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February 17, 2020
Colleen Bordeaux: Am I Doing This Right? Colleen Bordeaux is a best-selling author, speaker and human capital consultant based in Chicago. She has been published everywhere from the Chicago Sun Times to the Huffington Post and has been endorsed by New York Times columnist and past guest Barry Schwartz and Sunday Times bestselling author Louise Parker. Her popular blog has reached more than 200,000 readers and she leads a women’s mastermind group in Chicago. She is the author of the new book: Am I Doing This Right?: A Philosophical Guide to Life in the Age of Overwhelm*. In this conversation, Colleen and I discuss the power of relationships — and some of the key principles for cultivating the very best relationships to support you, both professionally and personally. Key Points You are the same today that you are going to be in five years except for two things: the people with whom you associate, and the books you read. -Charles Jones To be nobody but yourself in a world which does its best, day and night, to make you everyone else, is to fight the hardest battle any human being can fight and never stop fighting. -e.e. cummings Six steps to improving the relationships you cultivate: Assess your own crab-status. Take stock of who you’re spending time with. Consider who you’re not spending time with, but want to be spending time with. Evaluate these relationships based on what you need in your life. Eliminate or manage the relationships that aren’t working to create more space for the ones you need. Create a relationship mantra (Colleen’s is below): My relationships are the best gift I’ve been given, and they are my biggest responsibility. The primary purpose of each of my relationships is to help each other become better versions of ourselves by sharing our authentic experiences, perspectives, and gifts. I will be open to new connections, because that is a source of growth in life—and I will seek and cultivate friendships that bring me to life, and distance myself from relationships that drain me and influence me to betray my values. I aspire to have the kind of quality relationships that inspire others in how they approach developing, growing, and cultivating this important area of their lives. -Colleen Bordeaux Resources Mentioned Am I Doing This Right?: A Philosophical Guide to Life in the Age of Overwhelm* by Colleen Bordeaux Book Notes Download my highlights from Am I Doing This Right? in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Grow Your Professional Network, with Tom Henschel (episode 279) The Way to Build Relationships at Conferences, with Robbie Samuels (episode 346) Grow Beyond What is Safe, with John Corcoran (episode 362) How to Create Meaningful Gatherings, with Priya Parker (episode 395) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
February 10, 2020
David Marquet: Leadership is Language David Marquet is the former commander of the U.S.S. Santa Fe, a nuclear-powered attack submarine. Under David’s command, the ship had an impressive turnaround, achieving the highest retention and operational standings in the Navy. David is the author of the bestseller Turn the Ship Around: A True Story of Turning Followers Into Leaders* and has just released his new book, Leadership is Language: The Hidden Power of What You Say and What You Don’t*. In this conversation, David and I explore the seven sins of questioning. David shares the story of the ill-fated El Faro and how we can discover better information in leadership by making the shift from self-affirming to self-educating. Key Points A leading question comes from a place of thinking the person is wrong, or that you have the answer. I hear this a lot from people who think they have the right answer but don’t want to use say so, so they use the Socratic method as a “teaching moment.” It’s annoying and arrogant.   Self-affirming questions are often binary questions with a special motivation: to coerce agreement and make us feel good about the decision we have already made. Seven Ways to Ask Better Questions: Instead of questions stacking, try one and done. Instead of a teaching moment, try and learning moment. Instead of a dirty question, try a clear question. Instead of a binary question, start the question with “what” or “how.” Instead of a “why” question, try “tell me more.” Instead of a self-affirming question, try self-educating questions. Instead of jumping to the future, start with the present, past, then future. Resources Mentioned Leadership is Language: The Hidden Power of What You Say and What You Don’t* by David Marquet Turn the Ship Around: A True Story of Turning Followers Into Leaders* by David Marquet David Marquet’s website Related Episodes Leadership Lessons from Challenger, with Allan McDonald (episode 229) These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237) The Path of Humble Leadership, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein (episode 363) How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
February 2, 2020
Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She is the author of The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide*. Key Points Create margin by under-scheduling family and kid commitments. Our default setting is to have a limited about scheduled on weekends. We collaborate on schedules by using shared iCloud calendars as a family. Acuity Scheduling supports both of us professionally in automating scheduling to ensure conflicts are rare. We both use systems to capture ideas and activities before we decide to move on them. The Drafts app helps both of us do this quickly. Bonni keeps a “someday/maybe” list and Dave keeps an “incubation” list. We get the kids involved with household responsibilities, so everybody learns to contribute and share daily work. Take time to put on your leadership hat to make decisions about what’s important. Then, you can manage from there. Resources Mentioned The Productive Online and Offline Professor: A Practical Guide* by Bonni Stachowiak Full Focus Planner* from Michael Hyatt Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World* by David Epstein Who Killed the Weekend? by Katrina Onstad Kourosh Dini: Mind, Music, & Productivity Streaks app Related Episodes Getting Things Done, with David Allen (episode 184) How to Become the Person You Want to Be, with James Clear (episode 376) Finding Joy Through Intentional Choices, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 417) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
January 27, 2020
John Maxwell: The Leader’s Greatest Return John Maxwell is a #1 New York Times bestselling author, coach, and speaker who has sold more than thirty-one million books in fifty languages. He has been identified as the #1 leader in business by the American Management Association and the most influential leadership expert in the world by Business Insider and Inc. magazine. He is the founder of The John Maxwell Company, The John Maxwell Team, EQUIP, and the John Maxwell Leadership Foundation, organizations that have trained millions of leaders from every country of the world. He is the author of the new book The Leader’s Greatest Return: Attracting, Developing, and Multiplying Leaders*. In this conversation, John and I discuss his work to develop leaders and the distinctions between motivating followers and motivating leaders. We also explore the seven key motivations of leaders that John has uncovered. Key Points Successful people have discovered what they are good at. Successful leaders discover what other people are good at. “I didn’t have any sudden big hits early in my career. I wasn’t a home run hitter. My secret was to get up to bat every day and just try to get on base consistently.” -John Maxwell “You can have everything in life you want if you’ll just help enough other people get what they want.” -Zig Ziglar The Seven Motivations of Leaders: Purpose: leaders want to do what they were created to do. Autonomy: leaders want the freedom to control their lives. Relationships: leaders want to do things with others. Progress: leaders want to experience personal and professional growth. Mastery: leaders want to excel at their work. Recognition: leaders want others to appreciate their accomplishments. Money: leaders want to be financially secure. Resources Mentioned The Leader’s Greatest Return: Attracting, Developing, and Multiplying Leaders* by John Maxwell Book Notes Download my highlights from The Leader’s Greatest Return in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Ten Steps to Create a Recognition Program, with Michelle Smith (episode 80) Start With Why, with Simon Sinek (episode 223) The Scientific Secrets of Daily Scheduling, with Daniel Pink (episode 332) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
January 20, 2020
Scott Young: Ultralearning Scott’s work is intended to consistently answer this question: what’s the best way to learn? This has led him to take on two year-long experiments in learning: The MIT Challenge, where he attempted to learn MIT’s 4-year computer science curriculum without taking classes, and The Year Without English, where he worked with a friend to learn four languages in one year. Scott is the author of the new book, Ultralearning: Master Hard Skills, Outsmart the Competition, and Accelerate Your Career*. In this conversation, Scott and discuss what ultralearners do diffusely, the importance of transfer in learning, and four key tactics to enhance directness. Key Points Transfer is critical for learning, but most formal education programs don’t address it. “Many ultralearners who have specialized in a smaller subset of fields are masters at transfer; no doubt this is largely due to their depth of knowledge, which makes transfer easier to accomplish.” The key to ultra learning is to enhance directness. Four tactics for enhancing directness: Project-based learning (producing something) Immersive learning (such as language immersion) Flight simulator method (like how pilots learn to fly) Overkill approach (intentional making it harder than a real use scenario) Book Notes Download my highlights from Ultralearning in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Six Tactics for Extraordinary Performance, with Morten Hansen (episode 337) How to Become the Person You Want to Be, with James Clear (episode 376) Permission to Be Yourself, with Bar Schwartz (episode 414) How to Know What You Don’t Know, with Art Markman (episode 437) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
January 13, 2020
Nancy Duarte: DataStory Nancy Duarte is a communication expert who has been featured in Fortune, Time Magazine, Forbes, Fast Company, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, and many others. Her firm, Duarte, Inc., is the global leader behind some of the most influential visual messages in business and culture. Nancy has written many best-selling books, including Slide:ology*, Resonate*, and Illuminate*. She is the author of the new book DataStory: Explain Data and Inspire Action Through Story*. In this conversation, Nancy and I discuss the realities of executive life, how executives are measured, and why you should expect to be grilled when briefing them. With intentional preparation, you’ll be prepared to more successfully influence executives both inside the organization — and with your customers. Key Points “The higher their level of authority, the more structured and brief your approach should be.” -Nancy Duarte Time is an essential asset for executives. Appreciating how much they work to maximize efficiency can help you align better with their world. Craft a recommendation that’s brief and easily skimmable. Leave time for questions and expect to be grilled. Executives are measured on money (revenue/profit and costs), market (market share and time to market), and exposure (retention and risk). Know how executives plan to consume information. Tailor your message and medium to align with these preferences. Resources Mentioned DataStory: Explain Data and Inspire Action Through Story* by Nancy Duarte Duarte DataStory Book Notes Download my highlights from DataStory in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Success on Presentation Day, with David Sparks (episode 159) Ignite Change Through Storytelling, with Nancy Duarte and Patti Sanchez (episode 268) Executive Presence with Your Elevator Speech, with Tom Henschel (episode 316) Get Your Emails Read (Dave’s Journal) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
January 6, 2020
Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She joins me monthly to respond to listener questions. Listener Questions Susan asked for advice on some of the challenges she is facing with an aging workforce. Nellie wondered if she should report a difficult situation before she moves onto another opportunity. Thiaga asked how Dave manages to read lot of books and how he remembers the key message from these books. Robert asked about the best way to position his experience as a faculty member when applying for a role as an administrator. Resources Mentioned Digital Reading by Bonni Stachowiak The First 90 Days* by Michael Watkins Big Rocks by Steven Covey Related Episodes How To Create A Personal Knowledge Management System, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 129) How to Lead a 100-Year Life, with Lynda Gratton (episode 266) Five Steps to Hold People Accountable, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 306) How to Make Your Work More Visible, with John Stepper (episode 397) Help People Learn Through Powerful Teaching, with Pooja Agarwal (episode 421) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
December 30, 2019
Neil Pasricha: You Are Awesome Neil Pasricha helps people live happy lives. He is the New York Times-bestselling author of The Happiness Equation and The Book of Awesome series, which has been published in ten countries, spent over five years on bestseller lists, and sold over a million copies. He’s a Harvard MBA, one of the most popular TED speakers of all time, and after ten years heading Leadership Development at Walmart he now serves as Director of The Institute for Global Happiness. He is the author of the new book, You Are Awesome: How to Navigate Change, Wrestle with Failure, and Live an Intentional Life. In this conversation, Neil and I explore the importance of being uncomfortable to drive professional development. We discuss both of our journeys through mediocrity and how those times helped us to serve many more people today. Key Points “I know see that my anger stemmed from my deep disappointment in myself.” “I didn’t see it then and I wouldn’t see it for at least ten years that the P&G failure helped me to get more comfortable with being uncomfortable." “What we often think of evolution as ‘destroying and replacing’ the past is actually transcending and including.” Resources Mentioned You Are Awesome: How to Navigate Change, Wrestle with Failure, and Live an Intentional Life* by Neil Pasricha Neil’s blog Book Notes Download my highlights from You Are Awesome in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Essentials of Adult Development, with Mindy Danna (episode 273) How to Be a Happier Person, with Neil Pasricha (episode 334) Six Tactics for Extraordinary Performance, with Morten Hansen (episode 337) Neil Armstrong’s Other Landings (Dave’s Journal) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
December 23, 2019
Shelley Winner: Restorative Justice Shelley Winner is a Restorative Justice Activist whose goal is to change the world, reduce crime, and advocate for justice involved people all while helping companies improve productivity and revenues. She is also a technology specialist, is very active in the restorative justice movement in San Francisco and wants to educate the public about the benefits of hiring the formerly incarcerated. Through her work with Winner’s Circle, she is closing the gap between soon to be released inmates and technology companies by developing and delivering training to inmates and helping technology companies create internships for justice involved individuals. In this conversation, Shelley shares her story of moving from incarceration to successful employment in the technology industry. We highlight how some organizations are leading in this work and what the research shows about companies that are helping to unlock the formerly incarcerated workforce. Key Points “There isn't anyone you couldn't learn to love once you've heard their story.” -Fred Rogers 95% of people incarcerated will be released back to communities. The formerly incarcerated are five times more likely to be unemployed than the general population. “Within organizations that have hired those with a criminal record, 82% of managers rate the value workers with a criminal record bring to the organization as similar to or greater than that of those without a record.” -Society for Human Resource Management Be an advocate. Research what other organizations are doing on this. Begin by reading the SHRM report. Resources Mentioned Hiring the Formerly Incarcerated is Best for Your Team (Shelley’s TED talk) Winner’s Circle (Shelley’s organization) Getting Talent Back to Work by Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) Out of Prison & Out of Work: Unemployment Among Formerly Incarcerated People by Prison Policy Initiative Embracing Formerly Incarcerated Workers: Things HR Should Consider by CareerMinds Facts & Trends by The National Reentry Resource Center Big Tech's Newest Experiment in Criminal-Justice Reform in The Atlantic The Last Mile JPMorgan Chase Joins Second Chance Efforts to Reduce Obstacles to Employment Related Episodes Sin by Silence, with Olivia Klaus (episode 103) Leadership Lessons from the Challenger Disaster, with Allan McDonald (episode 229) The Choice for Compassion, with Edith Eger (episode 336) How to Get Moving, with Scott Harrison (episode 374) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
