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January 26, 2018
This talk continues Shohaku Okumura Roshi’s commentary on Dogen Zenji’s Tenzo Kyokun – Instructions for the Zen Cook. (Covering the third paragraph on page 37). In the previous paragraph of Tenzo Kyōkun, Dōgen said we should see things not with our common eyes, but we should see things with the dharma eye or Buddha’s eye; and here he’s saying: anyway, we do have a competitive mind. How can we use this competitive mind for our practice? First he said: “If you’re resolute in your intention and are most sincere, you will vow to be more pure-hearted than the ancients and surpass even the elders in attentiveness.” So he said that instead of competing with the contemporaries, the people around you, you should compete with the ancient masters, or elders. This is kind of a tricky thing, an interesting thing. Dōgen said when we really, sincerely want to work as a tenzo, in order to develop or improve our ability to make better dishes, somehow we need to compete; compete with ourselves and compete with others. How can we use this competitive mind to become better? Listen to the podcast for more. This talk was originally given at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on September 26, 2007. Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com), at Sanshin's home page (http://sanshinji.org/home/), or at the Dōgen Institute website (http://dogeninstitute.org/home/donate/).
October 14, 2017
This talk continues Shohaku Okumura Roshi’s commentary on Dogen Zenji’s Tenzo Kyokun – Instructions for the Zen Cook. (Covering the second paragraph on page 37). Beginning with the passage studied in this podcast, Dōgen describes the most important point in the attitude of the tenzo. The meaning of Dōgen’s admonition is very clear: don’t complain. The tenzo receives food ingredients from storage, and whatever the tenzo receives, they don’t complain, they just accept things as they are and work together with those things to make them into the best food or dish possible. But if we carefully read the expressions and sentences, what Dōgen is saying is not so simple. Of course, the meaning is to avoid “like and dislike.” But the reason for that attitude is very deep and important within the essence of Buddhist teaching. In the English translation alone, we cannot see that connection. Listen to the podcast for more. This talk was originally given at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on September 12, 2007. Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com), at Sanshin's home page (http://sanshinji.org/home/), or at The Dōgen Institute (http://dogeninstitute.org/home/donate/) website.
September 30, 2015
This talk continues Shohaku Okumura Roshi’s commentary on Dogen Zenji’s Tenzo Kyokun – Instructions for the Zen Cook. (p. 36). Okumura Roshi speaks about the tenzo’s attitude toward his work in the kitchen: the importance of not judging the quality of the ingredients that are provided. Just prepare them carefully, paying attention to the three important things in cooking: quality, quantity, and timing. The tenzo’s life is at the intersection between discrimination and non-discriminating. He receives the food with no judgment and then makes determinations about the best way to use it. This is mind (as subject) and things (as object) working together as zenki – total function. This talk was originally given at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on September 9, 2007. Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page, at Sanshin's home page, or at the Dōgen Institute website.
June 25, 2015
This talk continues Shohaku Okumura Roshi’s commentary on the modern classic Opening The Hand of Thought written by his teacher Kosho Uchiyama Roshi. (Section 4, p.66). Okumura Roshi continues the theme of his previous talk, offering a description and examples of “self-power” and “other power” in both Pure Land Buddhism and Zen. There is no separation between self-power and other power; other power includes self-power. Yet the individual determination or personal ability of self-power cannot reach the deeper power; we need to awaken to the larger context, the interconnectedness of self and other beings, in which we are living as an individual. This talk was originally given at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on November 28, 2010. Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page, at Sanshin's home page, or at The Dōgen Institute website.
January 13, 2015
This talk continues Shohaku Okumura Roshi’s commentary on Dogen Zenji’s Tenzo Kyokun (p. 35). Okumura Roshi discusses the importance of cooking the rice carefully and returning the kitchen utensils to their appropriate places. In this way, we can study dharma in our everyday lives—by attending to and valuing things without discriminating mind. This talk was originally given at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on June 20, 2007. Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com), at Sanshin's home page(http://sanshinji.org/home/), or at The Dōgen Institute (http://dogeninstitute.org/home/donate/) website.
