego that's working on a DNA-based vaccine for COVID-19, instead of using traditional techniques. Reporter: Tarryn Mento, KPBS
March 6, 2020
Stranded Cruise Ship Passengers Wait for Coronavirus Test Results Off the California coast, passengers aboard the Grand Princess cruise ship are quarantined. People aboard are waiting for test results to come back from swabs taken Thursday.  Reporter: Raquel Maria Dillon, KQED Californians Can Get Coronavirus Testing For Free, Gov. Gavin Newsom Announces Gov. Gavin Newsom announced on Thursday that people who believe they may have coronavirus can get tested for the COVID-19 disease with no out-of-pocket cost. Reporter: Nicole Nixon, CapRadio Lawmakers Demand Changes to Los Angeles Voting after Long Lines and Delays State lawmakers are demanding changes to Los Angeles County's voting process, after some Angelenos waited hours to cast ballots during California's primary election on Tuesday. Women React to Elizabeth Warren's Exit from Presidential Race Senator Elizabeth Warren's announcement that she was dropping out of the presidential race wasn’t surprising to many after her poor showing in the Super Tuesday elections but it was still heartbreaking to many of Warren’s supporters, particularly women. This is part of a reporting project following several women, who were inspired to run for office after Hillary Clinton’s presidential defeat two years earlier. Reporter: Katie Orr, KQED Politics
March 5, 2020
California Declares State of Emergency in Response to Coronavirus As COVID-19 cases mount and the state marks its first confirmed coronavirus death, Governor Gavin Newsom declared a state-wide emergency Wednesday. Meanwhile, Los Angeles County has declared a local health emergency in response to the coronavirus outbreak. Cruise Ship Held Off the Coast After Passenger Coronavirus Death A cruise ship off the coast of Northern California is currently docking offshore until testing of passengers is conducted. One of the previous guests of the ship was the elderly Placer County man who was the first person to die of COVID-19 in California. Reporter: Tara Siler, KQED News Kids and Coronavirus: What to Know A lot of parents are worried about what kind of risk the new coronavirus poses to their children. Experts have reassuring news. Reporter: Lesley McClurg, KQED Science What Went Wrong with LA County's New Election System  Many voters in Los Angeles County had to stand in line for hours to vote on Super Tuesday. There were reports of glitchy equipment and confused staff, even though L.A. County was using new touch screen machines that were supposed to make voting faster and more convenient.  Guest: Kim Alexander, president of the California Voter Foundation Sanders' Focus on Latino Voters in California Pays Off In this Tuesday’s California presidential primary Latino voters voted in huge numbers for Bernie Sanders. The community's support has been the focus of his campaign. Reporter: Katie Orr, KQED Politics
March 4, 2020
Sanders Strikes Gold in Golden State by Mining Latino Vote One reason for Sanders’ California victory was the Latino electorate which voted for the Vermont Senator by a huge margin. Reporter: Saul Gonzalez, California Report co-host Sanders Wins Golden State as Biden Racks Up Wins Elsewhere For more analysis on the heated primary race and other California voting trends, we turn to an expert on state politics for some Super Tuesday takeaways. Guest: Raphael Sonenshein, Pat Brown Institute of Public Affairs Statewide School Bond Measure Failing A $15 billion bond measure to pay for repairs and upgrades to California schools. Governor Newsom supported this one.. The campaign emphasized how the money would be used to remove asbestos from schools and eliminate lead in students’ drinking water. Reporter: Adolfo Guzman Lopez Central Valley Primary Rematch A rematch is brewing in the Central Valley. Former Republican congressman David Valadao placed first in the race for his old seat, the 21st congressional district. He is well ahead of incumbent Democratic Congressman TJ Cox. San Diego's Hot Races San Diego is a once reliably red town which has turned blue in recent years. It's home to a big congressional race and a mayor's race. Guest: Tom Fudge, KPBS Fresno Police Chief Poised to Win Nunes' Seat in Congress A man who gained fame in 2018 for challenging Congressman Devin Nunes went head to head with the city's police chief, Jerry Dyer. Early results in the Fresno mayors race show Dyer is poised to win. Reporter: Laura Tsutsui, Valley Public Radio
March 3, 2020
California Makes Super Tuesday Debut Now that California is part of Super Tuesday, our primary votes really matter. California has a confusing election process with both mail-in and in-person voting, and there are a lot of changes this year that are a lot for voters to digest. Guest: Kim Alexander, California Voter Foundation Health Officials Work To Protect Homeless From Coronavirus Coronavirus is most threatening to the vulnerable including the elderly and those with preexisting health problems. Health workers are also reaching out to offer support to homeless people living in shelters and encampments. Reporter: Molly Solomon, KQED Fed Cuts Interest Rates To Limit Coronavirus' Economic Impact The economic impact of coronavirus is among the factors that have sparking serious volatility in financial markets. This morning the Federal Reserve announced it's stepping in with a half percentage point rate cut, a move it hasn't made since the financial crisis. Tech Giants Make Big Changes To Prevent Spread Of Coronavirus More California companies are making big changes in response to the new coronavirus. Twitter, Google, and Salesforce have limited employee travel and cancelled events in an attempt to prevent workers from contracting and spreading the virus. Reporter: Alice Woelfle, KQED California Brings Coronavirus Testing Closer To Home Figuring out how to test people for coronavirus quickly has been one of the biggest challenges that public health officials have been grappling with. But there's progress to report, the state is bringing testing for coronavirus closer to home. Reporter: Peter Arcuni, KQED  'Sick, Tired, and Fired,' Striking Students Aren't Giving Up UC Santa Cruz graduate students were back on the picket lines yesterday. The university now says it's fired more than 70 graduate teaching assistants. The students are asking for a cost of living increase to help with housing costs. Reporter: Erika Mahoney, KAZU California Companies Now Have More Women On Boards California's Secretary of State has released a progress report on the new law requiring that companies have female directors on their boards. In the last six months 100 women have been added to boards in California, 282 major California companies are now in compliance with the law. Guest: Ellen Kullman, Goldman Sachs Board Of Directors
March 2, 2020
20 Million Californians are Registered. But Will They Vote? As we head into Super Tuesday, voter registration in California is at an all-time high.  More than 20 million voters are currently registered in the state. Voter registration campaigns and the state’s successful motor voter law have likely put younger and more diverse Californians on the voter rolls. Reporter: Hayley Gray Chasing California's Massive Delegate Haul California has 415 delegates up for grabs in tomorrow's election. The process of doling out the hundreds of Democratic delegates up for grabs is enough to make a mathematician's head hurt. Reporter: Scott Shafer, KQED Tomorrow's Only Statewide Measure Asks For Billions For Schools The only statewide measure on tomorrow's ballot asks voters to consider borrowing $15 billion to fund school construction projects.  In the next two years, California's aging schools are projected to need more than $100 billion for facilities. Some for new construction, most for maintenance. Reporter: Vanessa Rancaño, KQED UC Santa Cruz Fires 54 Striking Grad Students The administration at UC Santa Cruz stunned graduate students on Friday by firing more than 50 of them. The students have been on strike since February 10th demanding more money to deal with high housing costs. Guest: Veronica Hamilton, Vice President, UCSC Grad Student Association and unit chair, UAW Local 28-65 Cal Fire Prepares For Early And Busy Fire Season Following Dry February Last month was California's driest February on record, during what's supposed to be the rainy reason. That has fire officials preparing for the possibility of an earlier and more intense fire season. This weekend, firefighters were already put to work here in Northern California. Reporter: Sarah Hossaini, KQED
February 28, 2020
California Braces for Spread of Novel Coronavirus Governor Gavin Newsom says the state is working closely with federal officials to tests as many potential coronavirus patients as possible. Solano County here in the Bay Area did so just yesterday after getting confirmation that a woman there tested positive. It may be the first transmission of the virus that can't be tied to travel from outside the U.S. Fears of Novel Coronavirus Prompt Conference Cancellations Growing fears over coronavirus are prompting tech companies to cancel conference plans here in the Bay Area. Microsoft Gamestack and Epic Games announced they would withdraw from the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco. Several others already announced that they will not attend the mid-March event. Reporter: Nina Sparling, KQED Election Officials Gear Up for Super Tuesday Part of preparing for the election is heightening voting protection. California Secretary of State Alex Padilla says a lot of security upgrades have happened at the local level since the last presidential election four years ago. Reporter: Scott Shafer Sanctuary State Law Not Always Followed By Police Earlier this month, the Trump administration ratcheted up efforts to punish California for its so-called “sanctuary state” law. But a state new passed in 2017 -- which limits when California law enforcement can help U.S. immigration authorities -- remains controversial within the state. More than two years after the law took effect, police don’t always follow it. Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED Extra-Dry February Has Officials Hoping For a Wet March State water officials have announced that snowpack in the Sierra Nevada is 46-percent of normal for this time of year. Twenty-three percent of the state is in a "moderate drought."