December 16, 2019
Jim Kirkpatrick: Four Levels of Training Evaluation Jim Kirkpatrick is co-owner of Kirkpatrick Partners. He is an expert in training evaluation and the creator of the New World Kirkpatrick Model. He trains and consults for corporate, government, military, and humanitarian organizations around the world. Jim co-authored three books with his late father, Don Kirkpatrick, who is credited with creating the Kirkpatrick Model. He also has written four books with Wendy Kirkpatrick, including Kirkpatrick's Four Levels of Training Evaluation*. In this conversation, Jim and I explore the details of the New World Kirkpatrick Model. Many leaders miss the critical nature of focus on level 4 (results) and level 3 (behavior). We examine these two levels in detail and show leaders how they can take practical steps to link training with results. Key Points Ask yourself this when considering results: “Is this what the organization exists to do, deliver, or contribute to its customers or society, at a high level?” Level 4 (Results): The degree to which targeted outcomes occur as a result of the training and the support and accountability package. Level 3 (Behavior): The degree to which participants apply what they learned during training when they are back on the job. Level 2 (Learning): The degree to which participants acquire the intended knowledge, skills, attitude, confidence and commitment based on their participation in the training. Level 1 (Reaction): The degree to which participants find the training favorable, engaging and relevant to their jobs. Resources Mentioned Kirkpatrick Community: Free Resources Kirkpatrick’s Four Levels of Training Evaluation* by Jim and Wendy Kirkpatrick Bonus Audio Aligning Training with Business Objectives Related Episodes Effective Delegation of Authority, with Hassan Osman (episode 413) Help People Learn Through Powerful Teaching, with Pooja Agarwal (episode 421) Tie Leadership Development to Business Results, with Mark Allen (episode 435) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
December 14, 2019
Mindy Pankoke, Jeff VandenHoek, and Andrew Mugford On this SaturdayCast, longtime listeners Mindy, Jeff, and Andrew join Dave to discuss how they’ve worked together to support each other in their leadership development. They share the importance of setting expectations in advance, getting external perspective, and celebrating key milestones. Key Points Getting people together outside of the organization/industry is helpful for objective perspective. “You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.” -Jim Rohn There’s the temptation to think, “What could I possibly offer?” Almost always, each person is able to offer a lot more than they expected. Say “thank you” when someone offers something, even if you’re not sure it’s useful. It is important to celebrate significant milestones. Resources Mentioned The Coaching Habit* by Michael Bungay Stanier Related Episodes These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237) How to Create Meaningful Gatherings, with Priya Parker (episode 395) How to Make Your Work More Visible, with John Stepper (episode 397) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
December 9, 2019
Lisa Cummings: Lead Through Strengths Lisa Cummings is the founder and CEO of Lead Through Strengths, a firm that exists to help people find and use their strengths at work. Lisa and her team serve large teams and organizations to help them leverage the results of the CliftonStrengths (formerly StrengthsFinder) assessment. She is also the host of the popular Lead Through Strengths podcast. In this conversation, Lisa and I discuss the value of bringing continual learning into existing team meetings. We explore several steps for making this a reality and feature her new Stronger Teams training for individuals and teams who want to do this more intentionally. Use code CFL10 for a 10% tuition discount if you decide the program is right for you. Key Points Consistency of team learning over time, each if for only a few minutes in each interaction, can make substantial progress. If possible, begin a meeting with a learning component. Help connect the dots for people between their natural talents and the work in front of them in the organization. When you ask people to think of others who they admire, be specific. Resources Mentioned Activity: What Do You Want to Be Remembered For? in PDF format (free membership required). StrengthsFinder Stronger Teams training for individuals and teams (use code CFL10 for a 10% tuition discount) The Ultimate Guide to Using Your Strengths to Get Hired Related Episodes Five Effective Ways to Train the People You Lead (episode 31) How Teams Use StrengthsFinder Results, with Lisa Cummings (episode 293) How to Lead Meetings That Get Results, with Mamie Kanfer Stewart (episode 358) One Alternative to Standing Meetings Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
December 5, 2019
Join us for the inaugural Coaching for Leaders Expert Class: How to Create Team Guidelines Thursday, December 12th at 1:00 p.m. New York / 10:00 a.m. Los Angeles Claim Your Free Seat
December 2, 2019
Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She joins me monthly to respond to listener questions. Listener Questions Robert asked how he could support other leaders in his organization to do better, while also supporting his own career. Harrison was wondering how he could handle a situation with a difficult client. Gregory wanted to know how to support team members when they are on-site with a customer and not available to connect. Chris asked what he could do to get more feedback on what should happen with training and development activities. Resources Mentioned How to Stop Worry and Start Living* by Dale Carnegie The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People* by Stephen Covey Related Episodes How to Listen When Someone Is Venting, with Mark Goulston (episode 91) Performance Measurement That Gets Results, with Stacey Barr (episode 419) Tie Leadership Development to Business Results, with Mark Allen (episode 435) Keep Your Ideas From Being Stolen (Dave’s Journal) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
November 25, 2019
Tasha Eurich: Insight Tasha Eurich is an organizational psychologist, researcher, and New York Times best-selling author. Thinkers50 has named her one of the top 30 emerging management thinkers in the world and a top 50 world leader in coaching. She was selected by Marshall Goldsmith for his exclusive “100 Coaches” project to advance the practice of leadership. Tasha’s TEDx talks have been viewed more than three million times. She is the author of the book Insight: The Surprising Truth About How Others See Us, How We See Ourselves, and Why the Answers Matter More Than We Think. In this conversation, Tasha and I discuss the critical nature of self-awareness and the tendency most people have to stay mum about the truth. She shows us how to discover loving critics who will help you get better — and what you can do and say to support useful feedback coming your way. Key Points Internal and external self-awareness are both critical — and different. Improving both is important for most leaders. “Research shows that people are perfectly willing to tell white lies when they’re easier than the cold, hard truth.” Loving critics are people who have mutual trust with you, have sufficient exposure to the behavior you want feedback on and a clear picture of what success looks like, and are willing and able to be brutally honest with you. It’s critical to be specific in the questions you ask, seeking feedback. Prime the pump by zeroing in on only one or two areas at a time. Bonus Audio What Others See Resources Mentioned 5-minute Insight Quiz Insight: The Surprising Truth About How Others See Us, How We See Ourselves, and Why the Answers Matter More Than We Think* by Tasha Eurich Book Notes Download my highlights from Insight in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Get Way Better at Accepting Feedback, with Sheila Heen (episode 143) Five Steps to Hold People Accountable, with Jonathan Raymond(episode 306) How to Process Your 360 Degree Feedback, with Tom Henschel (episode 341) What to Do With Your Feelings, with Lori Gottlieb (episode 438) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
November 18, 2019
Willie Jackson Willie Jackson is a diversity, equity, and inclusion consultant and facilitator with ReadySet, a boutique consulting firm based in the San Francisco Bay Area. He is a frequent writer and speaker on the topics of workplace equity, global diversity, and inclusive leadership. Willie founded an online magazine for black men called Abernathy in 2015, growing the publication from initial concept to over 400 articles and thousands of subscribers. He also served as Technical Lead of Seth Godin’s altMBA program. In this conversation, Willie and I discuss getting started on the journey with diversity and inclusion, what leaders can do to be more mindful, and some of the missteps that I’ve made along the way. Key Points Most of us have good intentions — and intentions alone do not ensure we make the impact we want. We don’t rise to the level of our ambition. We sink to the level of our training. You will make mistakes, regardless of how mindful and intentional you are. Bonus Audio The Language of Inclusivity Resources Scene on Radio podcast White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism* by Robin DiAngelo Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Re-create Race in the Twenty-first Century* by Dorothy Roberts The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration* by Isabel Wilkersons Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America* by Ibram Kendi How to Be an Antiracist* by Ibram Kendi Related Episodes How to Handle Workplace Bullying, with Jill Morgenthaler (episode 172) How to Tame Workplace Incivility, with Sharone Bar-David (episode 210) How to Make Inclusion Happen, with Deepa Purushothaman (episode 307) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
November 11, 2019
Jim Mattis: Call Sign Chaos Jim Mattis served more than four decades as an infantry officer in the United States Marines, rising to the rank of 4-star general. In 2017, he was nearly unanimously confirmed as the 26th Secretary of Defense of the United States, a position he held for almost two years. Today, he is a distinguished fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University and the author of the new book with Bing West: Call Sign Chaos: Learning to Lead*. In this conversation, Jim and I discuss his career in the Marines and the leadership lessons that emerged during combat. Jim shares the mistake he made in soliciting support for his plan to capture Osama Bin Laden in Tora Bora and discusses how he handled disagreements on strategy in Fallujah. Finally, Jim recommends three books and reflects on the greatest threat to America today. Key Points Creating “focused telescopes” outside the normal chain of command were useful in discovering concerns that might not otherwise have become known. Keep key stakeholders in the loop with these three questions: What do I know? Who needs to know? Have I told them? “You cannot order someone to abandon a spiritual burden they’ve been wrestling with.” Even in a war zone, command was only a small portion of the daily tasks. Most of the time was spent coaching. “History teaches that we face nothing new under the sun.” Books will help you take advantage of the accumulated experiences of leaders who came before you. Resources Mentioned Meditations* by Marcus Aurelius Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant* by Ulysses S. Grant and Mark Twain Long Walk to Freedom* by Nelson Mandela Book Notes Download my highlights from Call Sign Chaos in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Stop Rescuing People From Their Problems, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 284) Develop Leaders Before You Leave, with David Marquet (episode 405) Influence Through Overlapping Networks, with Sandie Morgan (episode 422) How to Start Seeing Around Corners, with Rita McGrath (episode 430) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
November 4, 2019
Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She joins me monthly to respond to listener questions. Listener Questions David asked about how to replace his manager who’s had 20 years of experience. Said wondered what he should do to overcome the fear of leading someone smarter than him. James asked about the best ways to prepare how more opportunities to influence others. Resources Mentioned Leaders Need “User Manuals” – and What I Learned By Writing Mine What If You Had to Write a "User Manual" About Your Leadership Style? Business Model Generation* by Alexander Osterwalder and Yves Pigneur Related Episodes Seven Principles for Leading People Older Than You, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 59) An Astronaut’s Guide To Life On Earth, with Chris Hadfield (episode 149) Do This for a Productive Week (episode 180) How to Create Team Guidelines, with Susan Gerke (episode 192) How to Actually Move Numbers, with Chris McChesney (episode 294) The Path to Start Leading Your Team, with John Piñeiro (episode 349) Develop Leaders Before You Leave, with David Marquet (episode 405) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
October 28, 2019
Lori Gottlieb: Maybe You Should Talk to Someone Lori Gottlieb is a psychotherapist and New York Times bestselling author of Maybe You Should Talk to Someone*. In addition to her clinical practice, she writes The Atlantic’s weekly Dear Therapist advice column and contributes regularly to The New York Times and many other publications. Lori has written hundreds of articles related to psychology and culture, many of which have become viral sensations. She is a sought-after expert in media appearing on The Today Show, Good Morning America, and NPR’s “Fresh Air.” In this conversation, Lori and I explore what to do with our feelings, how make the transition from idiot compassion towards wise compassion, and where a therapist can help. When a therapist is the right resource, Lori teaches us how to gain the most from therapy by stepping into both vulnerability and accountability. Key Points It’s important to make the transition from “idiot compassion” to wise compassion — and to find others who can do that for us. Sometimes people say they want to stop the difficult feelings, but you can’t mute some feelings without muting all of them. We keep secrets from our therapists — and we keep secrets from ourselves. The more we are able to be vulnerable, the more that people are able to help ourselves. Insight alone is not valuable without accountability to do better with new insight. What matters most in the success of therapy is the relationship with your therapist, more so than any other factor or credentials. Resources Mentioned Maybe You Should Talk to Someone* by Lori Gottlieb Dear Therapist in The Atlantic Related Episodes How to Manage Your Inner Critic, with Tara Mohr (episode 232) Four Steps to Get Unstuck and Embrace Change, with Susan David (episode 297) The Way to Have Conversations That Matter, with Celeste Headlee (episode 344) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
October 21, 2019
