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July 3, 2020
Have you ever considered starting a learning design career in higher education? Have you wondered if academia is the best fit for your preferences and interests? In this episode, Peter Shea and I discuss the roles that instructional designers play in higher education and what it's like to work in that environment. Peter manages an excellent Facebook community called Instructional Designers in Education, which has close to 7000 members. He is also an instructional designer, teacher, editor, and writer. Peter is an advocate for immersive learning experiences and for using learning analytics to inform learning design. He has spent several years as director of professional development in higher education and is co-editor of a forthcoming book on technology for learning and assessment. Peter also created another social media group in LinkedIn for people interested in data-informed learning design. See the links at the end for access. WE DISCUSS: * The role that instructional designers play in higher education * How working in higher ed differs from L&D in the workplace * Importance of faculty relationships * Differences between working in community colleges versus universities * Salary comparison * Benefits and disadvantages of working in higher ed * Using simulations for learning * Importance of mixing it up with IDs in other fields * How learning designers in higher ed can improve the field * Effects of remote learning on higher education * Learning analytics in higher education * How to find a job in higher education * How to prepare for the learning designer role TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found] RATE: Rate this podcast in Apple Podcasts TIME: 39 minutes RESOURCES MENTIONED: * Instructional Designers in Education (Facebook Group) * Data Informed Data Design (LinkedIn Group) * Chronicle Vitae (Job listings) * HigherEd Jobs (Job listings) * Michael Feldstein Resilience Network Get the latest articles, resources and freebies once a month plus my free eBook, Writing for Instructional Design. SEND EBOOK NOW
May 14, 2020
Accessible design and inclusive design are one of those things that once you learn about it, you can’t turn back. That's because changing your design habits is not only easy, it has a big impact on the lives of others and it benefits everyone. Today I’m speaking with Brian Dusablon, from Learning Ninjas. Brian works in many roles, helping clients apply existing and emerging technologies to support process and business improvement. As an advocate, he creates and teaches about inclusive, accessible user experiences and improving the lives of others. He’s the person many turn to, to get answers to their accessibility questions. In this episode, Brian provides easily actionable steps you can take to start an inclusive design practice. WE DISCUSS: * Difference between accessibility and inclusive design * Limits of accessibility guidelines * Methods for adopting an inclusive design mindset at the start of a project * Creating your own standards for inclusive design * Lenses of accessibility to analyze for eLearning: animation; audio and video; color; controls; readability * How to design inclusively for animations * How to design inclusively for typical graphics and the challenges of infographics * How to design inclusively for audio and video * Looking at the lens of time in terms of inclusive design * How to get started quickly * What to do if management is resistant to inclusive design * Biggest challenges regarding accessibility in the learning industry DOWNLOAD THE TRANSCRIPT: As usual, elves are working on it right now. TIME: 33 Minutes RESOURCES: * Learning Ninjas Accessibility Resources * The Accessibility Primer * Five Golden Rules of Alt-text * 12 Lenses of Accessibility * Wave Extension for Chrome and Firefox: In the podcast, Brian mentions reviewing HTML code output from Rise. You can do some checking with the WAVE plugin or use the “inspect element” function in your browser to see Rise output (or other tools) after publishing. To get to Inspect, right-click on a web page in Chrome. * Diverse Photos * Hemingway Editor
February 25, 2020
I am hoping that this will be the decade of maturation for the learning industry. Part of that maturation will involve disseminating and applying relevant research findings from the learning sciences. In this episode, I speak with Mirjam Neelen about the conclusions that learning researchers agree on, how to identify learning myths and how to incorporate evidence-informed learning strategies into your work. Mirjam is a coauthor of Evidence-Informed Learning Design: Creating training to improve performance. She is a learning advisory manager with over 10 years of industry experience. In her current role, she leads learning experience design processes across Accenture's various business entities globally. WE DISCUSS: * Difference between evidence-informed and evidence-based learning desig * Disciplines that feed into the learning sciences * Learning principles that cognitive researchers agree on * Value of reflection in learning * Differentiating between learning myths and research-based findings * Why we should beware of applying neuroscience findings to learning experience design * Effective strategies for direct instruction and feedback * Effective strategies for worked examples, which are underused in workplace training RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TIME: 26 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Someone is working on that now RESOURCES: * Evidence-Informed Learning Design (book) by Mirjam Neelen and Paul A. Kirschner * 3-Star Learning Experiences: (blog) Articles written by Mirjam Neelen and Paul A. Kirschner * ELC 045: The Art and Science of Practice and Feedback with Patti Shank * Measured Approach or Magical Elixir? How to Tell Good Science from Bad by Willingham Get the latest articles, resources and freebies once a month plus my free eBook, Writing for Instructional Design. SEND EBOOK NOW
December 30, 2019
Vince Han says that part of the learning journey is a conversation. One way to have that conversation and to meet the needs of the modern workplace is with a chatbot programmed to engage people in interactive activities that support learning and behavior change. In this episode, I speak with Vince about the power of chatbots for learning and support and the ins and out of designing the conversational interface. Vince is the founder and CEO of mobile coach, a chatbot platform for interactive engagement intended to positively influence learning and behavior change. Vince is an industry thought-leader in learning technologies and often speaks about artificial intelligence and chatbot technology. QUESTIONS ANSWERED: * What is a chatbot and how does it work? * What platforms can chatbots work with? * Can many of the platforms enable chatbots to learn (or be predictive) from audience responses? * How can chatbots be used to support performance in the work flow? * What can a chatbot bring to different phases of the learning journey? * What are examples of how organizations are using chatbots as part of the learning journey? * How can you use a chatbot in a blended learning program? * Can chatbots deliver training? * Is there any research yet on how chatbots affect learning? * Why do chatbots appear to increase engagement? * How does the target audience respond to using a chatbot? * What guidelines do you suggest for those who are designing a conversational interface? * Does designing a chatbot conversation require continuous improvement? * When using a chatbot, can you always see how people responded? * What is the importance of tone in chatbot design? * What does the future hold for chatbots? What are the trends? TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found] RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TIME: 28 minutes RESOURCES: * Chatbot Articles * Mobile Coach * Vince Han's Bio * Connect with Vince on LinkedIn and Twitter (@vincehan) Get the latest articles, resources and freebies once a month plus my free eBook, Writing for Instructional Design. SEND EBOOK NOW
November 10, 2019
How can you translate the in-person learning experience to an effective virtual classroom? This episode answers that question. Author and virtual training expert, Cindy Huggett, clarifies the misconceptions people have about the virtual classroom experience. She provides fantastic tips and techniques for facilitating an effective virtual learning event. You'll hear how to increase the interactivity and collaboration of the virtual classroom so that participants get involved. Cindy has been providing virtual learning solutions since the early 2000s, and is a recognized industry expert in teaching training professionals how to design and deliver interactive online classes. She is the author of several books, including the updated Virtual Training Basics and Virtual Training Tools and Templates. WE DISCUSS: * The difference between virtual training and webinars or webcasts * Why virtual students need their own device to participate * Three components of a successful virtual training event * How to prepare participants to be ready to learn * The biggest challenges of turning in-person training into a virtual classroom * What's changed in virtual training in the past decade * When to use participant web cams * Effective activities for a smaller number of participants * How to efficiently break people into groups in online training. * A brilliant start-up activity that breaks isolation * Managing participant use of audio * Which virtual classroom platform to choose * Examples of creative use of the virtual classroom * What’s in store for the future of virtual training. TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found] RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TIME: 38 minutes RESOURCES: * Cindy's Virtual Training Resources (books, webcasts, recordings, checklists, etc.) * Cindy's Publications * Tips for Presenting Yourself on WebCam * Virtual Training Basics by Cindy Huggett * Virtual Training Tools and Templates by Cindy Huggett * Microsoft HoloLens Get the latest articles, resources and freebies once a month plus my free eBook, Writing for Instructional Design. SEND EBOOK NOW
October 2, 2019
Microlearning is a thing and it's coming to a workplace near you. Of all the trends and terms of the last few years, perhaps none have been as poorly defined as microlearning. Karl Kapp, PhD, professor at Bloomsburg University, and Robyn Defelice, PhD, Director of Training at Revolve Solutions, decided enough was enough. They set out to write the definitive book on microlearning, Microlearning Short and Sweet. In this episode, they clarify misunderstandings about microlearning and provide best practices for planning, designing and implementing it—whatever it is. WE DISCUSS: * Why they wrote a book about microlearning * How they define microlearning (spoiler alert: it's not about time) * Examples of successful microlearning projects * How cognitive science supports microlearning * Use cases for microlearning * When NOT to use microlearning * Best practices for designing microlearning * Elvis TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found] RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TIME: 32 minutes RELATED RESOURCES: * Microlearning Short and Sweet by Karl Kapp and Robyn Defelice * Dishing Design Robyn Defelice's website * Karl Kapp's website * Elevate * Presentr * Primer Get the latest articles, resources and freebies once a month plus my free eBook, Writing for Instructional Design. SEND EBOOK NOW
June 5, 2019