February 27, 2020
New Case of Coronavirus in California Has Unknown Origins Officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have confirmed a case of novel coronavirus in California that is not known to be related to travel or direct contact with someone who’s already contracted the virus. The person is a resident of Solano county and contact tracing in this case has already begun. Reporter: Kevin Stark, KQED Facebook Moves to Prevent Coronavirus Misinformation Facebook says its prohibiting advertisements that make false claims about products tied to the coronavirus, like face mask advertisements claiming the products are 100% guaranteed to prevent the spread of the virus. Reporter: Saul Gonzalez, KQED Building Affordable Housing Faces Hurdles There’s a major push in California, from the governor down, to make housing more affordable. But the latest home price number show why that’s easier said than done. They should prices rising by their biggest margin in five years. Reporter: Darrell Satzman, KCRW Governor Newsom Allocates Land to Help Homeless People Governor Gavin Newsom has designated using 14-thousand acres of land in California for temporary housing for the homeless, but some counties have more sites than others. This has homelessness advocates concerned that the uneven distribution of sites might force people to move away from their communities. Reporter: Sarah Mizes-Tan, CapRadio PG&E Bankruptcy Judge Considers Utility Reimbursement The judge overseeing the PG&E bankruptcy case heard arguments yesterday over whether disaster relief agencies FEMA and Cal OES have a valid claim against the utility. Reporter: Lily Jamali, KQED LA D.A. Race: How Do the Front-runners Compare? Voters in Los Angeles County have a big decision to make on Election Day. Who should be the county’s District Attorney? Incumbent Jackie Lacey or her leading opponent, George Gascon, the former D.A. of San Francisco. Saul Gonzalez finds out more about the candidates. Reporter: Emily Elena Dugdale, KPCC
February 26, 2020
SF Mayor, 'Don't Overreact To State Of Emergency' San Francisco Mayor London Breed has declared a local emergency in response to the coronavirus. At a press conference yesterday she stressed that there are no confirmed cases in San Francisco and that the emergency declaration is all about prevention. Bernie Sanders Poised To Win The California Primary Less than a week before Californians vote in the Super Tuesday presidential primary, a new poll shows one candidate dominating the field. On the heels of strong showings in Iowa, New Hampshire and Nevada, Bernie Sanders is poised to add California to his column on this coming Super Tuesday. Reporter: Scorr Shafer, KQED Feds Call For Stricter Rules For Semiautonomous Vehicles An investigation has found a man who died when his Tesla SUV crashed on a Silicon Valley freeway in March of 2018 was playing a game on his phone at the time. That’s prompted the National Transportation Safety Board to call for changes. Reporter: Angela Corral, KQED Composting Could Be An Option For California Cadavers Death is the fate that awaits us all, and then comes the question what to do with our bodies?  The California Legislature is weighing a proposal that would allow people the option to be composted  after death. Reporter: Scott Rodd, CapRadio Oh, Snap! Tiny Shrimp Make A Big Noise In The Ocean Scientists are finding that it’s noisy under the sea in part because a tiny creature makes a lot of sound. Shrimp make snapping sounds to communicate and defend territory, and things could be getting louder because of climate change. Reporter: Ariana Remmel, KQED Firefighters Use E-Bikes To Asses Fire Danger The recent dry weather across the state has officials worried that fire season could be just weeks away. Firefighters in one Bay Area community have spent the off-season preparing and trying out a new tool, high tech bikes to survey rugged terrain. Reporter: Lily Jamali, KQED
February 25, 2020
Lawmakers Say Education Budget Lacks Clarity Lawmakers should reject many of the education spending proposals in the governor’s budget. That's the recommendation that’s out from the Legislative Analyst's Office, which advises the state legislature on fiscal and policy issues. Reporter: Vanessa Rancaño, KQED New Union Rules Aim To Protect Women From Sexual Abuse Film producer Harvey Weinstein could go to prison for more than twenty years after a jury in New York found him guilty him of rape and sexual assault yesterday. As Hollywood works to shift its culture, one union has implemented standards directly inspired by Weinstein. Reporter: Mary Franklin Harvin, KQED Julian Castro Campaigns For Warren In Fresno Once a political afterthought in national campaigns, California’s Central Valley has become an important stop for candidates vying for the presidency. Supporters of Elizabeth Warren gathered in Fresno to hear from someone who used to be her competitor. Reporter: Lauren Tsutsui, Valley Public Radio Women Of Color Mobilize Their Power At The Polls Voters of color flexed their muscle in Nevada over the weekend, propelling Senator Bernie Sanders to a decisive victory. Advocates say the outcome shows women of color could be a potent force for Democrats hoping to beat President Trump in November. Reporter: Marisa Lagos, KQED
February 25, 2020
Lawmakers Say Education Budget Lacks Clarity Lawmakers should reject many of the education spending proposals in the governor’s budget. That's the recommendation that’s out from the Legislative Analyst's Office, which advises the state legislature on fiscal and policy issues. Reporter: Vanessa Rancaño, KQED New Union Rules Aim To Protect Women From Sexual Abuse Film producer Harvey Weinstein could go to prison for more than twenty years after a jury in New York found him guilty him of rape and sexual assault yesterday. As Hollywood works to shift its culture, one union has implemented standards directly inspired by Weinstein. Reporter: Mary Franklin Harvin, KQED Julian Castro Campaigns For Warren In Fresno Once a political afterthought in national campaigns, California’s Central Valley has become an important stop for candidates vying for the presidency. Supporters of Elizabeth Warren gathered in Fresno to hear from someone who used to be her competitor. Reporter: Lauren Tsutsui, Valley Public Radio Women Of Color Mobilize Their Power At The Polls Voters of color flexed their muscle in Nevada over the weekend, propelling Senator Bernie Sanders to a decisive victory. Advocates say the outcome shows women of color could be a potent force for Democrats hoping to beat President Trump in November. Reporter: Marisa Lagos, KQED
February 24, 2020
Early Voting In Begins In L.A. County...Mostly In L.A. County how and where people vote is new this election cycle. Instead of voting at neighborhood polling places on a single day, people can now cast their ballots over an 11 day period at newly established “voting centers," where old fashioned paper and ink voting machines have been replaced with computerized touch screen devices. According to reports voting generally went pretty well but there were exceptions. Reporter: Saul Gonzalez, KQED 'Public Charge' Rule Breeds Anxiety In Immigrant Communities A federal rule that would penalize some green card and visa applicants for using federal public services like food stamps goes into effect today. The rule has already had a chilling effect on many immigrant communities. Reporter: Michelle Wiley, KQED Controversial Immigration Detention Center Adds 750 Beds Over the objection of critics last week, the planning commission in the High Desert community of Adelanto approved a 750 bed expansion to a controversial immigration detention center. The center is operated by a private prison company and has been criticized by the Department of Homeland Security. Reporter, Benjamin Purpur, KVCR Coronavirus Patients In Limbo After Costa Mesa Facility Says No A federal court is set to discuss what to do about 50 people who've tested positive for the new coronavirus, after temporarily blocking their transfer from Travis Air Force base to a location in Southern California. Reporter: Sarah Hossaini, KQED  Lawmakers Call For $2 Billion To Fight Homelessness A group of state lawmakers from Southern California, the Bay Area, and the Central Valley are coming together on a bill to dedicate funding to homeless services. It’s an attempt to identify ongoing funding, which Governor Gavin Newsom says is crucial if California wants to see fewer people homeless. Reporter: Erika Aguilar, KQED SF Taxi Driver Losing Teeth Over Medallion Debt A San Francisco taxi medallion, which allows drivers to operate a cab, costs a quarter of a million dollars. San Francisco has made an estimated 64 million dollars off the medallions, but many taxi drivers have wound up in crushing debt. One driver is losing his teeth because he's so stressed over money. Reporter: Sam Harnett, KQED
February 24, 2020
Early Voting In Begins In L.A. County...Mostly In L.A. County how and where people vote is new this election cycle. Instead of voting at neighborhood polling places on a single day, people can now cast their ballots over an 11 day period at newly established “voting centers," where old fashioned paper and ink voting machines have been replaced with computerized touch screen devices. According to reports voting generally went pretty well but there were exceptions. Reporter: Saul Gonzalez, KQED Coronavirus Patients In Limbo After Costa Mesa Facility Says No A federal court is set to discuss what to do about 50 people who've tested positive for the new coronavirus, after temporarily blocking their transfer from Travis Air Force base to a location in Southern California. Reporter: Sarah Hossaini, KQED Controversial Immigration Detention Center Adds 750 Beds Over the objection of critics last week, the planning commission in the High Desert community of Adelanto approved a 750 bed expansion to a controversial immigration detention center. The center is operated by a private prison company and has been criticized by the Department of Homeland Security. Reporter, Benjamin Purpur, KVCR
February 21, 2020
Berkeley Students Rally In Solidarity With UC Santa Cruz Strike UC Berkeley grad students will rally on campus today in support of their counterparts at UC Santa Cruz. who are on strike over a cost of living increase. the Cal students are now considering a strike of their own. Reporter: Kate Wolffe, KQED New Bill Forces Cities To Build Housing And Shelters Governor Gavin Newsom this week said there are nearly 300 vacant lots and state-owned buildings that cities can use to build new shelters a state lawmaker is putting pressure cities to act quickly. Reporter: Erika Aguilar, KQED Sierra Nevada Brewery Founder Reflects On 40 years Founder and CEO Ken Grossman had a knack for this early on -- buying his first homebrewing kit as a teen... and hiding it from his mom, according to company lore. He says the industry has come a long way in four decades Guest: Ken Grossman, Founder, Sierra Nevada Brewing Company
February 20, 2020
Homelessness Takes Center Stage In State Of The State Speech Governor Gavin Newsom delivered his second State Of The State speech in Sacramento yesterday. It was a break with tradition both in style and substance. The governor promised to put homelessness at the top of his agenda this year. Reporter: Guy Marzorati, KQED Governor Calls For New Housing Bill Gavin Newsom wants to make it easier for cities across California to build new homeless shelters and permanent supportive housing by side-stepping environmental reviews. Newsom also called for a revival of a controversial housing bill that died last month. Reporter: Erin Baldassari, KQED Democrats Target Nevada's Latinx Voters With Mixed Results The Nevada Caucuses are coming up this weekend, and KUNR, in Reno is digging into different voter experiences across the state. Today, a look into Latinx voters in Nevada. According to the Pew Research Center, Latinos will make up the second largest voting block for the 2020 election. Reporter: Andrew Mendez, KUNR
February 19, 2020
UC Threatens To Fire Striking Graduate Students A strike by graduate student teachers at the UC Santa Cruz campus is now in its second week. Striking teaching assistants have been withholding grades for about two months now. The UC says the students are facing the real prospect of losing their jobs. Reporter: Erika Mahoney, KAZU Governor Newsom's Approach To Homelessness Continues To Evolve Governor Gavin Newsom will deliver his second State of the State Address from Sacramento today, where he’s likely to talk about one of California's thorniest issues: homelessness. It's an issue that’s followed Newsom since the start of his political career here in San Francisco. Reporter: Erin Baldassari, KQED Same Day Voter Registration  Presents A Challenge For Poll Workers Yesterday was the deadline to register to vote in the state's March 3rd primary. But, thanks to a new law, it's still possible to register right through — and on Election Day itself. The law's got support from county election officials, but they say implementing it will be a challenge. Reporter: Scott Rodd, Capital Public Radio Union President Critical Of Sanders Ad The head of PG&E's largest union has some words for Democratic Presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders. In a new video, IBEW President Tom Dalzell attacks Sanders' calls for a public takeover of the utility, which has been in bankruptcy protection for the last year. Lawmakers Call For More Local Control Over Wildfire Prevention The California Public Utilities Commission has the sole authority to make sure utility companies like PG&E are safely managing their equipment and taking preventative measures like maintaining vegetation. A new bill would expand that power to authorities including local district attorneys and the state attorney general. Reporter: Kate Wolffe, KQED After 78 Years, California Offers Apology For Japanese Internment In 1942 President Franklin Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which authorized the incarceration of Japanese Americans and immigrants from Japan living in the United States after Pearl Harbor. This week, a California lawmaker will announce a resolution demanding an official apology from the state legislature for its role.