Art Markman: Bring Your Brain to Work Art Markman is the Annabel Irion Worsham Centennial Professor Centennial Professor of Psychology and Marketing at the University of Texas at Austin. He is also the Founding Director of the Program in the Human Dimensions of Organizations, which brings the humanities and the social behavioral sciences to people in business. Along with Bob Duke, Art hosts the radio show Two Guys on Your Head for KUT Radio in Austin, also available as a podcast. He’s the author of many books, most recently: Bring Your Brain to Work: Using Cognitive Science to Get a Job, Do it Well, and Advance Your Career*. In this conversation, Art and I explore the science behind what we know and how we can both better recognize what we don’t know and increase our knowledge in that area. Research shows that others are one of our best sources of knowledge and we discuss how to make intentional connections through mentoring to accomplish this. Key Points Metacognition is the awareness of one’s own knowledge. The Dunning-Kruger explains how sometimes feels like we know more about something than we actually do. The success of expert generalists demonstrates the value of leveraging connections with others in the organization and industry. The most powerful source of knowledge is the people around you. Traditional mentoring programs aren’t ideal since they are inorganic. Seek these five kinds of people when building a team that can mentor you: coach, superstar, connector, librarian, and teammate. Resources Mentioned Bring Your Brain to Work: Using Cognitive Science to Get a Job, Do it Well, and Advance Your Career* by Art Markman Book Notes Download my highlights from Bring Your Brain to Work in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Find a Mentor (episode 105) How to Grow Your Professional Network, with Tom Henschel (episode 279) What You Gain By Sponsoring People, with Julia Taylor Kennedy (episode 398) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
October 19, 2019
Michal Holliday: United States Air Force Mike is a 26-year career military officer and colonel in the United States Air Force. He’s been a commander at the squadron and group level. Today, he is chief of engineering overseeing design and construction across the entire Pacific theatre. He’s also a longtime listener of Coaching for Leaders. In this conversation, Mike and I discuss how his view of leadership has changed over time and how he’s used personal leadership to guide his journey. We highlight how he’s inspired vivid visions in his organization, created team expectations, and embrace a culture of more immediate coaching and feedback. Key Points “Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.” -Viktor Frankl “The unexamined life is not worth living.” -Socrates Vision statements often end up in a drawer. The vivid vision process taught by Cameron Herold has helped the vision to come alive. Giving coaching and feedback more immediately is essential for learning and cultivating the right culture. “When I see something, I do something.” There is a time and place for order-giving. Spending more time coaching, giving feedback, and listening well helps build trust for orders to be followed when that time comes. Resources Mentioned Man's Search for Meaning* by Viktor Frankl Vivid Vision* by Cameron Herold Radical Candor* by Kim Scott Related Episodes How to Create Team Guidelines, with Susan Gerke (episode 192) The Way to Make New Behaviors Stick, with Marshall Goldsmith (episode 196) How to Make Deep Work Happen, with Cal Newport (episode 233) How to Challenge Directly and Care Personally, with Kim Scott (episode 302) The Power of Solitude, with Mike Erwin (episode 308) How to Create a Vivid Vision, with Cameron Herold (episode 345) The Way to Stay Grounded, with Parker Palmer (episode 378) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
October 14, 2019
Mark Allen: Pepperdine University Mark Allen is an educator, speaker, consultant, and author who specializes in talent management, corporate universities, and human resources. He is the author of Aha Moments in Talent Management*, The Next Generation of Corporate Universities*, and The Corporate University Handbook*. Mark is a professor at Pepperdine University’s Graziadio School of Business and Management, where he also serves as Academic Director of the Master of Science in Human Resources program. He is also a senior faculty member of the Human Capital Institute. In this conversation, Mark and I explore the changing demographics of the workforce and what it matters for talent acquisition and leadership development today. Mark shares the key strategies he uses with clients to ensure that leadership development ties directly to organizational results. Key Points 10,000 baby boomers a day are turning 73 and will continue to do so for the next 18 years. The competition for talent will become even more intense than it is today. Research shows that 60-90% of all learnings from development programs are never used on the job. Leadership development programs should not be designed to create better leadership. Leadership is not a business outcome - it's a means to an end. Begin with the end in mind. What’s the business result your leadership development program aims to achieve? Get alignment there before you start building or hire someone to build it. Use the 70-20-10 rule to develop people. 70% of time doing experiential learning, 20% of time in coaching and mentoring, and 10% classroom instruction. Resources Mentioned The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People* by Stephen Covey Evaluating Training Programs: The Four Levels* by Donald Kirkpatrick and James Kirkpatrick Mark’s consulting work Related Episodes The Best Way to Do On-the-Job Training (episode 32) How to Use Strategy and Evaluation in Training, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 33) How to Hire a Trainer or Training Company, with Aaron Kent (episode 35) Three Strategies To Build Talent In Your Organization, with Mark Allen (episode 155) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
October 7, 2019
Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She joins me monthly to respond to listener questions. Listener Questions Jules asks about how transparent she should be with her boss on her long-term career aspirations. Megan is wondering what she can do when reporting to a leader who seems to have checked out. Mason facilitated a strategy meeting with his team is asks for our advice on how he might improve. Julie’s organization is changing and she is seeking input on the best path forward to determine if her current team can go the distance. Resources Mentioned 11 Ways to Facilitate Great Conversations How to Better Control Your Time by Designing Your Ideal Week by Michael Hyatt Audio Course: How to Create Your Personal Vision Drive* by Daniel Pink The Empowered Manager* by Peter Block Analyzing Performance Problems* by Robert F. Mager and Peter Pipe Gallup’s StrengthsFinder instrument Related Episodes How Teams Use StrengthsFinder Results, with Lisa Cummings (episode 293) How to Deal with Opponents and Adversaries, with Peter Block (episode 328) How to Lead an Offsite, with Tom Henschel (episode 377) Align Your Calendar to What Matters, with Nir Eyal (episode 431) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
September 30, 2019
Tom Henschel: The Look & Sound of Leadership Tom Henschel of Essential Communications grooms senior leaders and executive teams. An internationally recognized expert in the field of workplace communications and self-presentation, he has helped thousands of leaders achieve excellence through his work as an executive coach and his top-rated podcast, The Look & Sound of Leadership. Recently, I’ve received a number of questions about “managing up” and “coaching up.” In this conversation, Tom and I discuss the art and practice of managing up, how it is different than coaching up, and where to focus your mindset and time for the best results to influence effectively. Key Points Managing up happens when you want to influence how you’re perceived by your manager. Coaching up happens when you want to create change in the relationship with your manager. A useful phrase to start with when speaking truth to power: “I think differently about that…” Set aside the emotion when addressing a business issues and lead with data and evidence. “Appeal to the nobler motives.” -Dale Carnegie Come to the table with solutions — or at least a first step. Most people know this rule, but far fewer do it consistently. Ask yourself: how is my boss being measured for success? A cardinal rule when managing up: take more off your boss’s plate that you add to it. Bonus Audio How is your boss being measured? Resources Mentioned How to Win Friends and Influence People* by Dale Carnegie Managing Your Boss by John Gabarro and John Kotter Related Episodes How to Handle a Boss Who’s a Jerk, with Tom Henschel (episode 164) Managing Up (The Look & Sound of Leadership) Managing Your Boss (The Look & Sound of Leadership) Upward Feedback (The Look & Sound of Leadership) Green Lights Always Change (Dave’s Journal) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
September 23, 2019
Denice Hinden: Managance Consulting & Coaching Denice is the president of Managance Consulting & Coaching, a firm that helps transform organizations with provocative strategic planning and coaches leaders and leadership teams. She was lead researcher and co-designer of Executive Transition Management (ETM), a now widely used methodology for effectively supporting nonprofits through leadership transitions. Denice is the author of The Nonprofit Organizational Culture Guide: Revealing the Hidden Truths that Impact Performance* and Taking Leadership to the Next Level: A Year of Stimulating Essays to Discover More Joy in Leading & Inspiring Others* has a tremendous amount of experience helping leaders and boards find alignment and succeed. In this conversation, Denice and I discuss the purpose of a board and how leaders can build relationships with board members. We explore the importance of transparency, how to keep initiatives moving forward, and the practice of regular context. Key Points Six purposes of a board: (1) set policy and direction, (2) monitor operations for compliance and mission, (3) represent the organization, (4) serve as strategy partners, (5) keep record for the organization, and (6) develop current and future leaders. Leaders who lean into full transparency with their boards will build relationships that weather difficult times. Be cautious of making assumptions about what board members want to know. When meeting one on one, communicate what has happened in conversations with other board members to help keep things moving forward. Connecting board members to context regularly will help them find movement, especially when the board is in a volunteer capacity. Resources Mentioned The Nonprofit Organizational Culture Guide: Revealing the Hidden Truths that Impact Performance* by Denice Hinden Taking Leadership to the Next Level: A Year of Stimulating Essays to Discover More Joy in Leading & Inspiring Others* by Denice Hinden Related Episodes How to Increase Your Conversational Intelligence, with Judith Glaser (episode 271) Executive Presence with Your Elevator Speech, with Tom Henschel (episode 316) How to Find Confidence in Conflict, with Kwame Christian (episode 380) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
September 16, 2019
Nir Eyal: Indistractable Nir Eyal is one of the most respected experts on the intersection of psychology, technology, and business. The MIT Technology Review has called him, “The Prophet of Habit-Forming Technology.” He previously authored the Wall Street Journal bestseller Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products* which received tremendous traction in the technology and entrepreneurial communities. Now, he’s turned his attention to how we can control our attention in a world of complexity. His new book, Indistractable: How to Control Your Attention and Choose Your Life*, challenges some of the traditional misconceptions about distractions. In this conversation, Nir and I discuss the practical steps on how to align your calendar with what matters most. Key Points Being a professional is doing what you say you’re going to do. Most people don’t know what they are going to do. Research shows only a third of Americans keep a daily schedule. If you don’t plan your time, someone else will plan it for you. Look to executive leaders for inspiration on being intentional with time. Move away from the to-do list and instead begin the discipline of timeboxing your calendar. Resources Mentioned Resources Nir mentioned in our conversation Indistractable: How to Control Your Attention and Choose Your Life* by Nir Eyal Book Notes Download my highlights from Indistractable in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Getting Things Done, with David Allen (episode 184) How to Transform Your Limitations Into Advantages, with Mark Barden (episode 207) The Way to Stop Spinning Your Wheels on Planning (episode 319) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
September 11, 2019
Lesson 5: Your Next Step Once you’ve made your vision tangible: Set it aside for a day or two Consider sharing it with a supportive partner or friend Pick on place to take action Academy Applications Close Friday, September 13th The Academy is a year-long cohort of participant leaders who work personally with me to create movement in their leadership development and organizational results. Discover more and submit your application by this Friday, September 13th. Resources Great at Work* by Morten Hansen Atomic Habits* by James Clear Related Episodes Six Tactics for Extraordinary Performance, with Morten Hansen (episode 337) How to Become the Person You Want to Be, with James Clear (episode 376) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
September 10, 2019
Lesson 4: What to Set Aside Four practices to set aside what’s not important for your vision: Don’t worry about how to get there. Focus on what you haven’t yet mastered. Place your intention on what you can influence. Write your personal vision for you, not for the organization. Academy Applications Close Friday, September 13th The Academy is a year-long cohort of participant leaders who work personally with me to create movement in their leadership development and organizational results. Discover more and submit your application by this Friday, September 13th. Resources The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People* by Stephen Covey Leadership vs. Management by Tom Henschel Related Episodes How to Succeed with Leadership and Management, with John Kotter (episode 249) How to Create a Vivid Vision, with Cameron Herold (episode 345) Find Your Leadership Voice, with Johanna Nalau (episode 420) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
September 9, 2019
Lesson 3: Making It Tangible Harvard professor Michael Porter says: The essence of strategy is choosing what not to do. A few useful guidelines: Pick a date, 2-3 years from now. Use present tense language. Zero in on 3-5 of the most important areas for you. Frame the vision around your why. Capture as much detail (conversation, sights, smells) as you can. In writing, a vision may start something like this: It’s three years from today, on the morning of March 13th. I climb out of bed at 5:30 a.m., put on my running shoes, and start walking down the stairs. A smile comes to my face as I step outside the house and smell humid air and morning dew on the plants… Dwight Eisenhower said: Plans are worthless, but planning is everything. Academy Applications Close Friday, September 13th The Academy is a year-long cohort of participant leaders who work personally with me to create movement in their leadership development and organizational results. Discover more and submit your application by this Friday, September 13th. Related Episodes How to Create a Vivid Vision, with Cameron Herold (episode 345) Fly the Plane (Dave’s Journal) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
September 9, 2019
Lesson 2: Pursuing Your Why The Japanese word “ikigai” roughly translates to the reason you wake up in the morning. It’s your reason for being. During his 2005 commencement address at Stanford, Steve Jobs said: The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. And don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. Academy Applications Close Friday, September 13th The Academy is a year-long cohort of participant leaders who work personally with me to create movement in their leadership development and organizational results. Discover more and submit your application by this Friday, September 13th. Resources Start with Why by Simon Sinek The Happiness Equation by Neil Pasricha Steve Jobs’ 2005 Stanford Commencement Address Related Episodes The Secret to Happiness (episode 134) Start With Why, with Simon Sinek (episode 223) How to Be a Happier Person, with Neil Pasricha (episode 334) Create Margin Through Intentional Leadership, with Amy McPherson (episode 429) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
September 9, 2019