Do you ever find yourself wishing you could come up with more creative ideas? Do you think of creativity is a gift bestowed on the lucky few? The guest for this episode, Brad Hokanson, will help you see that creativity is fluid and that it is a skill that can be developed. Brad is a professor and author, who teaches students how to develop their creative skills. He is a professor in Graphic Design at the University of Minnesota. Brad has a diverse academic record, including degrees in art, architecture and urban design, and received his PhD in Instructional Technology. He teaches in the area of creative problem solving and has published research in the fields of creativity and educational technology. His most recent book on the subject is Developing Creative Thinking Skills. He won his college's award for outstanding teaching in 2002 and 2008. WE DISCUSS: * An accepted definition of creativity * Increasing importance of creativity * Characteristics of a creative solution * Traits of the creative person * Metrics for measuring creativity * Why we come up with more creative solutions over time * Evidence that creativity can be improved * How to improve creativity * Divergent and convergent thinking * Combinatory thinking * Exercises to improve creativity * Stories of people who improved their creativity * A brainstorming technique: the idea relay * Stretching the solution space TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found] RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TIME: 33 minutes RESOURCES: * Developing Creative Thinking Skills by Brad Hokanson * Investment Theory of Creativity, article by Sternberger * Cambridge Handbook of Creativity, book by Sternberger * [Download not found] (brainstorming technique) Get the latest articles, resources and freebies once a month plus my free eBook, Writing for Instructional Design. SEND EBOOK NOW
April 23, 2019
If you are a learning professional or if you think of yourself as a product designer, one of the most important aspects of your work is understanding how people learn. Yet, many of us in the field lack a basic understanding of the key theories that explain human cognitive architecture and how to best leverage it for learning. It’s up to us to learn about it, spread the word and advocate for learners. That’s why I couldn’t be more excited to present a conversation I had with John Sweller, PhD, the person who developed cognitive load theory. John Sweller is an Emeritus Professor in the school of Education at the University of South Wales Sydney. He is an educational psychologist, best known for formulating cognitive load theory, which uses our knowledge of evolutionary psychology and human cognitive architecture as a basis for instructional design. Cognitive load theory is one of the most highly cited educational psychology theories. WE DISCUSS: * Characteristics of working memory and long-term memory * Importance of tying novel information to previously learned information * What causes cognitive load * Cognitive load considerations in user interface and visual design * Examples of taxing cognitive resources in instruction: redundancy effect, split attention effect, transient information effect * Intrinsic and extrinsic cognitive load * Isolating elements as an instructional strategy * Why guided instruction is superior for novices learning difficult material TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found] RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TIME: 37 minutes RESOURCES: You may need access to an academic library to read many of Sweller's publications. * Select publications by John Sweller * Book chapters by John Sweller Cognitive Load Articles on The eLearning Coach * 8 Principles on Cognitive Load and Collaborative Learning * Six Strategies You May Not Be Using To Reduce Cognitive Load * What is cognitive load? Get the latest articles, resources and freebies once a month plus my free eBook, Writing for Instructional Design. SEND EBOOK NOW
March 21, 2019
Are we all a little over-confident about the graphics we use to promote learning? Today’s guest, Elizabeth Boling, has done research that demonstrates we are. We assume that people can understand our intent in the instructional graphics that we or others produce. Elizabeth has done a lot of thinking and research in this area. She is a professor of instructional systems technology in the School of Education at Indiana University. Her resume includes 10 years of design practice, five of which were at Apple. She was editor-in chief at Tech Trends and is founding editor and current editor-in-chief of International Journal of Designs for Learning,  WE DISCUSS: * How people interpret instructional illustrations versus what the designer intended * What affects decoding of a graphical element * Visual literacy * How text augments visuals * Why schools should be teaching students how to create graphics * Decoding icons and information graphics * Importance of testing graphics on users * Some criteria for when graphics are needed to enhance learning * When graphics may detract from learning TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found] RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TIME: 30 minutes RESOURCES: * elizabethboling.com * International Journal of Designs for Learning * Studio Teaching in Higher Education * Instructional Illustrations: Intended Meanings and Learner Interpretations * List of Elizabeth's research papers * Yes, Icons Need Labels (related to the conversation) Get the latest articles, resources and freebies once a month plus my free eBook, Writing for Instructional Design. SEND EBOOK NOW
January 7, 2019
As learning experience designers, we can borrow techniques for innovation from product design and game design. That's why I was eager to chat with Amy Jo Kim, who has written an excellent book, Game Thinking: Innovate smarter & drive deep engagement with design techniques from hit games. "Game thinking is the art and science of engaging your customers on the path to mastery." In this conversation, Amy Jo presents ideas for applying  Game Thinking to Learning Experience Design. Specifically, she focuses on ways to bring long-term engagement to new products. Amy Jo started her career as a neuroscientist and eventually became a social game designer, community architect, and startup coach. She works with startups & game studios worldwide to help them accelerate innovation and create compelling experiences. WE DISCUSS: * Five steps of Game Thinking: hypothesize, empathize, design, play test, and implement * The double-diamond approach to design: problem space and solution space * Extrinsic and intrinsic motivation * What it means to play test * The Minimum Valuable Product concept * How to find super fans to get good results from testing in a short amount of time * Three pillars of game thinking: super-fans, path to mastery and learning loop * How to overcome obstacles through leadership * Emotional journey to mastery * Important qualities of early adopters * Favorite method for unlocking creativity TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found] RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TIME: 42 minutes RESOURCES: * Amy Jo's website: amyjokim.com * Book: Game Thinking: Innovate smarter & drive deep engagement with design techniques from hit games by Amy Jo Kim  * Find out about programs: Game Thinking Master Class * Podcast: Getting2Alpha * Double-diamond approach * Four Ways to Improve Your Strategic Thinking Skills Find out where you can get 110 free assets and tools for Learning Experience Designers. GET FREEBIES LIST Get the latest articles, resources and good finds once a month plus this freebies list.
November 14, 2018
If you are a new or experienced manager or an aspiring manager, this episode is for you. If you want to develop leadership skills, you'll find some relevant conversation here too. And if you want to better understand your manager, you may benefit from this episode. In this session, I speak with Katy Tynan about the misconceptions people have about management, the best ways to manage a creative team, the relationship between leadership and management and much more. Katy is an author, speaker and internationally-recognized expert on how work is evolving and how the employer/employee relationship is changing. She works as a talent strategy and organizational development consultant with a focus on helping individuals, businesses and educational institutions adapt to the evolving landscape of work. Her book, How Did I Not See This Coming, is written as fiction. Readers follow a new manager, Julie, who is less than competent. Along the way, you learn the lessons of how to become a more effective manager. You can find find her book at ATD Press and Amazon. WE DISCUSS: * The situation new managers find themselves in * Good intentions are quite enough * The core skill of an effective manager * Reflections on leadership and its role in management * Common misconceptions of new managers * Six practices that demotivate creative work * Mistakes new and experienced managers make * How to write a team vision * How to facilitate a growth mindset * How to discover what motivates team members * Ways to develop leadership skills RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TIME: 37 minutes TRANSCRIPT: [Download not found] LINKS TO RESOURCES DISCUSSED IN THIS EPISODE: * Katy's Website: www.katytynan.com * How Did I Not See This Coming by Katy Tynan available at Amazon and ATD Press * Start with Why by Simon Sinek * Theresa Amabile (creativity at work research) * Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by Daniel Pink * Stephen Covey books * Servant Leadership in Action by Ken Blanchard * Lynda.com * SkillSoft * Harvard ManageMentor Get the latest articles, resources and freebies once a month plus my free eBook, Writing for Instructional Design. SEND EBOOK NOW
October 10, 2018
Life happens. You never know when you might need to show an eLearning portfolio. If you don't have one yet, this episode will demonstrate how valuable a portfolio can be. If you've been resisting, listen to get inspired with ideas. And if you already have one, Mike Taylor's insights will prepare you to refine your current version. Mike Taylor works, speaks, facilitates and writes at the intersection of learning, design, technology and social media. He works at Mindset Digital, where he develops videos and online courses to educate learners on social media and online best practices. Mike is big on sharing and he’s the first person I thought of when I was creating the ideas for this episode. He has made presentations about eLearning portfolios and has a great curated site on the topic too. See Resources below for links. WE DISCUSS: * Why everyone should have an eLearning portfolio * Wide variety of types of portfolios * The competitive advantages of the work portfolio * The case study portfolio * What to do if your work is proprietary * How extensive a portfolio should be * The technical side of portfolios: platforms for the front page and hosting options * The Desperation Option (if you need something in an hour or two) * Technical obstacles you can easily overcome * Creating a good user experience for viewers * Organizing, categorizing and tagging for meaning * Overcoming obstacles RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TIME: 30 minutes TRANSCRIPT : Download the [Download not found] in PDF format or see the full text below. LINKS TO RESOURCES: * Mike Taylor's Website * Mike's Curated eLearning Portfolio Site * Sign up for Mike's newsletter Portfolio Front Page Platforms 1. Easiest * LinkedIn * About Me * Mural 2. Portfolio Platforms * Behance * Krop * Carbon-made * Dribble 3. Website Builders * Wix * Square Space * Wordpress.com (hosted on their site) or Wordpress.org (find your own host) Hosting Your Files * Articulate Tempshare and Articulate 360 Review (these are for Articulate products and only a temporary option) *
July 11, 2018
Are you inadvertently believing learning myths? Are your best practices based on hearsay? In this episode, I speak with Clark Quinn, Ph.D., about many of the myths, superstitions and misconceptions he explains in his book Millennials, Goldfish and Other Training Misconceptions. Clark is a prolific author and a recognized leader in learning technology strategy. He helps organizations take advantage of information systems to meet learning, knowledge, and performance needs. He's been involved in the design, development, and evaluation of a wide variety of educational technology for over 30 years. WE DISCUSS: * Prevalence of learning myths and misconceptions * Problems in our industry caused by learning misinformation * Do generations think differently? * Do humans have a shorter attention span than goldfish? * Are data from fMRIs reliable? * Is there such a thing as learning styles? * Has the human brain evolved from continuous use of technology? * Are mistakes useful for learning? * Is knowledge required as a prerequisite for learning a skill? * Do click to reveal interactions engage learners? * Should learning be easy or difficult? * Is the 70-20-10 framework effective? * Is there a good way to identify the credibility of a claim? RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TIME: 38 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download [Download not found] RESOURCES AND LINKS: * Millenials, Goldfish and Other Training Misconceptions on Amazon and ATD Books * Learnlet's (Clark's blog) * Clark's Amazon Page (lots 'o books!) * Four Component Instructional Design Model by van Merriënboer * BadAss: Making Users Awesome by Kathy Sierra (see my short review) * Vgotsky's Zone of Proximal Development (an explanation of Vgotsky's theories) * Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi's Ted Talk: Flow, the secret to happiness * 70-20-10 Institute Get the latest articles, resources and freebies once a month plus my free eBook, Writing for Instructional Design. SEND EBOOK NOW