February 18, 2020
Tech Companies Face Economic Impact Of The Coronavirus The coronavirus outbreak is having an impact on tech business. Yesterday, Apple told nervous investors that it’s not selling as many of its products as it had originally projected it would for the current quarter. Reporter: Mary Franklin Harvin, KQED Homeless Activists Are Pushing For Housing Rights Amendment The phrase 'housing is a human right' has been on the lips of activists and tenants rights attorneys. Now its being adopted by California lawmakers. A group of mothers who squatted in protest in a vacant house in Oakland is pushing for a new amendment to the state constitution. Reporter: Molly Solomon, KQED Medallion Crisis Leaves Cab Drivers With Overwhelming Debt A San Francisco judge could decide Friday whether a jury will decide the fate of a $150 Million dollar lawsuit against the city of San Francisco. The case stems from hundreds of taxi medallions the city sold for a quarter-million bucks a piece.  Now, because of companies like Uber and Lyft, their medallions are virtually worthless. One driver is using his social security check to pay off his loan. Reporter: Sam Harnett
February 17, 2020
Sanctuary Cities Face New Immigration Crackdown The Trump Administration announced a new crackdown on undocumented immigrants this weekend. The plan is to boost immigration enforcement by sending border patrol agents to sanctuary cities across the U.S. Officials in Los Angeles and San Francisco are pushing back. Reporter: Michelle Wiley, KQED CA Supreme Court Ruling Could Set Precedent For Gig Economy If you’re driving Uber and don’t have a passenger, are you still working? What about if you’re waiting for a delivery order on Instacart? A recent California Supreme Court ruling involving Apple could set a precedent for these increasingly contested questions. Reporter: Sam Harnett, KQED Redlands Zero-Emmission Train Sparks Housing Debate The Inland Empire city of Redlands has a small-town feel. For decades, city officials there have tried to keep it that way, but that may soon change because Redlands is getting the first zero-emission train line in North America. That’s leading to debate over the third rail of state politics: building more housing near transit. Reporter: Benjamin Purper, KVCR Rare Tiny Sea Dragons Hatch At San Diego Aquarium Tiny sea dragons have made their debut at the Birch Aquarium in San Diego. The rare inch-long fish hatched last week, in what the aquarium calls a momentous event for its breeding program. Reporter: Angela Corral, KQED
February 14, 2020
LA Expunges Marijuana Records Recreational marijuana sales and use have been legal in California for a while now, but a lot of people have old marijuana convictions on their criminal records. In Los Angeles, relief is coming for them. Reporter: Sharon McNary, KPCC State Agency Snubs Governor's Green Initiative In Sacramento, the non-partisan Legislative Analyst’s Office advises elected officials on policy and whether proposals make fiscal sense. That office is recommending that an ambitious billion dollar green loan fund proposed by Governor Gavin Newsom be rejected. Reporter: Kevin Stark, KQED California is Safe From Drought...For Now In a weekly report, the US Drought Monitor said nearly ten percent of California is now designated as being in a moderate drought. However, meteorologists say we don't have to worry about severe drought just yet. Reporter: Angela Corral, KQED LAPD Collects but Doesn't Protect License Plate Data California's law enforcement agencies are falling short when it comes to protecting data gathered from automated license plate readers. That's according to a new report from the state's auditor. Reporter: Tiffany Camhi, KQED Sen. Kamala Harris Calls for Stephen Miller's Resignation Senator Kamala Harris introduced a resolution with colleagues on Thursday calling for President Trump’s advisor Stephen Miller to resign immediately.The resolution condemns Miller for quote “trafficking” in bigotry and hatred, and says he discredits the White House. Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED ACLU Fights Trumps Shifting Border Wall Funds The ACLU will ask a federal judge in Oakland to block the Trump administration from diverting billions of dollars from defense funding to build 177 miles of wall on the U.S.-Mexico border. Reporter: Tyche Hendricks, KQED Pluto's Beating Heart Pluto got dumped from its status as a planet a few years ago and is now called a “dwarf” planet. However, despite suffering rejection, this planet has heart — a big heart-shaped region known as Tombaugh Regio. Science reporter Danielle Venton tells listeners all about what this region does for the planet. Reporter: Danielle Venton, KQED
February 13, 2020
L.A. Councilman Wants to Tighten Rent Control With rents rising faster than wages in Los Angeles, one city official wants to tighten up existing rent control rules. Reporter: David Wagner, KPCC Bill Would Fund Dental Clinics for Disabled A bill introduced in the state Assembly this week would allow public universities to expand funding for dental clinics that serve people with special needs. Reporter: Alice Woelfle, KQED Domestic Dogs Transmit Distemper to Wildlife More California raccoons, skunks and foxes are sick with distemper this year. Wildlife officials say the animals caught the virus from domestic dogs. Reporter: Steve Milne, CapRadio A Housing Crisis Fix, One Backyard Unit at a Time Starting this year, new state laws make it easier for people to convert the land where residential garages or backyard sheds now stand into housing that homeowners can rent out. The California Report co-host Saul Gonzalez toured an accessory dwelling unit, or ADU, in the Crenshaw neighborhood of Los Angeles to talk about the potential. Guest: Steven Dietz, architect and developer
February 12, 2020
Critics Say Newsom's Homeless Spending Plan Lacks Strategy Governor Gavin Newsom wants to use a lot of state money to address California's homeless crisis. But, a new report by the State Legislative Analyst’s office says the Governor lacks a plan to spend the money smartly. Reporter: Scott Shafer, KQED Politics and Government Editor  Quarantine Lifted for Hundreds of American Evacuees The quarantine has been lifted for a group of American evacuees from Wuhan, China, who had been confined to an air base in Riverside because of the novel coronavirus strain. Reporter: Benjamin Purper, KVCR  Ex-Lawyer for PG&E Takes Helm of West Coast EPA John Busterud, a former lawyer for Pacific Gas & Electric, is expected to become the new head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s San Francisco office next week. That will put him on the front lines in a series of conflicts between California and the Trump Administration over environmental policies. Reporter: Kevin Stark, KQED Science Bill Could Bring Oversight to Bail and Immigration Bonds State senators have introduced a new bill meant to protect people who use bail and immigration bond companies. Reporter: Mary Franklin Harvin, KQED   UC Santa Cruz Grad Students Strike for Higher Pay Graduate students at UC Santa Cruz began an indefinite teaching strike this week. They're fighting for a cost of living adjustment to their pay. Reporter: Erika Mahoney, KAZU    San Diego Freelancer Slams Gig Worker Bill Assembly Bill 5 was was meant to extend regular pay and benefits to millions of people who work in the state's gig economy. But San Diego freelance writer Beth Demmon says the law is a threat to her livelihood. Guest: Beth Demmon, freelance writer
February 11, 2020
Seventh Coronavirus Case Confirmed in California A person evacuated from Wuhan, China who was on the flight that landed at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar in San Diego has tested positive for the new coronavirus.  Reporter: Raquel Maria Dillon, KQED  Air Quality Regulators Continue Push for Cleaner Cars The California Air Quality Resources Board says it will continue to seek agreements with automakers to make cleaner cars. This comes after the Justice Department dropped legal challenges against four car manufacturers that had made a special deal with the state. Reporter: Peter Arcuni, KQED Science  Bill Could Open Up Post-Release Careers for Inmate Fire Fighters  California Assemblymember Eloise Reyes of San Bernardino has proposed a measure that would give prisoners who work on wildfire crews a better chance to rebuild their lives after they’re released. Reporter: Kate Wolffe, KQED  Congresswoman Aims to Defend San Gabriel Mountains More than 30,000 acres of canyons, vistas and wilderness areas in Los Angeles backyard could be granted special federal protection. Pasadena Congresswoman Judy Chu wants to protect parts of the San Gabriel Mountains. Reporter: Jerome Campbell, KCRW   Uber Driver Hopes For Gains from Gig Worker Bill  Under Assembly Bill 5, companies like Uber, Lyft, and Postmastes are meant to offer gig economy workers regular pay, vacation time, and health insurance. But these companies are fighting the measure in court. So, what's really changed for workers? Guest: Manuel Antonio Rodriguez, Los Angeles Uber driver
February 10, 2020
California Labs Prepare for Rapid Coronavirus Testing As the death toll from the coronavirus continues to mount in China, laboratories in California will be soon able to start processing tests for the virus. Reporter: Mary Franklin Harvin, KQED The Economic Toll of the Coronavirus Many California companies that either have factories and stores in China or rely on imported parts are worried about disruptions to their supply chains because of the Coronavirus. Reporter: Robert Garrova, KPCC State Workers Filed Over 180 Sexual Harassment and Discrimination Claims  California’s state government is trying to improve the reporting of sexual harassment and discrimination claims. In the last year, the legislature received 181 such complaints. Reporter: Scott Rodd, CapRadio 'Smart' Street Lights in San Diego Raise Privacy Concerns San Diego has installed thousands of high tech "smart" street lights that come equipped with sensors, cameras and microphones.  The lights are intended to help the city reach its environmental and urban planning goals. But according to reporting by the Voice of San Diego, these devices are also frequently used by law enforcement, and that raises privacy concerns. Guest: Jesse Marx, reporter, Voice of San Diego
February 7, 2020
Federal EPA Fires Top Official in California Mike Stoker, the controversial head of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in California and other Western states, was fired this week. Stoker says his firing may have stemmed from praise he received from Democrats for his work on contaminated sites in their communities. However, Stoker received criticism for his extensive travel and for managing hundreds of San Francisco-based staff remotely from Southern California. Reporter: Kevin Stark, KQED Company Behind Controversial Pesticide Says it Will Halt Production Corteva Agriscience, the main manufacturer of a pesticide called chlorpyrifos, said yesterday it will stop making the product. That announcement comes as California moves to ban the pesticide’s sale, citing studies that link the popular agricultural pesticide to brain damage in kids and harm to wildlife. Reporter: Laura Klivans, KQED Native American Actress Reflects on Film Industry's Changes Native American actress Sacheen Littlefeather stepped in for Marlon Brando at the Academy Awards in 1973 to protest the mistreatment of her people. Littlefeather says there still aren’t many lead roles for Native Americans today, but things are slowly changing. Reporter: Chloe Veltman Lottery Faces Questions After Big 'Ellen Show' Giveaway The California State Lottery is facing criticism for donating more than 200-thousand dollars worth of Scratchers tickets to an audience giveaway on “The Ellen DeGeneres Show.” The LA Times got a hold of a whistleblower complaint that's drawn attention to the exchange, which says the gifted tickets may qualify as misused funds. CSU Has a Massive Maintenance Backlog There are 23 campuses in the California State University system. And a lot of those schools face a massive backlog of repair work that needs to get done. The work will take an estimated four billion dollars and years to complete. One maintenance worker tells us what the situation looks like from his perspective. Reporter: Adolfo Guzman-Lopez, KPCC Disney CEO Responds to Berkeley Fine Controversy The PTA for Berkeley's Emerson Elementary School said it had been fined 250 dollars by Disney's licensing company for showing The Lion King to kids during a fundraiser for the school. Now, Disney Chairman and CEO Bob Iger says he will personally donate to the fundraising initiative. Reporter: Lily Jamali, KQED
February 6, 2020
Hundreds More Coronavirus Evacuees Arrive in California  California is hosting 350 more Americans fleeing the coronavirus outbreak in Wuhan, China. Two planes full of evacuees landed at Travis Air Force base north of San Francisco Wednesday.  Reporter: Sara Hossaini, KQED Lobster Trade Suffers Over Coronavirus Fears Lobster fishermen along our California's Central Coast are having trouble selling their catch as China halts animal imports into the country.  Reporter: Kathryn Barnes, KCRW Joe Biden Pitches Environmental Legacy to California Voters Concern over climate change has peaked this presidential race, and former Vice President Joe Biden is hoping California voters remember the environmental legacy of the Obama era.  Reporter: Guy Marzorati, KQED Farmers Sue To Keep Insects Off Endangered Species List  A licensing company for Burbank-based Disney.. send a PTA in Berkeley a $250 dollar fine for playing The Lion King as a fundraiser.
