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July 28, 2020
Danny Thompson discusses his road to a successful tech career, after working for years outside the industry (frying chicken at gas-stations). He explains the importance of setting goals and following through, and how to overcome adversity, and handle setbacks. It's simultaneously a very inspirational story, but also filled with lots of very practical advice and action items to pursue. For example, the importance of attending and participating in Meetups and engaging with the local tech community. Panel AJ O’Neal Aimee Knight Charles Max Wood Steve Edwards Dan Shappir Guest Danny Thompson Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing Scout APM | We'll donate $5 to the open source project of your choice when you deploy Scout React Native Remote Conf 2020 Links AI powered resume builder Picks Danny Thompson: Follow Danny Thompson on Twitter > @DThompsonDev James Q Quick - YouTube Brad Traversy - YouTube Florin Pop - YouTube AJ O’Neal: Template Resume This Video Is Sponsored By ███ VPN The Wisdom of the Ancients by Sir Francis Bacon Free AudioBook) Aimee Knight: Amazon Web Services Eco Performance Bamboo Clothing I Handmade I by TransientCraft Charles Max Wood: The One Funnel Away Challenge! Devchat.tv Conferences Steve Edwards: xkcd: Wisdom of the Ancients Casablanca (1942) - IMDb Dan Shappir: Adopt a puppy or other pet Follow JavaScript Jabber on Twitter > @JSJabber
July 21, 2020
Kevin Kreuzer, a freelance front end engineer from Switzerland shares his developer’s journey in this episode of the My JavaScript Story. Kevin is also a Google Developer expert, who loves JavaScript, Angular etc and as such writes a lot of blog posts and maintains some open source libraries. And when he is not engrossed in the tech world, he is out snowboarding or playing soccer. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Kevin Kreuzer Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing CacheFly Links Medium Kevin Kreuzer GitHub Kevin Kreuzer GitHub kreuzerk/svg-to-ts Twitter Kevin Kreuzer: @kreuzercode Picks Kevin Kreuzer: GitHub kreuzerk/ng-sortgrid Jojo Rabbit The Settlers of Catan Charles Max Wood: Narnia Boxed Set
July 14, 2020
Join the 30-DAY CHALLENGE: "You Don't Know JS Yet" Gareth McCumskey, a Solutions Architect in Cape Town, South Africa engages the panelists of JavaScript Jabber in an informative discussion about the broad topic of serverless. The JavaScript expert explains that serverless is essentially a way to use the existing managed services of the cloud in building a solution. He expounded on the different ways in which to employ the use of serverless. Panel AJ O’Neal Charles Max Wood Steve Edwards Dan Shappir Guest Gareth McCumskey   Sponsors Scout APM | We'll donate $5 to the open source project of your choice when you deploy Scout React Native Remote Conf 2020 Picks Gareth McCumskey: Follow Gareth on Twitter > @garethmcc Oryx Pro - System76 Full-Stack Application Development on AWS (Free Video Course)   AJ O’Neal: Follow AJ on Twitter > @coolaj86 webinstall.dev Serviceman | webinstall.dev Pathman | webinstall.dev Steve Edvards: The Black Stallion (1979) - IMDb Charles Max Wood: Devchat.tv Remote Conferences Follow JavaScript Jabber on Twitter > @JSJabber
July 7, 2020
React Native Remote Conf Raúl Jiménez runs a small consultancy focused on Angular out of Barcelona Spain. Raul got into programing in High School. He was working on the equivalent of a USA based Associates Degree. He had a computer when he was 5 and got into copy/paste programming on the Spectrum computer. He started writing on his own at 16. He started with TurboPascal and then got into other languages before graduating to Angular and JavaScript. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Raúl Jiménez Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing CacheFly Links AiA 235 Functional Programming with Angular, NgRx with Raul Jimenez Gulpjs GruntJs GitHub Raul Jimenez Byte Default Twitter Raúl Jiménez: @elecash Picks Raúl Jiménez: GitHub joanllenas/ts.data.json GitHub joanllenas/ngx-remotedata Aeon's End Charles Max Wood: Course Creator Pro
June 30, 2020
Join the “You Don’t Know JS Yet” 30-day CHALLENGE   SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT at the end of this episode. Don't miss it. Kyle Simpson, author of the You Don't Know JS Yet series joins the JavaScript Jabber panel to discuss the origins and approach to his book series. The discussion varies to the basic parts of JavaScript, the parts you should know, and how to learn them. Panel AJ O’Neal Aimee Knight Charles Max Wood Steve Edwards Dan Shappir Guest Kyle Simpson Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! Links getify/TypL: The JavaScript Type Linter Picks Kyle Simpson: Follow Kyle Thompson on Twitter > @getify github/super-linter: Combination of multiple linters to install as a GitHub Action Charles Max Wood: WordPress Vlog - Video Blog & Podcast WordPress Theme by meks | ThemeForest Devchat.tv Book Camp - Use Promo code "JSJABBER" Dan Shappir: Wix in the '90s Breaking Chains with Pipelines in Modern JavaScript A Promise of a Bright Future With Async Iterators, Generators, and Pipes, Part 1 Join the “You Don’t Know JS Yet” 30-day CHALLENGE Follow JavaScript Jabber on Twitter > @JSJabber
June 23, 2020
React Native Remote Conf July 28th to 31th Loiane Groner is an Angular developer from Brazil currently living the USA. She started out working in Java and has worked in Java for nearly 14 years before moving over to Angular. She did an episode on Adventures in Angular about writing documentation in Portuguese. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Loiane Groner Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing CacheFly "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! Links AiA 266: Creating Content in Portuguese with Loiane Groner YouTube Loiane Groner Twitter Loiane Groner: @loiane Picks Loiane Groner: World of Warcraft The Mandolorian Charles Max Wood: The Expanse Rode Procaster Blue Yeti
June 16, 2020
React Native Remote Conf July 28th to 31th What is MongoDB? How does it work? How is it different than a standard relational database? How does it fit into a modern web app? This week, the panel gets the answers to these questions and more when they talk to Joe Karlsson, Software Engineer and Developer Advocate at MongoDB. Panel AJ O’Neal Aimee Knight Steve Edwards Guest Joe Karlsson Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing Remote Work: Get a Job or Make a Career Working From Home "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! Links Free MongoDB Official Courses | MongoDB University Course to start with MongoDB Developer Hub Picks Joe Karlsson: Follow Joe on Twitter > @JoeKarlsson1 MongoDB Twitch Animal Crossing: New Horizons MongoDB.live AJ O’Neal: The guys who invented the term "sharding"? Supporting Pick: WikiPedia confirms that Ultima Online popularized the term "sharding" Your Coffee Shop Doesn't Use Two-Phase Commit Aimee Knight: What happens when I type kubectl run? The Cereal School Steve Edwards: Pink Floyd: A Momentary Lapse of Reason Follow JavaScript Jabber on Twitter > @JSJabber
June 9, 2020
Andrew Evans is a history major turned designer turned developer. His journey leads through doing development in Java, getting and MBA, and eventually picking up Angular and working at Capital One. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Andrew Evans Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing CacheFly "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! Links AiA 229: Deploying to Firebase with CircleCI with Andrew Evans inDepth.dev Picks Andrew Evans: The Expanse Jumanji: The Next Level Charles Max Wood: The Name of the Wind devchat.tv/workshops
June 2, 2020
The panel is joined by Travis Tidwell, co-founder and CTO of Form.io, a ME*N stack platform that incorprates a form builder with automatically generated REST API endpoints. Travis discusses the history of Form.io, how it’s built and works, and lays the smackdown on panelist and noted NoSQL database skeptic AJ O’Neal by showing how MongoDB is the appropriate DB for storing form data in JSON format. Panel Steve Edwards AJ O’Neal Aimee Knight Guest Travis Tidwell Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing Remote Work: Get a Job or Make a Career Working From Home "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! Links Form.io Picks AJ O’Neal: Follow AJ on Twitter > @coolaj86 File System | Node.js v14.3.0 Documentation JDD webinstall.dev Steve Edwards: Follow Steve on Twitter > @wonder95, Website Needtobreathe - Rivers In The Wasteland Travis Tidwell: Follow Travis on Twitter @softwaregnome, Github VEX IQ - VEX Robotics Follow JavaScript Jabber on Twitter > @JSJabber
May 26, 2020
In this week's episode of My JavaScript Story, Charles Max Wood interviews Farzad Yousefzadehr, who was a guest on the React Round Up show. As a Senior Software Engineer, Farzad has the cool job of designing and refactoring existing games at Epic Games. He currently lives in Helsinki, Finland, with his lovely wife and cat. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Farzad Yousefzadehr Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing CacheFly "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! Links RRU 079: State Machines and State Charts with Farzad Yousef Zadeh The Imposters Handbook Twitter: @Farzad_YZ Picks Farzad Yousefzadehr: Almost Everything on Computers is Perceptually Slower Than It Was In 1983 Charles Max Wood: BusyCal podcastplaybook.co
May 19, 2020
Gil Tayar gave a presentation recently on ES modules in Node. He joins the panel to discuss how to use and think about ES modules. With considerable pushback from AJ, Gil explains how to start using modules and what the tradeoffs are between modules, script tags, and build tools. Panel AJ O’Neal Aimee Knight Charles Max Wood Steve Edwards Dan Shappir Guest Gil Tayar Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing Remote Work: Get a Job or Make a Career Working From Home "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! Links JSJ 341: Testing in JavaScript with Gil Tayar Picks AJ O’Neal: USB 4 Heavy Duty Suction Cups Miracle Berry Aimee Knight: AJ ONeal - YouTube Charles Max Wood: Dr. Erickson COVID video Zelda: Breath of the Wild 75HARD Steve Edwards: Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus The Pigeon Finds a Hot Dog Dan Shappir: webinstall.dev Visit Israel Gil Tayar: Follow Gil on Twitter > @giltayar Sunset Blvd Node v14.0.0 Follow JavaScript Jabber on Twitter > @JSJabber    
May 12, 2020
JavaScript Remote Conf 2020 May 13th to 15th - register now! Kay Plößer is an German developer who does front-end and mobile development with React. He primarily focuses on developer relations and will be teaching at a University soon. He got started in programming doing basic scripting and game mods to buy game weapons when the game started. He also build IRC bots and programs that ran in IRC. We dive into his journey through development into React and JavaScript. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Kay Plößer Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing Sentry CacheFly "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! Links RRU 048: Using and Teaching React with Kay Plößer Kay Plößer Twitter: @K4y1s k@kay.is Picks Charles Max Wood: The Expanse Kay Plößer: Undone
May 5, 2020
JavaScript Remote Conf 2020 May 13th to 15th - register now! Joe Karlsson is a developer advocate at MongoDB. He and the panel walk through the different approaches, uses, and libraries for building IoT with JavaScript Panel Aimee Knight Charles Max Wood AJ O’Neal Dan Shappir Steve Edwards Guest Joe Karlsson Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today!   Links Cylon.js - JavaScript framework for robotics, physical computing, and the Internet of Things using Node.js Johnny-Five: The JavaScript Robotics & IoT Platform Arduino - Home Tessel 2 Tessel Kit for Johnny-Five The Programming Language Lua Luvit.io Gumstix, Inc. Picks AJ O’Neal: MicroPython - Python for microcontrollers Raspberry Pi Reverse Emulator (Part 1) Raspberry Pi Reverse Emulator (Part 2) Arduino With Python: How to Get Started – Real Python Duktape How to Diagnose and Fix Everything Electronic Getting Started in Electronics Make: Electronics (Book) Make: Electronics (Component Pack) Aimee Knight: Cutting Your own Hair Joe's Appartment Charles Max Wood: The Iron Druid Chronicles Series by Kevin Hearne JavaScript Jabber Meetup Steve Edwards: Pearls Before Swine Dan Shappir: JavaScript Remote Conf 2020 JS VidCon Future Sync Conference Joe Karlsson: Follow Joe on Twitter > @JoeKarlsson1 MongoDB.live Follow JavaScript Jabber on Twitter > @JSJabber
April 28, 2020
JavaScript Remote Conf 2020 May 13th to 15th - register now! Håkon Krogh is a Norweigan developer who focuses on web performance. We start out discussing working from home in the current pandemic. His current company works in Product Information Management. It's a headless ecommerce system. We dive into his experience learning learning to build applications and learning JavaScript and leading a team. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Håkon Krogh Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing Sentry CacheFly "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! Links RRU 078: The Uncanny Valley with Håkon Krogh Crystallize FindThatLead Twitter: Håkon Krogh Picks Håkon Krogh: High Performance Browser Networking Tiny Helpers Charles Max Wood: Cleverly Scrabin
April 21, 2020
JavaScript Remote Conf 2020 May 13th to 15th - register now! Matt Crook joins the conversation to talk with the JavaScript Jabber panel to talk about his experience going through Nashville Software School. The panel discusses and asks questions about getting into programming, working through the bootcamp, and what prospects are for bootcamp graduates. Panel AJ O’Neal Aimee Knight Charles Max Wood Steve Edwards Dan Shappir Guest Matt Crook Sponsors Taiko Educative.io | Click here for 10% discount "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! Picks AJ O’Neal: PostgREST The Way of Kings VirtualBox Bootable Installers for MacOS, Windows, and more Aimee Knight: State of Microservices 2020 Report Peloton Bike Charles Max Wood: The Hobbit D&D Starter Set JavaScript Weekly Devchat.tv Remote Meetups Devchat.tv Remote Conferences Reading to Kids Steve Edwards: It Is Well With My Soul Pitbull Gold PRO Skull Shaver Brad Balfour Dan Shappir: Gödel, Escher, Bach Translating "The Hobbit" in Captivity Matt Crook: Follow Matt on Twitter > @mgcrook, Instagram, LinkedIn Swolenormous Fireship Static Headz Yugen Follow JavaScript Jabber on Twitter > @JSJabber
April 14, 2020
JavaScript Remote Conf 2020 May 13th to 15th - register now! Join us as we talk to Joyce Lin, a developer relations advocate with Postman, and we talk about this amazing tool for interacting with APIs. We discuss it’s more well-known features, and also learn about other less well known, but very powerful features that allow users to greatly increase the usefulness of the tool, both for front end and back end developers. Panel Aimee Knight Steve Edwards Guest Joyce Lin Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing Educative.io | Click here for 10% discount ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links Postman Roadmap on Trello Follow Postman on Twitter > Postman | The Collaboration Platform for API Development Picks Steve Edwards: The Big Red NO! Button Desktop Sound Toy Joyce Lin: Follow Joyce on Twitter > @petuniaGray The Science of Well-Being by Yale University | Coursera Follow JavaScript Jabber on Twitter > @JSJabber
April 14, 2020
JavaScript Remote Conf 2020 May 14th to 15th - register now! Varya is an expert in design systems. She talks about the process of working in and building design systems. She learned basic Pascal at school. She did programming exercises on paper. She then got into building web pages for groups she was a part of. She then picked up PHP and went professional at that point. On the front-end, she began picking up JavaScript and worked using Yandex's internal framework. Follow here story through the rest of the podcast. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Varya Stepanova Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing Sentry CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links RRU 068: Design Systems with Varya Stepanova Zend The History of BEM Picks Charles Max Wood: Contigo Water Bottle Run With Hal Varya Stepanova: Learn a New Language!