June 2, 2018
Mark Shatz, Ph.D., teaches educational psychology, statistics and a course on writing humor at the University of Ohio, Zanesville. He's a coauthor of the book, Comedy Writing Secrets. Research shows that appropriate humor in the instructional setting can set the stage for a positive attitude toward learning. It can enhance interest, build rapport and heighten attention. In this conversation, Mark explains techniques for speaking and writing with humor. WE DISCUSS: * What funny is * How to "find funny" * Why it's easy to be funny in instructional settings * The psychology of why people laugh * How humor can benefit learning * Whether placement of humor affects learning * The pitfalls of using humor in learning * The best style for writing humor * Beginner mistakes * Techniques for making situations funny * The structure of stand-up comedy jokes * Finding your writer's voice RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TIME: 32 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found] RESOURCE LINKS: * Comedy Writing Secrets: The Best-Selling Guide to Writing Funny and Getting Paid for It, 3rd Edition by Mark Shatz and Mel Helitzer * Enhancing Online Instruction with Humor by Loschiavo and Shatz (Download article on request) * Does Humor Enhance Learning? * Teaching Humor: An Interview with Dr. Mark Shatz Get the latest articles, resources and freebies once a month plus my free eBook, Writing for Instructional Design. SEND EBOOK NOW
April 9, 2018
If you think of the learning management system (LMS) as an antiquated platform, then listen to this conversation with John Leh. He has a fascinating perspective on the evolution of LMSs and the value they can add to an organization. John is the CEO and Lead Analyst at Talented Learning, a learning management research and consulting firm devoted to helping organizations of all sizes choose and use LMS solutions and related technologies for their unique business needs. His company has reviewed scores of learning management systems and he shares his insights on this podcast. WE DISCUSS: * What a Learning Management System is * Number of LMSs in the market * Flavors of Learning Management Systems * The hottest category of LMS in the market today * Determining the use cases prior to purchasing an LMS * Criteria for reviewing an LMS * How LMSs are evolving and changing * Consolidating your credentials using Mozilla backpack, Credly and others * LMS platforms and xAPI integration (or not) * LMS and Customer Relationship Management (CRM) integration * LMS platforms with authoring tool integration * Costs of using a free open source LMS * How not to define your requirements and a better way to do it * How to measure the success of your LMS implementation RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TIME: 30 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found] RESOURCE LINKS: * Talented Learning * The Talented Learning Show * Talented Learning LMS Directory * More on LMS and CRM Integration Get the latest articles, resources and freebies once a month plus my free eBook, Writing for Instructional Design. SEND EBOOK NOW
February 23, 2018
If you are frustrated with the limited models available for instructional design, then you’ll be interested in this conversation with Cathy Moore. She is the creator of Action Mapping and author of Map It, a model of training design that focuses on improving workplace performance. Cathy is a training designer, teacher, speaker and author. Her advice and designs have been used by many organizations and the U.S. government. She also teaches online workshops on scenario design. Cathy has made it her mission to save the world from boring instruction. In this conversation, we discuss her book, Map It!. We also talk about the changing role of learning experience designers, measuring the effects of training, how to tell whether training is the solution to a performance problem, tracking practice activities (or not), creating prototypes and much more. WE DISCUSS: * Providing effective solutions that go beyond training * Action Mapping process * Using business metrics to measure performance improvement and behavior change * How action mapping has evolved and changed over the years * Criteria to determine whether a performance problem can be solved with training * Action mapping as a method for practicing instructional design * When to use and not use action mapping * How to choose the tasks that require practice activities * Advantages of branching scenarios * Technical implementation of practice activities * Prototyping guidelines RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TIME: 24 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found] RESOURCES: * Map It by Cathy Moore * Cathy's website * Is training the answer? Use this flowchart * Will Action Mapping work for my project? (interactive flowchart) * Action Mapping * Cathy's Scenario Design Course * Balsamiq (mockup tool) * Twine (for telling branching stories) Get the latest articles, resources and freebies once a month plus my free eBook, Writing for Instructional Design. SEND EBOOK NOW
January 15, 2018
I've been producing The eLearning Coach podcast since January of 2013, and I've been learning and growing along with you. When I look back through the podcasts I see that there are many older ones that you may not have heard or certainly, you've forgotten. So I thought that every so often, I would pull out a few gems for you from years past and put them together into a Best of Show. I hope you enjoy this one. WE DISCUSS This episode includes segments from: * ELC 001: Joe Fournier on finding a job in instructional design * ELC 002: Jane Bozarth on how to use social media for learning * ELC 004: Lisa Cron on how to write awesome stories * ELC 007: Susan Weinshenck on working memory, schemas and mental models * ELC 010: Alberto Cairo on the purpose of visuals and information graphics RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TIME: 28 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * Spot Learning: Joe Fournier's blog * Social Media for Trainers by Jane Bozarth * Wired for Story by Lisa Cron * 100 Things Every Designer Needs to Know About People and Neuro Web Design by Susan Weinschenk * The Functional Art by Alberto Cairo Get the latest articles, resources and freebies once a month plus my free eBook, Writing for Instructional Design. SEND EBOOK NOW
November 27, 2017
Practice and feedback. Seems easy, right? Actually, designing the appropriate type of practice and providing effective feedback requires a lot of know-how. Patti Shank, PhD., has been studying the research on this topic and wrote a book about it. In this conversation, she shares some of the key takeaways that she has gleaned from the research. Patti has more than 20 years of experience with performance and learning analysis, instructional design, learning sciences,information design and usability principles. She is deeply engaged in researching what works best for workplace learning and training outcomes. WE DISCUSS: * Difference between deep learning and superficial learning * Importance of practice and feedback * Why humans need a lot of practice to learn skills and retain knowledge * Types of practice that promote learning transfer (fidelity, consequences, variability, social interaction) * Types of practice that promote remembering (context, realism, reference) * Formative feedback versus summative feedback * Feedback for novices versus those with experience * Value of effortful learning RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TIME: 24 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download the transcript: [Download not found] RESOURCES: * Practice and Feedback for Deeper Learning by Patti Shank * Patti Shank (Patti's website) Get the latest articles, resources and freebies once a month plus my free eBook, Writing for Instructional Design. SEND EBOOK NOW
October 9, 2017
If you use audio in your learning materials, then you'll be fascinated by what these voice actors reveal about their work and the scripts they are given. What do voice actors, voice artists and narrators need in a script? What can we provide to ensure we support them to do their best. How do we reduce the corrections cycle? These questions and more are answered in this episode by three excellent and experienced voice actors. WE DISCUSS: * Education and training needed to become a voice artist * Characteristics of good scripts * Script formatting that makes it easier for a voice actor to perform * What to provide prior to recording * Discussing rates and timelines * Common mistakes to avoid * What a voice over job for eLearning entails * Pronunciation keys * *How to make a dying sound for a video game RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TIME: 31 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * Kim Handysides * George Washington III, VO Evolution * Rebecca Haugh, Love That Rebecca * If You Can Talk, You Can Write (Book) * World Voices * Voices.com *Extremely important Get the latest articles, resources and freebies once a month plus 12 Scripting Tips. SEND THE SCRIPTING TIPS
August 13, 2017
The future is now. I’m talking about the fact that software we use every day is based on artificial intelligence algorithms and the trend is growing. How will you be using AI in the future? Will you benefit from automation?  Will you design AI software for learning? Will you be training AI agents? In this session, I interview Chris Noessel, about a fascinating category of artificial intelligence known as agentive technology. Chris is the author of Designing Agentive Technology: AI That Works for People and coauthor of Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons from Science Fiction. He is also a UX professional, where he has designed products, services, and strategy for a variety of domains, including health, financial, and consumer. Chris currently works with IBM, as Global Design Practice Lead for the Travel and Transportation sector. WE DISCUSS: * Artificial intelligence categories: General AI, Super AI, Narrow AI * The Singularity * Machine learning versus deep learning * Differences between agentive AI and assistive narrow AI * How online services are using AI * Benefits of agentive technology * How agentive technology will affect your job * We step through the ux design process of agentive software (setup, touchpoints,monitoring) RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TIME: 40 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES AND MENTIONS: * Chris Noessel's web page * Designing Agentive Technology: AI That Works for People by Chris Noessel (Amazon or Rosenfeld Media) * Make It So: Interaction Design Lessons from Science Fiction by Nathan Shedroff and Chris Noessel * Sci-fi Interfaces (Interaction design lessons from sci-fi) * Roomba Vacuum (Narrow AI machine) * Person of Interest (AI Show) * Near Future Laboratory * Society of Mind Get the latest articles, resources and freebies once a month plus my free eBook, Writing for Instructional Design. SEND EBOOK NOW
July 6, 2017