February 5, 2020
State Elections Chief: App Debacle Won't Happen Here Could the mess at the Iowa caucuses happen in California when we vote on March 3rd? No, but don't expect final election results quickly. Reporter: Marisa Lagos, KQED Nevada Dems Ditch Developer that made Failed in Iowa Next door in Nevada, the Democrats are set to caucus in two weeks. And the Nevada State Democratic Party just ditched the app that's being blamed for the problems with the Iowa caucuses. Reporter: Bree Zender, KUNR Rent Control Measure Will Go To Voters In November, a hot topic here in our state will be back on the ballot: rent control. This week, the Secretary of State’s office verified that proponents have collected enough signatures to put the issue to voters. Reporter: David Wagner, KPCC Disney vs. Emerson Elementary: What It Says About Prop. 13 A licensing company for Burbank-based Disney.. send a PTA in Berkeley a $250 dollar fine for playing The Lion King as a fundraiser. Guest: Lori Droste, Berkeley City Councilwoman Bankruptcy Judge Approves PG&E's Deal with Bondholders The judge overseeing the PG&E bankruptcy has signed off on a key piece of PG&E's plan to exit bankruptcy. But the company's proposal may still face major obstacles. Reporter: Dan Brekke, KQED Tesla Stock Soars and a Visit to the Gigafactory in Sparks, Nevada With Tesla shares on a roll this week, The California Report recently took a field trip just over the state line to visit the Gigafactory in Sparks, Nevada. Guest: Isabelle West, Gigafactory worker
February 4, 2020
Democratic Hopefuls Wait For Iowa Results As Mike Bloomberg Tours California As Democratic candidates gathered in Iowa for the caucuses, one democratic presidential candidate was in California yesterday. Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg made a quick tour through the state, including a stop in Fresno. Reporter: Alex Hall, KQED California Counties Adopt New Voting Rules Ahead Of Primary Leading up to next month's presidential primary, 15 million ballots have been mailed to California voters. But not all of the counties are handling the election the same way. Fifteen counties are now following the Voter's Choice Act. Reporter: Bob Moffitt, Capital Public Radio Advocate For Sick Immigrants Will Attend State Of The Union Twenty-four year old Maria Isabel Bueso who fought for humanitarian protections for sick immigrants will attend President Trumps State of the Union speech this evening as an honored guest. Reporter:  Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED UC Faculty Task Force Wants to Keep SAT and ACT Admission Requirements University of California faculty leaders are recommending their schools stick with the SAT and ACT admissions requirement. They have been studying the use of standardized tests for the past year. Reporter: Vanessa Rancaño, KQED One of State's Top Oil and Gas Regulators Resigns Jason Marshall plans to step down later this month as supervisor of the embattled division that oversees the state's oil fields. Reporter: Ted Goldberg, KQED New Guidelines For Intimacy Coordinators Ensure Comfort On Set The Screen Actors Guild has announced new protocols for intimacy coordinators on sets, to keep performers safe while also meeting the creative needs of productions.  Intimacy coordinators are there to ensure everyone working on set is comfortable with what’s going on in front of the cameras -- everything from preparing actors for sex scenes to prosthetics or nudity garments. Reporter: Mary Franklin Harvin, KQED
February 3, 2020
CDC Orders First Quarantine In 50 Years Due To Coronavirus There are three more confirmed cases of the deadly coronavirus in the U.S. All of them are in Northern California. More than half of the 11 coronavirus cases across the U.S. are in California. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have ordered the first quarantine in half a century for 195 passengers who were flown from China to March Air Reserve Base in Riverside County.  Reporter: Robert Garrova, KPCC Coronavirus Fears Are Keeping Many People At Home This Lunar New Year The Southern California Community of Alhambra cancelled its Lunar New Year festivities entirely because of Coronavirus and crowds at L.A.'s Chinese Lunar New Year parade were smaller than usual on Saturday. many who did come to enjoy the festivities wore surgical masks. Reporter: Saul Gonzalez, KQED Lawmakers Get First Look At Plan To Make PG&E Public Later today in Sacramento, lawmakers will get their first look at new legislation that proposes turning PG&E into a public utility. PG&E is currently in bankruptcy protection, after its equipment caused a series of wildfires in recent years. Guest: Marisa Lagos, KQED Politics Reporter
January 31, 2020
Four years ago, Bernie Sanders lost the California presidential primary to Hillary Clinton. This election the Sanders campaign wants to make sure it carries the Golden State. Sanders has 17 campaign offices in California and it’s pouring money and resources into parts of the state where Sanders didn’t do well the last time he ran for president. Reporter: Jeremy Siegel, KQED
January 30, 2020
Coronavirus Evacuees Held at Riverside County Military Base A government-chartered plane that evacuated more than 200 United States citizens from Wuhan, China, the center of the Coronavirus outbreak, has landed at a military base in Riverside County.  None of the passengers show symptoms of the deadly virus, but they’re undergoing re-testing at the base and are being asked to stay there. Reporter: Caroline Champlin, KPCC Senate Bill 50 Housing Bill Fails Again Senate Bill 50, a controversial and closely-watched housing bill, has failed to pass the California Senate. The measure would have required cities to allow four-to-five story apartment buildings near major transit hubs. Reporter: Erin Baldassari, KQED  Newsom Threatens PG&E Takeover Governor Gavin Newsom stated at a forum Wednesday in Sacramento that Pacific Gas & Electric, the state’s largest utility, quote “no longer exists.” He also threatened to take over the bankrupt utility unless it makes fundamental changes to how it operates. Judge Approves PG&E Settlement With Tubbs Fire Victims The judge overseeing Pacific Gas & Electric's bankruptcy approved a giant settlement Wednesday with victims of one of our state's worst wildfires. PG&E also assured the judge that it's on track to emerge from bankruptcy by June 30, a state mandated deadline. Reporter: Lily Jamali, California Report co-host Poll Shows Sanders Lead in California A new poll commissioned by KQED News shows Senator Bernie Sanders in a strong position among likely Democratic voters in the state. Reporter: Marisa Lagos, KQED  Security Activists Sound Alarm Over L.A.'s New Voting System Voters in Los Angeles County will vote using a new electronic touchscreen system in the upcoming primary. California’s Secretary of State’s office certified the new machines just days ago.  But some election security activists are still worried and have called the decision to approve the voting machines "dangerously naive." Guest: Alex Padilla, California's Secretary of State Drought, Fire, and Beetles Kill Off Dozens of Sequoia Trees California’s giant sequoia trees  are dying at an alarming rate in the parks that were founded to preserve them. Scientists from Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks say they've lost 28 in the last five years. Reporter: Peter Arcuni, KQED Science
January 29, 2020
San Francisco Public Works Director Arrested And Charged With Corruption The head of San Francisco’s Public Works department was arrested Monday by the FBI on public corruption charges. 57 year-old Mohammed Nuru faces up to 20 years in prison if convicted. Nuru is charged with a series of schemes involving public agency contracts. Reporter: Marisa Lagos, KQED Market Street In San Francisco Goes Car Free Around the world cities are experimenting with ways to make streets faster and safer for mass transit, cyclists, and pedestrians, even if that means restrictions on private cars. Starting today autos and trucks on San Francisco’s Market Street won’t be allowed to travel its most congested stretch between City Hall and the waterfront. President Trump To Sign U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Deal President Trump today will sign the new U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade agreement at the White House.  It comes at a time when Mexico is cracking down on Central American migrants trying to reach the U.S. through its territory. Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED Supreme Court Rules In Favor Of 'Public Charge' Rule The Trump Administration wants to make it tougher for immigrants to get permanent legal resident status in the U.S. if they also access social services.  That plan got a boost on Monday when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of the administration’s so called “Public Charge Rule.” Reporter: Erick Galindo, KPCC
January 28, 2020
Feds Examine Weather And Other Condition In Bryant Crash Investigation The National Transportation Safety Board has released information about  the helicopter crash that killed nine people, including retired NBA legend Kobe Bryant. Officials say the chopper was manned by a veteran pilot who was trying to maneuver in difficult conditions that had grounded other aircraft in the area north of Los Angeles where the crash occurred Sunday. Reporter: Saul Gonzalez, KQED California Researchers Rush To Develop Coronavirus Vaccine California is on alert in the search for more cases of coronavirus. Officials have confirmed two cases in Southern California, and a lab in San Diego's gotten a $9 million grant to try and develop a coronavirus vaccine fast. They hope to have something ready for human testing by summer. Reporter: Tarryn Mento, KPBS Survey Shows Most Americans Favor Data Privacy California's landmark data privacy law has only been on the books for a few weeks. It gives consumers the right to know what big tech is doing with our data. A survey out today finds most Americans want some form of data privacy regulation, and more control over how their data is used. Reporter: Rachael Myrow, KQED California has a new system to track sexual harassment within state government. The new system will track harassment and discrimination investigations by department. The names of state employees who file complaints will remain confidential. Officials say the system will help identify repeat offenders and struggling departments. Reporter: Scott Rodd, Capital Public Radio From Dynasty to Scandal: Duncan Hunter's Old District Is Up For Grabs A new documentary series by the San Diego Union-Tribune digs into the history of California's 50th Congressional District, held by Duncan Hunter until he resigned earlier this month after pleading guilty to misusing campaign funds. Now it's the site of a heated race featuring former Congressman Darrell Issa and former City Councilman Carl DeMaio. There's also Ammar Campa-Najjar, the Democrat who almost flipped the seat in the 2018 election. Reporter: Sam Hodgson, San Diego Union-Tribune California Law Mandates Women On Boards, More States May Follow California's publicly-traded companies have been scrambling to make sure they comply with a 2018 law that required them to have at least one woman on their boards by January 1. The Boardlist database - where directors can search for qualified female board candidates - says their data base shows there has been a 20% increase in queries on their site. Reporter: Lily Jamali, KQED
January 27, 2020
Two Cases of Coronavirus Confirmed in Southern California Public health officials have announced two patients here in California have tested positive for the virus -- one in Los Angeles and another in Orange County. Both had traveled to Wuhan, China.  Reporter: Raquel Maria Dillon, KQED Abortion Providers Promise to Fight Back Against Latest Legal Action The Trump administration threatened legal action against California’s abortion protections Friday. But state lawmakers and health groups say they’ll keep working to make the procedure more affordable and accessible. Reporter: Sammy Caiola, Capital Public Radio What Humans Can Do To Prevent Whale Entanglements California scientists are learning more about how a warming ocean threatens species like humpback whales. New research from UC Santa Cruz also highlights the connection between climate change and whale entanglements. Reporter: Danielle Venton, KQED Science Basketball Legend Kobe Bryant's Death Stuns Fans Hundreds of people poured onto the plaza outside of Staples Center to remember Bryant with other fans. Reporter: Saul Gonzalez, The California Report co-Host Bryant's Legacy Complicated by Rape Allegation In 2003, Kobe Bryant was accused of rape by a 19-year-old hotel worker in Colorado. Prosecutors dropped the criminal case after his accuser decided not to testify. Later, as part of a civil settlement, Bryant publicly apologized to her, saying he understood how she felt she didn’t consent to the encounter. That means survivors of sexual assault might have a more complicated response to news of his death. Guest: Kavitha Davidson, The Athletic
January 23, 2020
State Public Health Officials Brace for Coronavirus An outbreak of coronavirus in China has killed at least 17 people and sickened hundreds more. Although the LA County Department of Public Health says the risk of the virus spreading to people in LA is currently very low, public health officials across the state are taking precautions. Reporter: Robert Garrova, KPCC Some Families Separated at the Border Reunite Hundreds of migrant parents were separated from their children at the U.S. Mexico border and then deported without their children under the Trump administration’s zero tolerance policy. Now, some of those parents are returning to cities like Los Angeles and reuniting with their kids because of a federal judge’s order.  Farida Jhabvala Romero spoke with one dad, as he waited to board his flight to LAX at the airport in Guatemala  City. Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED Newsom Says PG&Es Plan Doesn't Cut It Governor Gavin Newsom is warning Pacific Gas and Electric that the utility’s current plan for exiting bankruptcy isn’t good enough to get the state’s approval. And this isn’t the first time the Governor as warned the utility Reporter: Marisa Lagos, KQED  SF Prosecutors Will No Longer Seek Cash Bail San Francisco prosecutors will no longer seek cash bail as a condition for a defendant's release before trial. That’s long been a goal of the city’s new District Attorney, Chesa Boudin. Reporter: Mina Kim, KQED State Defends Women in Discrimination Lawsuit State regulators are intervening in a 10 million dollar settlement proposal between the popular Los Angeles video game maker Riot Games and former female employees. Their concern? The dollar amount may not be big enough. Reporter: Tiffany Camhi, KQED Grassroots Campaigns Ramp Up for Democratic Candidates As presidential candidates accelerate their grassroots campaigns in California, Saul Gonzalez visits a couple of Los Angeles organizing events to see and hear what street-level politicking looks like. He also talks to fired-up volunteer supporters.