November 21, 2014
This talk continues Shohaku Okumura Roshi’s commentary on the modern classic Opening The Hand of Thought written by his teacher Kosho Uchiyama Roshi. (Section 4, p.66) Okumura Roshi describes two categories of Buddhism: ji riki (self-power) and ta riki (other-power). Traditionally, Zen is considered to be “self-power” and Pure Land Buddhism to be “other-power,” but Uchiyama Roshi says that our practice of zazen is before separation between self-power and other-power. This talk was originally given at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on November 14, 2010. Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com), at Sanshin's home page (http://sanshinji.org/home/), or at The Dōgen Institute (http://dogeninstitute.org/home/donate/) website.
January 14, 2014
This talk continues Shohaku Okumura Roshi's commentary on Dogen Zenji's Tenzo Kyokun. Okumura Roshi discusses the difference between our normal attitude toward preparing food and the teaching Dogen Zenji offers to the tenzo. Preparing meals is a metaphor for making choices about the lives we live. It was originally given at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on May 23, 2007. Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com) or at Sanshin's home page (http://sanshinji.org/home/)
November 19, 2013
This talk continues Shohaku Okumura Roshi's commentary on Dogen Zenji's Tenzo Kyokun. It was originally given at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on May 16, 2007. Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com) or at Sanshin's home page (http://sanshinji.org/home/)
November 5, 2013
This talk continues Shohaku Okumura Roshi's commentary on Dogen Zenji's Tenzo Kyokun. In this talk he begins addressing Dogen's Instructions for the Cook directly. It was originally given at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on May 9, 2007. Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com) or at Sanshin's home page (http://sanshinji.org/home/)
October 22, 2013
This talk is part of Shohaku Okumura Roshi's commentary on Dogen Zenji's Tenzo Kyokun. He discusses the history of monastic practice in China, the creation of monastic regulations (Shingi), and the Eihei Shingi in which we find the Tenzo Kyokun. It was originally given as part of the 2007 practice period at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on April 25, 2007 Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com) or at Sanshin's home page (http://sanshinji.org/home/)
October 8, 2013
This talk continues Shohaku Okumura Roshi's commentary on Dogen Zenji's Tenzo Kyokun. This talk includes a substantial introduction to the Yogacara (Mind-only) and Madhyamika schools and their relationship to our practice of Dogen's teaching. It was originally given during the 2007 practice period at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on April 18, 2007 Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com) or at Sanshin's home page (http://sanshinji.org/home/)
September 23, 2013
This talk is part of Shohaku Okumura Roshi's commentary on Dogen Zenji's Tenzo Kyokun. In it he sets the stage by discussing one of the most important texts for understanding Dogen's teaching, the Jijuyu Zanmai section of Bendowa. It was originally given as the beginning of the 2007 practice period at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on April 11, 2007 Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com) or at Sanshin's home page (http://sanshinji.org/home/)
May 29, 2013
This talk is part of Shohaku Okumura Roshi's commentary on Dogen Zenji's Shobogenzo Zuimonki. Here he continues his discussion of the six points of wholesome speech and communication. It was originally given at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on November 27, 2005.   Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com) or at Sanshin's home page (http://sanshinji.org/home/)
April 15, 2013
This talk is part of Shohaku Okumura Roshi's commentary on the modern classic Opening The Hand of Thought written by his teacher Kosho Uchiyama Roshi. In it Okumura Roshi continues his exploration of the meaning of the style of sesshin created by Uchiyama Roshi and practiced at Sanshinji. It was originally given at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on October 31, 2010. Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com) or at Sanshin's home page (http://sanshinji.org/home/)
April 4, 2013
This talk continues Shohaku Okumura Roshi's commentary on the modern classic Opening The Hand of Thought written by his teacher Kosho Uchiyama Roshi. In it Okumura Roshi explores the meaning of the style of sesshin created by Uchiyama Roshi. What does it mean to be "before time" and "before 'I' effort"?  It was originally given at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on October 24, 2010. Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com) or at Sanshin's home page (http://sanshinji.org/home/)
February 24, 2013
This talk is part of Shohaku Okumura Roshi's commentary on Shobogenzo Zuimonki. Here he continues his discussion of the six points of wholesome speech and communication, focusing on "Not engaging in idle talk". It was originally given at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on November 13, 2005.   Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com) or at Sanshin's home page (http://sanshinji.org/home/)