Digital curation is emerging as a sound strategy in learning experience design to replace or enhance courses. It's also a strategy for building community and a way to support informal learning and a backchannel. In this episode, I speak with Allison Anderson and Ben Betts, co-authors and editors of Ready, Set, Curate: 8 Learning Experts Tell You How. Allison is a Chief Learning Strategist at Learning EcoStrategies. She has more than 20 years of experience as a learning leader in both higher education and the private sector. Ben leads the team at his startup, HT2 Labs, an R&D company for learning and performance technology. Ben is a thought-leader in Learning Technology with more than 15 years of experience and a doctorate where he studied the impact of gamification on adult social learning. WE DISCUSS: * Defining digital curation * Difference between aggregation and curation * Why curation is a viable solution for workplace learning * Examples of how digital curation can be used: Imagination, Instruction, Integration and Implementation * How curation is supported by instructional science * Curation and community—the social aspect of curation * Curation strategies for learning experience design * Effective curation process * Determining valid sources to curate * Curation copyright and licensing issues * Common mistakes new curators make * Curation tools TIME: 31 minutes RATE: Review this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * Ready, Set, Curate: 8 Learning Experts Tell You How by Allison Anderson and Ben Betts * HT2 Labs where Ben is the CEO * Scoop.it: curation tool * Medium: writing platform * AndersPink: automated curation tool * Curatr: Ht2 Labs curation tool that incorporates social learning and gamification * Degreed: micro-credentialing platform * PathGather: enterprise learning platform * Review of Ready, Set, Curate Get the latest articles, resources and freebies once a month plus my free eBook, Writing for Instructional Design. SEND EBOOK NOW
June 8, 2017
The possibilities in our field are changing rapidly. Do you ever want to take a moment to get a bird's eye view of the current landscape and where things are headed? That’s what we do in this episode, which is a conversation with Donald Taylor. We also talk about the keys to having a successful technology implementation, which is the theme of his book, Learning Technologies in the Workplace. Donald Taylor is a veteran of the learning, skills and human capital industries, with experience at every level from delivery to chairman of the board. Donald is the chair of the Learning and Performance Institute, Chairman of the Learning Technologies Conference, international speaker, independent consultant and author. He also published the L&D Global Sentiment Survey. See links at the end. WE DISCUSS: * Difficulties explaining learning in the workplace * The schoolroom assumption * Drivers of change in organizations * What employees expect as solutions to performance problems * Providing immediate solutions versus building long-term capabilities * How L&D can benefit from user-generated content * New mindset required by L&D for future * Effective enterprise-wide learning technology implementations * Future of learning technology and L&D roles * Impact of artificial intelligence as it predicts behaviors at work TIME: 34 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * Donald's Website * Learning and Performance Institute * Learning Technologies in the Workplace: How to Successfully Implement Learning Technologies in Organizations (Book) * L&D Global Sentiment Survey Get the latest articles, resources and freebies once a month plus my free eBook, Writing for Instructional Design. SEND EBOOK NOW
April 20, 2017
Why aren't design critiques a standard part of our design process? Why aren't critiques visualized as an iterative loop in every design model diagram? Design critiques, whether formal or informal, are an important tool to have in your toolbox. When they focus on the goal of meeting your objectives (rather than personal likes and dislikes), they may provide some of the most valuable feedback you can get. Design critiques can be for anything you choose: user interface, instructional design, visual design, game design, story design, etc. In this episode, I speak with Adam Connor, co-author of Discussing Design. Adam is VP of Organizational Design at Mad*Pow, where he designs and develops products, services, and strategies aimed at tackling challenges in healthcare, finance, and education. WE DISCUSS: * Critiques defined * Value of critiques to the design and the team * What a design critique looks like * What form or level of detail the design can be in * How do start implementing critiques in your organization or team * Formal versus informal critiques * Common mistakes that newbies make * Frameworks and types of feedback for design critiques * Best way to receive feedback * What to do when a critique goes downhill * Recommended roles at a critique * Ideal number of people to participate * Bad habits at critiques TIME: 34 Minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * Discussing Design by Adam Connor and Adam Irizary * Adam's Website * Adam's Writings Get the latest articles, resources and freebies once a month plus my free eBook, Writing for Instructional Design. SEND EBOOK NOW
March 16, 2017
How well do you think through your assessment strategy? Is a test something that you throw together at the end? Don't miss out on the valuable data you can derive from a well-designed test. In this episode, you'll find guidance and advice from professor, author and psychometrician, Michael Rodriguez, PhD. Michael is the Campbell Leadership Chair in Education and Human Development and associate professor in the University of Minnesota Department of Educational Psychology. He teaches courses in educational measurement and assessment. His research is on understanding the psychometric properties of tests, and developing ways to maximize test accessibility to diverse test takers, including those with cognitive impairments or limited English proficiency. WHAT WE DISCUSS: * Definition of psychometrics * When it's best to write test items in the instructional design cycle * The role of validity in test development * Important guidelines for making sure that test items contribute to validity * Things to avoid when writing test items * A new type of test format: Multiple True/False * Whether true/talse questions provide a good measure of student learning * Some ways to write effective true/false questions * How to plan for test design * Whether Bloom's Taxonomy is based on research * Ways to test higher-order thinking * How to choose an item format * Common errors that novice test developers make * Benefits of instructional design * The focus of new academic research on assessment TIME: 45 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * More about Dr. Rodriguez * Developing and Validating Test Items: Textbook written by Thomas Haladyna and Michael Rodriguez Get smarter about online learning with articles, tips and resources delivered to your Inbox once a month. (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//forms.aweber.com/form/66/775275066.js"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, "script", "aweber-wjs-v9wwc4idc"));
February 1, 2017
Do you want to design learning games, but you're not sure where to get help? I suggest listening to the learning game guru, Karl Kapp. He is an Instructional Technology Professor at Bloomsburg University and an author of many books on learning games (see Resources below). In addition to teaching and writing, Karl  speaks and consults on topics related to the convergence of learning, manufacturing, and e-technology. He helps organizations transition into learning organizations through the effective application of technology. WE DISCUSS: * Latest trends in games and gamification * Differences and similarities between games and gamification * The evil trifecta of gamification * Game elements that are highly motivating * Advantages of games for learning * Commercial gamification, game tools and learning game developers * Criteria for selecting a learning game vendor * Philosophical approach to making your courses game-like * Are "fake games" okay? * Deconstructing engagement * Learning research on games: criteria for a well-designed game * Common novice mistakes in game design * Sensible uses of VR TIME: 37 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * Karl's Website: Lots of great information. Be sure to check out Kapp Notes * Zombie Sales Apocalypse: Game designed by Karl * Play to Learn: New book by Sharon Boller and Karl Kapp * The Gamification of Learning and Instruction: by Karl Kapp * The Gamification of Learning and Instruction Fieldbook: by Karl Kapp, Lucas Blair and Rich Mesch Gamification Tools Mentioned: * Axonify * Badgeville * Bunchball * Desire 2 Learn * GamEffective * Growth Engineering * Knowledge Guru * Insight Hub * mLevel * Open Badges (Listen to an interview about badges) * Poll Everywhere * QStream *
November 28, 2016
Agile principles call for iterative and incremental development that improves as a project advances. It's an effective way to make project corrections as requirements change. In this session, I speak with Megan Torrance about Agile project management for eLearning design and development. Megan is the chief energy officer of TorranceLearning, an eLearning design and development firm. She has spent over two decades knee-deep in projects involving change management, instructional design, consulting, and systems deployment. She and the TorranceLearning team have developed the LLAMA project management approach, blending Agile with instructional design. WE DISCUSS: * Where Agile started and what it's about * How Agile is different than Addie or the waterfall method * Six key Agile practices that apply to eLearning project management * How to improve through iteration and making incremental advancements * Determining what to include in the early iterations * The meaning of LLAMA and the model * Reputation of the eLearning industry * How to run an Agile project adapted for LX design * Convincing clients that an iterative approach results in the best solution * Tool recommendations for Agile project management TIME: 30 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * TorranceLearning * Agile for eLearning * 6 Things Agile Teams Do Well * Reconciling ADDIE and Agile * Adopting an Agile approach in your organization * 12 Principles Behind the Agile Manifesto * Cathy Moore's Action Mapping * Leaving ADDIE for SAM (book) by Michael Allen: An iterative approach to design and development * User Stories for Agile TOOLS MENTIONED: * DominKnow Flow * Trello: Project management app * Slack: Team communication app * One Note: Note-taking app * Card Colors for Trello: Chrome extension * Scrum for Trello or
October 6, 2016
Does learning with technology rewire our brains? How can we leverage technology to enhance attention and memory? If you ever ask yourself these questions, you'll enjoy this conversation with Michelle D. Miller, author of Minds Online: Teaching Effectively with Technology. Michelle is Director of the First Year Learning Initiative and Professor of Psychology at Northern Arizona University. WE DISCUSS: * How Minds Online contributes to the body of knowledge about online teaching. * Thinking in new ways about comparing classroom learning with online learning. * The benefits of blended learning. * Whether certain ideas about the brain in the popular culture are myths. * Strategies for improving learner attention. * A way to conceptualize working memory and long-term memory. * Strategies for avoiding excessive cognitive load. * How to use technology to enhance memory. * Why irrelevant or disconnected information won't be remembered and what to do about it. * Ways to promote learning transfer in online instruction. * Key research findings on using multimedia in online learning. TIME: 32 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * Michelle's book: Mind's Online: Teaching Effectively with Technology * Michelle's blog: Minds-Online Blog * Michelle on Twitter: @mdmillerphd * Michelle on Facebook * Articles and essays: * At The Conversation, read Michelle Miller’s look at how millennials—a population frequently lauded as “digital natives” and for their facility with multitasking—really deal with technology in the classroom * On KTEP (El Paso, TX)’s Focus on Campus, listen to Michelle Miller discuss helpful techniques from cognitive psychology that both students and teachers can use to improve learning and memory * At Inside Higher Ed, read Miller’s essay on the module she designed to educate students about the limits of attention—and just how much they miss when they choose to multitask * At the Chronicle of Higher Education, read more about Miller’s research into how online tools and strategies can increase access to education and improve learning experiences Get smarter about online learning with articles, tips and resources delivered to your Inbox once a month. (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.