April 7, 2020
JavaScript Remote Conf 2020 May 14th to 15th - register now! Josh Ponelat is Software Architect at SmartBear working on Swagger and OpenAPI. He's from South Africa. Josh's father is a programmer and was heavily influenced by his father. He started with ANSI-C and hacking on shells. He studied graphic design in school. He got back into programming in PHP and MySQL and wound up transitioning to JavaScript. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Josh Ponelat Sponsors Sentry CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links JSJ 409: Swagger and Open API with Josh Ponelat D3.js Swagger.io What is OpenAPI? SwaggerHub Immutable JSJ 243 Immutable.js with Lee Byron 231 RR GraphQL with Lee Byron Hacker News Clojure ClojureScript Parinfer Datomic Cloud Picks Josh Ponelat: Miro Pour Over Coffee Charles Max Wood: Interview Cake Docking Station
March 31, 2020
JavaScript Remote Conf 2020 May 14th to 15th - register now! Paige Niedringhaus started her career as a Digital Marketer before making the move to becoming a software developer at the Home Depot. She current works with React and Node building internal apps for them. This episode discusses the ins and outs of making that transition in a semi-recent world and community. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Paige Niedringhaus Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links JSJ 398: Node 12 with Paige Niedringhaus Syntax. GitHub testing-library/react-testing-library Gatsby NextJS Interview Cake Medium - Paige Niedringhaus Follow Paige on Twitter: @pniedri Picks Paige Niedringhaus: Breville Milk Frother Stuff You Should Know Charles Max Wood: Instant Pot Sphero BB-8
March 24, 2020
Daniel Caldas is a Portuguese developer working and living in Singapore. He learned to code in high school programming in Pascal. He moved up to the university and that's where he encountered JavaScript. He wound up doing a bunch of design work, static websites, and jQuery. He explains his journey and learning methods leading to a job working for Zendesk on their CRM. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Daniel Caldas Sponsors Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links JSJ 411: Unit Testing Jest with Daniel Caldas goodguydaniel.com Picks Daniel Caldas: tweak Charles Max Wood: Shift Bose SoundLink Around Ear Wireless Headphones II
March 17, 2020
Dan Shappir takes the lead and walks the panel through the history of JavaScript and a discussion on ES6, TypeScript, the direction and future of JavaScript, and what features to be looking at and looking for in the current iteration of JavaScript. Panel AJ O’Neal Aimee Knight Charles Max Wood Steve Edwards Dan Shappir Sponsors Taiko - free and open source browser test automation Split ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links The TC39 Process Le Creuset Star Wars™ Han Solo Roaster | Williams Sonoma 124 JSJ The Origin of Javascript with Brendan Eich Crockford on JavaScript Le Creuset Turkey MJS 108: Dan Shappir MJS 132: Douglas Crockford JSJ 392: The Murky Past and Misty Future of JavaScript with Douglas Crockford "Things You Can Do In ES6 That Can't Be Done In ES5" - View Source talk by Dan Shappir Object Property Value Shorthand in JavaScript with ES6 Spread syntax - JavaScript | MDN JavaScript for-loops are… complicated - HTTP203 Optional chaining - JavaScript | MDN Breaking Chains with Pipelines in Modern JavaScript Picks AJ O’Neal: Expert Secrets Course Creator Pro Braun Series 7 Aimee Knight: Kickstarter Employees Win Historic Union Election Broccoli Sprouts Nutrition And Benefits Of Sulforaphane Charles Max Wood: The Expanse The Masked Singer LEGO Masters Steve Edwards: Beano Steve Wright HBO special Dan Shappir: CC 001: Clean Agile with Robert "Uncle Bob" Martin .NET 019: The History of .NET with Richard Campbell RRU 097: State Management and React Component Design with Becca Bailey Follow JavaScript Jabber on Twitter > @JSJabber
March 17, 2020
Jared Palmer has been a guest on 3 different shows on Devchat.tv. He's talked to us about Formik, Razzle, and React. He's taking a break from consulting to build up Formik, Inc and tools for forms. He got started in programming by taking a programming class at Cornell on a lark and quickly transitioned out of Investment Banking after graduating from university. His first apps were custom lock screens for mobile phones. We then move through framer and CoffeeScript and eventually in to JavaScript and React. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Jared Palmer Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links RRU 014: Razzle with Jared Palmer RRU 052: React Suspense with Jared Palmer Formik feat. Jared Palmer of The Palmer Group Picks Jared Palmer: Remote UI (Shopify) Charles Max Wood: The Man In the High Castle
March 10, 2020
In this episode of JavaScript Jabber the panelists and guest delve into the advantages of the shadow dom, transitioning from polymer js polyfills to native web components when moving for SAP UI to UI5, which works within React, Vue, Angular, and others. Panel AJ O’Neal Aimee Knight Steve Edwards Dan Shappir Guest Peter Müßig Follow Peter on Twitter > @pmuessig, Github Sponsors Taiko, free and open source browser test automation ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links OpenUI5 Home - SAPUI5 SDK Picks AJ O’Neal: Vinyl Clocks Acrylic Stand AJ's YouTube Channel (AMA) Aimee Knight Announcing Div Ops as the Slack and Reddit communities Steve Edwards Today on Pearls Before Swine - Comics by Stephan Pastis Dan Shappir The Wixing Street Interview | Facts about Wixing in Germany Wix.com werbung | versuch nicht zu lachen UI5 Web Components Peter Müßig JavaScript Jabber Follow JavaScript Jabber on Twitter > @JSJabber
March 10, 2020
Tommy Hodgins is a developer that typically works on A/B tests figuring out how to get websites the outcomes they want. He got into JavaScript and front-end technologies and then read a paper that led him to realize the capabilities of writing software to solve problems. He maintains a front-end focus with his A/B testing work and CSS in JS and other work. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Tommy Hodgins Sponsors Sentry CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Picks Tommy Hodgins: QuickJS Language Learning with Netflix Charles Max Wood: Gmelius The Man In the High Castle The Name of the Wind Verdict with Ted Cruz
March 3, 2020
The panelists discuss that latest State of JS survey. They begin talking about the merits and methods of the survey and then discuss the value you can extract from the survey. They also consider the various comparisons and trends presented by the survey and what they may mean. Panel: AJ O’Neal Aimee Knight Charles Max Wood Dan Shappir Sponsors: G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links: The State of JavaScript 2019 Picks: Aimee Knight: Fruit and Veggie Trays A curated list of Chaos Engineering resources. AJ O’Neal: Gear.Club Unlimited Charles Max Wood: Clean Coders Podcast Workshops with Chuck Dan Shappir: Wix Engineering Blog Beating Textbook Algorithms in String Search   Follow JavaScript Jabber on Twitter > @JSJabber  
March 3, 2020
Rado Stankov is the Head of Engineering at Product Hunt. He's based in Sofia Bulgaria. He walks us through learning Pascal and PHP and Flash. We then dive into Ruby and JavaScript and what he's working on now at Product Hunt. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Radoslav Stankov Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links MRS 077: Radoslav Stankov RR 396: GrapQL at Product Hunt with Radoslav Stankov RRU 042: React at Product Hunt with Radoslav Stankov React Native at Product Hunt feat. Radoslav Stankov and Vlad Vladimirov Prototypejs jQuery Picks Radoslav Stankov: Dependency cruiser The Unicorn Project Charles Max Wood: The Name of the Wind LinkedIn Clean Coders Podcast Devchat.tv Workshops
February 25, 2020
Una Kravets talks to the panel about CSS and its future. We dive into what Houdini is and how much of it is implemented in the browsers. She explains how the changes outlined in Houdini will improve the user experience on the web and developer experience for web developers. Panel: Aimee Knight AJ O’Neal Charles Max Wood Guest: Una Kravets Sponsors: Split ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links: CSS Houdini Working with the new CSS Typed Object Model PaintWorklet.registerPaint | MDN Is Houdini Ready Yet? extra.css New horizons in CSS: Houdini and the Paint API CSS Houdini Experiments Picks: Aimee Knight: Things you can do with a browser in 2020 AJ O’Neal: SD Card Wallet SP 128gb MicroSD Rocketek Charles Max Wood: Gmelius (Affiliate link) MyPillow Chilipad (Affiliate link) Una Kravets: Follow Una on Twitter - @Una Una's Podcast - Toolsday Web Series: Designing in the Browser Having a nice Couch Bob's Discount Furniture
February 25, 2020
Carl is a developer from Zimbabwe currently living in London. He explains how he started out as a journalist and wound up doing web development to keep track of news stories coming out in his local area. He leveled up by attending meetups and talking to other developers. He currently works for LimeJump, an energy startup which is creating a virtual power plant by connecting together different power assets Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Carl Mungazi Sponsors Sentry CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links Nailing Your First (Info-Product) Launch CarlMungazi.com Picks Carl Mungazi: React Dev Tools Charles Max Wood: Gmelius Devchat Workshops The Dev Rev Podcast
February 18, 2020
Bruce Lawson is an expert in and proponent of semantic HTML. After receiving some good natured ribbing, Bruce walks the panel through the benefits of semantic HTML. He provides several examples on how it's used and in particular how it helps with other issues like accessibility and navigability on your websites. Panel AJ O’Neal Aimee Knight Charles Max Wood Dan Shappir Guest Bruce Lawson Sponsors G2i Springboard | Promo code "JABBER" gives $500 off the job-guaranteed Course ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links WebAIM: Web Accessibility In Mind The 4 minute business case for accessible online shopping Picks AJ O’Neal: Better Mic Sound Canon T4i 650D Canon T5i Course Magic Lantern Filmic Pro & Promovie Aimee Knight: AddyOsmani.com - Native image lazy-loading for the web! Charles Max Wood: Codineer - 100 days of Vue challenge Dan Shappir: Alex Russell - The Mobile Web: MIA Bruce Lawson Website Bruce Lawson: Taffy music band Follow Bruce on Twitter @brucel
February 18, 2020
Florian Rival is a React developer who has built his own game engine. He's been a guest on both React Round Up and React Native Radio. This episode provides you a walkthrough on using gDevelop to build games from scratch and goes into his history as a game developer. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Florian Rival Sponsors G2i CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links RNR 126: Native Web Apps with Florian Rival RRU 058: React.js and WebAssembly to Rewrite Native Apps with Florian Rival LinkedIn Florian Rival PixiJS Picks Florian Rival: GDevelop Charles Max Wood: Gmelius
February 11, 2020
This My JavaScript Story episode is a discussion with Kaelig Deloumeau-Prigent. Kaelig works on the Polaris design system from Shopify. We walk through his journey into programming, HTML, and CSS. We wander through is career until he was building design systems at Shopify. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Kaelig Deloumeau-Pregent Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly ___________________________________________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Links JSJ 397: Design Systems with Kaelig Deloumeau-Prigent Design Tokens Community Group JSJ 388: Functional Programming with Brian Lonsdorf Polaris Picks Kaelig Deloumeau-Prigent: The Courage to Be Disliked Charles Max Wood: The Name of The Wind
February 4, 2020
My JavaScript Story this week welcomes Paul Cowan. Paul works as a consultant in front end development. He learned how to program at a really early age but didn't own an email address until he was 30 years old. When he was 30 years old he wanted to change his lifestyle and attended a course in London and took a job as a software developer. Paul was interested in React because, for him, much of programming didn’t make a whole lot of sense until he read about the flux model and React Redux was one of the few frameworks that followed the flux model. Spending most of his life outside of the programming world has granted him a unique perspective framework like React. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Paul Cowan Sponsors G2i CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links RRU 088: Frustrations with React Hooks with Paul Cowan Paul's Twitter Paul's Blog Picks Paul Cowan: https://blog.logrocket.com/ Fitness and MMA Fight Charles Max Wood: "#100daysofvue" Vue Learning Challenge @ Devchat.tv YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCABJEQ57MIn6X3TIHIebJUw/videos Devchat.tv Upcoming Workshops: "How To Stay Current" "How to Find Your Dream Developer Job" "How to Start a Podcast" Sign up for the newsletter @ https://devchat.tv/subscribe/ to receive information about our upcoming workshops
January 28, 2020
My JavaScript Story this week welcomes Maximiliano Firtman. Maximiliano Firtman is a mobile web developer from Buenos Ares, Argentina. He has been a developer for 24 years and his most recent focus has been on progressive web apps. Maximiliano started coding when he was 11 years old by creating games and digital magazines. He got into web development by learning HTML in college. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Maximiliano Firtman Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links JSJ 415: Progressive Web Apps with Maximiliano Firtman Maximiliano Firtman Website Maximiliano Firtman Twitter Picks Maximiliano Firtman: Using Trusted Web Activities Charles Max Wood: Generation Z Unfiltered by Tim Elmore
January 27, 2020
My JavaScript Story this week welcomes Maximiliano Firtman. Maximiliano Firtman is a mobile web developer from Buenos Ares, Argentina. He has been a developer for 24 years and his most recent focus has been on progressive web apps. Maximiliano started coding when he was 11 years old by creating games and digital magazines. He got into web development by learning HTML in college. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Maximiliano Firtman Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links JSJ 415: Progressive Web Apps with Maximiliano Firtman Maximiliano Firtman Website Maximiliano Firtman Twitter Picks Maximiliano Firtman: Using Trusted Web Activities Charles Max Wood: Generation Z Unfiltered by Tim Elmore
January 21, 2020
My JavaScript Story this week welcomes Jonathan is an educator, speaker, and author.h Jonathan has been a developer since high school and he started out by teaching at Big Nerd Ranch and currently has his own teaching brand. He teaches career switchers and senior developers and also has written a book "Functional Design Patterns for Express.js". Teaching career switchers has led him to adopt a pedagogy approach to teaching where he focuses on getting people to absorb relevant information faster. Some of the lessons he has learned when working with career switchers is the role of failure in the classroom. He noticed when something did not work in their code career switchers tended to want to start out again instead of debugging what was wrong with the code. Jonathan had to show that most of developing is turning failure into success and getting code that doesn't work bu debugging and asking for help. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Jonathan Martin Sponsors G2i React Native Radio CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links JSJ 396: Publishing Your Book with Jonathan Lee Martin Jonathan's LinkedIn Jonathan's Twitter https://jonathanleemartin.com/ Functional Design Patterns for Express.js Picks Charles Max Wood: Pomodoro Timer Amazon Fire tv stick Jonathan Martin: WebXR Device API Innergie USB C Charger
January 14, 2020
In this episode of JavaScript Jabber the panel interviews Sean Grove from OneGraph; asking him questions about GraphQL tooling and common complaints about GraphQL. Sean starts by explaining what GraphQL is and how it benefits frontend developers. GraphiQL is a frontend open sourced tool produced by OneGraph, Sean explains how this handy tool simplifies GraphQL.   Authentication and authorization are one of the biggest criticisms of GraphQL. Sean walks the panel through the solution, getting a schema definition language and adding directives to build a simple authentication and authorization. The panel defines authentication and authorization and explains the difference.    The next issue common with GraphQL that the panel discusses is migration. Sean explains how OneGraph helps with migration using a Rust network layer and how it works. They also discuss how to migrate without this tool. Without the tool it is painful and he recommends incremental migration.    Sean explains that another problem in GraphQL is poor documentation. He explains why the documentation is poor and explains how they hope to fix it at OneGraph. The last issue they cover is the length of queries. Sean tells the panel how they can handle this problem with depth analysis or persistent queries. The episode ends with an elevator pitch for Reason.  Panelists Aimee Knight AJ O’Neal Charles Max Wood Dan Shappir Guest Sean Grove Sponsors Split CacheFly ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links https://github.com/graphql/graphiql  https://devchat.tv/js-jabber/jsj-401-hasura-with-tanmai-gopal/  Follow DevChatTV on Facebook and Twitter Picks Aimee Knight: http://ergonomictrends.com/hand-wrist-exercises-computer-users/  Cats in your lap AJ O’Neal: The Grievance Studies Affair  Go Proverbs  Music Dan Shappir: Guatemala Tigana  Sean Grove: Yuki Li: “Breaking Out of Box”  Charles Max Wood: A Christmas Story Rudolf the Red-Nosed Reindeer The Little Drummer Boy Santa Claus Is Comin' to Town The Ultimate Gift Frosty the Snowman
January 7, 2020
Maximiliano Firtman is a mobile web developer from Buenos Ares, Argentina. He has been a developer for 24 years and his most recent focus has been on progressive web apps, or PWAs. Steve and Max reflect on the technologies they were using when they first got started in web development and talk about their experience with mobile development. One area that Max emphasized was bringing the web into the mobile space. They discuss the progression of web access on mobile and some of the available tools. Max notes that responsible design has a very high cost in web performance for mobile devices, which requires unique approaches. They discuss some of the issues with latency in mobile, even on 4G. The solution to this latency is PWAs. Progressive web apps are a set of best practices to create web apps that are installable. They can work offline at high speeds on several operating systems. Once installed, it looks like any other app on the system. Max delves into more details on how it works. He talks about how the resources for your application are managed. He assures listeners that it’s just a website that’s using a new API, they’re not changing the way the web works, and that when that API is there, the app can be installed. It will also generally use your default browser. Steve and Max discuss how local data is stored with PWAs. To write PWAs, you can use Angular, React, JavaScript, or Vue, and it’s a pretty transparent process. Max talks about some common tools used for local storage and some of the PWAs he’s worked on in the past. The benefit of using PWAs is that they generally run faster than regular web apps. To get started, Max advises listeners to install one and start exploring. Panelists Steve Edwards Guest Maximiliano Firtman Sponsors G2i ____________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links Progressive Web Apps Appsco.pe IndexedDB Max's site Picks Steve Edwards: The Club Maximiliano Firtman: Llama Follow Max on Twitter
December 31, 2019
In this episode of JavaScript Jabber Charles Max Wood continues interviewing speakers at RxJS Live. First, he interviews Mike Ryan and Sam Julien. They gave a talk about Groupby, a little known operator. They overview the common problems other mapping operators have and how Groupby addresses these problems. The discuss with Charles where these types of operators are most commonly used and use an analogy to explain the different mapping operators.   Next, Charles talks to Tracy Lee. Her talk defines and explains the top twenty operators people should use. In her talk, she shows real-world use cases and warns against gotchas. Tracy and Charles explain that you don’t need to know all 60 operators, most people only need about 5-10 to function. She advises people to know the difference between the different types of operators. Tracy ends her interview by explaining her desire to inspire women and people of minority groups. She and Charles share their passion for diversity and giving everyone the chance to do what they love.   Dean Radcliffe speaks with Charles next and discusses his talk about making React Forms reactive. They discuss binding observables in React and how Dean used this in his business. He shares how he got inspired for this talk and how he uses RxJS in his everyday work.     The final interview is with Joe Eames, CEO of Thinkster. Joe spoke about error handling. He explains how he struggled with this as did many others so he did a deep dive to find answers to share. In his talk, he covers what error handling is and what it is used for. Joe outlines where most people get lost when it comes to error handling. He also shares the three strategies used in error handling, Retry, Catch and Rethrow and, Catch and Replace. Charles shares his admiration for the Thinkster teaching approach. Joe explains what Thinkster is about and what makes them special. He also talks about The DevEd podcast.  Panelists Charles Max Wood Guests Mike Ryan  Sam Julien Tracy Lee Dean Radcliffe Joe Eames Sponsors ABOUT YOU |aboutyou.com/apply Sentry -use the code "devchat" for 2 months free on Sentry's small plan CacheFly ____________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ___________________________________________________________ Links https://www.rxjs.live/ RxJS Live Youtube Channel https://twitter.com/mikeryandev https://twitter.com/samjulien https://twitter.com/ladyleet? https://www.npmjs.com/package/rx-helper https://twitter.com/deaniusol https://twitter.com/josepheames https://devchat.tv/dev-ed/ https://www.facebook.com/javascriptjabber https://twitter.com/JSJabber