February 5, 2013
This talk is part of Shohaku Okumura Roshi's commentary on Shobogenzo Zuimonki. Here he continues his discussion of the six points of wholesome speech and communication, focusing on "Not speaking words which cause enmity between people". It was originally given at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on October 30, 2005.   Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com) or at Sanshin's home page (http://sanshinji.org/home/)
January 15, 2013
This talk continues Shohaku Okumura Roshi's commentary on the modern classic Opening The Hand of Thought written by his teacher Kosho Uchiyama Roshi. In it Okumura Roshi explores Uchiyama Roshi's description of what we encounter in zazen practice as the scenery of our lives, and explains that the process of sleeping or thinking and then returning to sitting is itself zazen.  It was originally given at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on September 26, 2010. Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com) or at Sanshin's home page (http://sanshinji.org/home/)
January 1, 2013
This talk continues Shohaku Okumura Roshi's commentary on the modern classic Opening The Hand of Thought written by his teacher Kosho Uchiyama Roshi. In it Okumura Roshi explores the ways we encounter, react to, and deal with our thoughts in our daily lives and our zazen practice.  It was originally given at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on September 12, 2010. Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com) or at Sanshin's home page (http://sanshinji.org/home/)
December 16, 2012
Shohaku Okumura Roshi discusses Dogen Zenji's dharma talk on the occasion of the traditional celebration of Buddha's enlightenment (December 8th each year). In this piece, Dogen describes Buddha's enlightenment in the context of his zazen practice. It was originally given at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on December 11, 2011. Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com) or at Sanshin's home page (http://sanshinji.org/home/)
November 9, 2012
This talk continues Shohaku Okumura Roshi's commentary on the modern classic Opening The Hand of Thought written by his teacher Kosho Uchiyama Roshi.  Okumura Roshi discusses how we are carried away by the three poisonous minds (desire, hatred, and delusion).  Through our zazen practice we can find a peaceful foundation for our lives without running around chasing our desires.  It was originally given at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on July 25, 2010. Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com) or at Sanshin's home page (http://sanshinji.org/home/)
September 1, 2012
This talk continues Shohaku Okumura Roshi's commentary on the modern classic Opening The Hand of Thought written by his teacher Kosho Uchiyama Roshi.  Okumura Roshi discusses how we wake up in our zazen practice. An excerpt: "We simply repeat waking up from thinking or sleeping.  That’s all we do.  So there’s no goal.  The point is just to be, right now, right here.  Right now right here is just sitting.  So whenever we find we deviate from just sitting we return to here and now and just sit.  There’s no goal, nowhere to go."  It was originally given at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on July 18, 2010. Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com) or at Sanshin's home page (http://sanshinji.org/home/)
August 10, 2012
Shohaku Okumura Roshi investigates section 2-20 of Dogen Zenji's Shobogenzo Zuimonki. Okumura Roshi shares his thoughts (and relief!) on Dogen and Shakyamuni Buddha's assertion that so-called enlightenment is not dependent on having a superior intellect or knowledge, nor is it anywhere other than right at hand.   Shohaku Okumura Roshi investigates section 2-20 of Dogen Zenji's Shobogenzo Zuimonki.  Okumura Roshi shares his thoughts (and relief!) on Dogen and Shakyamuni Buddha's assertion that so-called enlightenment is not dependent on having a superior intellect or knowledge, nor is it anywhere other than right at hand. Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com) or at Sanshin's home page (http://sanshinji.org/home/)  
July 24, 2012
This talk continues Shohaku Okumura Roshi's commentary on the modern classic Opening The Hand of Thought written by his teacher Kosho Uchiyama Roshi.  Okumura Roshi explores the meaning of shikantaza and the origins of the expression "opening the hand of thought".  It was originally given at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on July 11, 2010.   Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com) or at Sanshin's home page (http://sanshinji.org/home/)
July 14, 2012
This talk is part of Shohaku Okumura Roshi's ongoing commentary on the modern classic Opening The Hand of Thought written by his teacher Kosho Uchiyama Roshi. This talk focuses on what happens in our minds during zazen - how should we handle the unstopping flood of thoughts?  It was originally given at Sanshinji in Bloomington, IN on March 21, 2010.   Please consider supporting Okumura Roshi's teachings and the activities of Sanshin Zen Community by making a contribution on this podcast's page (http://sanshin.podomatic.com) or at Sanshin's home page (http://sanshinji.org/home/)
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