August 17, 2016
In this episode of The eLearning Coach Podcast, I speak with Kevin Thorn about a hot topic in our field—how to write storyboards. Kevin teaches storyboarding classes and is an award-winning eLearning designer with over 30 years of experience in the training industry, with the last decade in eLearning. His experience in instructional design, storyboarding, eLearning development, LMS implementation, illustration, graphic design, storytelling, cartooning, and comics makes him unique in the industry. Kevin is the "chief nuggethead" and owner of NuggetHead Studioz. WE DISCUSS: * What a storyboard is * Kevin's storyboarding process (the storyboard workbook) * Benefits of using storyboards * The design hats of the learning experience designer * Who writes the storyboard * Problems with designing and developing at the same time * The moving parts in an assessment * Depicting global access and isolated access * Approaches to visual storyboarding * Value of thumbnail sketches TIME: 26 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * Nuggethead Studioz (Kevin's website) * Storyboard Depot (Storyboard templates including one from Kevin) * Storyboard and Project Documents by Kevin (on eLearning Heroes) * Storyboards for eLearning (article) * 8 Tips for Preparing Audio Scripts for Recording (article) * The Art of Writing Great Voiceover Scripts (article) Get The eLearning Coach in your Inbox once a month, with articles, tips and free resources and tools. (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//forms.aweber.com/form/66/775275066.js"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, "script", "aweber-wjs-v9wwc4idc"));
July 14, 2016
If we want to facilitate behavior, performance and attitude changes, than we need to spend more time and effort thinking about the psychology of the audience members we are designing for. In this session, I speak with Victor Yocco, PhD, about some of the psychological principles that impact design. Victor is the Research Director at Intuitive Company. He works with clients in diverse fields applying principles of psychology and communication to improving products. He is also the author of, Design for the Mind: Seven psychological principles of persuasive design. You can get a 39% discount when purchasing this book from the publisher. Use the discount code yoccomupad and this link: https://www.manning.com/books/design-for-the-mind. Enjoy the conversation! WE DISCUSS: * Relationship between psychology and design * Value of interviews, observations and co-designing * Psychology of changing attitudes * Psychology of decision making * Primacy effect * Extrinsic and intrinsic motivation * Influence and persuasion * Influence through visual design * Social influence and learning (Social Identity Theory) TIME: 39 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * Victor's website: http://www.victoryocco.com/ * Victor's book: https://www.manning.com/books/design-for-the-mind  (use code yoccomupad for 39% discount) * Academic journals and papers by Victor Yocco: http://www.victoryocco.com/academic/ //
June 8, 2016
How often do we look at the actions, thoughts and feelings of learners over time to better understand what they experience while they are working, using a learning management system, taking a course or seeking support and help? In this episode, I interview Jim Kalbach, author of Mapping Experiences: A Complete Guide to Creating Value through Journeys, Blueprints, and Diagrams. Jim entered the design world as an information architect and has worked in various design-related consulting roles for large companies, such as eBay, Audi, SONY, Elsevier Science, LexisNexis, and Citrix. He is currently Head of Customer Success at MURAL.  WE DISCUSS: * What a user experience map is and what it can include * How to categorize and diagram actions, thoughts and feelings * How to identify a user's feelings during an experience * How experience maps foster important conversations * How Jim got interested in experience maps * Aligning experiences to the organization * Choosing the right map for the problem * Using constraints to understand a problem: point of view, scope and focus * Five phase process for mapping * Maps for learning experience design * Tools for creating user experience maps * Mental model maps TIME: 32 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * Mapping Experiences by Jim Kalbach * Experiencing Information: Jim's website * MURAL: Cool collaboration tool and where Jim works * Touchpoint Dashboard: Customer journey management software Get smarter about online learning with articles, tips and resources delivered to your Inbox once a month. (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//forms.aweber.com/form/66/775275066.js"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, "script", "aweber-wjs-v9wwc4idc"));
April 28, 2016
Roddy Roediger, PhD, is a psychology researcher, distinguished professor and Dean of Academic Planning at Washington University in St. Louis. He is the co-author of Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning and has edited or co-edited ten other books. His research has centered on human learning and memory and he has published about 300 articles and chapters, mostly on various aspects of cognitive processes involved in remembering. His recent research has focused on illusions of memory (how we sometimes remember events differently from the way they actually occurred); effects of testing memory (how retrieving events from memory can change their representation, often making them more likely to be retrieved in the future). WE DISCUSS: * How cognitive psychology defines learning * Common misconceptions about learning * How re-reading and review doesn't work for retention * Why retrieval practice works * How higher order thinking skills integrate with retrieval practice * Retrieval practice and learning transfer * Simulations * Study groups * Interleaved and spaced practice versus massed practice * Memory consolidation * Benefits of making learning difficult * Neuroplasticity TIME: 35 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * Roddy Roediger's Washington University page * Retrieval Practice Website * Make It Stick on Amazon * Make It Stick Website * SuperMemo * Knowledge Factor Get smarter about online learning with articles, tips and resources delivered to your Inbox once a month. (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//forms.aweber.com/form/66/775275066.js"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, "script", "aweber-wjs-v9wwc4idc"));
March 7, 2016
Will Thalheimer, PhD, cares about improving the products that learning professionals create. He has spent years exploring the best ways to conduct course evaluations and has compiled his findings in an excellent book, Performance-focused Smile Sheets: A Radical Rethinking of a Dangerous Art Form. Will has worked in the learning-and-performance field for 30 years—as a trainer, instructional designer, simulation architect, project manager, business product line manager, speaker, writer, researcher, and consultant. Forming Work-Learning Research in 1998 to build bridges between research and practical wisdom, Will works to provide the workplace learning-and-performance field with research-based information, simultaneously helping clients create and deploy radically more effective learning interventions. WE DISCUSS: * Importance of measurement and evaluation for instructional designers * Correlation between smile sheets and learning * When to get feedback during the instructional design process * Different ways to get feedback * Smile sheets defined * Problems with traditional smile sheets * Solutions to the problems with traditional smile sheets * Types of questions and responses that work and don't work * Four pillars of learning effectiveness * The kinds of questions that allow us to get feedback on learning effectiveness * The deeper message that smile sheets send * Creating evaluation questions for low reading levels * Delayed smile sheets * Wow! TIME: 24 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found] RESOURCES: * Performance-focused Smile Sheets: A Radical Rethinking of a Dangerous Art Form by Will Thalheimer * Will at Work Learning: Will's blog * Smile Sheets: Book Website * Work-Learning Research: Will's Consultancy * Submit a smile sheet question to get evaluated by Will Leave your comments about the podcast below. Get smarter about online learning with articles, tips and resources delivered to your Inbox once a month. (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//forms.aweber.com/form/66/775275066.js"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, "script", "aweber-wjs-v9wwc4idc"));
February 5, 2016
Learning experience designers handle all types of content for a wide variety of uses, from formal courses to performance support aids. Organizing this information for learning and/or quick access is crucial. If you determine the purpose of the content, how it will be used, and the nature of the content itself, you can choose the most effective strategy to meet the needs of the audience. This podcast explains different strategies so that your choices can be intentional. If you have other strategies for organizing content, please share them in the Comments section below. I DISCUSS: * Purpose of intentionally choosing an organizational strategy * 12 different strategies for organizing content TIME: 11 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * 10 Ways to Organize Instructional Content * Ways to Organize Information * Chunking Information for Instructional Design * The Information Design Handbook by O'Grady & O'Grady * Design for Information (relevant to visual information) by Meirelles * Information Architecture: For the Web and Beyond by Rosenfeld, Morville & Arango Get smarter about online learning with articles, tips and resources delivered to your Inbox once a month. (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//forms.aweber.com/form/66/775275066.js"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, "script", "aweber-wjs-v9wwc4idc"));
December 17, 2015
Marcia Conner has spent a lot of time exploring how social learning benefits organizations and individuals. She is the co-author of The New Social Learning: Connect, Collaborate, Work (the second edition was recently published), author of Learn More Now and co-author of Creating a Learning Culture.  Marcia spent twenty years working as a "corporate fixer," helping organizations reinvent the cultural practices and policies that prevent people from doing what needs to be done–individually and collaboratively. She currently is focused on helping entrepreneurs who want to do world-changing work. She describes herself as an impactrepeneur. WE DISCUSS: * Social learning as a shift in how we do work * Why social learning is not a training tool * Impact of technology on learning with others * How learning socially is vital to who we are * How connecting and collaborating has changed in the past several years * What an effective learning culture looks like * Why measure social learning and how to measure it * How YOU can foster a learning culture TIME: 23 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * Marcia Conner: Marcia's website * Marcia on Twitter: @marciamarcia * The New Social Learning 2nd edition * Interview with Jay Cross How do you benefit from connecting, sharing and collaborating at work? Share in the Comments section below. Get smarter about online learning with articles, tips and resources delivered to your Inbox once a month. (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//forms.aweber.com/form/66/775275066.js"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, "script", "aweber-wjs-v9wwc4idc"));
November 5, 2015
You may think that accessible designs are only for people with disabilities. Actually, accessible designs are for diverse groups, such as people who are limited to using low bandwidth, people who may not be fluent in the language, as well as people who are using a mobile phone to access the Internet. In this conversation with accessibility and usability specialists Sarah Horton and Whitney Quesenbery, they explain how all users win when we design for accessibility first. And how Universal Design is the path that provides the best access to digital products for the widest audience. Sarah is a consultant for strategic planning for websites and web applications. She also does accessibility and usability reviews. Sarah has written several books on topics from web design to accessibility for the web. Whitney brings user research insights to designing products where people matter. She has written two other books on user experience and is co-director of the non-profit Center for Civic Design, working with election officials on usability and design of ballots and other election materials. Use Code AWFE for 20% off when you buy from Rosenfeld Media WE DISCUSS: * The story behind A Web for Everyone * Why accessibility should be part of design and not just a legal mandate * Difference between accessibility and universal design * Spectrum of accessibility strategies * Common problems people have with web accessibility * Designing with an "accessibility first" strategy * How usability testing makes designs more effective * Web standards and standards for authoring tools and authoring tool vendors * Guidelines for visual presentation of content TIME: 35 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes RESOURCES AND LINKS: * A Web for Everyone by Sarah Horton and Whitney Quesenbery (Use Code AWFE for 20% off when you buy from Rosenfeld Media) * Sarah Horton Design (Sarah's website) * WQUsability (Whitney's website) * Web Accessibility Initiatives (WAI) Easy Checks * Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) * Authoring Tool Accessibility Guidelines (ATAG) Get smart about online learning with The eLearning Coach Newsletter delivered to your Inbox every month. Ideas-articles-freebies-resources.
September 9, 2015
When designing or developing an online course or app, how much effort do you put into the small interactive details? In this episode, I chat with Dan Saffer about the surprising  importance of those little details. Dan is Creative Director of new products at Jawbone, where he designs next generation products and services for wearables and consumer electronics. He is a well-known interaction designer and the author of four books on design, including Microinteractions: Designing with Details. WE DISCUSS: * Difference between microinteractions and regular interactions * Look and Feel and what it really means * A model of microinteractions: trigger, rules, feedback, loops or modes * How to put a little personality into your feedback * Little interactions that bring pleasure and/or pain * Why context and user goals are key to good design * How to know whether your design is creating a positive experience * Tools for designing microinteractions * Creating a style guide for microinteraction styles TIME: 25 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes. TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * O Danny Boy: Dan Saffer's Website. Be sure to check out his books and articles. * Microinteractions: Designing with Details by Dan Saffer * Little Big Details: a community collection of microinteractions * Design A Day: some designs Prototyping Tools * Invision * Pixate * Proteo Get smart about online learning with The eLearning Coach Newsletter delivered to your Inbox every month. Ideas-articles-freebies-resources.