December 24, 2019
In this episode of JavaScript Jabber Charles Max Wood does interviews at RxJS Live. His first interview is with Hannah Howard at RxJS Live about her talk. Hannah is really enthusiastic about RxJS especially when it comes to frontend development. Her talk is about how to architect full-scale apps with RxJS. Hannah gives a brief summary of her talk. Charles having met Hanna previously at Code Beam asks her how functional programming and reactive programming work together in her mind. Hannah describes how she sees programming.   Charles’s next interview is with Ben Lesh, a core team member of RxJS. Ben has been working on RxJS for the last four years. In his talk, he shares the future of RxJs, the timeline for versions 7 and 8. With Charles, he discusses his work on RxJS and the adoption of RxJS.    Next, Charles interviews Sam Julien and Kim Maida. They gave a talk together covering the common problems developers have when learning RxJS. In the talk, they share tips for those learning RxJS. Charles wonders what inspired them to give this talk. Both share experiences where they encouraged someone to use RxJS but the learning curve was to steep. They discuss the future of RxJS adoptions and resources.    Finally, Charles interviews Kim alone about her second talk about RxJS and state management. She explains to Charles that many state management libraries are built on RxJS and that it is possible to roll out your own state management solution with RxJS. They discuss why there are so many different state management libraries. Kim shares advice for those looking to roll out their own solutions. Panelists Charles Max Wood Guests Hannah Howard Ben Lesch Sam Julien Kim Maida Sponsors Sentry -use the code "devchat" for 2 months free on Sentry's small plan CacheFly Links https://www.rxjs.live/ RxJS Live Youtube Channel https://twitter.com/techgirlwonder https://twitter.com/benlesh http://www.samjulien.com/ https://twitter.com/samjulien https://twitter.com/KimMaida https://www.facebook.com/javascriptjabber https://twitter.com/JSJabber
December 17, 2019
Noah, a.k.a. Svelte Master, is from Indiana and recently moved to San Francisco. He has been given title Computational Linguist by SoundHound. He starts the show by talking about his Youtube channel all about Svelte. Svelte is a JavaScript framework similar to React and Vue. When you write components, Svelte will compile it into Vanilla JS, CSS, or HTML, and create a small bundle that will be sent to the client. Svelte is a ‘disappearing framework’, so your bundles come out as DOM APIs and there is no Svelte in the end result. Because the Svelte framework doesn’t send with the bundle, bundle sizes are significantly smaller, and it runs on all browsers. Noah shares some Svelte’s performance statistics. Sapper is a companion technology to Svelte that gives you server side rendering, routing, code splitting, and other features. Noah talks about how to write plugins for Svelte and embedding components. One main difference between Svelte and other frameworks is that it lacks a virtual DOM. This is because since it is just compiling down to JavaScript and the framework is not sent with the package, it doesn’t need a virtual DOM and instead updates as things change. Noah talks more about how this works. Some of Svelte Master’s favorite things about Svelte is that you write less code, especially unnecessary code, and state management is simple. He talks about how routing is handled through other tools like Sapper. The panel talks about methods for testing a Svelte app, adding Svelte components into a website, and pulling in third party libraries. They discuss whether there are things that you can’t do with Svelte that would require React or Vue. The show ends with Noah talking about what the future holds for Svelte and how to get started with it.  Panelists Steve Edwards Charles Max Wood **To receive your 40% OFF coupon for Manning Publications (good for all our products in all formats) visit us on Facebook - click on "Send A Message"and type "YES"** Guest Noah (Svelte Master) Sponsors Hasura.io Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit ____________________________________________________________ > "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ____________________________________________________________ Links SoundHound Svelte Master Youtube channel Syntax.fm Show 173: Hasty Treat Wes and Scott Look at Svelte Svelte Sapper Rollup Netlify Heroku Cypress  Apollo Async/await Svelma Sveltstrap Svelte-Apollo Smelte Electron Svelte-Native  Picks Steve Edwards: The Court Jester Charles Max Wood: The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job The Bishop’s Wife Miracle on 34th Street Daniel Caldas: WaniKani
December 10, 2019
Daniel Caldas is calling from Singapore. He currently works as a software engineer for Zendesk and has also worked in Portugal and Germany. He has worked primarily on the frontend with Node and JavaScript. He talks about his experience testing JavaScript, how he got started with Jest, and why he likes it. Daniel finds Jest very easy to use and straightforward. He likes that Jest has a single reference page for documentation. He feels that Jest is largely complete out of the box and has only made a small add on to get rid of Boilerplate in some tests. Daniel explains what a snapshot, how they work, and why he prefers fixtures over factories. He gives tips on how to set up your tests so that they are easy to follow. He finds it helps to structure your scenarios in the fixture description. He talks about gotchas in Jest. While Jest is largely easy to use, Jest has been around for a while and breaking changes do happen. It’s important to check what version your code base is using. While there are a lot of free sources around Jest online, he advises listeners to stick as close to the official documentation as possible, or to people associated with Jest, and to read recent stuff. As for conventions, Jest has pretty much everything out of the box and the built in conventions make it easy to navigate any project that uses Jest. Daniel talks about some of the features available in Jest, converting observables into promises, and tricks he has used to make tests easier to put together. He talks about his method for keeping his mocks and stubs straight. He advises listeners to have some organizational rules, such as starting the imports alphabetically, and to always follow those rules. He talks about how he runs tests and what environments he uses. While Jest is normally used for unit testing, Daniel has also used it for end to end tests, and he talks about his experience with an open source project doing both types in Jest. Daniel concludes the show by advising listeners starting with JavaScript and frontend, don’t think too much about the library you’re going to use because you’ll probably end up using Jest. It’s more important to have unit tests and a proper testing framework at the beginning than anything else. He also invites listeners to check out his open source work on Github. Panelists Aimee Knight AJ O’Neal Charles Max Wood   **To receive your 40% OFF coupon for Manning Publications (good for all our products in all formats) visit us on Facebook - click on "Send A Message"and type "YES"** Guest Danile Caldas Sponsors Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Links Zendesk Jest React Babel ESLint Async/Await Cypress React-d3-graph Unrevealed tips for unit testing with Jest Picks Aimee Knight: The Difference Between Fault Tolerance, High Availability, and Disaster Recovery AJ O’Neal: Rubin Report with Lindsay Shepherd Charles Max Wood: White Christmas Holiday Inn Daniel Caldas: Home Alone
December 3, 2019
Today the panel is discussing iterating on open source projects. Aimee and AJ recall a conversation they had in the past on this subject and AJ talks about some of his experience iterating with open source. AJ believes that we have an obligation to capture the value of what you create so that we can reinvest and create more value, though he admits that making money in open source is a unique challenge because donations only really work if you have a project that gets billions of downloads a month. As your project grows, it has to change in order to survive, and eventually you will need to get financial support from your project. The panel agrees that some of the main issues with iterating in open source are maintaining the code and getting feedback from users, financial backing, and roadmapping and integrations. The panel discusses their methods for getting feedback from their users. This feedback is valuable because it can show you things that you missed. They acknowledge that there can be conflicts of interest between those who only use the project and those who financially support it, and you have to make a choice. Unfortunately, someone is probably going to be inconvenienced no matter what choice you make. When making these decisions, you have to consider who it helps, who it frustrates, and who it may cause problems for. The panelists talk about different ways they’ve handled making these decisions in the past. The JavaScript experts talk about the importance of having data on your user base in order to make good choices for your users. They talk about different methods for notifying your users of upcoming changes and how it will affect compatibility, and some of the challenges with communicating with your users. AJ talks about an iteration he thought was a good idea but that a lot of people hated and how he noticed that the new users liked it but the old users did not. They panel agrees that people in general don’t like change. AJ talks about what he learned from this experience. Another common issue is integrating with other services. Integrating with cloud services, or at least giving people the option to integrate gives you an opportunity to reach more people and maintain the project long term. AJ gives some final thoughts to close the show, namely that most projects never go anywhere, and that’s ok. If you’ve got something that starts going somewhere, think early on about how you can better serve the community and remember that these people are mostly grateful and semi-willing to support you. He believes that if you are helping people create value, you deserve to see the fruits of your labor. He advises listeners to stay true to your open source ideals, think about your users perspective, and that the earlier you can think about this and make these choices, the better it is for your project   Panelists Aimee Knight Steve Edwards AJ O’Neal Charles Max Wood Sponsors Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Links How-npm-am-i React Vue.js Let’s Encrypt Async/await Node Picks Aimee Knight: Debug Like a Ninja Steve Edwards: Jack Ryan  AJ O’Neal: Why I, as a black man, attend KKK meetings Charles Max Wood: It’s a Wonderful Life Mr. Kreuger’s Christmas
November 26, 2019
Today the panel discusses the difference between Swagger and Open API with Josh Ponelat. Josh details the difference between the two. Swagger is a set of protocols around describing restful APIs. Swagger was taken over by a company called SmartBear, who donated the donated the specification to the Open Linux Foundation, and that became the Open API. Swagger is the tooling surrounding these specifications. Open API is a standardized way to describe a restful API in a YAML file. Once you’ve got a YAML file to describe your API, you can use tooling like Swagger to leverage that and take it to the next level. Using the Open API process is useful for situations where you already have an API in place, but want to codify and document it so that it’s controlled. Then going forward, you won’t introduce contradictions and it remains consistent because it’s documented in a YAML file. The process leaves room for enhancement in the future as well. Josh talks about some of the benefits of standardizing your API and some of the use cases besides tooling. A standardized API can help show developers how to use your API, SDKs, and service stubs by knowing your API is consistent in style. This makes it easier to find breaking changes and more. Josh talks more about Swagger, a finite set of tooling around Open API, most of which are open source. He talks about other tools that test APIs and do linting on YAML files. Some of the companies that use Open API include Google, Amazon, and Microsoft. Josh talks about how Amazon implements Open API. Josh talks about the book he’s writing, Designing APIs with Swagger and Open API. The book goes over describing APIs today, how to design APIs without writing code first, and how to get the most out of the system. The show concludes with Josh talking about the power of consistency and writing things down on paper. He discusses where implications that the standardization of APIs has on the text industry.  Panelists Dan Shapir Charles Max Wood Guest Josh Ponelat **To receive your the 40% OFF coupon for Manning Publications (good for all our products in all formats) visit us at Facebook - click on "Send A Message"and type "YES"** Sponsors Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Links Swagger Open API Difference Between Swagger and Open API GraphQL Designing APIs with Swagger and Open API Picks Dan Shapir Saga of Pliocene Exile Charles Max Wood DevChat.tv Merchandise  BusyCal Josh Ponelat AsciiDoc FASD tool
November 20, 2019
"The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is available on Amazon. Get your copy here today only for $2.99!
November 20, 2019
"The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is available on Amazon. Get your copy here today only for $2.99!
November 19, 2019
Douglas Crockford is a language architect and helped with the development of JavaScript. He popularized the data format JSON, and has developed various JavaScript related tools such as JSLint and JSMin He started working with JavaScript in 2000. He talks about his journey with the language, including his initial confusion and struggles, which led him to write his book JavaScript: The Good Parts. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Douglas Crockford Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Adventures in DevOps Adventures in Blockchain CacheFly Links JSJ 392: The Murky Past and Misty Future of JavaScript with Douglas Crockford JavaScript: The Good Parts How JavaSript Works Picks Charles Max Wood: https://www.mypillow.com/
November 19, 2019
Carl Mungazi is a frontend developer at Limejump in London. He is a former journalist and switched to programming in 2016. Today the panel is discussing the benefits of reading source code. Carl began reading source code because he came into programming late and from a different field. His first project was with Mithril, and he read the source code and documentation to help him understand it. The panelists discuss how reading the source code has helped them and others to improve their coding. They compare reading and understanding source code to learning a foreign language, and discuss different methods.  Carl gives some suggestions for reading source code effectively. He advises people to be patient and step through the code. Accept that you will probably take a wrong path at some point or another, but the more you read, the more you will see patterns in how libraries are structured. He also encourages listeners to approach the authors, as they are often happy to lend a hand. Reading source code is an active approach of stepping through, debugging, putting in break points, checking the stack, and so forth. It’s also important to do outside research.  Since he has been reading source code, Carl has come to prefer plain JavaScript and libraries with as little code as possible. The panel discusses the benefits of small, simple libraries. Carl gives examples of techniques that he learned from reading a library source code and how he applied it to his own coding style. Reading source code has made him more careful about mixing logic and UI, and now he separates them. He also is more confident in seeing a problem, going to a preexisting library, and just importing the fix for that problem rather than the whole library. Reading source code is really about understanding the code you use in your project. It may slow you down, but you’ll be thankful in the long term because it will help you solve future bugs more efficiently. Carl talks more about his debugging process. He still relies on a debugger, but reading a library helps you to see patterns and guess the output of a function. These patterns persist in other libraries as well. Once you can guess correctly what will happen, you go back to reading the code and find instances where the output is unexpected, and fix it. Carl’s closing thoughts are that through reading source code, he has learned that although code is used differently in each library, they are all written in the same language, and therefore interrelated. This gave him more confidence in reading code because they’re all fundamentally the same. When a bug is discovered, he encourages listeners to look at the source code before googling a solution.  Panelists AJ O’Neal Dan Shapir Steve Edwards Charles Max Wood Guest Carl Mungazi Sponsors Hasura.io  Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Adventures in Angular Links Mithril.js Preact Limejump Picks AJ O’Neal Zen of Python The Go Proverbs Go with Versions Link’s Awakening soundtrack Dan Shapir Programming Pearls book Lord of Light Steve Edwards Jabra Elite 65T Charles Max Wood Garth Brooks The Rocky movies Carl Mungazi Follow Carl @CarlMungazi and carlmungazi.com EcmaScript Spec HTML 5.2 Snarky Puppy
November 12, 2019
Chris is an independent consultant working with open source startups. He taught himself to program and started in open source. He talks about how he got into programming and how he learned to code. Chris' first access to programming was writing index.hml files when he was younger and again when he was majoring in Arts in university he was introduced to ActionScript. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Chris Biscardi Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan iPhreaks Adventures in DevOps CacheFly _______________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood will be out on November 20th on Amazon. Get your copy on that date only for $1. _______________________________________________________ Links JSJ 386: Gatsby.js with Chris Biscardi Chris' LinkedIn Chris' Twitter https://www.twitch.tv/chrisbiscardi Picks Charles Max Wood: Follow Charles Max Wood on Instagram at CharlesMaxWood Follow Charles at https://devchat.tv/events/ Suggest a topic/guests on podcast pages at https://devchat.tv Follow Devchat.tv on Instagram at devchat.tv Join us on Discord by going to https://discordapp.com/invite/z7RNTHR Go to Maxcoders.io to find out more about MaxCoders movement Chris Biscardi: Follow Chris on Instagram at ChrisBiscardi
November 5, 2019
This week, My Javascript Story welcomes Javan Makhmali,a Programmer at Basecamp from Ann Arbor, Michigan. Javan attended Community College to study Computer Science but then decided to work as a Freelancer developer. Javan and Charles debate whether having a 4-year college degree is better to become a developer and conclude that it depends on the person. Some people prefer a structured 4 year degree to feel ready for a full time jo and some people do better with bootcamps. Javan mentions he knows several people that switched careers after completing an 8 week bootcamp and that the industry was really flexible to accomodate both options. Charles and Javan then continue talking about Javan's journey as a developer and particularly his journey with Basecamp. Javan started out working with Ruby on Rails and after a couple of years applied for a job at Basecamp (then known as 37 Signals). Javan then started working with CoffeeScript which helped him understand working with JavaScript. Charles and Javan talk about the projects Javan is working on currently at Basecamp. Outside of work Javan, is a new parent and enjoys spending time with his daughter. He feels ever since he has become a parent, his work life balance has been better. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest:  Javan Makhmali Links JSJ 376: Trix: A Rich Text Editor for Everyday Writing with Javan Makhmali Javan's Twitter Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Dev Ed Podcast Adventures in Blockchain CacheFly Picks Charles Max Wood: https://maxcoders.io/
November 5, 2019