January 22, 2020
University of California Delays Vote On Undergrad Tuition Hikes A heated vote was scheduled for today by the University of California on whether to raise tuition for undergrads. Now, the UC has pulled the topic from its agenda. Experts say that continued tuition hikes are putting pressure on families in the state. Reporter: Peter Jon Shuler Los Angeles Takes Stance Against Cheating in Baseball Fans are still reeling from news that two of the Dodgers' recent World Series opponents were linked to a cheating scandal. The City Council voted yesterday to ask Major League Baseball to strip the Houston Astros and Boston Red Sox of their World Series titles. California Airports Screen for New Coronavirus Major airports throughout California are bracing for a new virus, known as coronavirus, spreading through Asia. Public health officials are ordering air travelers who may have been exposed to it be re-routed. These passengers will be screened for symptoms at five designated airports, including LAX and SFO. Reporter: Lesley McClurg, KQED Where Did All the Camp Fire Survivors Go? As part of our ongoing coverage of the 2018 Camp Fire, which destroyed much of Paradise and surrounding towns, we take a look at where survivors are now. The fire forced many residents to scatter across the region, the state, and the country. Now, research out of Chico State is giving us new insights into where so many people went. Guest: Peter Hansen, Chico State
January 21, 2020
A Victory for Homeless 'Moms 4 Housing' in Oakland After a contentious court battle and an early morning eviction, the company that owns the West Oakland home that a group of mothers occupied without permission says it will negotiate a sale with a community land trust that will allow the mothers to live there. The mothers occupied the house in November to protest investors meddling in the housing market and gained national attention. Reporter: Kate Wolffe, KQED Hearing Relocations Could Lead to Hundreds More Deportations Public defenders in the Bay Area say they had no warning before President Trump's administration announced a major pivot that will shift hearing venues for immigrant detainees from Northern to Southern California.  Lawyers in San Francisco and Alameda counties have provided pro bono and low cost legal support to many Bay Area immigrant detainees, and this move may mean detainees will be deprived of the legal services they need. Reporter: Mary Franklin Harvin, KQED Newsom Works to Expand Bachelor's Degree Program in Prisons There’s only one public bachelor’s degree program in a California prison. But if the governor has his way, that’s going to change. We find out more about a proposal to get more California State Universities teaching behind bars. Reporter: Vanessa Rancaño, KQED Car Break Ins Prompt Bi-Partisan Action in Sacramento There were almost a quarter of a million thefts from vehicles reported across the state in 2018. But, as the law stands right now, victims have to prove their car was locked to get a conviction for auto-burglary. A new bill, sponsored by San Francisco State Senator Scott Weiner, could change that so the cases are easier to prosecute Reporter: Raquel Maria Dillon, KQED After String of Race Horse Deaths, California Officials Investigate Racetrack Three race horses have died in the past three days at Santa Anita Park Racetrack. These deaths are occuring despite safety measures put in place after 37 horses died last year. The string of fatalities is drawing scrutiny from lawmakers and animal advocates. Reporter: Scott Rodd, Capital Public Radio The Problem With the Insurance Behind the Insurers Californians who live in wildfire zones are in crisis mode. Many of them have reported that they can't get their home insurance renewed or if they can, that their rates have skyrocketed after the state's string of unprecedented fire years. It's not just household-name insurers like Farmers or State Farm, but lesser known companies that insure those companies, called "re-insurers." We find out exactly what the problem is. Guest: Dale Kasler, Sacramento Bee
January 20, 2020
The Push to Block A Private Equity Firm from Buying .Org Democratic lawmakers in California are moving to stop a private equity firm from buying the internet registry for .org domain names, which are commonly used by non-profits and advocacy groups. Advocates say the issue is the firm will have to recoup its billion dollar investment by either raising fees, or worse. Reporter: Peter Jon Shuler, KQED Immigrant "Brain Waste" Costs California Almost $700 Million Annually The Trump administration has made it more difficult for asylum seekers to win protection, and for refugees to be accepted into the country. Even so, the thousands of humanitarian migrants already here face big challenges in finding work in which they can use their talents and skills. Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED PG&E Makes Progress on Installing Power Lines Underground in Paradise The town of Paradise was nearly destroyed in 2018's Camp Fire, the deadliest and most destructive in the history of our state. A few months after the fire, PG&E, which caused it, promised to re-install the town's power lines underground to reduce fire risk. So far, they've installed 20 out of almost 200 miles of line. Guest: Paul Moreno, PG&E spokesman
January 17, 2020
Gov. Newsom Delivers FEMA Trailers to East Oakland Governor Gavin Newsom has spent the week visiting homeless service providers in Grass Valley, San Diego, Los Angeles and Fresno. This week's "homeless tour kicks off his ambitious agenda to address the state’s growing homeless crisis. Newsom says the state plans on using a hundred FEMA trailers to provide temporary shelter and services to the homeless. The first 15 travel trailers will house between 50 and 70 people in East Oakland. Reporter: Erin Baldassari, KQED Immigration Officials Can Continue to Separate Families for Many Reasons A federal judge in San Diego will meet with Trump administration lawyers and the ACLU to oversee continuing efforts to reunite the more than 5,500 migrant families who’ve been separated by immigration officials at the U.S.-Mexico border. Earlier this week, the same judge ruled that the government may continue separating families for a number of reasons. Reporter: Tyche Hendricks, KQED Officials Apologize for Destroying Garden That Straddles Border CBP officials in San Diego is apologizing for the destruction of a garden along the border fence with Mexico last week. Reporter: Max Rivlin-Nadler, KPBS School Districts Scramble to Balance Budgets Across the state, school districts are scrambling to cover soaring costs, especially those tied to special education and pensions. San Francisco Unified is the latest. Reporter: Vanessa Rancaño, KQED Chef Alice Waters to Collaborate with UC Davis UC Davis has announced a new collaboration with the renowned chef and sustainable agriculture advocate, Alice Waters. Reporter: Mary Franklin Harvin, KQED Many Paradise Homes Rebuilt Bigger Than Before Camp Fire The town of Paradise is rebuilding 14 months after the Camp Fire killed 85 residents and destroyed 11-thousand homes. The process is raising questions about whether Paradise will remain the affordable community that was before the fire. Reporter: Lily Jamali, California Report co-host
January 16, 2020
Orange County Homeless Dispute Continues In Orange County, the fate of unhoused people are at the center of a long-simmering legal dispute between the city of Santa Ana and some of its Orange County neighbors that’s heading to federal court. Santa Ana is accusing the county and three other cities of dumping unhoused people within its borders Reporter: Darrell Satzman, KCRW Proposed Bill Allows Absences For Mental Health It’s common for students to be released from school if they have physical health problems, like a high fever or stomach ache, but California students could soon be allowed excused absences from school for mental and behavioral health issues.  Reporter: Katrina Schwartz, KQED Prop 47 Could Keep Thousands Out Of Prison A criminal justice reform measure passed by California voters in  2014 is saving the state a record 122 million dollars a year on prisons. The change has let California end its use of out-of-state, private prisons entirely.  Reporter: Marisa Lagos, KQED
January 15, 2020
CalBright President Resigns Unexpectedly  In 2018, California launched Calbright, a tuition-free, purely online community college that offers courses in coding, cybersecurity and information technology. Now, Calbright is looking for a new leader after CEO Heather Hiles unexpectedly resigned. Hiles was in the role for less than one year.  Reporter: Katrina Schwartz, KQED California Attorney General Intervenes to Ensure Cities Build Housing The state Attorney General is intervening in a lawsuit against the Bay Area city of San Mateo for blocking a proposed condo complex. AG Xavier Becerra intends to defend a decades-old state law designed to encourage the construction of affordable housing by preventing cities from rejecting projects that comply with their general plan.   Reporter: Peter Jon Shuler, KQED State Law Results in More Women on Corporate Boards What should the government do, if anything, to make sure women have more clout in the corporate world? There’s a new law in California requiring publicly-traded companies to have at least one woman on their corporate boards or faces fines starting at $100,000 dollars. One of the law’s staunchest supporters is Betsy Berkhemer-Credaire, who heads 2020 Women on Boards. She says the law is already showing results.