August 3, 2015
Are you curious about the future of instructional technology and learning? Abbie Brown, Ph.D., and Tim Green, Ph.D., make it a point to follow the trends and issues in our field—from the latest technologies to new research. Together, they produce the Trends & Issues in Instructional Design, Educational Technology and Learning Sciences Podcast. Abbie Brown is Professor at East Carolina University, teaching in the Instructional Technology Program. He specializes in instructional media production and online learning environment design, and provides consultation and workshops. Dr. Brown was Editor-in-Chief of the journal, TechTrends from 2009 to 2012. Tim Green is a professor of educational technology and teacher educator at California State University, Fullerton. For five years he served as the Director of Distance Education at CSUF. He is the author of numerous articles and books, as well as a presenter, on the integration of educational technology, instructional design, and online distance education (see Resources below). He consults with and provides professional development to schools and districts. WE DISCUSS: * Difference between Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality * Mixed reality * Google Glass for the workplace (and use cases) * Microsoft's HoloLens * Future of wearables as a learning technology * Learning trends associated with mobile devices * How 3D printers can expand cognitive capabilities * Trends in Learning Management Systems * Trends in games and gamification * Research in brain activity * Mr. Spock TIME: 33 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * The Ed Tech Doctor: Tim Green's website * @edtechdoctor (Tim Green on Twitter) * Abbie Brown's Website * @abbiebrown (Abbie Brown on Twitter) * Podcast: Trends & Issues in Instructional Design, Educational Technology and Learning Sciences Podcast * Flipboard: Trends & Issues in Instructional Design, Educational Technology and Learning Sciences * HoloLens * Minecraft HoloLens Demo * Essentials of Instructional Design (Brown & Green) Get smart about online learning with The eLearning Coach Newsletter delivered to your Inbox every month. Ideas-articles-freebies-resources.
July 7, 2015
Today's learning environment is wide open. We can choose from a multitude of technologies, modalities and techniques. But what's the best way to design in this new environment? In this episode, I chat with Jennifer Hofmann, who offers lots of tips and insights for designing blended learning. Jennifer is the president of InSync Training, LLC, a consulting firm that specializes in the design and delivery of virtual and blended learning.  She was featured in Forbes Most Powerful Women issue and has led InSync Training to the Inc. 5000 as the 10th Fastest Growing Education Company in the U.S. in 2013. She is also the author of several books, including The Synchronous Trainer's Survival Guide, Live and Online!, and How to Design for the Live Online Classroom (see links below). Follow Jennifer on Twitter @InSyncJennifer. WE DISCUSS: * Where we went wrong with blended learning * Evolution of blended learning * Why the blended learning concept is growing * Challenges of designing with blended learning * What makes a learning experience authentic * Four-step process for creating blended learning * Common mistakes to avoid when designing blended learning * Tips for people who are designing a program for the first time TIME: 30 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES AND LINKS: * InSync Training (Jennifer's company) * Body Language In The Bandwidth (Jennifer's Blog) * White Paper: Blended Learning Instructional Design * The Synchronous Trainer's Survival Guide: Facilitating Successful Live and Online Courses, Meetings, and Events * Live and Online: Tips, Techniques, and Ready-to-Use Activities for the Virtual Classroom Get smart about online learning with The eLearning Coach Newsletter delivered to your Inbox every month. Ideas-articles-freebies-resources.
April 30, 2015
If you want to know something about authoring tools, Joe Ganci is usually the person to ask. eLearning Joe has a computer science background and has been designing and developing eLearning for many years. He is also adept at explaining and reviewing eLearning development tools and has a regular column (Toolkit) in Learning Solutions Magazine. In this session, we discuss the strengths of many authoring tools. This is important, because as Joe points out, designers should select the best tool for creating the most effective and engaging learning experience, rather than attaching to an application as though it is a political party. WE DISCUSS: * A brief history of authoring tools * Difference between authoring tools and programming languages * Types of authoring tools * Strengths of some of the most popular tools * When IDers shortchange the learner * Cloud-based authoring tools * Responsive design and authoring tools * Tips for designing mobile learning * Joe's mystical predictions for the future of authoring tools and learning TIME: 34 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes RESOURCES AND LINKS: * eLearning Joe: Joe Ganci's website * Toolkit: Articles by Joe Ganci in Learning Solutions Magazine eLearning Development Tools Discussed: * Articulate Studio * Adobe Presenter * iSpring * Articulate Storyline * Adobe Captivate * Trivantis Lectora * BranchTrack * DomiKNOW Claro * Skilitics Interact * Zebra Zapps * Adapt * GoMo Get smart about eLearning with The eLearning Coach delivered to your Inbox every month. Ideas-articles-freebies-resources.
March 20, 2015
In this conversation with Jane Bozarth, PhD., we talk about the benefits of showing your work to the individual, one's colleagues and the organization. Jane relates many 'show your work' stories that will inspire you to adopt this mindset. By the end, you'll understand why showing your work is one of the most effective strategies for working and living. Jane Bozarth is the eLearning Coordinator for the North Carolina Office of State Personnel. She is the author of many books, including Show Your Work. Jane also serves as one of the moderators of the popular weekly Twitter event #lrnchat, WE DISCUSS: * How 'Show Your Work' turned into a book * Difference between tacit and explicit knowledge * Benefits to employees, colleagues and the organization of showing one's work * Dealing with privacy and proprietary concerns * How to think about tools for showing your work * Metacognition: how showing your work can make you more aware of your mental processes * Why experts are a dying breed * What motivates people to share and show what they know * Common mistakes in showing your work (spoiler alert: don't expect much here) * How an organization can encourage staff to show their work TIME: 38 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES AND LINKS: * Show Your Work by Jane Bozarth * Bozarth Zone: Jane's blog * Learning Solutions: Articles by Jane Bozarth * Your First Day: Pinterest page to help new employees where Jane works * #lrnchat on Thursdays @8:30pm Get smart about eLearning with The eLearning Coach delivered to your Inbox every month. Ideas-articles-freebies-resources.
February 20, 2015
Digital badges are bound to become increasingly important in the years to come. If you have a vague understanding of digital badges and are wondering how learners can benefit from them, you'll want to listen to this episode. I interview Jon Aleckson, PhD, and Andy Hicken, PhD, from Web Courseworks. They have a good sense of what's going on in the digital badge space right now. You'll learn how digital badges will be used to validate learning, what needs to be done to further adoption and the current state of the technology. WE DISCUSS: * What micro credentials are * Where digital badges fit in * Why micro credentials are needed * The psychology underlying digital badges * What gives a digital bad or micro credential meaning * Standards that are emerging * Use cases when digital badges have value * What will drive adoption of digital badges * Mozilla Open Badges * Interoperability of xAPI and Open Badges TIME: 29 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES AND LINKS: * Managing eLearning (the blog at Web Courseworks) * Web Courseworks (where Jon and Andy work) * ASTM International Standard: New Practice for Achievement-based Digital Badges * Mozilla Open Badges * Mozilla Backpack * xAPI * The Limitless Possibilities of xAPI (podcast) Get smart about eLearning with The eLearning Coach delivered to your Inbox every month. Ideas-articles-freebies-resources.
January 21, 2015
We know that mobile learning is more than eLearning on a phone, but what is it? Are there easy ways to help employees use mobile to enhance their work experience? These and other topics are discussed in this interview with Chad Udell, managing director at Float Mobile Learning. Chad designs, develops and manages interactive Web and mobile projects. He is also the author of two books about mobile learning: Mastering Mobile Learning (co-authored with Gary Woodill) and Learning Everywhere. If you are looking for ways to improve performance and efficiency in the workplace, this podcast is a must-listen! WE DISCUSS: * A better definition for mobile learning * Five types of mobile learning: convert, capture, communication, computation, contextual * Why mobile can solve problems before mistakes occur * Biggest mistakes people make with mLearning * Tools for implementing mobile experiences * Some inexpensive ways to implement mobile * Understanding responsive design * Future of mobile learning in the workplace TIME: 31 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * Float Mobile Learning * Mastering Mobile Learning by Chad Udell and Gary Woodill * Learning Everywhere by Chad Udell * Designing mLearning by Clark Quinn * Bootstrap * Foundation * Angular.js Share how you are using mobile learning experiences at your workplace in the Comments section below. Keep up with your field! Get The eLearning Coach delivered to your Inbox every month, with ideas, articles, freebies and resources.
November 13, 2014
Whether you fell into instructional design by accident or purposefully sought out a career designing learning experiences, you'll enjoy this conversation with Cammy Bean. Cammy is the author of The Accidental Instructional Designer and Vice President of Learning Design at Kineo. Having taught many workshops, Cammy is in tune with the needs and questions that people have about designing effective learning experiences. She writes and speaks about ways to avoid the dreaded type of eLearning that puts audiences to sleep. WE DISCUSS: * Who is an accidental instructional designer * How to work with subject matter experts (SMEs) * Three approaches or categories of learning design based on the course goal * Strategies to use for each approach: information awareness, building skills and knowledge and problem-solving * Using the advertising model, AIDA, for sustaining attention * How to avoid clicky-clicky-bling-bling * Tips for writing learning content * Future of workplace learning TIME: 27 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * The Accidental Instructional Designer: Learning Design for a Digital Age by Cammy Bean * Cammy Bean's Learning Visions: Cammy's website * Papers, resources and guides from Kineo Don't miss a thing! Get The eLearning Coach delivered to your Inbox every month, with ideas, articles, freebies and resources.
September 25, 2014
In an age when information changes quickly and skills are being reinvented, a formal course may not be the appropriate solution. When knowledge is more of a flow than a static entity, you may prefer to design a learning environment. This is  a collection of resources and activities that are curated for a specific learning need. In this episode, I speak with Catherine Lombardozzi, author of Learning Environments by Design. Catherine has developed a framework for designing learning environments that should be of great interest to those who design learning experiences. Catherine is founder of Learning 4 Learning Professionals, and author of the forthcoming book, Learning Environments by Design (preview available free here). In her consulting work, Catherine focuses on the professional development of designers, facilitators, learning consultants, learning leaders, and faculty and she advises people who are looking to create comprehensive learning and development strategies in many different contexts. Catherine holds a doctoral degree in Human and Organizational Learning from George Washington University. WE DISCUSS: * Difference between learning environment and learning ecosystem * Why we need a new paradigm for learning development * How Web 2.0 influences learning * Four types of learning environments: Blended Learning Hub, Knowledge Exchange, Learning Resource Portal, Collaboratory * How to assess the most effective learning environment for a need and an audience * Situations when designing a learning environment is most effective * Intrinsic motivation and self-directed learning * Research supporting learning environments * Five processes for creating learning environments * How a learning environment has to be designed and maintained over time * How to get started designing learning environments * What's in store for the future of learning professionals TIME: 32 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * Learning 4 Learning Professionals (Catherine's Website) * Related Book Resources * John Seeley Brown * John Hagel Don't miss a thing! Get The eLearning Coach delivered to your Inbox every month, with ideas, articles, freebies and resources.