Today the panel is talking about security features that are being added to Node 13. AJ talks about the background and what he’s working with Let’s Encrypt. He talks about changes that Node has made to the TLS module. TLS is a handshake that happens between a client and a server. They exchange certificates, generate some random numbers to use for encryption, and TLS handles the encryption. The move to HTTP/2 is all about fixing legacy bugs and legacy features from the SSL days and reducing the number of handshakes. AJ talks about the difference between TLS and HTTPS. While TLS reduces the handshakes between client and server, HTTPS is just HTTP and has no knowledge that TLS is going on. HTTP/2 is more baked in as both encryption and compression are part of the specification and you get it automatically. HTTP/2 is also supposed to be faster because there’s fewer handshakes, and you can build heuristic based web servers. Since browsers have varying degrees of compatibility, a smart HTTP/2 server will classify the browser and anticipate what files to send to a client based on behavior and characteristics without the client requesting them A lot of these new features will be built into Node, in addition to some other notable features. First, there will now be set context on the TLS object. Second, if you’re connected to a server, and the server manages multiple domains, the certificate will have multiple names on it. Previously, each different server name had a different network request, but now a .gitcertificate will let you get all the metadata about the certificate, including the primary domain and all the secondary domains and reuse the connections. These new features are a great improvement on the old Node. Previously, the TLS module in Node has been an absolute mess. These are APIs that have been long neglected, and are long overdue core editions to Node. Because of these additions, Node Crypto has finally become usable. HTTP/2 is now stable, usable, and has backwards compatable API, and a dictionary of headers to make it more efficient in compression. The conversation turns back to certificates, and AJ explains what a certificate is and what it represents. A certificate has on it a subject, which is a field which contains things like common name, which in the case of HTTPS is the server name or host name. then it will have subject alternative names (SAN), which will have a list of other names that are valid on that certificate. Also included on the certificate is the name of the authority that issued the certificate. AJ talks about some of the different types of certificates, such as DV, OV, and EV certificates. They differentiate between encryption and hashing. Hashing is for verifying the integrity of data, while encryption can be used either as signing to verify identity or to keep data owned privately to the parties that are part of the connection. Encryption does not necessarily guarantee that the data is the original data. The show concludes with AJ talking about how he wants to make encryption available to the average person so that everyone can share securely.  Panelists Steve Edwards AJ O’Neal Charles Max Wood Sponsors Tidelift Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry’s small plan Ruby Rogues Links Let’s Encrypt Greenlock HTTP/2 Node.js Node Crypto JWK LZMA Gzip Broccoli.js HTTPS GCM ASN.1 OWASP list jwt.io Diffie Hellman Key Exchange Khana Academy Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange pt.2 Follow DevChatTV on Facebook and Twitter Picks Steve Edwards: Panasonic SD-YD250 bread machine AJ O’Neal: Greenlock v.3 Samsung Evo 4 TOB paired with 2012 Macbook Pro Dave Ramsey on Christian Healthcare Ministries Charles Max Wood:  Velcro straps Mac Pro Upgrade Guide
October 31, 2019
Gant Laborde is the Chief Innovation Officer of Infinite Red who is working on a course for beginners on machine learning. There is a lot of gatekeeping with machine learning, and this attitude that only people with PhDs should touch it. In spite of this, Gant thinks that in the next 5 years everyone will be using machine learning, and that it will be pioneered by web developers. One of the strong points of the web is experimentation, and Gant contrasts this to the academic approach. They conversation turns to Gant’s course on machine learning and how it is structured. He stresses the importance of understanding unicode, assembly, and other higher concepts. In his course he gives you the resources to go deeper and talks about libraries and frameworks available that can get you started right away. His first lesson is a splashdown into the jargon of machine learning, which he maps over into developer terms. After a little JavaScript kung fu, he takes some tools that are already out there and converts it into a website. Chris and Gant discuss some different uses for machine learning and how it can improve development. One of the biggest applications they see is to train the computers to figure monotonous tasks out while the human beings focus on other projects, such as watching security camera footage and identifying images. Gant restates his belief that in the next 5 years, AI will be everywhere. People will grab the boring things first, then they will go for the exciting things. Gant talks about his creation NSFW.js, an open source train model to help you catch indecent content. He and Chris discuss different applications for this technology. Next, the panel discusses where machine learning can be seen in everyday life, especially in big companies such as Google. They cite completing your sentences in an email for you as an example of machine learning. They talk about the ethics of machine learning, especially concerning security and personal data. They anticipate that the next problem is edge devices for AI, and this is where JavaScript really comes in, because security and privacy concerns require a developer mindset. They also believe that personal assistant devices, like those from Amazon and Google, will become even more personal through machine learning. They talk about some of the ways that personal assistant devices will improve through machine learning, such as recognizing your voice or understanding your accent.  Their next topic of discussion is authenticity, and how computers are actually incredibly good at finding deep fakes. They discuss the practice of placing passed away people into movies as one of the applications of machine learning, and the ethics surrounding that. Since developers tend to be worried about inclusions, ethics, and the implications of things, Gant believes that these are the people he wants to have control over what AI is going to do to help build a more conscious data set.  The show concludes with Gant talking about the resources to help you get started with machine learning. He is a panelist on upcoming DevChat show, Adventures in Machine Learning. He has worked with people with all kinds of skill sets and has found that it doesn’t matter how much you know, it matters how interested and passionate you are about learning. If you’re willing to put the pedal to the metal for at least a month, you can come out with a basic understanding. Chris and Gant talk about Tensorflow, which helps you take care of machine learning at a higher level for fast operations without calculus. Gant is working on putting together a course on Tensorflow. If you’re interested in machine learning, go to academy.infinite.red to sign up for Gant’s course. He also announces that they will be having a sale on Black Friday and Cyber Monday. Panelists Christopher Buecheler With special guest: Gant Laborde Sponsors React Round Up Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry’s small plan Adventures in Angular Links Machine Learning: How To go from Zero to Hero NSFW.js Tensorflow.js PyTorch Keras Academy.infinite.red Gantlaborde.com  Follow DevChatTV on Facebook and Twitter Picks Christopher Buecheler: Next.js Big Wreck, But For The Sun Gant Laborde:  Nicornot.com Free 5 day mini course on academy.infinite.red
October 29, 2019
Charles Max Wood talks to Filipa Lacerda in this week's My JavaScript Story. Filipa has been working as a front end engineer since 2011 and she currently works at GitLab. Filipa originally wanted to study Economy but when she got to university she decided to major in Communications thinking it would be a lot more about communication and not as much about coding. At first she really didn't like the coding aspect of it but then as time went by she actually started to enjoy coding. When she first started working she started out on the User Experience side, but then she wanted to switch to building stuff with code because she wanted to see results really fast and enjoyed that aspect of coding. Charles asks why she stuck with that degree instead of switching it and Filipa explains that at first because she didn't want to go back and re - take the exams and also decided that this degree offered many job opportunities in many different industries and now she can't imagine herself doing anything else. Filipa then talks about why she is working with Vue and all the different kind of projects she has done using Vue as well as what working for GitLab looks like on a day to day basis. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Filipa Lacerda Links https://devchat.tv/views-on-vue/vov-025-gitlabs-journey-with-vue-with-filipa-lacerda-and-jacob-schatz/ https://devchat.tv/views-on-vue/vov-009-building-modal-component-with-filipa-lacerda/ https://filipa.gitlab.io/ https://twitter.com/FilipaLacerda Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Adventures in .NET Elixir Mix CacheFly Picks Filipa Lacerda: Why We Sleep by Walker PhD, Matthew Charles Max Wood: RxJS Live: Conference Nikon D5600 Camera RØDE Microphones
October 29, 2019
Guests Chris heilmann and Zohair Ali are developers for Microsoft working on the Edge project. Today they are talking about Edge on Chromium and the future of developer tools. Edge will now be built in Chromium rather than being its own engine, aligning it more with what is being used on the open web right now. The Edge team wanted to seize the opportunity to bring something into the Chromium project based on the needs of real users and contribute to the open source web. Edge on Chromium won’t be limited to Windows 10 either, but will be available on Mac, Windows 7, and Windows 8. This project is still in beta with no set release date, so the Edge team is looking for people to test it out on Mac and tell them how it works. Chris and Zohair talk about the different parts of a web browser and what distinguishes Chrome from Chromium.  Chromium is not just a platform, it’s an entire browser that you can install. Google adds a bunch of Google services to Chromium, such as being able to sign into your Google account,  and that’s how you get Google Chrome. Similarly, the new Edge adds its own features on top of Chromium, so you can sign into your Microsoft account. By now the browser engines are so similar to each other that the users are looking for the user experience, interface, and services around it, so it made more sense for the Edge team to contribute to Chromium than to maintain their own engine and help it improve. Chris and Zohair talk about some of the features in Edge on Chromium. One service they’re particularly excited about is the Collections feature, where you can drag images, text, etc into Collections and export it to Excel or Word. Collections was inspired by what users need, and they talk about some of the different use cases for it. The new Edge on Chromium will also have an IE mode for products that still require IE 11. If you define what services need IE 11, Edge will open an IE 11 tab within the browser so you will not have to jump between browsers. Unfortunately, this feature is only available on Windows. Edge on Chromium will also offer an integration with VS Code, called Elements for VS Code, which takes part of the developer tools from Edge and puts it inside VS Code. Since the tools are based on Chromium, it stays in the same context all the time so you don’t have to jump back and forth, and you can see the changes live in your browser. This feature is in beta right now and they are looking for people to test it.  The Edge team talks about their process for creating tools. They are working on putting their tools into other languages so that they are accessible to more people. They talk about how they want to avoid creating Edge specific tools as much as possible because they want to make it better for everybody. One of their biggest struggles is everybody demands developer tools, but nobody wants to contribute, so they don’t have as much feedback and not as much outside contribution. That’s why they keep calling for people to try out the new Edge on Chromium and give them feedback. They want to make that change more transparent so that they build things that people want. They will have to make some of their own tools, but they make sure that they don’t have any third party dependencies. They mention that all Chrome extensions are compatible with Edge, so if it’s available in the Chrome webstore, you can add it to Edge, you just have to be sure to allow it. They talk about some of the testing tools available. The show concludes with a discussion of the fate of Chakra Node.  Panelists AJ O’Neal Aimee Knight Dan Shapir Steve Edwards With special guests: Chris Heilmann and Zohair Ali Sponsors Tidelift Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry’s small plan Views on Vue Links Chromium Microsoft Edge Insider Microsoft Chakra Core Elements for VS Code MS Edge Driver Puppeteer  Follow DevChatTV on Facebook and Twitter Picks Aimee Knight: Cypress testing library Steve Edwards:  CSS Tricks Screencast episode 174: Using Local Overrides in Devtools Dan Shapir: The Chronicles of Amber AJ O’Neal: The Legend of Zelda: Oracle of Ages Lover by Taylor Swift Chris Heilmann: The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel TabNine doesthedogdie.com Zohair Ali: Saga graphic novel series
October 24, 2019
In this episode of JavaScript Jabber, Charles talks about the new direction he has for the company. He wants to drive people to the point that they have the skills that make people want to hire and work with them, to teach them how to ‘Max out’. Today the panel the skills that developers need to progress in their careers: social skills.  The panel talks about their observations from work that the people who advanced and grow in their career were the ones with social skills, not necessarily with technical skills. The company wants to get stuff done, and if your social skills are getting in the way of projects getting done because you can’t work with others, you are not that useful to the company, and you will be stuck in the lower ranks while others who may not have the same technical skills will rise in the ranks because they are pleasant to work with. Mani talks about his personal experience getting laid off for lacking these soft skills. But then he read the book 48 Laws of Power by Robert Green, realized his shortcomings, and started to apply just one lesson from the book. Within 6 months, he was promoted. Mani delves deeper into the first lesson taught in 48 Laws of Power, Never Outshine the Master. Fundamentally, this means that you don’t try to prove in meetings how good you are, or that they’re wrong, or that you think that you are better than them. The more you the aforementioned things, the less likely you will be to get promoted or trusted. Mani talks about how he used to do these things and how it cost him multiple jobs. When he put this lesson into practice, he changed his methods and the boss started to like him, leading to his promotion 6 months later. The panel discusses this lesson and what benefits can come from it.  Mani shares another lesson that he learned through the story of a friend trying to get him to invest in his business. After Mani refused to invest multiple times, his friend stopped asking him to invest, but instead asked him for business advice. Eventually, Mani invested in the business because when he saw that his friend was influenced by his advice, it engendered trust between them. The panel agrees that if you want to influence someone, you have to be influenced by them. It is important to treat someone as a person rather than an asset or wallet, and ensure them that their investment is not their end goal. One of the most fundamental social skills that you must be able to like people, because other people can smell manipulation.  The panel transitions to talking about the paradoxical nature of social skills and that they are often the opposite of what you think will work in a situation. Unfortunately, there will always be difficult people to work with. To illustrate how to work with difficult people, Mani shares the story of how Gengis Khan was convinced not to destroy a city of artists and engineers by his advisor, Yelu Chucai. Gengis Khan agreed because Yelu Chucai was able to structure his plea in a way that would also benefit Gengis Khan.  The conversation shifts to how to conduct an interview to see if a candidate will fit into your team culture. First, you must know what you’re looking for and understand your team culture, and then ask for stories of when they accomplished something in the interview. If every story is all about how they did something and they don’t include other people, then that may indicate their self-centeredness. They discuss the Ben Franklin Effect.  For those listeners wondering where to begin with all this self improvement, Mani has read over 2,000 books on business and offers a course on his website, 2000books.com. Mani has teamed up with JavaScript Jabber to offer a special deal to the listeners of this podcast. To get lifetime access to Mani’s courses at a 40% discount, follow the links below.  Panelists Steve Edwards Charles Max Wood With special guest: Mani Vaya Sponsors React Native Radio Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry’s small plan React Round Up Links 48 Laws of Power by Robert Green The 360 Degree Leader by John C. Maxwell The Ben Franklin Effect javascriptjabber.com/social and 2000books.com  40% off for the first 200 people Coupon code: Jabber Follow DevChatTV on Facebook and Twitter Picks Steve Edwards: Rex Chapman Charles Max Wood: BombBomb IndieHackers.com  Stolen bike prank Mani Vaya:  How I Built This by NPR As a Man Thinketh
October 22, 2019
In this episode of My JavaScript Story is Charles talks to Mike Hartington. Mike Hartington is a Developer Advocate for Ionic Framework and a Google Developer Expert, but he is most famous in the developer community because of his beard. Charles asks how Mike got introduced to development. Mike tried to code Tic-Tac-Toe and that was a challenge because knowing the rules to the game and trying to tell a computer the rules are two very two different things. Mike then majored in Graphic Design at Rhode Island College, and started learning Flash and ActionScript. Mike talks about what kind of projects he created with Flash and ActionScript and then the process of teaching himself JavaScript. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Mike Hartington Links Mike's Twitter Ionic Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Adventures in DevOps Adventures in Blockchain CacheFly Picks  Mike Hartington Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker Trailer Charles Max Wood: Atomic Habits by James Clear Superfans by Pat Flynn
October 17, 2019
Tanmai is one of the founders at Hasura. Hasura gives you instant graphQL APIs on top of a Postgres database. The eventual idea is to make data access secure and easy. Tanmai explains the challenges of doing this in the cloud. He talks about some of the difficulties with the tooling around using GraphQL and its bias towards working well with a monolith. Since GraphQL is basically a shared type system that describes your API, that means all your types need to be in the same code base. This is at odds with the folks who want to do microservices and serverless functions, because since their API is split across multiple services they have different types, and forcing these types to work together defeats the purpose of using microservices. Also, storing state across requests doesn’t work well with serverless and cloud native stuff. In short, learning to live without state is one of the general challenges with going serverless. This is where Hasura comes into play, and Tanmai explains how it works. Hasura is metadata driven, and each instance of the server can leverage multiple calls and exhibit a high amount of concurrency. It’s designed to be a little more CPU bound than memory bound, which means that configuring auto scaling on it is very easy and allows you to utilize the elasticity of cloud native applications. Tanmai clarifies his usage of the word ‘cloud native’, by which he means microservices. He explains that when you have a metadata based engine, this metadata has a language that allows you to bring to bring in types from multiple upstream microservices, and create a coherent graphQL API on top of that. Hasura is a middle man between the microservices and the consumer that converts multiple types into a single coherent graphQL API. Next, Tanmai explains how Hasura handles data fetching and a high volume of requests. They also invented PostgresQL, RLS-like semantics within Hasura. He explains the process for merging your microservices into a single graphQL interface. Back on data fetching, Tanmai explains that when the product is an app, preventing an overabundance of queries becomes easier because during one of the staging processes that they have, they extract all of the queries that the app is actually making, and in the production version it only allows the queries that it has seen before. Hasura is focused on both the public interface and private use cases, though private is slightly better supported.  Tanmai talks about the customizations available with Hasura. Hasura supports two layers. One is an aliasing layer that lets you rename tables, columns, etc as exposed by PostgresQL. The other is a computer column, so that you can add computer columns so you can extend the type that you get from a data model, and then you can point that to something that you derive.  The panelist discusses the common conception of why it is a bad idea to expose the data models to the frontend folks directly. They discuss the trend of ‘dumbing down’ available tooling to appeal to junior developers, at the cost of making the backend more complicated. They talk about some of the issues that come from this, and the importance of tooling to solve this concern.  Finally, Tanmai talks about the reasons to use Hasura over other products. There are 2 technologies that help with integrating arbitrary data sources. First is authorization grammar, their version of RLS that can extend to any system of types and relationships, The second is the data wrapper, part of the compiler that compiles from the graphQL metadata AST to the actual SQL AST. That is a generic interface, so anyone can come in and plug in a Haskell module that has that interface and implement a backend compiler for a native query language. This allows us to plug in other sources and stitch microservices together. The show concludes with Tanmai talking about their choice to use Haskell to make Hasura.  Panelists AJ O’Neal Dan Shapir Steve Edwards Charles Max Wood With special guest: Tanmai Gopal Sponsors Adventures in DevOps Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry’s small plan The Dev Ed Podcast Links Hasura Haskell Node.js Cloud Native Microservices  PostGraphile  Postgres  PostgresQL RLS Swagger JAMstack Soap Rest Follow DevChatTV on Facebook and Twitter Picks AJ O’Neal: The Economic Singularity Capital Cities GameCube Homebrew Dan Shapir: Romania JSCamp Steve Edwards: Cold Blooded: The Clutter Family Murders Charles Max Wood: Maxcoders.io TripIt St. George Marathon VO2 Max app Tanmai Gopal:  Follow Tanmai on Twitter @tanmaigo Broken Earth Trilogy The Three-Body Problem graphQL Asia