Lesson 1: Figuring Out What’s Important Past guest David Allen, author of Getting Things Done*, says there are two problems: You know what you want, and you don’t know how to get it. You don’t know what you want Earl Nightingale said: Success is the progressive realization of a worthy goal or ideal. Jim Harter, author of It's the Manager*, says: Around the world, the great global dream is to have a good job. Here are questions you might ask to determine your ideal, typical day: How would the day start? What would your work look like? What kinds of people would you be working with? Where would you live? What interactions would you have in your community? What hobby might you do? What kind of foods would you eat? What would you feel during that day? What would you experience? How would the day end? What would you remember? These questions might also help: What did you really enjoy when you were a kid? What do you get so engaged with that you lose track of time? What have you heard from others that you do really well? Past guest Simon Sinek, author of Start With Why*, says: You don’t have to have a vision. You have to find a vision. Austin Kleon reminds us to: Steal like an artist. Here are more ways to have others inspire your vision: Read biographies of the people your admire. Watch movies that you love and that inspire you. Tap into great thinkers. Academy Applications Close Friday, September 13th The Academy is a year-long cohort of participant leaders who work personally with me to create movement in their leadership development and organizational results. Discover more and submit your application by this Friday, September 13th. Resources Man’s Search for Meaning* by Viktor Frankl Related Episodes Getting Things Done, with David Allen (episode 184) Start With Why, with Simon Sinek (episode 223) Gallup Findings on the Changing Nature of Work, with Jim Harter (episode 409) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
September 9, 2019
Rita McGrath: Seeing Around Corners Rita McGrath is a best-selling author, a sought-after speaker, and a longtime professor at Columbia Business School. She is one of the world’s top experts on innovation and growth and is one of the most regularly published authors in the Harvard Business Review. Rita is consistently ranked among the top 10 management thinkers in the world and was ranked #1 for strategy by Thinkers50. Rita is the author of the bestseller The End of Competitive Advantage*. Her newest book is titled Seeing Around Corners: How to Spot Inflection Points in Business Before They Happen*. In this conversation, Rita and I explore how it feels like change happens overnight, but why that’s not usually accurate. We detail four basic stages of inflection points, why it’s critical to be present at the edges, and what leaders can do practically to see around corners. Key Points Strategic inflection points feel like they happen overnight, but in reality there are many indicators over time that inflection points are coming. The four basic stages of almost every inflection point: hype, dismissive, emergent, maturity. Snow melts from the edges. The most effective leaders can and will see this if they are present at the edges. To see early warning signs, create information flows that reach directly from leaders offices into the frontlines of the business. Create incentives that reward useful (and awkward) information. Talk to the future that is unfolding now. There are people, customers, and businesses where the future is already happening. Resources Mentioned Seeing Around Corners by Rita McGrath Rita McGrath on LinkedIn Breaking Up the Degree Stranglehold: Disruption in Higher Education Only the Paranoid Survive* by Andrew Grove Book Notes Download my highlights from Seeing Around Corners in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Lead a 100-Year Life, with Lynda Gratton (episode 266) The Truth and Lies of Performance Management, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 361) The Way to Nurture New Ideas, with Safi Bahcall (episode 418) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
September 8, 2019
Lesson 2: Pursuing Your Why The Japanese word “ikigai” roughly translates to the reason you wake up in the morning. It’s your reason for being. During his 2005 commencement address at Stanford, Steve Jobs said: The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. And don’t settle. As with all matters of the heart, you’ll know when you find it. Academy Applications Close Friday, September 13th The Academy is a year-long cohort of participant leaders who work personally with me to create movement in their leadership development and organizational results. Discover more and submit your application by this Friday, September 13th. Resources Start with Why by Simon Sinek The Happiness Equation by Neil Pasricha Steve Jobs’ 2005 Stanford Commencement Address Related Episodes The Secret to Happiness (episode 134) Start With Why, with Simon Sinek (episode 223) How to Be a Happier Person, with Neil Pasricha (episode 334) Create Margin Through Intentional Leadership, with Amy McPherson (episode 429) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
September 7, 2019
Part 1: Figuring Out What’s Important Past guest David Allen, author of Getting Things Done*, says there are two problems: You know what you want, and you don’t know how to get it. You don’t know what you want Earl Nightingale said: Success is the progressive realization of a worthy goal or ideal. Jim Harter, author of It's the Manager*, says: Around the world, the great global dream is to have a good job. Here are questions you might ask to determine your ideal, typical day: How would the day start? What would your work look like? What kinds of people would you be working with? Where would you live? What interactions would you have in your community? What hobby might you do? What kind of foods would you eat? What would you feel during that day? What would you experience? How would the day end? What would you remember? These questions might also help: What did you really enjoy when you were a kid? What do you get so engaged with that you lose track of time? What have you heard from others that you do really well? Past guest Simon Sinek, author of Start With Why*, says: You don’t have to have a vision. You have to find a vision. Austin Kleon reminds us to: Steal like an artist. Here are more ways to have others inspire your vision: Read biographies of the people your admire. Watch movies that you love and that inspire you. Tap into great thinkers. Academy Applications Close Friday, September 13th The Academy is a year-long cohort of participant leaders who work personally with me to create movement in their leadership development and organizational results. Discover more and submit your application by this Friday, September 13th. Resources Man’s Search for Meaning* by Viktor Frankl Steve Jobs’ 2005 Stanford Commencement Address Related Episodes Getting Things Done, with David Allen (episode 184) Start With Why, with Simon Sinek (episode 223) Gallup Findings on the Changing Nature of Work, with Jim Harter (episode 409) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
September 7, 2019
Amy McPherson: Advisors for Change Amy McPherson is the managing partner and founder of Advisors for Change. Since 2007, Advisors for Change has developed financial management systems for non-profit organizations so they can spend more time on their mission and less time on their administration. Amy is also a member of the Coaching for Leaders Academy. After discovering this podcast three years ago, Amy sought a practical way to implement the leadership ideas she was discovering. In this conversation, Amy and I discuss how her aim to create more margin for her family has driven more intention for staff development, coaching, and transparency. We also discuss what she’s discovered from expert guests and how she utilized the framework of the Academy to create movement. Key Points The seven questions from The Coaching Habit provided a framework for the kind of culture that would best serve the non-profit partners of Advisors for Change. Shifting focus from lagging indicators to leading indicators helped zero in on the behaviors needed today for success tomorrow. Find the bigger “why” behind what you are doing. In Amy’s case, her leadership growth was fueled by her desire to spend more time with her teenage children. The Coaching for Leaders Academy provided Amy with the framework for deliberate, consistent movement on what was most important for the business. Resources Mentioned Advisors for Change Amy McPherson on LinkedIn Related Episodes These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237) How Teams Use StrengthsFinder Results, with Lisa Cummings (episode 293) How to Actually Move Numbers, with Chris McChesney (episode 294) How to Challenge Directly and Care Personally, with Kim Scott (episode 302) Growth Mindset Helps You Rise From the Ashes, with Jeff Hittenberger (episode 326) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
September 2, 2019
Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She joins me monthly to respond to listener questions. Key Points In this episode, Bonni and I celebrate Coaching for Leaders recently passing the milestone of 10 million episode downloads since we began airing this podcast in 2011. Today, this podcast is regularly ranked as a Top 50 business show on Apple Podcasts. The growth of the show has been the direct result of listeners like you who have put your trust in us to support your development. As a result, we invited listeners to be featured in this episode by telling us what they’ve gained from the show. Thank you for supporting Coaching for Leaders and for sharing it with others in your professional network. There is no greater compliment to our work. Resources Mentioned Essential Communications with Tom Henschel StrengthsFinder with Isabeau Iqbal Lead Through Strengths with Lisa Cummings Sequentia Solutions with Steve Chase Related Episodes The Power of Introverts, with Susan Cain (episode 44) How to Improve Your Coaching Skills, with Tom Henschel (episode 190) These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237) How to Write a Killer LinkedIn Profile, with Brenda Bernstein (episode 285) Move From Theory to Practice, with Steve Schroeder (episode 369) Unconscious Mistakes Women Make, with Lois Frankel (episode 386) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
August 26, 2019
Pete Mockaitis: How to be Awesome at Your Job Pete Mockaitis is an award-winning trainer and coach who helps professionals perform optimally at work. He hosts the How to be Awesome at Your Job podcast, a show that has been downloaded eight millions times and consistently ranks as a top business show in Apple Podcasts. Pete facilitates training for organizations on enhanced thinking and collaboration to increase clarity and reduce rework. He helps teams save an average of 1.4 hours per person per week. In this conversation, Pete and I explore some of the key mindsets and questions that are helpful when getting alignment with your boss. We explore the areas you’ll want to generate clarity, as well a few key questions to consider. Key Points Six areas where clarity is critical: Deliverables Timing Process Resources Audience Motive Questions you may consider when getting alignment with your boss: How do you want this to look when complete? What does the organization value on metrics and deliverables? What’s an example of a time this expectation was not met? What metrics are my boss being measured on for their own success? Resources Mentioned How to be Awesome at Your Job Related Episodes Seven Principles for Leading People Older Than You, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 59) How to Influence Numerous Stakeholders, with Andy Kaufman (episode 240) Effective Delegation of Authority, with Hassan Osman (episode 413) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
August 19, 2019
Ginger Hardage: Unstoppable Cultures Ginger Hardage is the former senior vice president of culture at Southwest Airlines. She led a team responsible for building and sustaining the organization’s legendary culture and communications enterprise, resulting in 23 consecutive years on Fortune’s list of Top 10 Most Admired Companies in the World. Today, Ginger leads Unstoppable Cultures, a firm designed to help organizations create and sustain cultures of enduring greatness. She facilitates the annual Unstoppable Cultures Fellowship to help leaders of all kinds take practical steps to create the culture that will help their organization thrive. In this conversation, Ginger and I discuss the five lies she’s seen come up again and again in her work with leaders who are struggling with culture. Perhaps most importantly, Ginger emphasizes that leaders need not accept the default culture, but should work to define the culture. Key Points The five lies Ginger has uncovered about culture: Culture is someone else’s job. Our values are on the wall. Culture is fluffy. If I empower my employees, I might lose control. We can’t afford culture. Bonus Audio Defining a culture Resources Mentioned 5 Lies About Corporate Culture document Unstoppable Cultures Fellowship Related Episodes The Four Critical Stories Leaders Need For Influence, with David Hutchens (episode 148) Notice and Change Dysfunctional Culture, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 327) How to Create an Unstoppable Culture, with Ginger Hardage (episode 350) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
August 17, 2019
Leonardo Baumworcel: Hospital São Lucas Leonardo Baumworcel is the director of Hospital São Lucas in Brazil. He oversees a 200-bed hospital and emergency room seeing 10,000 patients a month. He also oversees the work of 2,500 staff. He is a cardiologist by training and a recent alum of the Coaching for Leaders Academy. Key Points One way to utilize the podcast is to leverage if for staff training to get the entire team on the same page. Resilience is key when working to achieve your vision through change — beware of giving up too quickly. Leaders need to establish the frameworks and limitations for what to do — and then help people to have the freedom to work within it. Peer mentoring allows both leaders to learn from each other, instead of limiting the professional development to one person. Resources Mentioned Leading Change* by John Kotter Our Iceberg Is Melting* by John Kotter and Holger Rathgeber Related Episodes The Power of Vulnerability in Leadership, with Jason Brooks (episode 385) How to Create an Unstoppable Culture, with Ginger Hardage (episode 350) How to Succeed with Leadership and Management, with John Kotter (episode 249) Move From Theory to Practice, with Steve Schroeder (episode 369) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
August 12, 2019
Scott Anthony Barlow: Happen to Your Career Scott Anthony Barlow is the founder of Happen to Your Career. He’s been featured on CNBC, Yahoo, CareerBuilder, Fast Company, and Huffington Post and various colleges and universities as a top expert on career happiness. He's held executive roles in human resources, business development, and career coaching. Scott is the host of the Happen to Your Career podcast, featuring the career stories of many successful professionals. He and his team have worked with over 25,000 people to help them stop settling, find their signature strengths, and start doing meaningful work they are enamored with. Key Points Many people frame career choices only as, “Should I take this offer or not?” or, “Should I quit this job and go and get another?” Skills are not necessarily strengths. People who are successful and happier are spending more time in their strengths. Gallup’s StrengthsFinder assessment (now called CliftonStrengths) is a useful tool for getting clarity. Change to a role/company that allows you spend more time in your strengths or decide to design your career from the inside. Stop pursuing marginal improvements of your weaknesses. Resources Mentioned The Ultimate Guide to Using Your Strengths to Get Hired* 8-Day Video Course to Figuring Out What You Love Related Episodes How to Figure Out Your Career, with Scott Anthony Barlow (episode 259) How Teams Use StrengthsFinder Results, with Lisa Cummings (episode 293) Move From Caretaker to Rainmaker, with May Busch (episode 390) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
August 7, 2019
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August 5, 2019
Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly-traded company. She joins me monthly to respond to listener questions. Listener Questions Samantha asks about how to confront an employee who is not willing to take direction for her. Cathy is wondering how she can lead on a team where she does not have formal authority. Amir is seeking advice on how to step into a director role with confidence and managing former peers. Kelly asks about responding to stakeholders who give suggestions when it doesn’t align with organizational strategy. Resources Mentioned Let's Get Real or Let's Not Play* by Mahan Khalsa, Randy Illig, and Stephen R. Covey Working Wardrobes* Related Episodes How to Manage Former Peers, with Tom Henschel (episode 257) How to Actually Move Numbers, with Chris McChesney (episode 294) The Path to Start Leading Your Team, with John Piñeiro (episode 349) Finding Joy Though Intentional Choices, with Bonni Stachowiak (episode 417) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
July 28, 2019