January 14, 2020
Should Cities Be Sued For Failing To Address Homelessness? Homelessness has become so bad in so many places in California that cities Governor Gavin Newsom has appointed a Homelessness task force.  The task force is recommending that cities and counties  be sued if they don’t address the issue by building more housing. Reporter: Chris Nichols, Capital Public Radio Wrongful Death Lawsuit Filed Against Dive Boat Owners The families of four victims of last year’s dive boat fire off the Santa Barbara Coast have filed wrongful death claims against the boat’s owners. The families’ lawyers allege the dive boat Conception violated a number of safety regulations. Reporter: Elly Yu, KPCC California Foresters May Learn From Australian Bushfires Australia’s bushfires have  scorched forests and farmlands, destroying thousands of homes. At least 28 people have died so far  as well as hundreds of millions of wild and domestic animals. These Australian mega-blazes are reminiscent of California's recent tragic history with wildfires. Guest: Malcom North, Researcher, U.S. Forest Service
January 13, 2020
New Tariffs Threaten Wine Importers in California Some in California’s wine industry are calling it the worst thing to happen to them since Prohibition. The Trump Administration wants to slap a 100 percent tariff on European wine imports. That's in retaliation for a French tax on U-S tech companies like Google. We learn more about how the tariff could affect Californians whose livelihoods depend on wine. Guest: Paul Young, Los Angeles wine importer How Would $1.5 Billion Help Fight Homelessness? On Friday, Governor Gavin Newsom unveiled his 222 billion dollar state budget for the coming fiscal year. His proposal includes nearly $1.5 billion in new money to fight homelessness. The Governor wants a lot of that funding to pay rent for homeless people once they find a place to live. Census Recruits Thousands of Workers in California In preparation for this year’s 2020 U.S. Census, the Census Bureau is hiring tens of thousands of temporary workers in California. The Bureau is holding hiring fairs across the state. But in an immigrant heavy state like California, it’s hard to overcome people’s anxieties about working for the federal government. Appeals Court Rules Cities Must Comply with Sanctuary State Law The California Court of Appeal ruled last week  that a state law limiting police collaboration with federal immigration authorities does not interfere with a city's right to make its own laws. Reporter: Michelle Wiley, KQED
January 10, 2020
Exclusive: For Young Prisoners, Newsom Proposes Rehabilitative Program Ahead of the release of the governor's budget, KQED has learned that Gavin Newsom will propose a new program aimed at young inmates. It would give them the chance to leave state prisons with college degrees, vocational training and other rehabilitation. Reporter: Marisa Lagos, KQED Campus Workers on Strike at UC Santa Cruz At UC Santa Cruz Thursday, more than 200 people rallied to support graduate teaching assistants and campus workers who have been on strike since November. A big issue for the protesters is the high cost of housing. Reporter: Erika Mahoney, KAZU Why California's King Tides Are Fun and Frightening Some of 2020's highest tides will start hitting California's coast on Friday. They're known as king tides. As part of our series, "Spacing Out with Danielle Venton," we visited San Francisco's Embarcadero to learn more Guest: Danielle Venton, KQED Science
January 10, 2020
Exclusive: For Young Prisoners, Newsom Proposes Rehabilitative Program Ahead of the release of the governor's budget, KQED has learned that Gavin Newsom will propose a new program aimed at young inmates. It would give them the chance to leave state prisons with college degrees, vocational training and other rehabilitation. Reporter: Marisa Lagos, KQED Campus Workers on Strike at UC Santa Cruz At UC Santa Cruz Thursday, more than 200 people rallied to support graduate teaching assistants and campus workers who have been on strike since November. A big issue for the protesters is the high cost of housing. Reporter: Erika Mahoney, KAZU Why California's King Tides Are Fun and Frightening Some of 2020's highest tides will start hitting California's coast on Friday. They're known as king tides. As part of our series, "Spacing Out with Danielle Venton," we visited San Francisco's Embarcadero to learn more Guest: Danielle Venton, KQED Science
January 9, 2020
Veterans View Events In The Middle East With Alarm  Some veterans are alarmed at how events in the Middle East are unfolding. Paul Cox is a Vietnam Vet with Veterans for Peace in Berkeley.  He says the US killing of Iran's top general last Friday was an attempt by President Trump to rally political support during the impeachment process. Muslim Organizations Speak Out Against Military Actions In Iran California is home to the largest population of Iranians and Iranian-Americans outside of that nation. Yesterday, five local Muslim organizations gathered in Los Angeles to speak out against military actions in Iran, which have caused anxiety in some parts of the Muslim-American community. Explaining Iran While Carrying 40 Years of Baggage when Iran makes international headlines, Iranian-Amerians are asked about what they think, what they know, and what might come next. Persis Karim, is an Iranian-American writer and professor at San Francisco State, She and Lily Jamali talked about their shared experience of facing their complicated identities.   Guest: Persis Karim
January 9, 2020
Veterans View Events In The Middle East With Alarm  Some veterans are alarmed at how events in the Middle East are unfolding. Paul Cox is a Vietnam Vet with Veterans for Peace in Berkeley.  He says the US killing of Iran's top general last Friday was an attempt by President Trump to rally political support during the impeachment process. Muslim Organizations Speak Out Against Military Actions In Iran California is home to the largest population of Iranians and Iranian-Americans outside of that nation. Yesterday, five local Muslim organizations gathered in Los Angeles to speak out against military actions in Iran, which have caused anxiety in some parts of the Muslim-American community. Explaining Iran While Carrying 40 Years of Baggage when Iran makes international headlines, Iranian-Amerians are asked about what they think, what they know, and what might come next. Persis Karim, is an Iranian-American writer and professor at San Francisco State, She and Lily Jamali talked about their shared experience of facing their complicated identities.   Guest: Persis Karim
January 9, 2020
Veterans View Events In The Middle East With Alarm  Some veterans are alarmed at how events in the Middle East are unfolding. Paul Cox is a Vietnam Vet with Veterans for Peace in Berkeley.  He says the US killing of Iran's top general last Friday was an attempt by President Trump to rally political support during the impeachment process. Muslim Organizations Speak Out Against Military Actions In Iran California is home to the largest population of Iranians and Iranian-Americans outside of that nation. Yesterday, five local Muslim organizations gathered in Los Angeles to speak out against military actions in Iran, which have caused anxiety in some parts of the Muslim-American community. Explaining Iran While Carrying 40 Years of Baggage when Iran makes international headlines, Iranian-Amerians are asked about what they think, what they know, and what might come next. Persis Karim, is an Iranian-American writer and professor at San Francisco State, She and Lily Jamali talked about their shared experience of facing their complicated identities.   Guest: Persis Karim
January 8, 2020
How the Killing of a California Man Sparked Conflict with Iran A report in the Sacramento Bee offers insight into the events that led up to the U.S. assassination of Iranian General Qassem Soleimani. Last month, an Iraqi-American translator from Sacramento was killed in a rocket attack while working in Iraq. The Bee reports the attack that cost Nawres Waleed Hamid his life set off a chain of events that prompted the U.S. to carry out the strikes that killed Soleimani last week. Reporter: Sawsan Morrar, Sacramento Bee Security Analyst Says There Is 'Opportunity For Cease fire With Iran' As tensions escalate with Iran, a security analyst say that while Iran's attacks on US forces in Iraq was provocative but restrained. Guest: Joe Cirincione, President, Ploughshares Fund Iranian Advocates Demand Investigation into Questioning of Iranian-Americans at U.S. Airports The National Iranian American Council is calling on the Department of Homeland Security to investigate why U.S. immigration officials have been holding and questioning many Iranians and Iranian Americans returning to the U.S. these last few days. Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED  Housing Activists Disrupt Press Conference On Housing Density Legislation housing activists yesterday protested changes to the controversial bill SB 50 being considered by lawmakers in Sacramento. The bill aims to get more housing built near transit hubs. What was supposed to be a pretty standard news conference took an unexpected turn. Reporter: Alice Woelfle, KQED New Podcast Delves Into The Legacy Of Jerry Brown Jerry Brown left the governor's office a year ago, but he's still very much in the game, weighing in on issues ranging from climate change to nuclear proliferation. Shortly after Brown stepped down, KQED politics editor Scott Shafer  a series of interviews with him over several months. They talked about everything from his childhood through his final term as governor. Guest: Scott Shafer, KQED Politics Editor
January 7, 2020
U.S. Firefighters Depart for Australia to Help Fight Bush Fires 21 U.S. Forest Service firefighters left last night on a flight to Melbourne. The California Report's Saul Gonzalez visited a fire house north of Los Angeles yesterday as the "hot shot" crew packed their gear and said their goodbyes to family. Guest: Firefighter Jorge Perez What Firefighters Will Do Once They Get to Australia Once the American firefighters get on the ground in Australia, here's a preview of what they're likely to be doing Reporter: Kate Wolffe, KQED Scott Wiener Pushes for Housing Density Zoning Fix for a Third Time One of the most closely-watched bills in the Legislature this session? is an attempt to fix our state's housing crisis. Senate Bill 50 hinges on boosting housing density by making it easier to build more housing, especially near transit hubs. And it's being introduced for a third time Tuesday with a series of changes he hopes will breathe new life into his plan. Guest: State Senator Scott Wiener, San Francisco State Lawmakers Push Bill to Ban Vaping California lawmakers want to go further to ban the sale of all flavored tobacco in stores throughout the state. Reporter: Laura Klivans, KQED $7M in Commerce Dept. Money Goes to Rebuild after Fires Californians are all too familiar with the aftermath of devastating fires. Now, $7 million dollars in federal money is being set aside to train workers to rebuild those lost structures. A top U.S. Commerce Department official made the announcement yesterday. Reporter: Peter Jon Shuler, KQED State Lawmakers Push Bill to Ban Vaping Much of the blame for recent fires has been placed on climate change. Scientists expect conditions will only get worse, from more severe droughts and rising sea levels, to worsened air and water quality. Now, state lawmakers want to borrow billions of dollars to protect Californians from the risk of a changing climate. Reporter: Sharon McNary, KPCC State Sues Silicon Valley Billionaire Over Beach Access California is suing one of the best known venture capitalists in Silicon Valley. The suit stems from a long-running battle over public access to a "prime surfing spot" called Martins Beach near Half Moon Bay. Billionaire Vinod Khosla owns it. Since he bought real estate there more than a decade ago has tried to block surfers and the rest of the public from accessing the beach there. Guest: Paul Rogers, KQED Science managing editor and Mercury News reporter
January 7, 2020
U.S. Firefighters Depart for Australia to Help Fight Bush Fires 21 U.S. Forest Service firefighters left last night on a flight to Melbourne. The California Report's Saul Gonzalez visited a fire house north of Los Angeles yesterday as the "hot shot" crew packed their gear and said their goodbyes to family. Guest: Firefighter Jorge Perez What Firefighters Will Do Once They Get to Australia Once the American firefighters get on the ground in Australia, here's a preview of what they're likely to be doing Reporter: Kate Wolffe, KQED Scott Wiener Pushes for Housing Density Zoning Fix for a Third Time One of the most closely-watched bills in the Legislature this session? is an attempt to fix our state's housing crisis. Senate Bill 50 hinges on boosting housing density by making it easier to build more housing, especially near transit hubs. And it's being introduced for a third time Tuesday with a series of changes he hopes will breathe new life into his plan. Guest: State Senator Scott Wiener, San Francisco State Lawmakers Push Bill to Ban Vaping California lawmakers want to go further to ban the sale of all flavored tobacco in stores throughout the state. Reporter: Laura Klivans, KQED
January 6, 2020
Iranian-Americans in 'Tehrangeles' React to Mounting Tensions Tensions between the U.S. and Iran are mounting after last week’s airstrike ordered by President Trump that killed a top Iranian general in Iraq. Those tensions are felt deeply here in California, where more Iranians live than anywhere outside Iran itself. Many of them live in Los Angeles, and they're divided on what should come next. Reporter: Benjamin Gottlieb, KCRW State Lawmakers Head Back to Work This Week State lawmakers get back to work today in Sacramento for the 2020 legislative session, and it should be a fast start to the year. Reporter: Scott Shafer, KQED Politics Editor Finding Common Ground in Polarized State Politics... With Karaoke As California lawmakers reconvene, Capitol Public Radio’s outgoing capitol bureau chief Ben Adler took a moment to dig into his reporter’s notebook and reflect on our polarized political debate.  He brings us the final piece in our California Dream collaboration on solutions. Reporter: Ben Adler, Capitol Public Radio Nonpartisan Voters Face Problems in Presidential Primary If you're an independent voter, aka "no party preference," you might run into some problems voting for your favorite candidate in the upcoming presidential primary in a few weeks. But it's not too late to make your vote count. Guest: Prof. Jessica Levinson, Loyola Law School
January 3, 2020