October 15, 2019
In this episode of My JavaScript Story, Charles talks to Thorsten Lünborg. Thorsten is a Business Service Manager at MVV Energy Solutions from Frankfurt Germany. Charles asks about Thorsten's developer journey in particular how he was introduced to JavaScript. Thorsten is also a core team member for Vue.js and he talks about his involvement with the Vue community. Thorsten mainly focuses on working on Vue CLI and answering questions in forums. He describes the Vue community as a very friendly and helpful one. According to Thorsten, Vue is very stable and seems to satisfy a lot of the needs of Vue community and so people are not looking for the "next best thing" with Vue. Out of all the frameworks i tried to learn, i found Vue was the one that i liked the most and i started answering questions about Vue on the forums. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Thorsten Lünborg Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Sustain Our Software Adventures in DevOps CacheFly Links VoV 060: Our Least Favorite Parts of Vue with An Phan and Thorsten Lunborg VoV 022: How I became a Vue.js core team member without a professional background‌ with Thorsten Luenborg Thorsten's Twitter Picks Thorsten Lünborg Preacher TV Series Borderlands 3 Vue.js London 2019 https://github.com/vuejs/rfcs Charles Max Wood Running a Marathon Honeywell wifi thermometer
October 10, 2019
Valeri Karpov is a maintainer on Mongoose, has started a few companies, and works for a company called Booster Fuels. Today’s topic debugging with Async/Await. The panel talks about some of the challenges of debugging with Async. AJ, however, has never encountered the same problems, so he shares his debugging method. Valeri differentiates between .catch vs try...catch, and talks about why he prefers .catch. There are two ways to handle all errors in an async function without leading to an unhandled promise rejection. The first is to wrap the entire body of the async function in a try...catch, has some limitations. Calling an async function always returns a promise, so the other approach is calling .catch on the promise to handle any errors that occur in that function body. One of the key differences is if you return a promise within an async function, and that return promise is wrapped in a try...catch, the catch block won’t get called if that promise is rejected, whereas if you call .catch on the promise that the function returns, you’ll actually catch that error. There are rare instances where this can get tricky and unintuitive, such as where you have to call new promise and have resolve and reject, and you can get unexpected behavior. The panel discusses Valeri’s current favorite JS interview question, which is,  “Given a stream, implement a function called ‘stream to promise’ that, given a stream, returns a promise that resolves to the concatenation of all the data chunks emitted by the stream, or rejects if the stream emits an error event.” It’s really simple to get this qustion right, and really simple to get it wrong, and the difference can be catastrophic. AJ cautions listeners to never use the data event except in the cases Val was talking about, only use the readable event. The conversation turns to the function of a readable event. Since data always pushes data, when you get a readable event, it’s up to you to call read inside the function handler, and then you get back a chunk of data, call read again and again until the read returns null. When you use readable, you are in control and you avoid piling functions into RAM. In addition, the right function will return true or false to let you know if the buffer is full or not. This is a way to mix imperative style into a stream. The next discussion topics are the differences between imperative style and reactive style and how a waits and promises work in a normal four loop. A wait suspends the execution of a function until the promise is resolved. Does a wait actually stop the loop or is it just transpiling like a promise and it doesn’t stop the loop. AJ wrote a module called Batch Async to be not as greedy as promise.all but not as limited as other options. The JavaScript panelists talk about different async iterators they’ve used, such as Babel. They discuss the merits of Babel, especially since baseline Android phones (which a significant portion of the population of the world uses) run UC Browser that doesn’t support Babel, and so a significant chunk of the population of the world. On the other hand, if you want to target a large audience, you need to use Babel. Since frameworks in general don’t handle async very well, the panel discusses ways to mitigate this. They talk about different frameworks like Vue, React, and Express and how they support async functions. They discuss why there is no way for you to actually cancel an async option in an actual case, how complex canceling is, and what you are really trying to solve for in the cancellation process.  Canceling something is a complex problem. Valeri talks about his one case where he had a specific bug that required non-generic engineering to solve, and cancelling actually solved something. When AJ has come across cancellation issues, it’s very specific to that use case. The rest of the panelists talk about their experiences with having to cancel something.  Finally, they talk about their experience with async generator functions. A generator is a function that lets you enter into the function later. This makes sense for very large or long running data sets, but when you have a bounded items, don’t complicate your code this way. When an async generator function yields, you explicitly need to call next in order for it to pick up again. If you don’t call ‘next’, it’s essentially cancelled. Remember that object.keys and object.values are your friends.  Panelists Christopher Buecheler AJ O’Neal Charles Max Wood With special guest: Valeri Karpov Sponsors The DevEd Podcast Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry’s small plan Adventures in DevOps Links Mongoose Express 5 Node Streams Pull Streams Masteringjs.io MongoDB Babel HTML Webpack Vue Express RxJS Console.log Json.stringify Batchasync.js How to Write Batch Async Functions Follow DevChatTV on Facebook and Twitter Picks AJ O’Neal: Ethan Garofolo YouTube Christopher Buecheler: Functional Design Patterns for Express.js Charles Max Wood: Microsoft Ignite Maxcoders.io Valeri Karpov: Follow Valeri on Twitter @code_barbarian and Github @vkarpov15 Masteringjs.io Jurassic Park: A Novel
October 8, 2019
In this episode of My JavaScript Story is Charles talks to Eduardo San Martin Morote. Eduardo is a freelance developer, a core team member of Vue.js, and loves contributing to open source. Eduardo started web development with games. He then majored in Computer Science and Mathematics. Eduardo works as a freelancer so he can work on Open Source projects in his free time. One of the problems he draws attention to is the sustainability of Open Source Projects. The developers that maintain the projects on Open Source are not funded, and even though many companies use Open Source code they don't have sponsor it even though they have the financial means to do so. Charles Max Wood recommends another podcast Devchat.tv hosts, Sustain Our Software that addresses this problem among others for Open Source. Eduardo and Charles talk about characters that have accents that have to be encoded and how they deal with this problem. Eduardo then talks about some of the projects he is working on currently with Vue.js. Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Adventures in Blockchain Adventures in DevOps CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Eduardo San Martin Morote Links VoV 038: Webassembly and Typescript with Eduardo San Martin Morote VoV 010: “Vue Libraries, Open Source, Meetups” with Eduardo San Martin Morote Eduardo's LİnkedIn Eduardo's Twitter J2EE jQuery Picks Eduardo San Martin Morote Tajin Eduardo's GitHub Charles Max Wood Subscribers Subscribe to your favorite podcast on Devchat.tv https://canny.io Suggest a Topic or a Guest for your Favorite Podcast on Devchat.tv by clicking on Suggest A Topic Or Guest
October 3, 2019
Kaelig Deloumeau-Prigent is a self taught web developer from west France. He has worked for BBC, The Guardian, and The Financial Times in the UK. He has also worked in the US for SalesForce and currently works for Shopify on their Polaris design system. Shopify has multiple design systems, and Polaris is open source. Today the panel is talking about design systems and developer tooling around design systems. To begin, Kaelig explains what a design system is. A design system is all of the cultural practices around design and shipping a product. It includes things like the words, colors, spacing grid system, and typography, plus guidance on how to achieve that in code. The panelists discuss what has made design systems so popular. Design systems have been around for a while, but became popular due to the shift to components, which has been accelerated by the popularity of React. The term design system is also misused by a lot of people, for it is much more than having a Sketch file.  Next, they talk about whether design systems fall under the jurisdiction of a frontend developer or web designers. Kaelig has found that a successful design system involves a little bit of everyone and shouldn’t be isolated to one team. They talk about what the developer workflow looks like in a design system. It begins with thinking of a few common rules, a language, and putting it into code. As you scale, design systems can become quite large and it’s impossible for one person to know everything. You either give into the chaos, or you start a devops practice where people start to think about how we build, release, and the path from designer’s brain to production. The panelists then talk about how to introduce a design system into a company where there are cultural conflicts. Kaelig shares his experience working with SalesForce and introducing a design system there. They discuss what aspects of a design system that would make people want to use it over what the team is currently doing. Usually teams are thankful for the design system. It’s important to build a system that’s complete, flexible, and extensible so that you can adapt it to your team. A good design system incorporates ‘subatomic’ parts like the grid system, color palette, and typography, referred to as design tokens. Design systems enable people to take just the bits of the design system that are interesting to them and build the components that are missing more easily.  The conversation turns to the installation and upgrade process of a design system. Upgrading is left up to the customer to do on their own time in most cases, unless it’s one of the big customers. They talk about the role of components in upgrading a design system. Kaelig talks about the possibility of Shopify transitioning to web components. Kaelig shares some of his favorite tools for making a design system and how to get started making one. A lot of design teams start by taking a ton of screen shots and looking at all the inconsistencies.Giving them that visibility is a good thing because it helps get everyone get on the same page. The panelists talk about the role of upper management in developing components and how to prioritize feature development. Kaelig talks about what drives the decision to take a feature out. The two main reasons a feature would be removed is because the company wants to change the way things are done and there’s a different need that has arisen. The show concludes by discussing the possibility of a design system getting bloated over time. Kaelig says that Design systems takes some of the burden off your team, help prevent things from getting bloated, allow you to ship less code.   Panelists Chris Ferdinandi Aimee Knight Steve Emmerich With special guest: Kaelig Deloumeau-Prigent Sponsors Sustain Our Software Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry’s small plan Adventures in Blockchain Links Shopify Polaris Bootstrap React Sketch.ui Figma.ui  CSS StoryBook ESLint Jest Ensign Webpacker Follow DevChatTV on Facebook and Twitter Picks Steve Emmerich: CedarWorks play beds  Azure’s container instances Aimee Knight: Awesome Actions for Github Chris Ferdinandi: Free Meek docuseries Simplicity: Part 2 by Bastian Allgeier Kaelig Deloumeau-Prigent: Dependabot Ink by Vadim Demedez Follow Kaelig on Twitter @kaelig
October 1, 2019
On this episode of My JavaScript Story is Charles talks to Dan Pastori, Co-Founder, Software Architect at 521 Dimensions. Charles asks about Dan's average day and what his life looks like before diving into his coding journey. Dan talks about how he got into web development. Dan taught himself PHP and JavaScript. Charles talks about the Views on Vue episode Dan was on VoV 012: Re-using VueJS Mixins and Filtering Google Map Data with Dan Pastori, and wants to know how Dan got into Vue. Dan compares learning times of Vue and Angular and mentions he learned Vue in a week as opposed to the months he spent learning Angular. Dan talks about his involvement in the Vue community and the future of Vue as well as the projects he is currently working on. Dan then talks about his future projects and plans. They finish off with picks. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Dan Pastori Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Adventures in DevOps Adventures in Blockchain CacheFly Links VoV 012: Re-using VueJS Mixins and Filtering Google Map Data with Dan Pastori Dan's LinkedIn https://github.com/521dimensions/amplitudejs 521 Dimensions https://avotoast.app/ https://github.com/521dimensions https://serversideup.net Dan's Twitter Picks Dan Pastori: Clean Code by Robert C. Martin The Food Lab: Better Home Cooking Through Science by Cherie Mason and J. Kenji López-Alt Charles Max Wood: Headliner App
September 26, 2019
Mike North is the Ember guy at Frontend Masters and LinkedIn’s web developer trainer. Today the panel is talking about the upcoming Ember update, which Mike calls a total reinvention of the way you build with Ember. Finally, they are letting go of the cruft and stuff they had to hold on to in order to support IE8 and using modern interface The panel talks about some of the issues with IE8, and agree that the reason Ember felt its age because it was built for IE8. Ember 314 is moving from the past into the present, a sleek modern way to build apps. Mike talks about how easy the new Ember is to use. Mike talks about the excitement in the Ember community because the new build is focused on stability and seamlessness. Charles talks about his less seamless experience with the Angular community. For context, Mike North’s first frontend masters course was recorded in 2014, and he’s only had to change two lines of code. Ember is the only framework that has managed to go all the way from IE7/IE8 to today without a major gap,breaks, or rewrites. They transition to talking about what keeps Ember going. There is an effort to make sure things are decentralized and not tied to any specific company, although Apple, Netflix, Nasa, and PlaysStation all use it. LinkedIn has also been hiring Ember core member to continue working on it, and sponsoring open source work.  Next, they talk about how Ember works with TypeScript. You can install an Ember add on with one terminal command that will enable TypeScript in an Ember app.There are some issues that could cause misalignment with JavaScript and TypeScript, but Ember has designed things around it. MIke talks about the major change in the learning curve with using Ember and how far Vanilla JS will take you. Overall, it is a lot more approachable than it used to be.  They move on to talk about the availability of third party solutions with Ember. Mike assures them that Ember has add-ons, and parts of the framework are opening up to allow experimentation with components. There are lots of ways to make Ember your own without running the risk of diverging, giving more flexibility than ever while maintaining the happy path. Testing within Ember is also a priority, and they want the code to be as readable as possible. The last topic discussed in this show is the importance of developer education. LinkedIn looks at employment numbers and the rate at which new jobs open, and software engineering is growing like crazy and will likely continue to grow.The rate at which new people are graduating with computer science and programming degrees, as well as those from unconventional backgrounds, is not keeping up with the number of jobs. This means that there will be fewer senior people spread across bigger groups of developers with less experience. The panel agrees that it is the responsibility of people who have been around or learned something period to pass on the knowledge because the more knowledge is passed on, the more stable things will remain as seniors become more scarce. It is also important for companies to level up junior developers. They conclude by talking about tools available for people who want to learn more about Ember Octane, and Mike makes an open request to the JS community.  Panelists Charles Max Wood Steve Emmerich Chris Ferdinandi Aimee Knight AJ O’Neal Christopher Buecheler With special guest: Mike North Sponsors React Native Radio Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry’s small plan Dev Ed Podcast Links Ember Frontend Masters IE8 Ember Octane Sprout Core TypeScript ES6 Lodash  Mocha Backstop.js  Semver Follow DevChatTV on Facebook and Twitter Picks Chris Ferdinandi: Vanilla JS Academy, get 30% off with code ‘jsjabber’ leanweb.dev Steve Emmerich: 123 Magic RGDK Aimee Knight: Recursion blog post Wholesome Provisions Protein Cereal AJ O’Neal: Carby V2 by Insurrection Industries GameCube Mods Charles Max Wood: Nikon D5600 Rode Newsshooter Viltrox light panel Quest Nutrition pumpkin bars Christopher Buecheler: Tool’s Fear Inoculum on Apple Music, Spotify, and Google Play Mike North: Github Universe Github Tracer Bench Follow Mike @mike-north on Github, @northm on LinkedIn, and @michaellnorth on Twitter
September 24, 2019
Episode Summary Dominik Kundel works as developer evangelist at Twilio. Dominik talks about the history of Twilio, which actually started with integrating phone calls into apps and then moved to SMS integration. Today Charles and Dominik are talking about how the SMS message approach can augment your user experience. Since many people are not familiar with implementing SMS, Dominik talks about how Twilio can help. Twilio created was a supernetwork where they work with carriers and gateways around the world to ensure that they provide reliable services. They also focus heavily on making sure that the developer experience is great. Uber and Lyft are two of the companies that use Twilio, and Dominik shares some of the interesting things that they’ve accomplished. He is particularly excited about phone number masking to support privacy. Uber and Lyft use phone number masking so that your driver doesn’t see your real number and you don’t see theirs. Instead, each of you sees a Twilio number. This use case is becoming more common.  Twilio recently introduced Flex, which Dominik explains is their contact center solution. Flex is designed to keep with their philosophy of everything should be programmable and configurable, and take it on to a software shipment. This is their first time shipping software instead of just APIs. Flex is highly customizable and flexible, allows you to build React plugins that let you change anything you want. Charles asks Dominik about some of the gotchas in telephony. One major issues is spam calls, which Twilio is trying to work with some providers on a ‘verified by Twilio’ list. This list lets companies get verified, and they’re working on ways to let you know the reason why they’re calling without having to answer your phone. This can be difficult because each country has different regulations. Dominik talks about what it would take for someone who wanted to build an SMS gateway themselves. They would have to work with carriers and learn SMS protocols. It’s important to note that SMS and phone calls have different protocols Dominik talks about some of the unique use cases they’ve seen their system. Some examples are contextual communications, account verifications, and codex creation. There are other fun examples, such as a drone controlled via text message, a fake boyfriend app, and a dog that was taught to take selfies that are sent to his owner.  Charles asks about ways to get started with Twilio. If you want to explore this and don’t know where to get started, try Twilio Quest, a game to teach you how to use Twilio. There is also documentation, which is good if you know exactly what you want to achieve, or if you just want to explore possibilities then download Twilio Quest.  They delve into a more specific use case for Twilio to send text to subscibers of DevChatTV. Dominik talks about ways of dealing with sending notifications to people outside of the US. You can send with a US number to any country code, or you can personalize it, so that people in the UK receive it from a UK number and so on through automatic geocode matching. They talk about Twilio’s billing.  Finally, they talk about security within telephony in light of recent hacks. They discuss the security of two factor authentication.Two factor authentication and security, especially in light of recent hacks. Dominik talks about the API called Authy, where you can implement different ways of doing two factor authentication, such as push notifications, time based one time password, sms, and phone calls. For most people in the world two factor authentication is very safe, unless you’re a very important person, then you’re more at risk for targeted attacks. They conclude by talking about Twilio’s acquisition of Sendgrid. Panelists Charles Max Wood With special guest: Dominik Kundel Sponsors iPhreaks Show Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry’s small plan Ruby Rogues Links Twilio Flex React Rust Twilio Quest Twilio docs Twilio Completes Acquisition of Sendgrid Authy Follow DevChatTV on Facebook and Twitter Picks Charles Max Wood: Superfans by Pat Flynn Neilpatel.com   Dominik Kundel: Enable a setting called javascript.implicit Follow him @dkundel