Sandie Morgan: Global Center for Women & Justice Sandie Morgan is the director of the Global Center for Women and Justice at Vanguard University of Southern California. She is recognized globally for her expertise on combatting human trafficking and working to end violence against women. Sandie is professor, researcher, and partner to many organizations and agencies across the globe including governments, law enforcement, and non-profits. Since 2011, she has hosted along with me the bimonthly Ending Human Trafficking podcast which was recognized by The National Clearinghouse on Families & Youth at the Department of Health and Human Services as a great way to “get up to speed on human trafficking.” Key Points Culture often changes from the top down. Engage “elites” who are outside of the centermost position of prestige. Find avenue of agreement instead of focusing on differences. Influence happens in exciting ways when the networks of elites and the institutions they lead overlap. Change will mean conflict — don’t be scared of this. The more diverse your partnerships are, the stronger your net is going to be. Bonus Audio Why learning from elites is so important Resources Mentioned To Change the World* by James Davison Hunter How to Win Friends and Influence People* by Dale Carnegie Global Center for Women and Justice 2019 Trafficking in Persons Report Related Episodes How Storytelling Helps You Lead, with Sandie Morgan (episode 51) How to Collaborate Across Organizations, with Kirsten Foot (episode 215) How to Grow Your Professional Network, with Tom Henschel (episode 279) The Power of Weak Connections, with David Burkus (episode 347) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
July 22, 2019
Pooja Agarwal: Powerful Teaching Pooja Agarwal is an expert in the field of cognitive science and is passionate about bridging gaps between education and the science of learning. She is the founder of RetrievalPractice.org and Assistant Professor at the Berklee College of Music, teaching psychological science to exceptional undergraduate musicians. She also serves as a consultant and facilitates professional development workshops on the science of learning around the world. Pooja is the author with Patrice Bain of the book Powerful Teaching: Unleash the Science of Learning*. In this conversation, Pooja and I discuss the key strategies that leaders can use in order to maximize their effectiveness as teachers. Since almost every leader is responsible for talent development in some capacity, becoming a more powerful teacher will help you develop others more successfully. Key Points The three stages of the learning process are encoding, storage, and retrieval. We tend to focus too much on getting information into peoples’ heads (encoding) and not enough on getting it out (retrieval). Stop reviewing past discussions and meetings. Instead, invite people to recall and articulate prior interactions. Cramming works, but only in the short-term. For long-term retention, spacing is much more effective. There is no significant evidence that visual, auditory, and kinetic preferences correlate to actual learning. Instead, effective learning combines all these methods. Bonus Audio Why struggling is a good thing for learning Resources Mentioned RetrievalPractice.org PowerfulTeaching.org Powerful Teaching: Unleash the Science of Learning* Are You a Visual or an Auditory Learner? It Doesn’t Matter Book Notes Download my highlights from Powerful Teaching in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Best Way to Do On-the-Job Training (episode 32) These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237) Essentials of Adult Development, with Mindy Danna (episode 273) Develop Leaders Before You Leave, with David Marquet (episode 405) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
July 20, 2019
Johanna Nalau: Climate Adaptation & Everyday Leadership Johanna Nalau is an adaptation scientist researching the ins and outs of climate change adaptation. She is an Australian Research Council DECRA Fellow and the Adaptation Science Theme Leader at Cities Research Institute at Griffith University. She’s also the lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 6th Assessment Report, Working Group II. Johanna writes about climate adaptation and everyday leadership on her own blog and is an alum of the Coaching for Leaders Academy. In this conversation, Johanna and I discuss how she found her voice as a developing leader and how she took action through her writing and other professional activities to help others. Key Points Never underestimate the importance of having a group you can just bounce ideas off of. The most transformative way to build leadership is to start with the people below you who are the future leaders. Blogging is a great way to synthesize you thoughts while also being helpful for others. Resources Mentioned Johanna’s blog: Climate Adaptation & Everyday Leadership Stand Out* by Dorie Clark Great at Work* Morton Hansen Digital Minimalism* by Cal Newport Related Episodes How to Write a Killer LinkedIn Profile, with Brenda Bernstein (episode 285) Ideas Worth Stealing From Top Entrepreneurs, with Dorie Clark (episode 318) Six Tactics to Achieve Extraordinary Performance, with Morten Hansen (episode 337) How to Reclaim Conversation, with Cal Newport (episode 400) The Way to Nurture New Ideas, with Safi Bahcall (episode 418) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
July 15, 2019
Stacey Barr: Practical Performance Measurement Stacey Barr is a specialist in strategic performance measurement and evidence-based leadership. She is the creator of PuMP®, a performance measurement methodology that routinely transforms measurement cynics into its greatest advocates. Stacey is also the author of two books, Practical Performance Measurement: Using the PuMP® Blueprint for Fast, Easy, and Engaging KPIs*, and Prove It!: How to Create a High Performance Culture and Measurable Success*. In this conversation, Stacey and I discussed some of the common mistakes that leaders and organizations make with performance measurement. We also explore what well-formulated performance measures have. Plus, Stacey has kindly made her book available for free to our listening audience. Key Points Common mistakes in performance measurement: Initiatives are not performance measures Events or milestones are not performance measures Measures of activity completion are not performance measures Sources of data are not performance measures A few vague words don’t make a performance measure Well-formulated performance measures have: A method of comparison that we can use to tell whether performance is good or not A base of objective evidence that gives a reasonably accurate and reliable picture of current performance A sufficient degree of granularity to detect small but important changes in performance to which we should respond Relevance to the organization’s priorities The ability to show changes in performance levels over time, giving us enough context to avoid short-sightedness Resources Mentioned Download a free copy of Stacey’s book, Practical Performance Measurement The PuMP® Approach to Performance Measurement and KPIs Book Notes Download my highlights from Practical Performance Measurement in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Actually Move Numbers, with Chris McChesney (episode 294) How to Leverage People Analytics, with Jenny Dearborn (episode 323) The Truth and Lies of Performance Management, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 361) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
July 8, 2019
Safi Bahcall: Loonshots Safi Bahcall is a second-generation physicist and a biotech entrepreneur. He co-founded a biotechnology company developing new drugs for cancer, leading its IPO and serving as its CEO for 13 years. He worked with President Obama’s council of science advisors on the future of national research. Safi is the author of the book Loonshots: How to Nurture the Crazy Ideas That Win Wars, Cure Diseases, and Transform Industries*. In this conversation, Safi and I discuss how leaders can work intentionally to nurture new ideas through three key practices. If you are an innovator (or leading an innovation team) and hearing the voices of the naysayers, this framework will help you begin nurturing new ideas more successfully. Key Points A loonshot is a neglected project, widely dismissed, its champion written off as unhinged. The ice cube is an analogy for the soldiers and artists in the organization. This is called phase separation. The most effective leaders view their work as gardeners, gently cultivating news ideas and investigating with genuine curiosity. Leaders who have a heart for both their soldiers and their artists will support a dynamic equilibrium in their organizations. Most innovation fails in the transfer between the artists and the soldiers. Steve Jobs is an example of a leader who, for many years, refused to show heart — but discovered it later with fantastic success. Resources Mentioned Loonshots: How to Nurture the Crazy Ideas That Win Wars, Cure Diseases, and Transform Industries* by Safi Bahcall Book Notes Download my highlights from Loonshots in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Four Critical Stories Leaders Need For Influence, with David Hutchens (episode 148) How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) Get Better at Deep Listening, with Oscar Trimboli (episode 408) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
July 1, 2019
Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She joins me monthly to respond to listener questions. Key Points Don’t spend time feeling guilty about things you have to cut. Focus on quality over quantity. Your priorities will change over time. Sometimes even good things can crowd out what is really important. Resources Mentioned The Checklist Manifesto* by Atul Gawande Getting Things Done* by David Allen TripIt PackPoint Ending Human Trafficking podcast Related Episodes How Storytelling Helps You Lead, with Sandie Morgan (episode 51) Getting Things Done, with David Allen (episode 184) How to Reduce Drama With Kids, with Tina Payne Bryson (episode 310) How to Be a Happier Person, with Neil Pasricha (episode 334) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
June 24, 2019
Kwame Christian: American Negotiation Institute Kwame Christian is a business lawyer and the Director of the American Negotiation Institute. His TEDx Talk, Finding Confidence in Conflict, was the most popular TED Talk on the topic of conflict of 2017. Today, he’s working extensively with procurement departments within companies to help them make better deals. Kwame hosts the top negotiation podcast, Negotiate Anything and is the author of the book Nobody Will Play With Me: How to Find Confidence in Conflict*. In this conversation, Kwame and I discuss walking into a negotiation situation when someone else has more leverage, power, or authority. Yes, there are still many things you can do to influence a positive outcome for both parties — and we detail several practical actions almost anybody can take. Key Points Preparation before entering into negotiation is essential. Research supports that you will do better, even if the tables are tilted to one side. Finding what is publicly available about the other party before you go into a conversation can be very useful to both parties. Our tendency is to give things away before we are even certain the other party wants them. Your self-awareness and emotional state are key to acknowledge going into negotiation. Beware feeling too positive about the potential outcome. Resources Mentioned Kwame’s Ultimate Negotiation Guide Negotiate Anything podcast Nobody Will Play With Me: How To Use Compassionate Curiosity to Find Confidence in Conflict* by Kwame Christian Thinking Fast and Slow* by Daniel Kahneman Book Notes Download my highlights from Nobody Will Play With Me in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Negotiating As If Your Life Depended On It, with Chris Voss (episode 262) Negotiation Tactics for Results, with Kwame Christian (episode 311) Enhance Your Self-Awareness, with Daniel Goleman (episode 353) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
June 17, 2019
Chris Deferio: Keys to the Shop Chris Deferio is a cafe quality specialist who has dedicated 20 years of his life to working in and studying specialty coffee retail. He is also the creator and host of the industry leading podcast, Keys to the Shop, which gives listeners insights, inspiration, and tools to grow as specialty coffee professionals. Chris previously appeared on the show to help us get more perspective on managing part-time staff. In this conversation, Chris and I explore some of the practical steps that small business owners and general managers can take in order to support employee retention. Key Points Be mindful of the realities of turnover in a small business, but don’t let it stop you from thinking about the future and investing in people. Yes, hire for attitude — and also have an eye to future potential as the business grows. Ask people this question in interviews: “Where did you contribute to dysfunction in your prior organization?” Make an investment in people beyond the paycheck. This could be learning, culture, competitions, or more. There are ways to do this without tremendous expense. Practice intentional breaks in your rhythm, since nobody else in your business is likely to do this. Resources Mentioned Keys to the Shop podcast Good to Great* by Jim Collins Good Authority* by Jonathan Raymond Chris Deferio’s consulting Related Episodes Three Steps To Soliciting Feedback, with Tom Henschel (episode 107) How to Lead Part-Time Staff, with Chris Deferio (episode 289) Six Tactics to Achieve Extraordinary Performance, with Morten Hansen (episode 337) How to Connect Personal Growth to Business Outcomes, with Jonathon Raymond (episode 373) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
June 15, 2019
Bar Schwartz: Bring Your People Along Bar Schwartz is a member of the Coaching for Leaders Academy. She’s a software engineer by training and today a consultant and coach who lives and works in Berlin. Bar helps leaders to look differently on how they lead people to create meaningful work — and building structures that put people first. When Bar joined the Academy last year, she quickly set a goal to capture a few ideas in writing. This goal led to her writing a book in just a few short weeks. More importantly, she discovered the power of consistent movement in creating future opportunities. Bar has graciously made her book, Bring Your People Along, available as a free download for our listening community. If you decide to download the book, please reach out and let her know what was helpful to you. Key Points Your team will be more productive if it feels connected. It’s not hard to find questions if you listen. Small, manageable steps are more likely to lead to long-term success. Bonus Audio How to work in your strengths Resources Mentioned Bar Schwartz on LinkedIn Bring Your People Along by Bar Schwartz Happen to Your Career podcast by Scott Anthony Barlow (bonus audio) Related Episodes How to Know When to Move On Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
June 10, 2019
Hassan Osman: Effective Delegation of Authority Hassan is a project management office leader at Cisco, where he leads a team of over 150 project and program managers on delivering complex projects across the world. He’s also served as a management consultant at Ernst & Young (now EY), where he led projects and programs for the largest enterprises. He’s the author of Effective Delegation of Authority: A (Really) Short Book for New Managers About How to Delegate Work Using a Simple Delegation Process. In this episode, Hassan and I discuss the three stages of delegation, the critical importance of planning, and how to leverage delegation as a development opportunity. Also impressive is the ten books Hassan has published while working full-time as a manager at a Fortune 100 company. He teaches others how to do it on his Writer on the Side podcast. Key Points Before you begin the delegation process, decide on the outcomes you need and the right person to get you there. Set expectations for goals, not actions. Use checkpoints to ensure progress and adjust frequency for experience and visibility. Summarize delegation meetings in writing after they occur. The real work of managers is to define the work, before it starts. Resources Mentioned Effective Delegation of Authority: A (Really) Short Book for New Managers About How to Delegate Work Using a Simple Delegation Process* by Hassan Osman Writer on the Side podcast Book Notes Download my highlights from Effective Delegation of Authority in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Start Influencing Virtual Teams, with Hassan Osman (episode 234) The Way to Stop Rescuing People From Their Problems, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 284) Five Steps to Hold People Accountable, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 306) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
June 3, 2019
Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She joins me monthly to respond to listener questions. Listener Questions Elizabeth asked about a tricky issue with an underperforming team member she inherited. Gordon wondered what he could do to support resilience during a time of massive change. Leona asked how she might think about the disconnect from what her organization espouses and what she sees in practice. Anthony was curious about when it’s appropriate to ask “why” and when it’s not. Resources Mentioned Scaling Up: How a Few Companies Make It … and Why the Rest Don’t* by Verne Harnish Scaling Up Growth Tools Analyzing Performance Problems* by Robert F. Mager and Peter Pipe Related Episodes How to Succeed with Leadership and Management, with John Kotter (episode 249) How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404) How to Clarify What’s Important, with Ron Williams (episode 410) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
June 1, 2019
Dave Stachowiak: Coaching for Leaders I am often asked about the tools and technology behind our work. As we’ve updated our systems over the past year, I’ve identified seven tools that may also be helpful for you in creating more margin. Used thoughtfully, tools like these help us automate the things we can automate so we can spend more time doing the things we should never automate. Here are seven that may help: Technology Tools to Create Margin Acuity Scheduling* powers our all our calendars and serves as a 24/7 scheduling assistant. Automated reminders, time zone adjustments, rescheduling, and video meeting integration happen seamlessly. TextExpander* saves us tons of time each day to quickly populate documents, emails, forms, and other repeatable typing so we can respond to others faster and with more accuracy. The link above will provide you a 20% discount. 1Password* helps us create unique and strong password for every account. Plus, there families and teams programs allow us to share passwords with others who need access. Pipedrive* is the customer relationship management system that’s just right for us. Powerful enough to visually help us to track every business conversation, but simple enough to be affordable and practical. The link above will provide access for a free trial. ConvertKit* gives our listeners a lot more choices on the kind of emails they receive. Plus, it provides its own automation to help your organization build its brand. This link above will provide access for a free trial. SaneBox* automatically filters our email so we can prioritize what’s most important. Plus, tons of other reminder tools come along with it. The link above will save you $15 if you decide to try it out. WP Engine* is the leader in WordPress managed hosting and now powers all of our sites. This link above will save you 10% hosting or three months free over a year. New Podcast: Dave’s Journal I announced a project titled Dave’s Journal. It’s a new podcast airing episodes of five minutes or less. The goal of each entry is to capture a valuable insight or reflection for leaders. Subscribe to Dave’s Journal on your favorite platform: Apple Podcasts Google Podcasts Overcast Stitcher Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
May 27, 2019
Ron Williams: Learning to Lead Ron Williams is a veteran business leader, turn-around expert, and advocate for value creation. Today he is chairman and CEO of RW2 Enterprises and also a member of the board of directors for American Express, The Boeing Company, and Johnson & Johnson. Ron is the former chairman and CEO of health insurance giant Aetna. When he joined Aetna in 2001, its loss from continuing operations was $292 million, with earnings per share at a loss of $0.46. In 2011, the year he stepped down as Chairman, Aetna’s full-year operating earnings were $2 billion, with operating earnings per share of $5.17. In this conversation, Ron shares wisdom from his book, Learning to Lead: The Journey to Leading Yourself, Leading Others, and Leading an Organization*. Ron discusses his own leadership journey and how he asked the right questions to inspire a successful turn-around at Aetna. He also shares the reason for avoiding “why” questions and the value that knowledge maps provided at Aetna. Key Points Ron’s five kinds of questions that help challenge your organization’s reality: Highlight key problems Clarify the facts Probe an underlying story Suggest alternatives Drill down to basics In addition, Ron suggested: Ask questions that start with “what” instead of “why.” Utilize knowledge maps to support business literacy for complex issues. Make yourself better every year by aiming for 15% improvement. Resources Mentioned Learning to Lead: The Journey to Leading Yourself, Leading Others, and Leading an Organization* by Ron Williams Book Notes Download my highlights from Learning to Lead in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Way to Grow Your Leadership Career, with Ron Wallace Executive Presence with Your Elevator Speech, with Tom Henschel How to Create an Unstoppable Culture, with Ginger Hardage Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
May 20, 2019
Jim Harter: It’s the Manager Jim Harter is the Chief Scientist for Workplace at Gallup. He has led more than 1,000 studies of workplace effectiveness, including the largest ongoing meta-analysis of human potential and business unit performance. He is the co-author with Jim Clifton of the new book, It’s the Manager: Gallup Finds That the Quality of Managers and Team Leaders is the Single Biggest Factor in Your Organization’s Long-Term Success*. Key Points Millennials and Generation Z have influenced the changing nature of work. Six key findings from Gallup: People don’t just work for a paycheck — they want a purpose. People are no longer pursuing job satisfaction — they are pursuing development. People don’t want bosses — they want coaches. People don’t want annual reviews — they want ongoing conversations. People don’t want a manager that fixates on their weaknesses. People say, it’s not my job — it’s my life. Resources Mentioned It's the Manager: Gallup Finds the Quality of Managers and Team Leaders is the Single Biggest Factor in Your Organization's Long-Term Success* by Jim Clifton and Jim Harter CliftonStrengths (formerly StrengthsFinder) assessment Gallup Access Book Notes Download my highlights from It’s the Manager in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier Leverage StrengthsFinder / CliftonStrengths, with Lisa Cummings Three Steps to Great Career Conversations, with Russ Laraway Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
May 13, 2019
Oscar Trimboli: Deep Listening Oscar is a mentor, coach, speaker, and author. He was a director at Microsoft for over a decade and headed up the MS Office division in Australia. Today, he works with leadership teams and their organizations on the importance of clarity to create change, how to embrace the digital economy, and the role values play in the achievement of your purpose. He is the author of Deep Listening: Impact Beyond Words*. Key Points Listen beyond the words that are said and try to determine what the speaker is really trying to say. The more senior you are, the more listening you’ll do. Ask the speaker: “Tell me more” or “What else are you thinking?” or “How long have you been thinking about that?” To be a great listener, you have to create a space where you’re available to listen. For every hour you listen, you need to spend another hour in action. Leaders often are not great at hearing all the opinions in the room. Bonus Audio Three tips to becoming a better listener Resources Mentioned The 5 Myths of Listening Deep Listening: Impact Beyond Words* by Oscar Trimboli Book Notes Download my highlights from Deep Listening in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Be a Non-Conformist, with Adam Grant How to Increase Your Conversational Intelligence, with Judith Glaser How to Become the Person You Want to Be, with James Clear Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
May 6, 2019
Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni Stachowiak is Dave’s life partner and best friend, business professor, past executive leader, and the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast. Listener Questions Brad asked about supporting a team member who’s being taken advantage of by someone else in the organization. Mark is wondering about how to help an existing team move on to being a high-performing team. Ashish asked about how to determine more in the interviewing process. Craig wanted perspective on how to be more visible. Resources Mentioned The Empowered Manager* by Peter Block Essentialism* by Greg Mckeown Related Episodes How to Deal with Opponents and Adversaries, with Peter Block The Path to Start Leading Your Team, with John Piñeiro Develop Leaders Before You Leave, with David Marquet How to Work With an Executive Recruiter, with Becky deSouza Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
April 29, 2019
Becky deSouza: Conexus Talent Acquisition Solutions Becky is a partner with Conexus Talent Acquisition Solutions and has dedicated her career of 20+ years to developing effective solutions for Talent Development and Recruiting. Becky spent 11 years running DreamWorks Animation’s Corporate Recruiting team. Today she leads the human resources recruiting practice with Conexus. Key Points Recruiting firms can be regional, industry-specific, or functional. Look to your network for leads, but be careful when networking with your colleagues. Work to fully engage with your recruiter. Be honest with your recruiter, even if you aren’t totally ready to commit. Always keep your LinkedIn profile updated since it can serve as a type of resume. Make sure your web and social presence is consistent with the expectations of your desired job. Check your privacy settings on social media. Resources Mentioned Becky deSouza on LinkedIn Related Episodes How to Figure Out Your Career, with Scott Anthony Barlow How to Write a Killer LinkedIn Profile, with Brenda Bernstein How to Get the Ideal Team Player, with Patrick Lencioni How to Find Your Calling, with Ken Coleman Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
April 22, 2019
David Marquet: Turn the Ship Around! David Marquet is the former commander of the U.S.S. Santa Fe, a nuclear-powered attack submarine. Under David’s command, the ship had an impressive turnaround, achieving the highest retention and operational standings in the Navy. David is the author of the bestseller Turn the Ship Around: A True Story of Turning Followers Into Leaders, a book USA Today called one of the 12 best business books of all time. Key Points Accomplishment is the production, leadership is building production capacity in your team. Understanding the purpose of the organization is the key to unlocking empowerment. You’ll suffer the consequences of your behavior if you couple the behavior with the outcome. Resources Mentioned Turn the Ship Around: A True Story of Turning Followers Into Leaders* by David Marquet The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People* by Stephen R. Covey Book Notes Download my highlights from Turn the Ship Around! in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Start With Why, with Simon Sinek Turn Followers Into Leaders, with David Marquet How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson Retrieval Practice, with Pooja Agarwal Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
April 15, 2019
Amy Edmondson: The Fearless Organization Amy Edmondson is the Novartis Professor of Leadership and Management at the Harvard Business School. She has been recognized by the Thinkers50 global ranking of management thinkers for many years and was honored with their Talent Award in 2017. Amy is the author of several, highly regarded books on teaming and psychological safety, including her newest book, The Fearless Organization: Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace for Learning, Innovation and Growth*. Key Points Psychological safety varies a lot even inside of an organization. More effective teams may appear to make more mistakes, but it’s likely those teams are just more comfortable reporting mistakes. Instead of calling it an error, call it an accident. And rather than calling it an investigation, call it a study. It’s fine to say, “I don’t know” when appropriate because it signals to others that it is okay to admit when they don’t know something. If somebody shares a problem, say thank you and then ask how you can help. Leaders should be concerned if they’re not hearing bad news. Resources Mentioned The Fearless Organization: Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace for Learning, Innovation and Growth* by Amy Edmondson Amy Edmondson faculty page Book Notes Download my highlights from The Fearless Organization in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Leadership Lessons from the Challenger Disaster, with Allan McDonald Turn Followers Into Leaders, with David Marquet The Path of Humble Leadership, with Edgar Schein Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
April 8, 2019
Gretchen Rubin: Outer Order, Inner Calm Gretchen Rubin explores happiness and good habits and is the author of several books, including the block-buster New York Times bestsellers, Better Than Before*, The Happiness Project*, Happier at Home*, and The Four Tendencies*. She is the author also of the new book Outer Order, Inner Calm: Declutter and Organize to Make More Room for Happiness*. Key Points When people have control over their stuff, they feel more in control of their lives. If you need a physical reset, do 10 jumping jacks. Your physical needs will override your emotional needs. Resources Mentioned Internal Time* by Till Roenneberg Book Notes Download my highlights from Outer Order, Inner Calm in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Make Deep Work Happen, with Cal Newport The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing, with Daniel Pink How to Reclaim Conversation, with Cal Newport Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
April 1, 2019
Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She joins me monthly to respond to listener questions. Listener Questions Peter asked about how to support a team member going through a difficult situation. Mike wondered what strategies he could use to avoid being a micro-manager. Roger asked about advice on next steps after an executive role didn’t work out. Ali asked for input on assessments for executive presence. Thomas wanted input on how to better design surveys. Resources Mentioned Hope for the Flowers* by Trina Paulus Double Loop Learning The Look & Sound of Leadership podcast by Tom Henschel Related Episodes How to Delegate Work Effectively The Way to Lead After a Workplace Loss, with Andrew Stenhouse Get ROI From Professional Associations, with John Corcoran How to Move From Victim to Victor, with John Sanei Get Smart About Assessments, with Ken Nowack Unconscious Mistakes Women Make, with Lois Frankel Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
March 25, 2019
Sheila Miller-Nelson: Midian Sheila Miller-Nelson is owner of Midian Consulting. She’s dedicated to helping people learn how to truly connect to create better relationships and enhance leadership. She’s a former trainer with Dale Carnegie and her experience in communication and leadership coaching spans more than 25 years. Key Points We will often learn a lesson but because it seems trivial, we don’t remember it for the next time. The way you practice determines how you perform. Write down what you want to be known for and then share that with others. The ability to humble yourself and admit when you’ve missed the mark will give you compassion for others when they fail. Resources Mentioned Midian Consulting Related Episodes How to Become a Champion, with Jeff Spencer Leverage StrengthsFinder for Your Team, with Lisa Cummings The Truth and Lies of Performance Management, with Michael Bungay Stanier Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
March 18, 2019
Cal Newport: Digital Minimalism Cal Newport is a computer science professor at Georgetown University who studies the theory of distributed systems. In addition to his academic work, he writes about the intersection of technology and culture. He’s the author of six books including Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World and Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World. Key Points The human brain is very sophisticated in how it navigates social dynamics using voice and visual cues. Digital interactions bypass the brain’s ability to see these cues. Social media interactions might make you think you’re being social, but you can still lonely because your brain doesn’t count these interactions the same as person-to-person interactions. Digital interactions are not bad, but they can crowd out more important real-world interactions. Make sure tech is serving the things that are important in your life, rather than just using it as an escape from your life. Small steps tend not to work when transitioning to digital minimalism. A better way is to take a 30-day break from consuming digital content and then rebuild your digital life from scratch. Resources Mentioned Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World* by Cal Newport Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age* by Sherry Turkle Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less from Each Other* by Sherry Turkle Book Notes Download my highlights from Digital Minimalism in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Make Deep Work Happen, with Cal Newport The Power of Solitude, with Mike Erwin Have Conversations That Matter, with Celeste Headlee How to Create Meaningful Gatherings, with Priya Parker Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