Sierra Snowpack Looking Good Despite Slow Start An annual California tradition took place yesterday.  Personnel from the state’s Department of Water Resources trudged up to a spot in the mountains west of Lake Tahoe. They plunged a big blue tube into the snow in order to measure the snowpack and how much water California will have in the coming months.  Reporter: Peter Arcuni Justice Dept. Report Confirms Racial Bias In Traffic Stops If you’re an African American driver in California it’s much more likely you’ll be stopped and searched by the police than Latino or white motorists. That’s the finding of a new report from California’s Department of Justice. More Top-Grossing Films Were Directed By Women In 2019 the number of top grossing films directed by women reached a new high last year. Thanks to movies like “Harriet” “Hustlers” and “Little Women. According to a USC Annenberg study, ten percent of the most profitable movies of 2019 were directed by women. Reporter: Alice Woelfle New State Law Leads To Dozens Of Catholic Sex Abuse Lawsuits In San Diego half a dozen lawsuits have been filed against the Catholic Diocese and various parishes. The suits allege child sexual abuse in the 1960s and 70s by now deceased priests across San Diego County. Tribal Liaisons Make A Difference For Cal State Students Students from California’s Native American communities have long had low college graduation rates. Lack of support and mentoring for Native American students is often cited as a reason. Now, more universities like Cal State San Bernadino are appointing tribal liaisons. Reporter: Adolfo Guzman-Lopez, KPCC
January 2, 2020
A Brief Overview Of New State Laws That Went Into Effect Yesterday A new year means new state laws. We give you an overview of a few of them, from restrictions on vaccine exemptions and rent increases, to a law requiring solar panels on new homes, and a law that requires tech companies to be more transparent about what they do with the personal data they collect. Private Prison Law Faces Legal Challenges Lots of new state laws went into effect yesterday. One of them will phase out private prisons and immigration detention centers in the state. But it's facing a legal challenge from one of the country's largest prison companies. The GEO Group argues in a federal lawsuit filed this week that California’s A-B-3-2 interferes with federal operations like immigration enforcement. California May Lose A U.S. House Seat Due To Mass Exodus The upcoming 2020 U.S. Census could have political implications for several states. A new population estimates from the federal government show that California is at risk of losing a seat in the House of Representatives, because so many Californians are moving to other states.  Google's Cafeteria Workers Vote To Unionize It takes all kinds of people, beyond software engineers, to keep Silicon Valley’s biggest companies running. Just take the workers who feed the techies. At Google’s offices around the Bay Area, about 2,300 cafeteria workers  have voted to unionize. Reporter: Rachael Myrow Highly Skilled Refugees Face Challenges Finding Employment Immigrants who were physicians, lawyers and engineers, in their home countries face big challenges when trying to find employment in the U.S. In this second part of a California Dream series we hear about an organization that helps immigrant health care professionals find work in California communities where they’re needed most. Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero
January 1, 2020
Fresno Police Arrest 6 Suspected Gang Members in Killings at Backyard Party There was a breakthrough yesterday in the investigation into last year’s mass shooting in Fresno that claimed the lives of four men. All members of the Hmong community. They were watching a football game at a private home when they were shot.  Reporter: Alex Hall After A Tumultous Year, What's Next For PG&E? Its been a big year for Pacific Gas & Electric.  Back when PG&E filed for bankruptcy in January, the utility blamed potential liabilities from wildfires saying it might have to pay tens of billions of dollars in damages. PG&E has been busy striking deals with survivors, cities, and insurance companies. But the story is far from over. Asylum Seekers And Refugees Face Big Challenges Finding Work That Utilizes Their Skills The Trump administration has made it more difficult for asylum seekers to win protection, and has cut way back on the number of refugees accepted into the country.  The thousands of humanitarian migrants already here face big challenges in finding work where they can use their talents and skills. Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero
December 31, 2019
state of California. They want to stop AB-5, a state law that takes effect tomorrow. It will make the companies classify thousands of their drivers as employees instead of independent contractors, making gig workers eligible for regular pay and health insurance. Recent Spills Mean Changes To Oil Drilling In California One of California's largest oil and gas producers is making cuts to its oil drilling operations because of new state rules prompted by a series of spills earlier this year. A company spokeswoman says that cut means about 90 workers from about a half-a-dozen contractors could lose their jobs.  Reporter: Ted Goldberg Judge Considers Whether To Evict Mothers Occupying Vacant Oakland Home An Alameda County judge is considering whether a group of homeless mothers living in a vacant home without permission can stay there. The women moved into the house last month and say they're not leaving anytime soon.  Reporter: Kate Wolffe The Trump Administration Wants To Increase The Fee For U.S. Citizen Applications  Several California mayors and members of Congress are slamming the proposal to eliminate fee waivers. They say the fee hikes will price out thousands of people applying for citizenship. Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero  After 45 Years Of Satire Beach Blanket Babylon Says Farewell One of the country’s longest-running comedy revues is staging its final performance in San Francisco this evening. For forty-five years Beach Blanket Babylon has entertained millions of locals, tourists and even the Queen of England, with its goofy send-ups of the rich and famous.  Reporter: Chloe Veltman
December 30, 2019
Anti-Semitic Attacks Increased In Los Angeles This Year There are growing concerns about antisemitism in the U.S. following recent attacks targeting the American Jewish community. In California cities like L.A. there has been an increase in anti-Semitic incidents in 2019.  New Law Mandates Fines For Californians Without Health Insurance Starting next year, Californians who don’t have health insurance will have to pay an annual penalty. That’s because of a new law intended to encourage Californians to buy insurance. Guest: Peter Lee, Executive director of Covered California It's Still Illegal To Eat Roadkill In California California wildlife officials say next year it will still be illegal to collect and eat dead animals you find along the state's highways. That's despite a new law that many believed would legalize the practice. Reporter: Dan Brekke  2020 Rover Will Explore Possibilities For Human Habitation Of Mars Engineers from NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab in Pasadena  are putting the finishing touches on what’s  called Mars 2020. It’s a car sized rover that will be sent to the Red Planet next year. The mission will explore possibilities for future human habitation.  Guest: Steve Barajas, JPL Engineer Martinez News-Gazette Shuts Down After 161 Years After 161 years of operation, Contra Costa County’s Martinez News-Gazette published its final print edition yesterday. Founded in 1858 it was one of the oldest papers in the state. Our colleagues from KQED podcast The Bay visited the News Gazette during its final days and spoke to 93 year-old Barbara Cetko, who worked at the paper for 38 years.
December 27, 2019
The Year In Tech: Privacy, Controversy, And Unsuccessful Public Offerings The tech industry was all over the news this year. Several high profile companies went public this year- and flopped. A controversial new law meant to protect gig workers is having a negative effect on other industries, and a new consumer privacy rule goes into effect January 1st, are California businesses prepared? Guests: Rachael Myrow and Mike Isaac
December 26, 2019
Cities enacted emergency housing bills and expanded rent control in an attempt to tackle homelessness, and a statewide law capping rent increases goes into effect January 1st 2020.  Homelessness continues to be one of the biggest challenges facing the state, but a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision ruled in their favor. The court said unhoused people have the right to sleep on the street, if no shelter beds are available.  Guests: Erika Aguilar and Anna Scott
December 25, 2019
This year teachers in Oakland and Los Angeles went on strike to demand better pay and more support, and smaller class sizes. In higher education the University of California may eliminate SAT tests for admissions, and and a look ahead to a 2020 ballot measure that would change the property tax rules for businesses and raise money for education. Guests: Vanessa Rancaño, and John Fensterwald
December 24, 2019
Wildfire Response And The Future Of PG&E Governor Gavin Newsom's first year in office has been a busy one. One of his biggest challenges was wildfire response and prevention, and what to do about Pacific Gas and Electric. After its damaged power lines were discovered to be the cause of some of the most catastrophic fires in state history, PG&E began shutting off power to millions of customers when high winds and low humidity increased the risk of fire.  PG&E is now facing bankruptcy and its future is uncertain. Guest: Marisa Lagos
December 23, 2019
A Look Back At The Year In Politics The California Report takes a look back at the year in politics, including highlights of Gavin Newsom's first year as governor, and former governor Jerry Brown's legacy. Also a look ahead to what to expect in 2020 Guests: Scott Shafer and Gustavo Arellano
December 20, 2019
Federal Government Could Award New Contracts to Private Prisons Detaining Immigrants in California As early as today, the federal government could award new contracts to private prison companies to keep detaining thousands of immigrants in the state. But advocates say that's an effort to undermine a new California law targeting prisons for profit just days before it takes effect. Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero State Attorney General Argues Against Releasing Police Misconduct Records The California Attorney General's Office on Thursday argued before a panel of three appellant judges that turning over misconduct and other records about officers employed by local agencies would be an "enormous burden" for the state department of justice. Reporter: Alex Emslie Los Angeles Pop Up Store Benefits Refugees Thoroughly sick of holiday season consumerism and buying things for people who already have plenty of stuff? In Los Angeles, a British charity has opened a pop up store where you can use your shopping impulse to help some of the world’s most desperate people. Reporter: Molly Peterson Not Much Mention of California at Democratic Debate in Los Angeles Thursday night's Democratic presidential debate was held in Los Angeles, but there wasn't much mention of California and issues central to the Golden State, such as housing and homelessness. Reporter: Jeremy Siegel Midnight Deadline to Sign Up for Covered California The clock is ticking for Californians who don't have health insurance and want to be covered starting January 1 through the state's insurance marketplace. Guest: Peter Lee, Executive Director of Covered California
December 19, 2019
National Politics Come To California With Impeachment And Democratic Debate In Los Angeles this evening a debate will be held among many of the Democratic candidates running for the nation’s highest office. The debate could affect the focus of discussion for the presidential candidates, but some presidential aspirants won’t be on the debate stage because they did not make fundraising and polling benchmarks set by the Democratic Party to qualify. Reporter: Scott Shafer In Blue California The Central Valley Remains Loyal To Trump In places like the Bay Area and L.A. impeachment is supported by a lot of people. California is often described as the bluest of blue states. But there are many places in the state that voted for Trump where impeachment isn’t so popular. Reporter: Alex Hall Humboldt County Community Rejects Wind Farm On Sacred Land California has become synonymous with green energy projects as it tries to wean itself off of fossil fuels. But in Humboldt County in far northern California, the Board of Supervisors has voted against a wind energy project. The company Terra-Gen wanted to place 47 wind turbines on the Bear River and Monument ridges above the former logging town of Scotia. Reporter: Shomik Mukherjee, Humboldt Times-Standard Data From Solar Probe Is Changing What We Know About The Sun It was announced last week that California had installed one million solar roofs across the state, achieving a goal set back in 2006. But how much do we really know about our closest star? Data from a probe launched last year is changing what we know about the sun, and may help predict solar storms, which can be harmful to satellites and astronauts. Guest: Danielle Venton
December 18, 2019
Journalists Challenge Law That Restricts Freelancers AB-5 is facing another legal challenge. The controversial law aims to give wage and benefit protections to people who work as independent contractors.  But this latest challenge isn't coming from ride-share companies, it's being brought by the American Society of Journalists and Authors and the National Press Photographers Association. Demonstrators Across The State Rally In Favor Of Impeachment Last night Californians in cities up and down the state gathered to demonstrate their support for the impeachment of President Donald Trump. The demonstrations come as the House of Representatives prepares for its historic impeachment vote scheduled for today. Impeachment Proceedings Become Teaching Moment For High School Students The House of Representatives prepares for its historic vote to impeach President Trump today. In the Bay Area some teachers are using the ongoing saga as a good real-time civics lesson. Inside a classroom at Oakland Tech High School,  students debated the merits of the case. Reporter: Matthew Green Ocean Acidity Is Increasing Off California's Coast Acidity  off the coast of California is rising faster than the rest of the oceans. That's according to a new study that used fossils to look at ocean acidification  over a century. Tracking the long-term effects is difficult because no one studied ocean acidification until the 1980's.