September 23, 2019
This episode of My Ruby Story is coming to you live from OSCON. Joining Charles Max Wood is Daniel Gruesso from GitLab to talk about developing in the Open Source and the Developer Report. GitLab works with an open core model, Daniel talks about the trade - offs of having code open to public, the first of which is having everything up-to-date so any contributions made will work with the latest version. Daniel calls this the "bus-factor" where if one of the team members gets hit by a bus, the rest of the team will have everything to work with. They then talk about the GitLab 2019 Global Developer Report results. One of the most interesting results of this survey with over 4,000 respondents, was that remote teams outperformed on site teams. This ties into the current Twitter discussion about "10x Performing Engineers". Remote teams are able to work on their own most productive hours and are not disturbed by their teammates when they are doing dedicated work on a deadline. Also remote teams by nature have to be more conscious of security. Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Adventures in DevOps Adventures in Blockchain CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Daniel Gruesso Links Daniel's LinkedIn GitLab Open Source & Software Development| O'Reilly OSCON GitLab 2019 Global Developer Report | GitLab 10x Engineer Twitter
September 23, 2019
This episode of My JavaScript Story is coming to you live from OSCON. Joining Charles Max Wood is Daniel Gruesso from GitLab to talk about developing in the Open Source and the Developer Report. GitLab works with an open core model, Daniel talks about the trade - offs of having code open to public, the first of which is having everything up-to-date so any contributions made will work with the latest version. Daniel calls this the "bus-factor" where if one of the team members gets hit by a bus, the rest of the team will have everything to work with. They then talk about the GitLab 2019 Global Developer Report results. One of the most interesting results of this survey with over 4,000 respondents, was that remote teams outperformed on site teams. This ties into the current Twitter discussion about "10x Performing Engineers". Remote teams are able to work on their own most productive hours and are not disturbed by their teammates when they are doing dedicated work on a deadline. Also remote teams by nature have to be more conscious of security. Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Adventures in DevOps Adventures in Blockchain CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Daniel Gruesso Links Daniel's LinkedIn GitLab Open Source & Software Development| O'Reilly OSCON GitLab 2019 Global Developer Report | GitLab 10x Engineer Twitter
September 19, 2019
Episode Summary Surma is an open web advocate for Google currently working with WebAssembly team. He was invited on the show today to talk about using web workers and how to move work away from the browser’s main thread. His primary platform is bringing multithreading out of the fringes and into the web. The panel talks about their past experience with web workers, and many of them found them isolated and difficult to use. Surma believes that web workers should pretty much always be sued because the main thread is an inherently bad place to run your code because it has to do so much. Surma details the differences between web workers, service workers, and worklets and explains what the compositer is.  The panel discusses what parts should be moved off the main thread and how to move the logic over. Surma notes that the additional cost of using a worker is basically nonexistent, changes almost nothing in your workflow, and takes up only one kilobyte of memory. Therefore, the cost/benefit ratio of using web workers gets very large. They discuss debugging in a web worker and Surma details how debugging is better in web workers.  Surma wants to see people use workers not because it will make it faster, but because it will make your app more resilient across all devices. Every piece of JavaScript you run could be the straw that breaks the camel’s back. There’s so much to do on the main thread for the browser, especially when it has a weaker processor, that the more stuff you can move away, the better. The web is tailored for the most powerful phones, but a large portion of the population does not have the most powerful phone available, and moving things over to a web worker will benefit the average phone. Surma talks about his experience using the Nokia 2, on which simple apps run very slow because they are not being frugal with the user’s resources. Moving things to another thread will help phones like this run faster.   The panel discusses the benefit of using web workers from a business standpoint. The argument is similar to that for accessibility. Though a user may not need that accessibility all the time, they could become in need of it. Making the app run better on low end devices will also increase the target audience, which is helpful is user acquisition is your principle metric for success.  Surma wants businesses to understand that while this is beneficial for people in countries like India, there is also a very wide spectrum of phone performance in America. He wants to help all of these people and wants companies acknowledge this spectrum and to look at the benefits of using web workers to improve performance. Panelists Charles Max Wood Christopher Buecheler Aimee Knight AJ O’Neal With special guest: Surma Sponsors Adventures in DevOps Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry’s small plan Adventures in Angular Links Web workers Service workers Worklets  Ecto model Babel Swoosh Comlink WhatsApp Follow DevChatTV on Facebook and Twitter Picks Charles Max Wood: For Love of Mother-Not Surma: Follow Surma @DasSurma on Twitter and at dassur.ma WebAssembly Spec AJ O’Neal: The GameCube Ultimate Pikmin for Wii and GameCube Super Monkey Ball Christopher Buecheler CinemaSins Sincast podcast
September 17, 2019
Episode Summary My JavaScript Story this week meets with Nick Basile, UX instructor at Lambda School from Austin, TX. Nick talks about how much he enjoys working with Laravel and Vue as well as his journey as a developer. Upon graduating from university in Switzerland with a degree in Economics, he started working for two start-ups doing UX/UI design. He then wanted to be able to build UI as well so he taught himself JavaScript and HTML. He then got a job as a front-end developer to further develop his skills. Charles makes a comment about how many developers don't have a Computer Science Degrees. Nick then talks about how he got into Laravel and Vue and also how he started working for Lambda. They briefly discuss Lambda's business model and Nick's approach to teaching. Finally Nick talks about how he spends his life outside work in Austin, which nowadays involves looking after his 4-month old daughter. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Nick Basile Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Adventures in DevOps Adventures in BlockChain CacheFly Links VoV 008: Getting Started with TDD on Vue.js with Nick Basile Nick's LinkedIn Lambda School Nick's Twitter https://nick-basile.com/ https://laravel-news.com/the-10-best-laravel-podcasts   Picks Charles Max Wood: SEMrush SEO Tools https://neilpatel.com/ubersuggest/ ActiveCampaign Nick Basile: How It Actually Works Tailwind CSS Going Back to the Gym
September 12, 2019
Episode Summary Todd Gardner is a software developer, podcaster on the show Script and Style, startup founder, and comedy host for Pub Conf, a ‘comedy after party for developers’. Since he was last on the show 6 years ago, he has seen his startup TrackJS become quite successful. TrackJS is a JavaScript error monitoring service which gives you visibility into your client side experience. It’s different from other tools because focused on simplicity, so you’ll never need a guy on your team dedicated solely to TrackJS because everyone can use it. The panel begins by talking about debugging methods and tools. Some rely solely on the debugger built into their platform while others prefer to use a third party service. They discuss the necessity of using a third party debugger and if there are better solutions than just the built in debugger.  They then discuss what to do after you’ve fixed a bug, such as if it is necessary to write a test to make sure it was completely fixed They talk about things to do to make debugging more effective. Todd and Aimee believe that code needs to begin by being designed for debug-ability.  The panel discusses issues with invisible boundaries encountered while debugging, such as running out of memory. They talk about ways to mitigate issues that happen outside of your code base. Todd talks about the dangers of ad-blockers, and the panel agrees that it is important to consider how your website will be crippled by the user’s own technology. The end user in a production environment will have a different experience than you did writing it on a professional computer.  Todd talks about the difference between debugging for the web versus a mobile application. Todd has encountered particular problems with debugging on a remote device, and he talks about how he solved the issue. The show concludes with Todd giving a quick elevator pitch for TrackJS Panelists Chris Ferdinandi Christopher Buecheler Aimee Knight Charles Max Wood Steve Emmrich With special guest: Todd Gardner Sponsors Adventures in Blockchain Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry’s small plan React Round Up Links Track JS (free trial available) Script and Style podcast PubConf Console.log Blackbox for Firefox and Chrome Redux lager Remote JS  Follow DevChat on Facebook and Twitter Picks Christopher Buecheler: React/TypeScript cheat sheet  Chris Ferdinandi: Pokemon Brawl  Space Invaders game Gomakethings.com newsletter Aimee Knight: TechLead Youtube channel Charles Max Wood: Atomic Habits Getting up at 4 am Steve Emmrich: Trello Babushkas and grandmas to help you with your newborn Todd Gardner: PubConf Follow Todd @toddhgardner or todd.mn
September 10, 2019
Episode Summary Rachel Roumeliotis and Roger Magoulas from O'Reilly Media join Charles Max Wood at OSCON to talk about the process of content development for OSCON. Rachel is the Vice President of Content Strategy at O'Reilly and Roger is Vice President of Radar at O'Reilly. Rachel and Roger talk about the history of OSCON Conference as well as the key technologies they wanted to cover this year such as Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Cloud-Native applications. They then talk about the future of OSCON and the highlights they wat to cover next year such as security. Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Adventures in DevOps Adventures in Blockchain CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Rachel Roumeliotis and Roger Magoulas Links Rachel's LinkedIn Roger's LinkedIn Open Source & Software Development| O'Reilly OSCON O'Reilly Radar O'Reilly Media - Technology and Business Training  
September 5, 2019
Sponsors Sustain Our Software Sentry– use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Adventures in Blockchain Panel Charles Max Wood Episode Summary In today’s show, Chuck talks about the recent tweet thread about 10x engineers. He goes through each of the points in the tweet and talks about each of them in turn. There are only two points he sort of agrees with, and believes the rest to be absolute garbage. One of the issues with this tweet is that it doesn’t define what a 10x engineer is. Defining a 10x engineer is difficult because it is also impossible to measure a truly average engineer because there are many factors that play into measuring productivity. Chuck turns the discussion to what a 10x engineer is to him and how to find one. A 10x engineer is dependent on the organization that they are a part of, because they are not simply found, they are made. When a 10x engineer is added to a team, the productivity of the entire team increases. Employers have to consider firstly what you need in your team and how a person would fit in. You want to avoid changing the entire culture of your organization. Consider also that a 10x engineer may be hired as a 2x engineer, but it is the employer that turns them into a 10x engineer. Overall, Chuck believes these tweets are asinine because it’s impossible to measure what makes a 10x engineer in the first place, and hiring a person that fits the attributes in the list would be toxic to your company.  Links 10x engineer twitter thread Follow DevChat on Facebook and Twitter Picks Charles Max Wood: Copyhackers.com Good to Great by Jim Collins Keto diet Podcast Movement
September 3, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Ruby Rogues React Native Radio CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Sam Selikoff Episode Summary Sam Selikoff, Co-Founder at EmberMap shares his journey of how he became a developer. Sam was an Economics major in college and he really loved the theory of economics. When he graduated, he started working as a consultant and while working with data for statistical analysis he found that he enjoyed working with SQL and that how he started his developing career. Sam explains why he prefers Ember.js framework to other frameworks. He also talks about the projects he is working on currently. Apart from coding Sam enjoys reading economics books and playing music with his family. He shares some of his favorite books to read on the Theory Of Economics. Links JSJ 364: Ember Octane with Sam Selikoff EmberMap Podcast Sam's Twitter Picks Charles Max Wood Podcast Movement Sam Selikoff UPLIFT Desk Midsommar Movie
August 29, 2019
Sponsors GitLab | Get 30% off tickets with the promo code: DEVCHATCOMMIT Sentry– use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Views on Vue Panel Charles Max Wood Joe Eames Episode Summary Today Joe and Charles are discussing how to stay current in the tech field. Since looking at all the new technology can be overwhelming, they advise listeners on what to focus on, which will differ depending on your career. Joe brings up that one of the top reasons people choose a job is because it has a technology they want to learn. Joe and Charles discuss trends in the tech world, such as the rise and fall of Rails. They discuss what to do if you’re happy with what you’re doing now but want your career to stay viable. While it is important to continue moving along with technology, they agree that the stuff that’s really important is the stuff that doesn’t change. Charles believes that if you have a solid knowledge on a subject that isn’t necessary current, that is still very valuable.  Joe and Charles discuss the importance of having a learning plan and the importance of having soft skills in addition to technological know-how. Another important part of staying current is figuring out where you want to end up and making a plan. If you want to work for a specific company, you need to learn the technology they’re using. Joe talks about some of his experiences trying to get a job with a big company and how he was reminded of the importance of the fundamentals.  They discuss the merits of being a generalist or a specialist in your studies and the best approach once you’ve chosen a technology to learn. Once you’ve learned a technology, it’s important to start building with it. Charles and Joe talk about different ways of learning, such as books, videos, code reading, or tutorials, and the importance of finding a medium that you can understand. They discuss the isolating nature of tutorials and how it is important to have real-world experience with the code. They discuss how to know if you’ve learned a technology well enough to move onto the next thing, and whether the technologies you studies should be career focused or passion based. Charles advises listeners to divide their time as follows: 50% of your learning should be focused on what you’re currently doing at your job, 25% looking towards the future and studying upcoming technology, and 25% on your passion.  Links Node Backbone Follow DevChat on Facebook and Twitter Picks Charles Max Wood: Rails 6 Containerization Joe Eames: Gatsby
August 27, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Ruby Rogues React Native Radio CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Thomas Grassl Episode Summary Thomas Grassl from SAP joins Charles Max Wood at OSCON to talk about what SAP is doing in the Open Source world. Thomas talks about SAP's recently released a UI5 Web Components. Charles wonders how the components will work with different frameworks and Thomas explains UI5 Web Components are HTML components and they should be used how regular HTML components are used. UI5 Web Components is Open Source so Thomas expects contributions from the Open Source community. Thomas then talks about UI5 Web Components' enterprise-ready functionality and scalability features as well as the security and accessibility aspects. They then talk about Thomas' position as Developer Relations in SAP and what it entails. Thomas then talks about the career opportunities that comes with customization on the enterprise scale. Finally Charles and Thomas talk about how SAP approaches developer relations and what developers should do if they would like to contribute to SAP Open Source project.   Links UI5 Web Components- SAP Thomas' LinkedIn Thomas' Twitter Open Source & Software Development| O'Reilly OSCON SAP Open Source | Developer
August 22, 2019
Sponsors RxJS Live Panel Charles Max Wood Christopher Beucheler Episode Summary Today Charles and Christopher discuss what can you do with JavaScript. They talk about the kinds of things they have used JavaScript to build. They discuss non-traditional ways that people might get into JavaScript and what first drew them to the language. They talk about the some of the non-traditional JavaScript options that are worth looking into. Christopher and Charles talk about some of the fascinating things that have been done with JavaScript, such as Amazon Alexa capabilities, virtual reality, and games. They spend some time talking about JavaScript usage in game creation and building AI. They talk about how they’ve seen JavaScript change and progress during their time as developers. They talk about areas besides web that they would be interested in learning more about and what kinds of things they would like to build in that area. They finish by discussing areas that they are excited to see improve and gain new capabilites. Links Node.js WebGL React React Native Quake TenserFlow.js WebAssembly Hermes Follow DevChat on Facebook and Twitter Picks Charles Max Wood: Instagram JavaScript Jabber Reccomendations New shows: Adventures in Block Chain, Adventures in .Net Christopher Beucheler: Pair programming VS Code Live Share
August 20, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Ruby Rogues React Native Radio CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Jeffrey Meyerson Episode Summary Jeffrey Meyerson, founder of FindCollabs and host at Software Engineering Daily joins Charles Max Wood for a discussion about latest trends in developer world, ways of monetizing podcasts and finding ads for podcasts.Jeffrey shares how he started hosts podcasts and how he became a developer. Jeffrey's journey as a developer started out with his interest through music and poker. They compare advertising through sponsoring a booth in a conference versus advertising through a podcast. Tune in for a fun chat that covers everything from Keto dieting to software buzz words. Links Jeffrey's LinkedIn https://www.secretsofsongwriting.com/ https://www.hooktheory.com/ FindCollabs Software Media with Charles Max Wood Picks Charles Max Wood #75Hard Jeffrey Meyerson Owning a Rice Cooker
August 15, 2019