March 11, 2019
Dan O’Connor: Life Unscripted Dan O’Connor is a multi-faceted actor, improviser, writer, and director. He is the founder and Producing Artistic Director of the critically acclaimed Impro Theatre. Dan is the author, with Jeff Katzman, of Life Unscripted: Using Improv Principles to Get Unstuck, Boost Confidence, and Transform Your Life*. Key Points When we meet someone for the first time, there is a narrative that happens between us. “If you’re interested, you’re interesting.” Oftentimes, people in meetings aren’t engaged in the conversation and are only waiting for the other person to stop talking. If you make the effort to really listen to your customers, you’ll be able to engage in customized sales because you’ll truly understand what their needs are. Resources Mentioned Life Unscripted: Using Improv Principles to Get Unstuck, Boost Confidence, and Transform Your Life* by Jeff Katzman and Dan O’Connor Dan O’Connor Impro Theatre Book Notes Download my highlights from Dan’s book in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes The Four Critical Stories Leaders Need For Influence, with David Hutchens How to Increase Your Conversational Intelligence, with Judith Glaser How to Close the Power Distance Gap, with Jordan Harbinger Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
March 4, 2019
Julia Taylor Kennedy: Center for Talent Innovation Julia is Executive Vice President and Director of Publications at the Center for Talent Innovation. She has co-authored Disabilities and Inclusion, Mission Critical: Unlocking the Value of Veterans in the Workforce, and The Power of the Purse: Engaging Women for Healthy Outcomes, on women and health. CTI recently released a new report, titled, The Sponsor Dividend. Key Points A sponsor actively advocates for the career of their protege. If you’re looking for a sponsor, be very clear on where you want to go in your career. Sponsors want to be sure they can trust the protege to deliver on the opportunities the sponsor presents. Sponsors do better when they have a protege who has complementary skills to their own. Resources Mentioned The Sponsor Dividend: Key Findings Related Episodes How to Help the Underdog Thrive, with Terry Lipovski How to Make Inclusion Happen, with Deepa Purushothaman How to Connect Personal Growth to Business Outcomes, with Jonathan Raymond Why Men Are Heard and Women Are Liked, with Lois Frankel and Tom Henschel Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
February 25, 2019
John Stepper: Working Out Loud John developed Working Out Loud, a practice that helps people be more effective, access more opportunities, and feel happier at work. Over several years, a small movement has formed based on his self-published book*, TEDx talk, and a peer support method that’s spread to over 40 countries and companies like Bosch, Daimler, BMW, and Siemens. Key Points Behavior change is about small steps, peer support, celebration along the way, and continual feedback. Changes start with only one tiny step. Do that until it gets easy, then take the next step. Peer support is a major part of habit change. Peer support gives you structure, shared accountability, and emotional support. Resources Mentioned Start a Working Out Loud Circle Martha Beck Drive* by Daniel Pink Everybody Matters* by Bob Chapman and Raj Sisodia Book Notes Download my highlights from Working Out Loud in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Be a Non-Conformist, with Adam Grant The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing, with Daniel Pink Six Tactics to Achieve Extraordinary Performance, with Morten Hansen How to Become the Person You Want to Be, with James Clear How to Create Meaningful Gatherings, with Priya Parker Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
February 18, 2019
Jill Schlesinger: Jill on Money Jill Schlesinger is the Emmy-nominated Business Analyst for CBS News, the host of the “Jill on Money” podcast and of the nationally syndicated radio show, “Jill on Money,” which won the 2018 Gracie Award for Best National Talk Show. She has been recognized as a Top 10 LinkedIn Influencer and a Top 10 LinkedIn Voice. She’s the author of The Dumb Things Smart People Do with Their Money: Thirteen Ways to Right Your Financial Wrongs*. Key Points Not all financial professionals are looking out for you. Make sure they are held to the fiduciary standard at all times. Before seeing a financial professional, make sure you’ve already paid off consumer debt, you’ve built an emergency reserve fund, and you’re maximizing your retirement fund contributions. Prioritize your own retirement savings before setting aside money for your children’s tuition. Make sure the cost of a degree is worth the expected income. Resources Mentioned The Dumb Things Smart People Do with Their Money: Thirteen Ways to Right Your Financial Wrongs* by Jill Schlesinger Mark Kantrowitz Book Notes Download my highlights from The Dumb Things Smart People Do with Their Money in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Improve Your Financial Intelligence, with Joe Knight How to Manage Your Money, with Jill Schlesinger How to Approach Corporate Budgeting, with Jody Wodrich Four Rules to Get Control of Your Money, with Jesse Mecham Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
February 11, 2019
Priya Parker: The Art of Gathering Priya Parker is a facilitator, strategic advisor, and founder of Thrive Labs, at which she helps activists, elected officials, corporate executives, educators, and philanthropists create transformative gatherings. She is the author of The Art of Gathering: How We Meet and Why It Matters*. Key Points What creates meaning in a gathering is conversation, not the functional details of the event. We’re often not totally clear on the purpose of our gatherings. We don’t need to gather more often, but we need to do a better job when we do gather. Resources Mentioned The Art of Gathering: How We Meet and Why It Matters* by Priya Parker The Modern Manager podcast Book Notes Download my highlights from The Art of Gathering in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Use Power for Good and Not Evil, with Dacher Keltner Have Conversations That Matter, with Celeste Headlee How to Plan Meetings That Get Results, with Mamie Kanfer Stewart The Path of Humble Leadership, with Edgar Schein Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
February 9, 2019
Kevin McCurdy Kevin McCurdy is the Chief Operating Officer of Auto-Chlor System and a longtime listener of the show. Key Points Think about the impact you’re having on people and if it’s really the impact you want to have. Don’t always show up with your own solution, come with the intention to learn and discover the best solution together. Truly listen to people instead of just thinking about what you want to say to back to them. Resources Mentioned The Look and Sound of Leadership The Coaching Habit by Michael Bungay Stanier* Related Episodes Three Steps To Soliciting Feedback with Tom Henschel How to Manage Your Inner Critic The Way to Stop Rescuing People From Their Problems, with Michael Bungay Stanier Executive Presence with Your Elevator Speech A Useful Mindset for New Leaders Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
February 4, 2019
Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She joins me monthly to respond to listener questions. Listener Questions Evelyn asked if you need to be a caretaker first before moving to become a rainmaker. Samantha wondered if you should always try to save someone who has elected to leave. Tammy wanted to know our advice for managing along with peers who have different styles. David asked for our advice for managing student workers. Resources Mentioned Drive* by Daniel Pink Employee Resignations: Counter Offer or Say Goodbye? When Talent Quits, Don’t Be A Jerk Related Episodes An Astronaut’s Guide To Life On Earth with Chris Hadfield How To Lead The Millennials How Superbosses Master the Flow of Talent What to Do When Somebody Quits How to Lead Part-Time Staff Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
January 28, 2019
Lois Frankel: Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office Lois Frankel is the President of Corporate Coaching International, a bestselling author, executive coach, and an internationally-recognized expert in the field of leadership development for women. She is the author of the New York Times bestselling books Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office*, Nice Girls Don’t Get Rich*, and Nice Girls Just Don’t Get It*. Tom Henschel: The Look & Sound of Leadership Tom Henschel of Essential Communications grooms senior leaders and executive teams. An internationally recognized expert in the field of workplace communications and self-presentation, he has helped thousands of leaders achieve excellence through his work as an executive coach and his top-rated podcast, The Look & Sound of Leadership. Key Points You can’t control anyone but yourself. What women contribute to the workplace is different but equal to what men contribute. Things are slightly better for women these days, but not by much. Men must be advocates for women in the workplace. Bonus Audio Why you shouldn’t coach a woman to act more like a man Resources Mentioned Lois Frankel on LinkedIn The Look & Sound of Leadership podcast by Tom Henschel Keynote: Why Men Are Heard and Women Are Liked Nice Girls Don't Get the Corner Office* by Lois Frankel The Confidence Code* by Katty Kay and Claire Shipman Related Episodes How Women Make Stronger, Smarter Choices How to Connect Personal Growth to Business Outcomes Unconscious Mistakes Women Make That Sabotage Their Careers Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
January 21, 2019
Daniel Goleman: Emotional Intelligence In 1995, Daniel Goleman published the blockbuster bestselling book Emotional Intelligence*, a book that now has more than 5 million copies in print worldwide in 40 different languages. He’s the author of a series of primers for the competencies of emotional and social intelligence, titled Building Blocks of Emotional Intelligence* and he’s the founder of the Emotional Intelligence Coaching Certification. Key Points The three types of empathy: Cognitive empathy - you can sense what people are thinking Emotional empathy - you can pick up on other people’s emotions Empathic concern - people can tell you care about them Resources Mentioned Emotional Intelligence* by Daniel Goleman Building Blocks of Emotional Intelligence* by Daniel Goleman et al. A Force for Good* by Daniel Goleman and the Dalai Lama Emotional and Social Competence Inventory Emotional Intelligence Coaching Certification Book Notes Download my highlights from the Empathy primer in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Get the Ideal Team Player, with Patrick Lencioni Have Conversations That Matter, with Celeste Headlee Enhance Your Self-Awareness, with Daniel Goleman The Power of Vulnerability in Leadership, with Jason Brooks Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
January 14, 2019
May Busch: Accelerate May Busch enjoyed a 24-year career at Morgan Stanley, most recently as Chief Operating Officer for Europe. She chaired the firm’s European Diversity Council and was a member of Morgan Stanley’s European Management Committee. She is the author of the book Accelerate: 9 Capabilities to Achieve Success at Any Career Stage*. She’s also the host the Career Mastery Kickstart summit*. Key Points Steps to move from caretaker to rainmaker: Identify the organization’s most important outcomes. Figure out what you can take action on. Create a safe space. Learn from your network what will move the needle the most. How to find the organization’s values: Observe Listen Ask Bonus Audio How to help others become rainmakers Resources Mentioned Career Mastery Kickstart Summit* Accelerate: 9 Capabilities to Achieve Success at Any Career Stage* by May Busch Eisenhower Grid Related Episodes How to Succeed with Leadership and Management, with John Kotter Three Steps to Great Career Conversations Leverage Your Defining Moments Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
January 7, 2019
Tom Henschel: The Look & Sound of Leadership Tom Henschel of Essential Communications grooms senior leaders and executive teams. An internationally recognized expert in the field of workplace communications and self-presentation, he has helped thousands of leaders achieve excellence through his work as an executive coach and his top-rated podcast, The Look & Sound of Leadership. Listener Questions Caroline asked about whether she should appease a peer by interviewing someone she doesn’t think is a good fit. Jane asked for suggestions on team diversity. Susan asked about promoting engagement with her team when there is lots of reluctance. Mariah wanted our advice on creating an orientation program for her team leads. Resources Mentioned StrengthsFinder (Gallup) Leading Change* by John Kotter Who Moved My Cheese? by Spencer Johnson Influence* by Robert Cialdini Three Steps to Great Career Conversations with Russ Laraway Being the Boss * by Linda Hill and Kent Lineback First, Break All the Rules* by Gallup Related Episodes Essentials of Adult Development How to Leverage Differences to Accelerate Results Six Tactics to Achieve Extraordinary Performance How to Become the Person You Want to Be Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
December 31, 2018
Sharone Bar-David: Trust Your Canary Sharone Bar-David is a leading Canadian expert on workplace incivility and author of Trust Your Canary: Every Leader’s Guide to Taming Workplace Incivility*. She is particularly passionate about her work with abrasive leaders — the highly talented people whose interpersonal style rubs people the wrong way and creates distress in the work environment. Key Points The three contexts that pose a risk: Routine (To mitigate risks, Cultivate) Sensitive (To mitigate risks, Calculate) Problem (To minimize damage, Compensate) Bonus Audio How to not cross the line Resources Mentioned Trust Your Canary: Every Leader’s Guide to Taming Workplace Incivility* Hey (We’re Not All) Guys! Why I Don’t Use “You Guys” Related Episodes How to Tame Workplace Incivility Use Power for Good and Not Evil How to Manage Abrasive Leaders How to Make Inclusion Happen Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
December 24, 2018
Corrinne Armour: Leaders Who Ask Corrinne is an accredited Master Certified Coach with the International Coaching Federation and a certified Neuro-Linguistic Programming Practitioner. She’s the author and co-author of several leadership books, most recently Leaders Who Ask: Building a Fearless Culture by Telling Less and Asking More*. Key Points You’re not developing your people if you’re constantly giving them all the answers. If you don’t have an awareness of something, you can’t change it. Ask your reports, “What have you tried so far, and what do you think I’m going to tell you to do?” Bonus Audio Why being clever doesn’t always make you a better manager Resources Mentioned Leaders Who Ask: Building a Fearless Culture by Telling Less and Asking More* Special book offer for Australian listeners (Use code: COACHINGFORLEADERS) Free resources for leaders from Corrinne Corrinne’s Leaders Who Ask program Book Notes Download my highlights from Leaders Who Ask in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Improve Your Coaching Skills, with Tom Henschel These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier The Way to Stop Rescuing People From Their Problems, with Michael Bungay Stanier Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
December 17, 2018
Lois Frankel: Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office Lois Frankel is the President of Corporate Coaching International, a bestselling author, executive coach, and an internationally-recognized expert in the field of leadership development for women. She is the author of the New York Times bestselling books Nice Girls Don’t Get the Corner Office*, Nice Girls Don’t Get Rich*, and Nice Girls Just Don’t Get It*. Key Points Women often back off when they see things get competitive. Don’t confuse other people in the workplace with relationships you’ve had in the past. When negotiating, women should focus more on the relationship. Bonus Audio Behavior has changed, attitudes haven’t Don’t be the company’s conscience Resources Mentioned Nice Girls Don't Get the Corner Office* by Lois Frankel Nice Girls Don't Get Rich* by Lois Frankel The Male Factor: The Unwritten Rules, Misperceptions, and Secret Beliefs of Men in the Workplace* by Shaunti Feldhahn “Ask Liz” with Liz Weston Connect with Lois Frankel on LinkedIn Book Notes Download my highlights from Nice Girls Don't Get the Corner Office in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Handle Workplace Bullying How to Manage Your Inner Critic How Women Make Stronger, Smarter Choices How to Help the Underdog Thrive Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