December 17, 2019
What Will Supreme Court Ruling Mean for Homeless and California Cities? The U.S. Supreme Court has decided not to hear a case about homeless encampments. Here's what that might mean for California. Reporter: Erika Aguilar, KQED Housing Editor Homeless People React to Supreme Court Not Taking Up Boise Case Vulnerable people who are stuck living in encampments or on the street, say they're hoping the Supreme Court's decision will make life a little less hard. Guest: Inesa Cooper Homeless Moms Occupy Vacant West Oakland Home Two homeless moms are drawing attention to real estate speculators in California's housing crisis by occupying a vacant house in West Oakland. It's a unique and practical way to draw attention to their argument: that housing should be considered a human right. Reporter: Molly Solomon, KQED Shell Companies Buying Up More Homes in California Cities The current housing crisis has been marked by a rise in ownership, not by real people, but by what are known as "shell companies." In fact, reporters at the public radio program Reveal have found that out of our state's total residential real estate purchases 30 percent were made in cold, hard cash. The reporters trying to figure out: Who's buying up cities across the country, and in California? Guest: Aaron Glantz, investigative reporter, Reveal
December 16, 2019
ICE Does Not Know How Many Parents It Detained And Deported Last Year U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement detained nearly 440,000 adults nationwide last year, but it doesn't know how many of them are parents, which violates the agency’s own policy.  Reporter: Farida Jhabvala Romero  Iraqi Community Near San Diego Finds Peace In The U.S. In a San Diego suburb, there’s a large and thriving population of Chaldeans, a religious and ethnic minority from Iraq. They’re hoping that economic success will now translate into local political clout. Reporter: Claire Trageser , KPBS Governor Newsom Rejects PG&E Settlement For Wildfire Victims In Sacramento on Friday evening Governor Gavin Newsom announced a major setback to the utility PG&E. The governor rejecting a multi-billion dollar deal the utility reached only a week ago with survivors of wildfires caused by the utility. PG&E was counting on that deal to help it make its way out of bankruptcy protection. San Jose Mayor's Call For PG&E Cooperative Gains Momentum San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo has been the face of a push to turn PG&E into a utility owned by customers rather than investors. Governor Newsom's rejection of PG&E's bankruptcy exit plan gives Liccardo some momentum.  The mayor started recruiting support for his plan after PG&E's power shutoffs thrust parts of the state into the dark. He now has more than 100 elected officials on his side. Guest: Sam Liccardo, Mayor of San Jose
December 13, 2019
DMV responsible for hundreds of voter registration inaccuracies If we needed one more reason to be fed up with the DMV we've got it. There are reports out this week saying the agency is responsible for inaccuracies in hundreds of Californians’ voter registration records. Reporter: Brian Anderson, Sacramento Bee Traffic in California Cities Is Getting Worse Ridership on public transportation is declining, and people are spending more time in their cars. As a result, traffic in many cities is getting worse. A state bill that relaxes zoning regulations may help, but cities will need to take advantage of the law and build more housing near public transportation.  Guest: Ethan Elkind, UC Berkeley After 42 Years Low Rider Magazine Is Going Out Of Business Low Rider magazine is going out of print. The car magazine was started in the mid 1970's by three San Jose State students who wanted it to be a voice for the Chicano community in the Bay Area. Data From Orbiting Solar Probe Is Released Ninety three million miles away, the Sun nourishes life on Earth. But the familiar star at the center of our solar system, the one we start and end our days with, still has many mysteries. Scientists are now receiving data from a solar probe sent to study solar wind and other phenomena. Reporter: Danielle Venton
December 12, 2019
Bipartisan Bill Would Offer Legal Status To Farmworkers Nationwide A bill that would legalize hundreds of thousands of undocumented farmworkers, including many in California, and reform the country’s temporary agricultural guest worker program,  has passed the U.S. House of Representatives with bipartisan support.  Reporter: Alex Hall California May Add Cannabis To List Of Substances Unsafe During Pregnancy A state panel of scientists has voted to put cannabis smoke and its active ingredient THC on the list of substances deemed to be a risk for pregnant women. This comes nearly 2 years after California legalized recreational marijuana.  Reporter: Peter Jon Schuler Three California Cities Have Three Different Ideas To Address Homelessness In Los Angeles County, the city of Lancaster wants to ban people from handing out food to homeless people in public spaces. Oakland's city council president is floating the idea of using a cruise ship to house people at Oakland’s port, and San Francisco just opened an RV parking lot with electricity, showers, and other services.  California's Rape Crisis Centers Receive Virtually No State Funding After a one-time increase in funding. California's rape crisis centers are once again left with practically no state support.  Reporter: Scott Soriano, Capitol Weekly
December 11, 2019
Federal Bill Would Legalize Many Undocumented Farmworkers The U.S. House of Representatives is set to vote today on a bill that would legalize many undocumented farmworkers. That could make a big difference in California, where most agricultural workers lack legal status. Reporter: Alex Hall, KQED North American Trade Deal Could Help Calif. Farmers The White House and the Democrats in the House have reached a deal updating the North American Free Trade Agreement between the U.S., Mexico and Canada. Farmers hope the deal will help them. Guest: Rep. Doug LaMalfa SF's African American Leaders Demand Reparations African American leaders in San Francisco are calling on the city’s supervisors to use money from taxes on hotels and legal marijuana sales to pay reparations to black residents. Reporter: Kate Wolffe, KQED Calling Out Misleading Personal Injury Ads on FaceBook Many LGBTQ and public health groups say ads targeting pharmaceutical companies that make anti-HIV medications are misleading. Now the groups have sent an open letter to Facebook demanding the ads be removed. Reporter: Rachael Myrow, KQED Doctors at U.S.-Mexico Border Want to Vaccinate Migrants A group of doctors from across the country are spending the week in San Diego demanding that they be allowed to vaccinate detained migrants against the flu. Reporter: Max Rivlin-Nadler, KPBS When Tenants Grow Pot, Sacramento Homeowners Face Six-Figure Fines From Malibu to Redding, California cities have a problem with illegal marijuana cultivation in residential neighborhoods. To fight it they often fine landlords. Sacramento is fining anyone growing more than the six plants allowed for personal use under state law. All told, the city has issued about $94 million dollars since 2017. Now, Sacramento landlords are fighting back, claiming they’re innocent because their tenants grew pot without their knowledge. Reporter: Scott Rodd, Capital Public Radio
December 11, 2019
Federal Bill Would Legalize Many Undocumented Farmworkers The U.S. House of Representatives is set to vote today on a bill that would legalize many undocumented farmworkers. That could make a big difference in California, where most agricultural workers lack legal status. Reporter: Alex Hall, KQED North American Trade Deal Could Help Calif. Farmers The White House and the Democrats in the House have reached a deal updating the North American Free Trade Agreement between the U.S., Mexico and Canada. Farmers hope the deal will help them. Guest: Rep. Doug LaMalfa Farmers Pledge to Prevent More E. Coli Outbreaks Farmers in the Salinas Valley are pledging to do better after the latest E. coli outbreak. Federal health investigators don't know exactly what caused it but they do know that at least eight people have been sickened across three states. Reporter: Erika Mahoney, KAZU Doctors at U.S.-Mexico Border Want to Vaccinate Migrants A group of doctors from across the country are spending the week in San Diego demanding that they be allowed to vaccinate detained migrants against the flu. Reporter: Max Rivlin-Nadler, KPBS
December 10, 2019
Yet Another E. coli Warning for Salinas Lettuce The U.S. Centers for Disease Control has issued another E-Coli warning to consumers and retailers. The message is: stay away from packages of chopped salads produced by the Salinas-based company Fresh Express. State's Feud with Trump Admin. Means Budget Surplus Is Smaller California is preparing for a much smaller budget surplus next year because of its ongoing feud with the Trump administration over its Medicaid program. CBP: Fewer People Crossing Border Illegally New numbers from the U.S. Customs and Border Protection show the number of people caught crossing the southwest border illegally last month dropped by a third compared to a year earlier. Claremont Church's Nativity Scene Puts the Holy Family in a Cage A Claremont church’s nativity scene featuring the Holy Family in cages has stirred some controversy.  Reporter: Erick Galindo, KPCC Old-School, Bricks-and-Mortar Shops Face an Online Shopping Season According to a report by Pricewaterhouse Coopers for the first time consumers will do more of their holiday shopping online instead of physical stores. Saul Gonzalez, co-host of The California Report, visited a unique shop in downtown San Francisco to talk about how small independent brick and mortar retailers in California keep up. Guest: Jonathan Levin, Cable Car Clothiers
December 9, 2019
Wildfire Victims Worry PG&E Payouts Won't Be Enough On Friday it was announced that Pacific Gas and Electric,  the state's largest utility reached a multi-billion dollar settlement with attorneys for wildfire victims in California. They’re victims who lost loved ones, homes, and businesses to fires caused by the utility in recent years. Holidays Cause Anxiety For People With Eating Disorders Food and sweets are everywhere during the holiday season, but indulging isn’t fun for everyone. Holiday cuisine like roasted hams, pies, and cookies can trigger panic for people with eating disorders. Reporter: Lesley McClurg
December 6, 2019
Native American College With Tribal Focus Makes A Difference For Native Students A College In Palm Desert, created for Native Americans two years ago doubled its enrollment this year. Administrators say its appeal is due in part to its mission to provide educational opportunities that aren’t usually available to Native Americans. Reporter: Adolfo Guzman-Lopez, KPCC Instagram To Discontinue Public "Likes" For Some Users A couple of weeks ago Instagram said that they were going to discontinue public like counts on some of their accounts. The move is aimed to reduce the competitive aspect of the platform among young people. Guest: Carly Severn
December 5, 2019
Former Google Workers Claim They Were Fired For Standing Up For Human Rights Four former Google employees who fired last week say they’ll ask the National Labor Relations Board to investigate why. They say they were fired for organizing for better working conditions and standing up for civil rights. Reporter: Alice Woelfle Mandatory Overtime, Twelve Hour Shifts, And High Rates Of Injury For Amazon Warehouse Workers Every time you order something from Amazon, it's sorted by workers at an Amazon warehouse. The holidays are Amazon’s busiest time of year which means it’s also one of the most exhausting and dangerous for workers processing all those packages. Reporter: Will Evans, Reveal  
December 4, 2019
Duncan Hunter Pleads Guilty to Corruption Charge Congressman Duncan Hunter dodged reporters as he entered a courthouse to plead guilty to conspiracy. Faced with 60 counts, which for the past year he insisted were part of a “witch hunt,” he ultimately admitted to a single charge use at least $150,000 in campaign cash on personal expenses. What's Next for Kamala Harris? Senator Kamala Harris is giving up on her run for the Democratic presidential nomination. As recently as this summer, the money was pouring into her campaign after some impressive debate performances launched her into the top tier. But the campaign contributions ran dry, and she's headed back to the Senate. Guest: Scott Shafer, KQED Politics Editor First Latina To Take the Gavel on LA's City Council For the first time in history, a Latina will be in charge of the Los Angeles City Council, shaping policy that impacts the lives of around 4 million city residents. Reporter: Libby Denkmann, KPCC
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