Sponsors RxJS Live Panel Charles Max Wood Christopher Beucheler Aimee Knight Episode Summary Today’s episode is an exploration of the question “What is JavaScript?”. Each of the panelists describes what they think JavaScript is, giving a definition for both technical and non-technical people. They talk about how the different layers of JavaScript tie into their definitions. They agree that it’s incorrect to call JavaScript one of the ‘easy’ programming languages and some of the challenges unique to JavaScript, such as the necessity of backwards compatibility and that it is used in tandem with CSS and HTML, which require a different thinking method. They discuss the disdain that some developers from other languages hold for JavaScript and where it stems from. They discuss methods to level up from beginner to mid level JavaScript programmer, which can be tricky because it is a rapidly evolving language. They revisit the original question, “What is Java Script?”, and talk about how their definition of JavaScript has changed after this discussion. They finish by talking about the story they want to tell with JavaScript, why they chose JavaScript, and what is it they are trying to do, create, become through using the language. They invite listeners to share their answers in the comments. Links JQuery JavaScript JSON React.js Follow DevChat on Facebook and Twitter Picks Charles Max Wood: The Dungeoncast  Aimee Knight: This Patch of Sky Christopher Beucheler: Silversun Pickups album Widow’s Weeds Andrew Huang YouTube channel
August 13, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly A $100 discount for RxJS Live tickets for all listeners with the code "chuckforlife" Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Aaron Frost Episode Summary Aaron Frost joins Charles to talk about what Observables are and why developers should learn about them and use them in their code. He explains the difference between Observables, Promises and Callbacks with an example. Aaron then invites all listeners to attend the upcoming RxJS Live Conference and introduces the impressive speaker line-up. The conference will take place on September 5-6 in Las Vegas and tickets are still available. Aaron also offers a $100 discount to all listeners with the code "chuckforlife". For any questions you can DM Aaron on his Twitter account. Links RxJS Live Conference RxJS Conference Tickets Aaron's Twitter
August 8, 2019
Sponsors Sentry– use the code “devchat” for $100 credit RxJS Live Panel Charles Max Wood Christopher Beucheler AJ O’Neal With Special Guest: John Somnez Episode Summary John is the founder of Bulldog Mindset andSimple Programmer, which teaches software developers soft skills, and the author of a couple books. He specializes in creating a personal brand and marketing. He addresses the rumors of him leaving software development and gives an introduction to marketing yourself as a software developer and its importance. The panel discusses their experience with consulting and how marketing themselves has paid off. John talks about the importance of having soft skills. In his opinion, the most important soft skills for programmers are communication, persuasion and influence, people skills and charisma. He talks about highlight those soft skills. The truth is, more and more people are hiring for people skills rather than technical skills. The panel discusses more about the importance of people skills. John talks about ways to build your personal brand. One of the easiest ways is blogging but he talks about other methods like podcasts YouTube, writing books, and others. A key to building a personal brand is choosing something that you can become the best at, no matter how small it is. The panel shares their experiences of what things have gotten them attention and notoriety and talk about how other influential programmers got famous. They talk about interacting with central platforms like Medium and Github. Building a personal brand for software developers is the same as any other personal brand, such as having a consistent message, consistent logos and color schemes, and repeated exposure). Most people in the software world aren’t willing to do what’s necessary to build a personal brand, so it makes you stand out when you do it. John talks about the importance of controlling your image so that companies want to hire you. John gives a brief overview of his course How to Market Yourself as a Software Developer.  Click here to cast your vote NOW for JavaScript Jabber - Best Dev Podcast Award Links John Somnez’s books Data Grid Girl Follow JavaScript Jabber on Facebook and Twitter   Picks Charles Max Wood: To Sell is Human How to Win Friends and Influence People John Somnez: Follow John at bulldogmindset.com and simpleprogrammer.com The Little Book of Stoicism Training Peaks Christopher Beucheler: Strasborg, France AJ O’Neal Distant Worlds: Music from Final Fantasy Parallels Cam Slide
August 6, 2019
Sponsors Datadog Sentry– use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Panel Charles Max Wood With Special Guest: Charlie Cheever Episode Summary Guest Charlie Cheever joins the discussion on JavaScript Jabber today. He was previously on React Round Up episode 47. Charlie works on Expo, which is a way to make React apps on every platform. Right now, Expo supports IOS, Android, and Web, provides a standard library of features, and takes care of services like builds and updates over the air. There are also code generators and templates available in Expo. Expo is focused on use cases where you just need to use a little bit of React Native in your app. Charlie talks about the origins of Expo, which was born from increased access of websites from people’s phones and the desire for a cross-platform tool that was as easy as building on the web. One of the biggest benefits is that Expo gives you the peace of mind knowing your app will work across all phones and all platforms. They discuss how to approach building your API’s for Expo so that it’s easy for people to use and have it consistent across all these different systems. Expo also has a voting board canny.expo.io where people can submit suggestions for new features. Expo is compatible with map view and React Native maps. Currently, Expo is missing bluetooth and things where the underlying platform wants to have a direct relationship with the developer, such as in-app purchases. Charlie talks about other components available in Expo, all of which can be modified. They discuss the influence of React on augmented reality and VR. Charlie talks about the updating feature of Expo. Charlie talks about the evolution of Expo and their goal to be a “developer first” company. He talks about the company, libraries, The Client, and services. He gives advice on how to get started with React Native development and using Expo. There is also Expo Web, which can be used to create a website, and if you create an app with Expo you get a website too. Expo hopes to be a stable, easy, coherent way of using all these tools across your entire experience of building your application so that you can relax a little bit. Click here to cast your vote NOW for JavaScript Jabber - Best Dev Podcast Award Links Expo Flex Valve jQuery Expo voting board LottieFiles SQLite React Native Maps The Client app Snack.expo.io NPM Follow DevChat on Facebook and Twitter Picks Charles Max Wood: Vdot02 Zoom H6 Portable 6 track Recorder Shure SM58-LC Cardioid Dynamic Vocal Microphone Chain React Conf Charlie Cheever: Draft bit (still in beta) AWS Amplify Follow Charlie @ccheever
August 1, 2019
Sponsors Netlify RxJS Live Panel Aimee Knight AJ O’Neal Charles Max Wood With Special Guest: Jeff Meyerson Episode Summary Jeff Meyerson is the host of the Software Engineering daily podcast and has also started a company called FindCollabs, an online platform for finding collaborators and building projects. Jeff started FindCollabs because he believes there are all these amazing tools but people are not combining and collaborating as much as they could, when so much good could be accomplished together. FindCollabs is especially useful for working on side projects. The panelists discuss the problems encountered when you try to collaborate with people over the internet, such as finding people who are facing similar and gauging interest, skill, and availability. Thankfully, FindCollabs has a feature of leaving reviews and rating your partners so that users can accurately gauge other’s skill level. Users can also leave comments about their experience collaborating with others. The only way you can show competence with an interest is to contribute to another project. FindCollabs is also a good place to look for mentors, as well as for Bootcamp graduates or people going through an online coding course. If you are part of an organization, you can create private projects. The company plans to expand this feature to all users in the future.The panelists talk about their past experiences with collaborating with other people. Jeff talks about his podcast Software Engineering Daily and how it got started and the focus of the podcast. As someone working in technology, it is important to stay current on up and coming technology, and listening to podcasts is an excellent way to do that. Jeff talks about where he thinks podcasting is going, especially for programmers. The panel discusses some of the benefits of listening to programming podcasts. Jeff talks about how he is prepping Software Engineering Daily for the future. He shares the audience size for Software Engineering Daily and some of the statistics for his different channels. Jeff has also released an app for Software Engineering Daily, and he shares some information on how it was written. Finally, Jeff gives advice for people who want to use FindCollabs and some of the next steps after creating a profile. Click here to cast your vote NOW for JavaScript Jabber - Best Dev Podcast Award Links FindCollabs Greenlock Telebit SwingCycle Software Engineering Daily Follow DevChat on Facebook and Twitter Picks Aimee Knight: Burnout and the Brain AJ O’Neal: Saber’s Edge from Final Fantasy by Distant Worlds Greenlock on FindCollabs Telebit on FindCollabs Charles Max Wood: Adventures in Machine Learning on FindCollabs Adventures in Virtual Reality on FindCollabs Adventures in Python on FindCollabs Adventures in Java on FindCollabs Air conditioning MFCEO Project Jeff Meyerson: Follow Jeff  @the_prion  Listen Notes Linbin’s Podcast Playlist Hidden Forces Podcast
July 30, 2019
Sponsors Datadog Sentry use code “devchat” for 2 months free Panel Aimee Knight Chris Ferdinandi Joe Eames AJ O’Neal Charles Max Wood With Special Guests: Josh Thomas and Mike Hartington Episode Summary Today’s guests Josh Thomas and Mike Hartington are developers for Ionic, with Josh working on the open source part of the framework on Ionic. They talk about their new compiler for web components called Stencil. Stencil was originally created out of work they did for Ionic 4 (now available for Vue, React, and Angular) and making Ionic 4 able to compliment all the different frameworks. They talk about their decision to build their own compiler and why they decided to open source it. Now, a lot of companies are looking into using Stencil to build design systems The panel discusses when design systems should be implemented. Since Ionic is a component library that people can pull from and use themselves, Jeff and Mike talk about how they are using Stencil since they’re not creating a design system. The panel discusses some of the drawbacks of web components. They discuss whether or not Cordova changes the game at all. One of the big advantages of using Stencil is the code that is delivered to a browser is generated in such a way that a lot of things are handled for you, unlike in other systems.The panelists talk about their thoughts on web components and the benefits of using a component versus creating a widget the old fashioned way. One such benefit of web components is that you can change the internals of how it works without affecting the API. Josh and Mike talk about some of the abilities of Stencil and compare it to other things like Tachyons. There is a short discussion of the line between frameworks and components and the dangers of pre optimization. If you would like to learn more about Stencil, go to stenciljs.com and follow Josh and Mike @Jtoms1 and @mhartington. Click here to cast your vote NOW for JavaScript Jabber - Best Dev Podcast Award Links Building Design Systems book Stencil Cordova Shadow DOM Tachyons Ionic 4 Follow DevChat on Facebook and Twitter Picks Aimee Knight: What Does Debugging a Program Look Like? AJ O’Neal: Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening Neon Genesis Evangelion soundtrack Prettier Chris Ferdinandi: Kindle Paperwhite Company of One Charles Max Wood: Ladders with feet Lighthouse Acorns Joe Eames: Moment.js How To Increase Your Page Size by 1500% article Day.js Josh Thomas: Toy Story 4 Mike Hartington: Building Design Systems Youmightnotneed.com
July 29, 2019
JSJ BONUS EPISODE: Observables and RxJS Live with Aaron Frost Mon Jul 29 2019 13:00:56 GMT+0300 (+03) Episode Number: bonus Duration: 29:35 https://media.devchat.tv/js-jabber/JSJ_Bonus_Aaron_Frost.mp3   Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Aaron Frost Episode Summary Aaron Frost joins Charles to talk about what Observables are and why developers should learn about them and use them in their code. He explains the difference between Observables, Promises and Callbacks with an example. Aaron then invites all listeners to attend the upcoming RxJS Live Conference and introduces the impressive speaker line-up. The conference will take place on September 5-6 in Las Vegas and tickets are still available. Aaron also offers a $100 discount to all listeners with the code "chuckforlife". For any questions you can DM Aaron at his Twitter account. Links RxJS Live Conference RxJS Conference Tickets Aaron's Twitter Promises Callbacks
July 25, 2019
Sponsors Datadog Sentry use code “devchat” for 2 months free Panel Aimee Knight AJ O’Neal Charles Max Wood With Special Guest: Rene Rubalcava Episode Summary Rene is a software developer for ESRI and works in spatial and mapping software. ESRI has been around since 1969 and has seen their work explode since they shifted to providing address and location services. Rene talks about how he thinks about location and mapping when building software around it and things that he has to approach in unique ways. The panel discusses some of their past experiences with location software. Some of the most difficult aspects of this software is changing time zones for data and actually mapping the Earth, since it is not flat nor a perfect sphere. Rene talks about the different models used for mapping the Earth. Most mapping systems use the same algorithm as Google maps, so Rene talks about some of the specific features of ArcGIS, including the ability to finding a point within a polygon. Rene talks about what routing is, its importance, and how it is being optimized with ArcGIS, such as being able to add private streets into a regular street network. The panel discusses how the prevalence of smartphones has changed mapping and GPS and some of their concerns with privacy and location mapping. One thing ESRI is very careful about is not storing private information. Rene talks about the kinds of things he has seen people doing with the mapping and location data provided by ArcGIS, including a Smart Mapping feature for developers, mapping planets, indoor routing, and 3D models.  Links Webricate  Esri ArcGIS Follow DevChat on Facebook and Twitter Picks Rene Rubalcava: Old Man’s War series Always Be My Maybe Rene’s website AJ O’Neal: INTL Colorful Time zones in Postgress Time zones in JavaScript Aimee Knight: Advice to Less Experienced Developers Charles Max Wood: Heber Half Marathon Netlify CMS Villainous Firefox
July 23, 2019
Sponsors Datadog Sentry use code “devchat” for 2 months free Panel Aimee Knight Chris Ferdinandi Christopher Beucheler AJ O’Neal With Special Guest: Javan Makhmali Episode Summary Today’s guest is Javan Makhmali, who works for Basecamp and helped develop Trix. Trix is a rich text editor for the web, made purposefully simple for everyday use instead of a full layout tool. Trix is not the same as Tiny MCE, and Javan discusses some of the differences. He talks about the benefits of using Trix over other native browser features for text editing. He talks about how Trix has simplified the work at Basecamp, especially when it came to crossing platforms. Javan talks more about how Trix differs from other text editors like Google Docs and contenteditable, how to tell if Trix is functioning correctly, and how it works with Markdown. The panel discusses more specific aspects of Trix, such as Exec command. One of the features of Trix is it is able to output consistently in all browsers and uses semantic, clean HTML instead of classnames. Javan talks about how Trix handles getting rid of the extraneous cruft of formatting when things are copy and pasted, the different layers of code, and the undo feature. He talks about whether or not there will be more features added to Trix. The panel discusses who could benefit from using Trix. The show finishes with Javan talking about Basecamp’s decision to make Trix open source and why they code in CoffeeScript.  Links Trix Tiny MCE Contenteditable Markdown SVG HTML CoffeeScript Follow DevChat on Facebook and Twitter Picks Javan Makhmali: API for form submissions Chris Ferdinandi: CSS Grid Alex Russel Twitter thread How To Live a Vibrant Life with Early Stage Dementia AJ O’Neal: Mario and Chill Chip Tunes 4 Autism: Catharsis Toilet Auger Christopher Beucheler:  Medium to Own blog Aimee Knight: Absolute Truth Unlearned as Junior Developer
July 18, 2019
Sponsors Triplebyte $1000 signing bonus Sentry use code “devchat” for 2 months free Panel Charles Max Wood Aimee Knight Chris Ferdinandi AJ O’Neal Christopher Beucheler Episode Summary Today the panel discusses the effect of current development practices, such as the heavy reliance JavaScript, on the web. Chris explains why he believes that current development practices are ruining the web. The panelists discuss different situations where they see complications on the web. They discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using an enterprise scale platform like React. The panel discusses Twitter’s move away from their legacy code base to CSS and JavaScript. The panelists agree that the way things are built, since it’s so JavaScript heavy, is alienating to people who work with other languages, and in turn other areas like UI are undervalued. They talk about possible reasons things ended up this way and some of the historical perception of a frontend as not a place for ‘real’ development. Because the web is now a serious platform, things associated with the backend has been thrown at the frontend where it doesn’t belong. They talk about changes in the ways programming is viewed now versus the past.  There is a discussion about how market demands that have influenced the web and if the market value CSS as highly as other languages. They mention some of the Innovations in CSS. Chris shares his solutions for the problems they’ve been discussing, namely using less JavaScript, leaning more heavily on what the browser gives you out of the box, and avoiding dependency where possible. They talk about ways to get involved if you want to take a leaner approach to the web. Ultimately, it is important to embrace things about the past that worked, but sprinkle in new technology when it makes sense Links Stimulus React Vue AppleScript Perl .NET Angular  Follow DevChat on Facebook and Twitter Picks Charles Max Wood: Tiny Epic Galaxies EverywhereJS Aimee Knight: Complete Guide to Deep Work Chris Ferdinandi: Developer Bait and Switch Vanillajslist.com Chris will be speaking at Artifact Conference AJ O’Neal: Weird Al: White and Nerdy Quantum board game Deploy Sites with Only Git and SSH Christopher Beucheler: Material Monstress
July 16, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Jeremy Fairbank Episode Summary Jeremy is a Software Developer at Test Double and the author of Programming Elm book. Even though Jeremy majored in Chemistry in college, he was always interested in programming since middle school. After he graduated from college he went to work as a web developer at Plastic Industries and relied on blog posts and other online resources to teach himself how to code. Gradually as the company’s needs changed, Jeremy transitioned into an application developer. He taught himself JavaScript using the book Professional JavaScript for Web Developers . He then attented a Coursera classto learn on principles of functional programming and gained experience with many front end frameworks and libraries, including Elm, React, Redux, Backbone.js, and Marionette.js. Jeremy is based out of Hawaii and when he isn't coding, he spends his time playing his guitar and hiking and going to the beach with his family. Links JSJ 325: Practical functional programming in JavaScript and languages like Elm with Jeremy Fairbank Jeremy’s GitHub Jeremy's LinkedIn Jeremy’s Blog Professional JavaScript for Web Developers by Nicholas C. Zakas Professional JavaScript for Web Developers by Matt Frisbie https://knockoutjs.com/ https://marionettejs.com/ https://www.coursera.org/ https://www.coursera.org/learn/programming-languages elm-lang.org https://www.facebook.com/javascriptjabber https://twitter.com/JSJabber https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv Picks Jeremy Fairbank: Programming Elm The Umbrella Academy Beyond Burger Charles Max Wood: Orphan Black https://devchat.tv/ https://www.netlify.com/ https://www.11ty.io/ https://github.com/cmaxw/devchat-eleventy JavaScript Jabber - Devchat.tv
July 11, 2019