August 22, 2014
If you've been thinking about designing learning games, but haven't quite figured out how to frame the experience, you will enjoy this interview with John Ferrera. John is the creative director of Megazoid games and author of the book Playful Design. He shares his knowledge and experience in this in-depth conversation. John has been thinking about games, playing games and designing games for a long time. His nutrition education game, Fitter Critters, was a top prizewinner in the Apps for Healthy Kids contest, an initiative of Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move!” campaign. John’s background is in user experience design, and he’s been designing games that achieve great things in the real world since 2001. You can follow John on Twitter at @playfuldesign. WE DISCUSS: * Why people get pleasure and satisfaction from playing games * Characteristics of games * Looking at games through a user experience perspective: avoiding boredom and frustration in games * Unique qualities of games that make them a good medium for learning * Research on the effectiveness of games in learning and who is doing the research * Learning through failure * Guidelines for designing persuasive games that change minds * How to create game prototypes * Tools for game development TIME: 44 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES MENTIONED: * Unity Programming Language for Games * Hopscotch for iPad * Tiny Tap * Institute of Play * Glass Lab Get The eLearning Coach delivered to your Inbox every month, with ideas, articles, freebies and resources.
May 20, 2014
Are you hearing buzz about the Tin Can API and wondering what it is and what it can do? Do you want to spread your wings and take advantage of modern technologies? In this episode, Megan Bowe demystifies the Tin Can API (a.k.a. Experience API or xAPI) and discusses its potential for advancing the learning environment. Megan's knack for explaining the Experience API helped it become the most successful and most quickly adopted learning technology innovation in the last thirty years. She worked hand-in-hand with innovators and early adopters implementing the specification at Rustici Software, teaciing others and designing products, early content and application prototypes.  In many ways, Megan invented much of what the emerging community of practice advocates around this learning technology. She continues the charge today at Making Better. WE DISCUSS: * How SCORM started and it's limitations * What the xAPI offers to designers and learners * What an API is and what it does * The beauty of the Learning Record Store (LRS) * Systems that can create and use xAPI data * Using xAPI for tracking and sharing your own learning or for creating a portfolio * Innovating with Learning Locker * Use cases for xAPI (getting insights in so different ways) * How to combine Tin Can and Open Badges * The big picture view * Getting started with xAPI TIME: 33 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found] RESOURCES: * Making Better (Megan's website) * xAPI Overview * IEEE Working Group on xAPI * Research Report: The Experience API * Learning Locker * Curatr * Rustici Software SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS: Share your thoughts about xAPI in Comments below. Get The eLearning Coach delivered to your Inbox every month, with ideas, articles, freebies and resources.
April 10, 2014
If you're looking for strategies to make learning more engaging and effective, you'll want to listen to this interview with Dorian Peters. She is the author of Interface Design for Learning: Design Strategies for Learning Experiences and Positive Computing. Dorian is an eLearning interface design evangelist. She currently directs online strategy for the University of Sydney’s Faculty of Education. She is also a founder of the E-learning Network of Australasia. WE DISCUSS: * A broad definition of user interface * How to reduce the extraneous cognitive load in your graphics * Strategies that support effective and efficient visual perception * Advantages of social learning * Strategies to support social learning and community building through interface design * Surprising findings about emotions and learning * Why video is such a good medium for learning * Strategies to make video most effective TIME: 36 Minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found] RESOURCES MENTIONED: * Interface Design for Learning by Dorian Peters * Dorian Peters' Website * The Design of Future Educational Interfaces by Sharon Oviatt: * The New Social Learning by Tony Bingham and Marcia Conner * Project Noah: An example of widespread social learning and collaboration Get The eLearning Coach delivered to your Inbox every month, with ideas, articles, freebies and resources.
March 12, 2014
Collecting, analyzing and using big data has become embedded in how governments, corporations and institutions work. It's now an expected, though often resented, part of our culture. How can this trend benefit the training and education industry? Is there a way we can use big data to make smarter decisions? In this episode, I interview Ellen Wagner Ph.D., who helps us understand big data and how it can be leveraged to improve learning and development as well as higher education. Ellen is Partner and Senior Analyst for Sage Road Solutions. She is responsible for learning industry intelligence, briefings, enablement and executive solutions and services. In this capacity, Ellen represents the interests of the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education while serving as the Executive Director of their Cooperative for Educational Technologies (WCET). She is the former senior director of worldwide eLearning at Adobe Systems and was a tenured professor and chair of the educational technology program at the University of Northern Colorado.  WE DISCUSS: * What big data is and isn't * Why the learning industry should be paying attention to big data * Decisions we can we make with big data * Problems we can prevent * Using data to get follow and get ahead of the trends * Why we push back on measurement and evaluation of our work * The benefits of being (partially) data driven * Patterns that people are finding in learning analytics * How to cooperate and share de-identified data * Difference between inferential and predictive statistics * Experience API TIME: 30 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * eLearning Roadtrip (Ellen's blog) * Sage Road Solutions (Ellen's company) * Data Changes Everything: Delivering on the Promise of Learning Analytics in Higher Education by Ellen Wagner * The Big Data Landscape by Ellen Wagner * 10 Things You Need to Know about Big Data * The Surprising Predictive Power of Analytics Get The eLearning Coach delivered to your Inbox every month, with ideas, articles, freebies and resources.
January 15, 2014
Subscribe in iTunes The eLearning industry isn't improving as quickly as many practitioners would like. One way to move things forward is to explore how effective we are at designing learning experiences. With an honest look at our designs, we then know what direction to take to improve. This isn't always easy to do in the world of eLearning. But Julie Dirksen has some solutions. Julie Dirksen is the author of Design For How People Learn. She's an experienced independent consultant and instructional designer with more than 15 years of experience creating highly interactive e-learning experiences. She also has a background in user experience design, game-based learning and behavior change. WE DISCUSS: * Why eLearning design isn't improving quickly * Deliberate practice in eLearning design * Why the feedback loop doesn't get closed * Ways to close the feedback loop * How to do user testing * Why getting an outside perspective is required TIME: 22 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes RESOURCES: * Julie's website: Usable Learning * Design for How People Learn by Julie Dirksen * My review of Design for How People Learn * Gorilla HCI by Jakob Neilsen * Don't Make Me Think by Steve Krug * Rocket Surgery Made Easy by Steve Krug COMMENT! How do you close the feedback loop? Ideas? Comment below. Get The eLearning Coach delivered to your Inbox every month, with ideas, articles, freebies and resources.
November 25, 2013
Subscribe in iTunes. Do you feel uncomfortable interviewing users? Does your organization think it's best to avoid discussions with learners? Would you like to improve your interviewing skills? This interview with Steve Portigal will be valuable for anyone who answers yes to these questions. Steve is the author of Interviewing Users: How to Uncover Compelling Insights. He has years of experience helping people learn to interview and to better understand their users. In this episode, Steve shares his best practices and advice, making it relevant for user experience and instructional design. WE DISCUSS: * The impact that interviewing has on the product and the designer * The places in a design/development cycle where user input is needed * Skills needed to become good at interviewing users * What you'll need to unlearn * The best attitude to have while interviewing * How to think about and manage "reticence" * Techniques to reinforce learning about the interviewee * How to plan for an interview * Tips for asking good questions * Ways to record interviews  TIME: 42 Minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes RESOURCES * Interviewing Users: How to Uncover Compelling Insights * Portigal Consulting * @steveportigal Get The eLearning Coach delivered to your Inbox every few weeks, with ideas, articles, freebies and resources.
October 16, 2013
Subscribe or rate in iTunes. An effective content curator pays attention to the big picture to watch patterns and trends. He or she also focuses on the small details to satisfy the needs of the audience. Gaining competence in content curation is a Learning and Development skill for the 21st century. In this podcast, I chat with Robin Good, new media communication expert, and the publisher of MasterNewMedia.org, a web magazine for communication professionals. Based in Rome, Italy, there's no one better to enrich our understanding of what's involved in curation. Robin shares expert techniques, best practices and tools for curation, which can be used to replace or supplement courses and a way to help employees keep up-to-date in their fields. He can be found and reached on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIN and YouTube as “RobinGood." WE DISCUSS: * What curation means * Steps involved in expert curation * Examples of collaborated curation * Guidelines for collaborating on content curation with a team * Future of content curation * Criteria for choosing tools (there are over 600 curation tools now!) * Preservation of content * Curation tool recommendations TIME: 45 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES Robin's Curation Sites: * Content curation * Online real-time collaboration and conferencing tools * Marketing strategy * Presentation tools * Video publishing * Web publishing tools MasterNewMedia.org Examples of Curation Collaboration by Teams: * Smarter Planet * CMO (Chief Marketing Officer) Unusual and Well-done Curation: * Maria Popova's Brain Pickings Content Curation Tool Lists: * Robin's Content Curation Tools Supermap * Robin's Content Curation Tools by Category on Zeef Curation Tools for Content: * Storify * Scoop.It * Flipboard Curation Tools for Images: * Pinterest *
September 17, 2013
Do you experience frustrating challenges when designing eLearning? This episode looks at some of the common issues designers and developers face. Tom Kuhlmann is Vice President of Community at Articulate, one of the most popular authoring tools and communities in the eLearning industry. In this conversation with Tom, we discuss some of the biggest challenges instructional designers face and how to overcome them. We also take a look at some of the things that could be improved in our industry. Subscribe in iTunes. WE DISCUSS * Difference between learning experiences and performance support * Whether a PDF download can substitute for a compliance course * Is a Click Next course ever appropriate? * The downside of Learning Management Systems * What motivates adult learners * The "throw 'em in the pool" approach to instructional design * How people use ADDIE in the real world * Treatment of employees versus consultants * Industry practices that need improvement * Ways to increase retention * Trends in eLearning * News about Articulate products TIME: 42 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * The Rapid E-Learning Blog * Articulate Community (You don't need to own Articulate products to discuss eLearning issues) Get The eLearning Coach delivered to your Inbox once a month, with ideas, articles, freebies and resources.