Sponsors Triplebyte $1000 signing bonus Sentry use code “devchat” for 2 months free Linode Panel Charles Max Wood Aimee Knight Chris Ferdinandi AJ O’Neal Joe Eames Episode Summary Today the panel discusses what is necessary to get a website up and how complicated or simple it needs to be. They mention different tools they like for static sites and ways to manage their builds and websites. They talk about why some people choose to host their websites and at what point the heavier tools become a concern. They discuss whan it is necessary to use those heavy tools. They caution listeners to beware of premature optimization, because sometimes businesses will take advantage of newer developers and make them think they need all these shiny bells and whistles, when there is a cheaper way to do it. It is important to keep the tools you work with simple and to learn them so that if you encounter a problem, you have some context and scope. The option of serverless website hosting is also discussed, as well as important things to know about servers. The panel discusses what drives up the price of a website and if it is worth it to switch to a cheaper alternative. They discuss the pros and cons of learning the platform yourself versus hiring a developer. The importance of recording the things that you do on your website is mentioned. Several of the panelists choose to do this by blogging so that if you search for a problem you can find ones you’ve solved in the past. Links Heroku Github Pages Netlify Eleventy DigitalOcean Lightsale Ubuntu Git clone Node static server Systemd script NGinx Cloud66 Thinkster Gatsby Docker Gentoo How to schedule posts with a static website How to set up automatic deployment with Git with a vps Automating the deployment of your static site with Github and Hugo Follow DevChat on Facebook and Twitter Picks Charles Max Wood: Microsoft build Aimee Knight: Systems Thinking is as Important as Ever for New Coders Chris Ferdinandi: Adrian Holivadi framework video Server Pilot   AJ O’Neal: Jeff Atwood tweet More on Stackflow Architecture Minio Joe Eames: Miniature painting  
July 9, 2019
Sponsors Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus Sentry use the code “devchat” for $100 credit CacheFly Panel Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Jessica Deen Episode Summary Coming to you live from the podcast booth at Microsoft BUILD is Charles Max Wood with The Deen of DevOps aka Jessica Deen. Jessica is a Senior Cloud Advocate at Microsoft. As an advocate she acts a liaison between developer communities and Microsoft to help understand developer pain points and road blocks especially in areas such as Linux, open-source technologies, infrastructure, Kubernetes, containers and DevOps. Jessica explains how to go about setting up a containerized application, Kubernetes and how to use Dockerfiles. Charles and Jessica then talk about how to get started with a Kubernetes cluster and the resources available for developers that don't have any infrastructure. Jessica advises that developers start with Azure DevOps Services and then go to Microsoft Learn Resource. Charles also encourages listeners to also check out the Views on Vue podcast Azure DevOps with Donovan Brown for further references. Jessica also recommends following people on Twitter and GitHub to find out about solutions and resources. Links Dockerfile and Windows Containers Kubernetes Jessica’s GitHub Jessica’s Twitter Jessica’s LinkedIn Jessica’s Website Microsoft Build 2019 Microsoft Learn Resource HTTP application routing Getting started with Kubernetes Ingress Controllers and TLS certificates Kubernetes Ingress Controllers and Certificates: The Walkthrough Azure DevOps Services VoV 053: Azure DevOps with Donovan Brown LIVE at Microsoft Ignite Jessica Deen Youtube Kubernetes in 5 mins – YouTube Follow Adventures in Angular on tv, Facebook and Twitter. Picks Jessica Deen: Lachlan Evenson Cloud Native Computing Foundation Kubernetes Handles on Twitter Shoe Dog Memoir Air Jordan 4 Fire Red Gum Singles Day Charles Max Wood: Real Talk /JavaScript Podcast The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild
July 2, 2019
Sponsors Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus Sentry use the code “devchat” for $100 credit CacheFly Panel Charles Max Wood Joe Eames Christopher Buecheler Aimee Knight AJ O’Neal Joined by special guest: Dan Shappir Episode Summary In this episode of JavaScript Jabber, special guest Dan Shappir, Performance Tech Lead at Wix, kicks off the discussion by defining server-side rendering (SSR) along with giving its historical background, and touches on the differences between server rendering and server-side rendering. He helps listeners understand in detail how SSR is beneficial for the web and takes questions from the panel about how it affects web performance in cases where first-time users and returning users are involved, and how does SSR fare against technologies such as pre-rendering. He then elaborates on the pitfalls and challenges of SSR including managing and declaring variables, memory leaks, performance issues, handling SEO, and more, along with ways to mitigate them. In the end, Dan sheds some light on when should developers use SSR and how should they start working with it. Links Dan’s Twitter Dan’s GitHub SSR WeakMap Follow JavaScript Jabber on Devchat.tv, Facebook and Twitter. Picks Christopher Buecheler: Tip - Take some time off once in a while Aimee Knight: Learning How to Learn: Powerful mental tools to help you master tough subjects AJ O’Neal: Fatherhood! Joe Eames: Tiny Towns The Goldbergs Charles Max Wood: EverywhereJS Christopher Buecheler’s books Get a Coder Job - Publishing soon! Dan Shappir: Quora Corvid by Wix You Gotta Love Frontend Conferences
June 25, 2019
Sponsors Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Panel Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Jeff Hollan   Episode Summary Coming to you live from the podcast booth at Microsoft BUILD is Charles Max Wood with Jeff Hollan. Jeff is a Sr. Program Manager for the Azure Functions cloud service. Continuing from where Colby Tresness left off in Adventures in Angular 241: Azure Functions with Colby Tresness LIVE at Microsoft BUILD, Jeff defines what “serverless” really means in developer world. Jeff also talks about various scenarios where Azure functions are extremely useful and explains what Durable Functions are. Jeff and Charles discuss creating and running an Azure function inside a container and the upcoming capabilities of Azure functions they are currently working on. Links JavaScript Jabber 369: Azure Functions with Colby Tresness LIVE at Microsoft BUILD Durable Functions Jeff’s GitHub Jeff’s Twitter Jeff’s LinkedIn Jeff’s Website Jeff’s Medium Microsoft Build 2019 Follow JavaScript Jabber on Devchat.tv, Facebook and Twitter. Picks Jeff Hollan: Calm App Game of Thrones TV Series Charles Max Wood: Family Tree App
June 25, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Sarah Dayan Episode Summary Sarah Dayan is a Frontend Software Engineer working for Algolia in Paris. She is also the author of Dinero.js which was the result of a production bug they discovered in JavaScript. Sarah first got introduced to computers when she was a child. She spent hours playing on her grandmother's computer with dial-up internet. At age 15, she created her first HTML website. Sarah and Charles discuss the evolution of front-end development. Listen to the show to find out more about Sarah's journey as a front-end developer and the projects she is working on now. Links JavaScript Jabber 351: Dinero.js with Sarah Dayan Sarah's Twitter Sarah's GitHub Sarah's Medium Dinero.js https://www.facebook.com/javascriptjabber https://twitter.com/JSJabber https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv Picks Sarah Dayan: Zdog Library Dear White People TV Series Mass Effect Trilogy for PC Charles Max Wood: Taking a roadtrip Hotels.com Velocity 2019 Food Fight Show Netlify Dev
June 18, 2019
Sponsors Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus Sentry use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Linode offers $20 credit CacheFly Panel Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Colby Tresness Episode Summary Coming to you live from the podcast booth at Microsoft BUILD is Charles Max Wood with Colby Tresness. Colby is a Program Manager on Azure Functions at Microsoft. Azure functions are the serverless functions on Azure. Colby explains what the Azure functions premium plan entails, then talks about KEDA – Kubernetes-based event-driven autoscaling, a Microsoft and Red Hat partnered open source component to provide event-driven capabilities for any Kubernetes workload. One of the other cool features of serverless functions they talk about is the Azure serverless community library. Colby and Charles discuss the best way to get started with Azure functions, as well as the non-JavaScript languages it supports. Links Colby’s GitHub Colby’s Twitter Colby’s LinkedIn Colby’s Blog Microsoft Build 2019 KEDA Red Hat Azure Serverless Community Library Follow Adventures in Angular on tv, Facebook and Twitter. Picks Colby Tresness: Barry (TV Series 2018– ) – IMDb  Charles Max Wood: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild The MFCEO Project Podcast – Andy Frisella  Downtown Seattle
June 11, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Anatoliy Zaslavskiy Episode Summary Anatoliy Zaslavskiy has been interested in computers since he was 7 years old, and began his programming career in high school, doing web development in PHP for the online community for his favorite show  Avatar: The Last Airbender. Anatoliy currently works for Hover as a Frontend developer transforming home photos into 3D models to help visualize what the final project will look like. Anatoliy shares his journey as a developer with bipolar disorder and tells us how he restructured his career with his employer so he can focus on projects that he enjoys working on. This way he performs at his best and both him and Hover can benefit from his talents. Anatoliy and Charles stress the importance for companies to talk to their developers to understand their nature as both parties benefit from open and honest dialogue. Links JavaScript Jabber 358: Pickle.js, Tooling, and Developer Happiness with Anatoliy Zaslavskiy Anatoliy's Website Anatoliy's Facebook Anatoliy's LinkedIn https://www.facebook.com/javascriptjabber https://twitter.com/JSJabber https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv Picks Anatoliy Zaslavskiy: XState - JavaScript State Machines and Statecharts Nozbe/WatermelonDB: High-performance reactive database Monorepo Charles Max Wood: https://www.twitch.tv/ OBS: Open Broadcaster Software
June 4, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Phil Hawksworth Episode Summary Currently the Head of Developer Relations at Netlify, Phil has been a developer for 20 years. Even though he was interested in computers from an early age, he started  studying Civil Engineering in university before changing course and switching to Computer Science. Though he didn't particularly enjoy studying Computer Science, he really liked working with HTML where he didn't have to compile any code and that's when he started thinking about a career in web development. Phil talks about his favorite projects he has worked on using JAMstack and JavaScript. He works remotely out of London, UK and as head of developer relations he spends a lot of time traveling for conferences for work. He doesn't have a 'typical' work day, but when he is not traveling for work he enjoys catching up on conversations on Slack and Twitter about JAMstack and collaborating with the rest of is team in San Francisco. Links JavaScript Jabber 347: JAMstack with Divya Sasidharan & Phil Hawksworth Eleventy JAMstack Phil’s Medium   Phil's Twitter Phil's GitHub Phil's LinkedIn Phil's Website https://www.thenewdynamic.org/ Netlify https://www.facebook.com/javascriptjabber https://twitter.com/JSJabber https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv Picks Phil Hawksworth: Rich Harris - Rethinking reactivity Charles Max Wood: EverywhereJS JavaScript Community
May 28, 2019
Sponsors Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus Sentry use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Linode offers $20 credit CacheFly Panel AJ O’Neal Chris Ferdinandi Aimee Knight Charles Max Wood Joined by special guest: Mikeal Rogers Episode Summary This episode of JavaScript Jabber starts with Mikeal Rogers introducing himself and his work in brief. Charles clarifies that he wants to focus this show on some beginner content such as node.js basics, so Mikeal gives some historical background on the concept, elaborates on its modern usage and features and explains what “streams” are, for listeners who are starting to get into JavaScript. The panelists then discuss how languages like Go and Python compare to node.js in terms of growth and individual learning curves. Mikeal answers questions about alternate CLIs, package management, Pika, import maps and their effect on node.js, and on learning JavaScript in general. Chris, Charles and AJ also chip in with their experiences in teaching modern JS to new learners and its difficulty level in comparison to other frameworks. They wrap up the episode with picks. Links Mikeal on Twitter Mikeal on GitHub Follow JavaScript Jabber on Devchat.tv, Facebook and Twitter. Picks Chris Ferdinandi: Mozilla Firefox Artifact Conference Aimee Knight: A Magician Explains Why We See What’s Not There Programming: doing it more vs doing it better Mikeal Rogers: The Future of the Web – CascadiaJS 2018 Brave Browser Charles Max Wood: Podwrench
May 21, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use code “devchat” for 2 months free Triplebyte $1000 signing bonus Linode Panel Charles Max Wood Aimee Knight Chris Ferdinandi AJ O’Neal Joe Eames Episode Summary Today the panel discusses the necessity of a front end framework. Overall, there is a consensus that frameworks are not necessary in all situations. They discuss the downsides of using frameworks, such as being restricted by the framework when doing edge development and the time required for learning a framework. They talk about the value of frameworks for learning patterns in programming. The panel delves into the pros and cons of different frameworks available. Joe shares a story about teaching someone first without a framework and then introducing them to frameworks, and the way it helped with their learning. One of the pros of frameworks is that they are better documented than manual coding. They all agree that it is not enough to just know a framework, you must continue to learn JavaScript as well. They talk about the necessity for new programmers to learn a framework to get a job, and the consensus is that a knowledge of vanilla JavaScript and a general knowledge of the framework for the job is important. New programmers are advised to not be crippled by the fear of not knowing enough and to have an attitude of continual learning. In the technology industry, it is easy to get overwhelmed by all the developments and feel that one cannot possibly learn it all. Charles gives advice on how to find your place in the development world. The show concludes with the panel agreeing that frameworks are overall a good thing and are valuable tools. Links JWT Angular Vue Backbone GoLang Express React Redux Hyper HTML 4each Pascal JQuery Npm.js Follow DevChat on Facebook and Twitter Picks Charles Max Wood: Podwrench Aimee Knight: How to Love Your Job and Avoid Burnout So Good They Can’t Ignore You Chris Ferdinandi: Vanilla JS toolkit Thinkster Artifact Conference AJ O’Neal: Binary Cocoa Binary Cocoa Slamorama Kickstarter Binary Cocoa Straight 4 Root
May 14, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Special Guest:  Dan Fernandez Episode Summary In this episode of My JavaScript Story, Charles hosts Dan Fernandez, Principal Group Program Manager at Microsoft. Listen to Dan on the podcast JavaScript Jabber on this episode. Dan went to a programming camp and fell in love with programming. He majored in Computer Science in college and started working for IBM upon graduation.  Listen to the show for Dan’s journey into programming and much more! Links JavaScript Jabber 241: Microsoft Docs with Dan Fernandez Dan’s Twitter Dan's LinkedIn https://twitter.com/JSJabber https://www.facebook.com/javascriptjabber Picks Dan Fernandez: Microstang: Microsoft helps build a custom Mustang packed with Windows 8 and Kinect JavaScript Jabber 347: JAMstack with Divya Sasidharan & Phil Hawksworth  
May 7, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Special Guest:  Shawn Clabough Episode Summary In this episode of My JavaScript Story, Charles hosts Shawn Clabough, Information Systems Manager and Senior Developer at Washington State University. Listen to Shawn on the podcast JavaScript Jabber on this episode. Shawn got interested in computers in high school. His first computer was a TRS-80. Upon graduating from Washington State University, he worked as an assistant buyer at a computer chain store before going back to university to receive further education as a programmer. He then got a job at the University of Idaho where he worked in web application development for 17 years before switching to Washington State University. Currently he is a senior developer and a developer manager at Washington State University. Shawn also works as a custom .NET application development consultant. Links JavaScript Jabber 258: Development in a Public Institution with Shawn Clabough Shawn's GitHub Shawn’s Twitter Shawn's LinkedIn Pathfinder Roleplaying Game https://devchat.tv/my-javascript-story/ https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv Picks Shawn Clabough: UtahJS Slack Group Utah .Net Slack Group Boise Code Camp Visual Studio 2019 Launch Event - Visual Studio Time Bandits The  Movie (1981) Charles Max Wood: if you want to be a host on a podcast on tv on any of the below topics, contact Charles Max Wood  Open Source Sustainability and Maintainability AI & Machine Learning Data Science Augmented Reality & Virtual Reality & Mixed Reality Internet of Things (IoT) Python .Net If you are interested in becoming a sponsor for any of the above topics or the existing podcasts on devchat.tv, contact Charles Max Wood    If you are interested in being represented by Charles Max Wood for a sponsorship contract for a podcast in any of the above topics, contact Charles Max Wood   If you were listening to a podcast in any of the above topics or any other programming related subject that ended abruptly within the last 6 months and would like it continued please contact Charles Max Wood. We would like to host these shows on devchat.tv. Most of time time podcasts stop being recorded due to lack of time or lack of money.   Become a Podwrench Beta User! If you would like to host a podcast but do not want to do it on tv then Podwrench is for you! Podwrench is a complete podcasting system that allows you to manage your podcast and sponsorship contracts all in one place! Please contact Charles Max Wood for more info.  
April 30, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Guest: Brian Woodward Summary Brian Woodward shares his programming story starting at 7 or 8 messing around on his dad's computer and getting a degree in computer science. Brian discusses his journey through technologies and why he decided to work with JavaScript. Brian discloses his struggle with deciding what to do as a programmer and his decision to get a business degree. Today Brian is the co-founder of Sellside, he discusses their tools and stack and what they are currently working on. Links https://devchat.tv/js-jabber/098-jsj-assemble-io-with-brian-woodward-and-jon-schlinkert/ https://github.com/enquirer/enquirer https://github.com/generate/generate https://github.com/assemble/assemble https://github.com/verbose/verb https://github.com/update/update https://twitter.com/doowb https://github.com/doowb https://doowb.com Picks Brain Woodward: https://www.cypress.io/ https://github.com/jonschlinkert/maintainers-guide-to-staying-positive https://github.com/jonschlinkert/idiomatic-contributing https://github.com/jonschlinkert/guide-to-staying-productive http://www.toastmasters.org/ Charles Max Wood: https://www.instagram.com/charlesmaxwood/ https://problogger.com/31-days-to-build-a-better-blog-course/
April 23, 2019
Sponsors Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus Sentry use the code “devchat” for $100 credit CacheFly Panel AJ O’Neal Joe Eames Aimee Knight Charles Max Wood Chris Ferdinandi Joined by Special guest: Nicholas Zakas Summary Nicholas Zakas discusses the overuse of JavaScript and the underuse of HTML and CSS. The panel contemplates the talk Nicholas Zakas gave 6 years ago about this very same topic and how this is still a problem in the development community. Nicholas expounds on the negative effects overusing Javascript has on web applications and the things that using HTML and CSS do really well. The panel talks about the need for simplicity and using the right tool to build applications. Nicholas recommends the methods he uses to build greenfield applications and to improve existing applications. Links https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=li4Y0E_x8zE https://www.slideshare.net/nzakas/enough-withthejavascriptalready https://twitter.com/slicknet https://humanwhocodes.com/ https://www.facebook.com/javascriptjabber https://twitter.com/JSJabber Picks Chris Ferdinandi: The Umbrella Academy Official Trailer https://github.com/features/actions AJ O’Neal: Jurassic Park Terminator 2 E6000 adhesive Aimee Knight: https://www.reebok.com/us/reebok-legacy-lifter/BD4730.html https://www.holloway.com/g/equity-compensation Charles Max Wood: https://podfestexpo.com/ http://charlesmaxwood.com/ https://www.11ty.io/ https://www.netlify.com/ Joe Eames: https://www.mysteryscenemag.com/blog-article/5905-tom-straw-the-author-behind-castle Richard Castle books https://vanillajslist.com/ Nicholas Zakas: The Power of Full Engagement: Managing Energy, Not Time, Is the Key to High Performance and Personal Renewal by Jim Loehr and Tony Schwartz https://opencollective.com/eslint
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