August 27, 2013
Information graphics are a tool for understanding so they have great potential for improving learning. But how do you start designing infographics? In this podcast, Alberto Cairo, visual journalist, educator and author walks listeners through the process. He also talks about the cognitive aspects of visualization. Alberto Cairo is a Professor of the Professional Practice at the School of Communication of the University of Miami. He teaches classes on visual storytelling and infographics. He is the author of the book The Functional Art: An Introduction to Information Graphics and Visualization. Alberto has been a professor at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, and director of infographics and multimedia at El Mundo, one of the main national newspapers in Spain, and at Época, the second news magazine in Brazil. His website is thefunctionalart.com, and he can be found on Twitter as @albertocairo. WE DISCUSS: * Real purpose of infographics * Importance of anticipating what your audience will do * Listening to science when it comes to perception * Types of graphic to use for specific goals * Questions to ask yourself when planning an infographic * Infographics are to be read and used * Problem with using pie charts for making comparisons * Alberto's infographic planning process * Principles for designing interactions * Tools and resources for understanding and creating infographics TIME: 46 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES Books Alberto recommends: * Functional Art * The Design of Everyday Things * Visual Language For Designers * Information Dashboard Design * Show Me the Numbers * The Elements of Graphing Data * Creating More Effective Graphs Tools for Creating Interactive Graphics (no programing required) * iChart * Data Wrapper * Google Fusion Tables * Tableau Public Interactive Graphics (programming required) * Processing * D3 * R  Blogs:
July 24, 2013
Whether you're explaining a process, product or service, explanations are supposed to make things clear. But they often fail. Learn how to create effective explanations from Lee Lefever, co-creator of the excellent Common Craft videos. Lee, who is also the author of The Art of Explanation, shares the knowledge he's gained from years of making short explanatory videos. Learn about the process they use to create Common Craft videos and how you can get access to the assets they use. At the end, Lee makes a surprising announcement! Subscribe in iTunes WE DISCUSS: * Goal of explanations * Self-explanation effect * What makes explanations fail * How to make better explanations * Finding the right level for your audience * Using novelty in explanations * Overcoming the curse of knowledge * Getting agreement with your audience * When to use and not use stories in explanations * Storyboard and video process Common Craft uses * How long people watch videos in "lean forward" mode * How to get Common Craft assets TIME: 31 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * Common Craft Videos * The Art of Explanation * Go Animate * Jam Handy Differential Gear Video (1937) Get The eLearning Coach delivered to your Inbox every few weeks, with articles, tips, freebies and resources.
June 26, 2013
Smart organizations are concerned with employee engagement. Engagement results from an open and connected culture that promotes collaborative technologies and a pervasive learning model. In this episode, I chat with Dan Pontefract, author of Flat Army: Creating a Connected and Engaged Organization. Dan champions cultural transformations that promote an engaged workforce. Find out how you can push your organization in this direction. WE DISCUSS: * Why organizations are culturally broken * What's wrong with today's leadership thinking * Trust levels in organizations * The central thesis of Flat Army * Advantages of an open and collaborative work culture * How leaders can give up control * Symptoms of a disengaged workforce * Why leaders aren't more concerned about the lack of engagement * The Pervasive Learning Model * How a grassroots effort can make a culture more open TIME: Around 30 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * Flat Army: Creating a Connected and Engaged Organization * Dan's Website Get The eLearning Coach delivered to your Inbox every few weeks, with ideas, articles, freebies and resources.
May 22, 2013
Are you using outdated research when you design learning experiences? In this podcast, Susan Weinschenk, Ph.D., uncovers some of the mysteries surrounding learning and the brain. Susan has a knack for explaining complex processes in simple everyday language. She helps people and organizations learn about and apply research in psychology and brain science to understand, predict, and direct human behavior. Her most recent book is, How to Get People to Do Stuff. She is also the author of these other books (see links in RESOURCES below): * 100 Things Every Presenter Needs to Know About People * 100 Things Every Designer Needs to Know About People * Neuro Web Design We discuss: * How many chunks of information can learners hold in mind? * Do you need to understand your audience's mental models and schemas? * Is there such a thing as a learning style? * Why is it important to organize information? * What are memory traces and how do they work? * What are the best ways to help learners retain information? * Why do people remember anecdotes better than data? * How important is visual design to the learning experience? * Why are people addicted to seeking information? TIME: Around 30 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * Susan Weinschenk Institute * The Brain Lady Blog * How to Get People to Do Stuff * 100 Things Every Presenter Needs to Know About People * 100 Things Every Designer Needs to Know About People * Neuro Web Design Get The eLearning Coach delivered to your Inbox every few weeks, with articles, tips, freebies and resources.
April 18, 2013
Are you wondering how to transform in-person training to a virtual classroom? Do you want to improve the effectiveness of your webinars? If so, you'll want advice from online event expert and speaker coach, Karen Hyder. In this podcast, Karen shares ways to keep your audience attentive and engaged. And she explains how you can minimize the endless issues that can bog down virtual events by never going it alone. We discuss: * Drivers for moving from face-to-face training to virtual classrooms and webinars * Types of internal resistance you might get * How to overcome resistance * Advice for being a first-time producer * What's best? Telephony or VOIP * How learners respond to a virtual classroom environment * Two best practices for adapting classroom content for virtual * Roles required for producing a virtual event * Is the producer the wizard behind the curtain? * Best practices for being a producer * How to read your virtual audience * How to use social media in the virtual classroom/webinar * The most common mistake to avoid What tips do you have for making virtual learning experiences a success? Answer in the Comments below. TIME: 20 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * Contact Karen at: Kaleidoscope Training and Consulting * Webinar Best Practices: Interview with Karen Hyder Get The eLearning Coach delivered to your Inbox twice a month, with articles, tips and resources.
March 28, 2013
Subscribe in iTunes Jonathan Halls, former BBC learning executive and author of Rapid Video Development For Trainers provides awesome tips for designing and shooting video. Whether you're new to video or have some experience, you're sure to benefit from Jonathan's knowledge. WE DISCUSS: * When video is effective for learning * How to make talking heads "less boring" * Two purposes of B Roll * How to use the visual language of video * Benefits of creating storyboards * Message layers in video * Common newbie mistakes * Frequency of changing shots * Uses for instructional video via social media * Considerations when shooting video for mLearning * Five functions your video camera should have * Complete video setup for $500 TIME: Around 35 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * Rapid Video Development for Trainers by Jonathan Halls * Jonathan Halls & Associates Get The eLearning Coach delivered to your Inbox once a month, with articles, tips and resources.
February 27, 2013
Lisa Cron, author of Wired For Story, is passionate about the power and value of stories. In this conversation, Lisa will convince you that it is through stories that humans survive and it is through stories that people learn. If you are looking for ways to write irresistible stories and scenarios, listen in for advice from a pro who understands how stories bring meaning to our world. WE DISCUSS: * Real purpose of stories * Dopamine and curiosity * Most important element of a story * Protagonist's inner world * How to grab attention from the start * Pros and cons of story structure * First person or third person? * Common mistakes in storytelling TIME: 30 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * Wired for Story by Lisa Cron * Wired for Story website * The Rules of Story article by Lisa Cron * Why You Need to Use Storytelling for eLearning Get the latest articles, resources and freebies once a month plus my free eBook, Writing for Instructional Design. SEND EBOOK NOW
February 13, 2013
Ruth Colvin Clark, PhD., shares her expertise on learning, instruction and using scenarios in eLearning. We discuss a range of topics, from how eLearning scenarios accelerate expertise to using the right amount of guidance. We discuss: * Comparing instructive and inductive approaches to learning * Evidence that scenarios improve learning * When scenarios have the most impact on learning * Examples of scenario-based eLearning * Skills that problem-based scenarios can build * Types of guidance to provide * Challenges with writing scenarios TIME: 20 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found]. RESOURCES: * Scenario-based eLearning by Ruth Colvin Clark * Evidence-based Training Methods by Ruth Colvin Clark * eLearning and the Science of Instruction by Ruth Colvin Clark * 5 Ways to Use Graphics in eLearning Scenarios * Alternatives to Correct and Incorrect
January 29, 2013
Subscribe in iTunes. In this conversation with, Jane Bozarth, PhD., we talk about how to use social media tools to implement a complete learning experience or to simply enhance online learning. Jane provides many actionable tips, innovative examples and common sense guidelines. WE DISCUSS: * Benefits of using social media to learn * How social learning is different than social media learning * Why listening is a powerful tool * Challenges of using social media for learning * Examples of successful learning projects with social media * Criteria for using social media in an online learning experience * Easiest tools to use TIME: 35 minutes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found] RESOURCES: * Social Media for Trainers * Learning Solutions Magazine articles by Jane * 23 Things (discussed in podcast) * Learning and Teaching Metaphors on Pinterest * Unlearning on Pinterest * How you can participate in #lrnchat * Molly McLure Wasko and Samer Faraj. “It is what one does”: why people participate and help others in electronic communities of practice. Get The eLearning Coach delivered to your Inbox once a month, with articles, tips and resources.  
January 7, 2013
Subscribe in iTunes. In this first episode, you'll get a fresh perspective on job seeking, hiring and finding your career path as a learning experience designer. Director of Instructional Design, Joe Fournier, provides super advice on starting out or moving to a better position in instructional design, training, and eLearning design and development. WE DISCUSS: * Skills hiring managers are seeking * How to get experience * Making a portfolio * Whether an ID degree is required * Changes in the field * Preparing for the future * Pay disparity between men and women TIME: 23 minutes RATE: Rate this podcast in iTunes TRANSCRIPT: Download the [Download not found] RESOURCES: * Spot Learning (Joe Fournier's website) * @jfournierii (Twitter) * Breaking Into Instructional Design: free 12-lesson email course about a career in instructional design Keep up with research, new ideas, tips and free resources with The eLearning Coach Newsletter delivered to your Inbox every month. Ideas-articles-freebies-resources.
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