December 15, 2018
Jason Brooks Jason Brooks is a member of the Coaching for Leaders Academy and principal of a high school in Los Angeles. Key Points People respond to honesty from a leader. Admitting that you don’t know all the answers helps build bridges and gets your team working together. Deciding what not to do can actually be harder than deciding what to do. Working out a vision for your life can reduce the constant anxiety of wondering whether you’re making the best use of your time. Resources Mentioned Racism in America, with Jason Brooks The Power of Vulnerability, with Brené Brown Related Episodes How to Get the Ideal Team Player How to Deal With the Diminishers How to Create a Vivid Vision Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
December 10, 2018
Howard “H” White: Believe to Achieve Howard “H” White was an NBA draft pick until knee injuries put a stop to his basketball career. Today he is vice president of Jordan Brand and has been with the company for thirty-five years. With Nike’s support, he founded the Believe to Achieve program, an innovative traveling seminar designed to encourage youth to believe in themselves and adults to mentor them. He’s the author of the book by the same name: Believe to Achieve: See the Invisible, Do the Impossible*. Key Points We often set our sights too low. Others often see things in us that we don’t see ourselves. How do you make others see the best in themselves? Everybody wants something in life, but there are very few who are willing to give up anything to get it. Bonus Audio Developing realistic expectations Resources Mentioned Believe to Achieve: See the Invisible, Do the Impossible* by Howard “H” White Book Notes Download my highlights from Believe to Achieve in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Everyday People, Extraordinary Leaders: Olivia Klaus Leadership Lessons from the Challenger Disaster The Way to Grow Your Leadership Career The Choice for Compassion Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
December 3, 2018
Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni Stachowiak (web) (Twitter) is Dave’s life partner and best friend, business professor, past executive leader, and the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast. Listener Questions Andrew asked about dealing with change on a personal level. Katie asked about inspiring movement for more recognition in her organization. Thomas asked for suggestions on his new role overseeing two related, but different, departments. Loveleena was looking for a suggestion for an article on executive presence. Paul asked for ideas on leading a full commissioned sales team. Resources Mentioned Transitions: Making Sense of Life's Changes by William Bridges* Managing Transitions: Making the Most of Change by William Bridges* Leading Change by John Kotter* Our Iceberg is Melting by John Kotter* Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by Daniel Pink* That's Not What I Meant!: How Conversational Style Makes or Breaks Relationships by Debra Tannen* The Look & Sound of Leadership podcast episodes on executive presence from Tom Henschel Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead by Brené Brown* Related Episodes Benefits You Get from a Recognition Program Ten Steps to Create a Recognition Program The Four Unique Types of Teams How to Create Team Guidelines Start with Why, with Simon Sinek How to Succeed with Leadership and Management, with John Kotter Enhance Your Executive Presence How to Lead Top-Line Growth Executive Presence with Your Elevator Speech The Path to Start Leading Your Team Three Steps to Great Career Conversations Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
November 26, 2018
Dan Schawbel: Back to Human Dan Schawbel is a New York Times bestselling author, a partner and research director at Future Workplace, and the founder of both Millennial Branding and WorkplaceTrends.com. He is the bestselling author of two career books, Promote Yourself* and Me 2.0*, and now his newest book, Back to Human: How Great Leaders Create Connection in the Age of Isolation*. Key Points We have to learn at the speed of business. Make learning a central part of what we do. The best source of knowledge is our coworkers. People learn by doing. Make learning a part of your daily routine. In addition to traditional things like pay and benefits, many prospective employees are also interested in what they’ll learn on a job. Resources Mentioned Back to Human: How Great Leaders Create Connection in the Age of Isolation by Dan Schawbel * Related Episodes Promote Yourself (and Others) Through Intrapreneurship, with Dan Schawbel (episode 163) How Superbosses Master the Flow of Talent, with Sydney Finkelstein (episode 236) Essentials of Adult Development, with Mindy Danna (episode 273) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
November 19, 2018
Seth Godin: This is Marketing Seth Godin was recently inducted into the American Marketing Association’s Hall of Fame and is the author of one of the most popular blogs in the world. He founded TheMarketingSeminar.com and the altMBA. Seth is the author of eighteen best‑sellers that have been translated into more than thirty‑five languages, including his newest book, This Is Marketing: You Can’t Be Seen Until You Learn to See*. Key Points The world is fragmented into many groups; there is no more mass market. Each of us has the ability to market the work we are doing through our actions. The hard work begins by choosing the smallest group of people you can live with and ignoring everyone else. Pick ten people. Find something that will amaze and delight the ten. And if you can’t, then start over. Resources Mentioned This Is Marketing* by Seth Godin Tribes* by Seth Godin Permission Marketing* by Seth Godin First, ten by Seth Godin Book Notes Download my highlights from This is Marketing in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Getting Things Done with David Allen (episode 184) Start With Why Featuring Simon Sinek (episode 223) How to Be a Non-Conformist, with Adam Grant (episode 238) How to Succeed with Leadership and Management, with John Kotter (episode 249) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
November 12, 2018
Kwame Christian: Negotiate Anything Kwame Christian is a business lawyer and the Director of the American Negotiation Institute. His TEDx Talk, Finding Confidence in Conflict, was the most popular TED Talk on the topic of conflict of 2017. He hosts the top negotiation podcast, Negotiate Anything, and is the author of the new book: Nobody Will Play With Me: How to Find Confidence in Conflict*. Key Points Three points to the breakdown of communication: The Frame (the storyline) The Pace (how fast) The Direction (what issues you’re talking about) Three steps of compassionate curiosity: Acknowledging emotions Getting curious with compassion Joint problem solving Resources Mentioned Kwame’s Negotiation guide Negotiate Anything podcast by Kwame Christian Nobody Will Play With Me: How to Find Confidence in Conflict* Anchoring episode on Negotiate Anything Book Notes Download my highlights from Nobody Will Play With Me in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Negotiating As If Your Life Depended On It, with Chris Voss (episode 262) Negotiation Tactics for Results, with Kwame Christian (episode 311) Have Conversations That Matter, with Celeste Headlee (episode 344) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
November 5, 2018
Bonni Stachowiak: Teaching in Higher Ed Bonni Stachowiak is the host of the Teaching in Higher Ed podcast, a professor of business and management at Vanguard University, and my life partner. Prior to her academic career, Bonni was a human resources consultant and executive officer for a publicly traded company. She joins me monthly to respond to listener questions. Listener Questions Samantha asked about what to do if you have a problem employee that is affecting the team. Pat asked about how to show respect for difficult work while also setting clear boundaries for ethical behavior. Ashish asked about using buzzwords and complexity vs. keeping language simple. Craig wanted to know how to influence people whom you have no direct control. Resources Mentioned Theory in Practice* by Chris Argyris Temple Grandin Double-loop learning Team of Teams* by General Stanley McChrystal Related Episodes What Search Dogs Can Teach You About Engagement (episode 25) Use Power for Good and Not Evil (episode 254) How to Challenge Directly and Care Personally (episode 302) Five Steps to Hold People Accountable (episode 306) Executive Presence with Your Elevator Speech (episode 316) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
October 29, 2018
Parker Palmer: On the Brink of Everything Parker Palmer is the founder and senior partner emeritus of the Center for Courage & Renewal and is a world-renowned writer, speaker, and activist who focuses on issues in education, community, leadership, spirituality and social change. He is the author of the newly published book, On the Brink of Everything: Grace, Gravity, and Getting Old*. Key Points “The unexamined life is not worth living.” —Socrates Encourage people to examine the fears they have about looking inward. When we befriend what we are afraid of, it will become our friend. “If you can’t get out of it, get into it.” —Outward Bound motto Focus on building goodwill in your business because it repays many times over. Resources Mentioned On the Brink of Everything: Grace, Gravity, and Getting Old* by Parker Palmer The New Better Off: Reinventing the American Dream* by Courtney Martin Outward Bound Book Notes Download my highlights from On the Brink of Everything in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes How to Manage Your Inner Critic, with Tara Mohr (episode 232) The Power of Solitude, with Mike Erwin (episode 308) The Path of Humble Leadership, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein (episode 363) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
October 22, 2018
Tom Henschel: The Look & Sound of Leadership Executive coach Tom Henschel of Essential Communications grooms senior leaders and executive teams. An internationally recognized expert in the field of workplace communications and self-presentation, he has helped thousands of leaders achieve excellence through his work as an executive coach and his top-rated podcast, The Look & Sound of Leadership. Key Points An offsite doesn’t have to actually be offsite, but it needs to be treated like it is. What do you want the team to know that they don’t know now? Or what do you want them to be able to do that they can’t do now? An offsite is a great way to just talk and have experiences together that you don’t normally have time for. Really skilled facilitation is an art, not a science. Think about the why before the what. A good offsite is the start of a process, not the end of a process. If the offsite is really productive, it creates more work. Leaders should adopt the language of the offsite and use it repeatedly so people don’t forget. Bonus Audio How to balance fun versus professional in an offsite Resources Mentioned Fieldbook of Team Interventions: Step-by-Step Guide to High Performance Teams* by Harry Eggleton and Judy Rice Liberating Structures Overcoming the Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Field Guide for Leaders, Managers, and Facilitators* by Patrick Lencioni The Thiagi Group Leading Offsites episode from The Look & Sound of Leadership Related Episodes The Four Unique Types of Teams, with Susan Gerke (episode 138) How to Create Team Guidelines, with Susan Gerke (episode 192) How to Lead Through Uncertainty and Change, with Jacqueline Farrington (episode 224) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
October 15, 2018
James Clear: Atomic Habits James Clear is an author and speaker focused on habits, decision-making, and continuous improvement. He is a regular speaker at Fortune 500 companies and his work is used by teams in the NFL, NBA, and MLB. He’s the author of the new book, Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones*. Key Points Goals are great for deciding what direction you want to head, but to actually get there it’s all about your systems. Results aren’t what needs to change; the processes and habits are what need to change. Start with the identity you want for yourself and build your habits to reinforce that identity. Your habits are what prove your identity to yourself. Habits are like compound interest for self-improvement. Bonus Audio How habits reinforce your identity Resources Mentioned Atomic Habits* by James Clear James Clear on Annual Reviews Related Episodes Getting Things Done with David Allen (episode 184) Create Behavior That Lasts With Marshall Goldsmith (episode 196) The Best Way to Make New Habits Reality (episode 217) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
October 13, 2018
Mark Ipaviz: ELEVEN Australia Mark Ipaviz is a member of the Coaching for Leaders Academy and National Sales Manager at Ozdare where he manages the brand ELEVEN Australia. Key Points Create an environment where people come to work absolutely loving every second of their day. If you create an environment where everyone feels loved, you create a family. If you take care of your people, they will take care of your customers. Resources Mentioned ELEVEN Australia How to Win Friends and Influence People* by Dale Carnegie The 7th Habits of Highly Effective People* by Stephen Covey The 5 Levels of Leadership by John C. Maxwell The Coaching Habit* by Michael Bungay Stanier Related Episodes These Coaching Questions Get Results (episode 237) How to Get the Ideal Team Player (episode 301) Your Permission to Fail (episode 338) Three Steps to Great Career Conversations (episode 370) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
October 8, 2018
Scott Harrison: charity: water Scott is the founder and CEO of charity: water, one of the most visible non-profit organizations in America. He’s author of the new book Thirst: A Story of Redemption, Compassion, and a Mission to Bring Clean Water to the World. Key Points If you’re chasing the wrong things there will never be enough. To do remarkable things you must have remarkable clarity of vision. Pick one thing and focus all of your energy on it. Resources Mentioned Thirst by Scott Harrison* Video: The Spring Thirstbook.com The Spring Related Episodes How to Be a Non-Conformist, with Adam Grant (episode 238) Four Steps to Get Unstuck and Embrace Change (episode 297) Six Tactics to Achieve Extraordinary Performance (episode 337) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
October 1, 2018
Jonathan Raymond: Good Authority Jonathan Raymond is the founder of Refound, where he and his team work with organizations to create a company culture based in personal growth. He’s the author of the book Good Authority: How to Become the Leader Your Team Is Waiting For*. Key Points People often separate their career goals from the personal development goals, and it doesn’t have to be that way. Leaders often have a quick chat and then leave the conversation without actually making any deep connections. We often don’t ask a question and leave it enough time to breathe. Employees get lots of feedback, but it’s often not helpful feedback. Think about feedback as a diagnostic tool. Leaders no longer need to be the problem solvers — they need to help make space for others to solve problems. Employees are looking for emotional transparency. Bonus Audio Emotional Intelligence and Women in the Workplace Resources Mentioned Good Authority by Jonathan Raymond* Refound Book Notes Download my highlights from Good Authority in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Five Steps to Hold People Accountable (episode 306) The Path of Humble Leadership (episode 363) Three Steps to Great Career Conversations (episode 370) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
September 24, 2018
Lynne Whiteford: Defining Moments Lynne Whiteford is a talent management executive who’s led in many capacities, including a focus in learning, leadership development, success planning, and organizational design. Most recently she served as vice president at Disney ABC Television Group. Key Points Recognize and leverage your defining moments. Realize that careers are not straight lines. It’s okay to not know the next step and to experiment. Careers get messy for all of us, at least sometimes, along the way. Related Episodes Growth Mindset Helps You Rise From the Ashes (episode 326) How to Be a Happier Person (episode 334) Three Steps to Great Career Conversations (episode 370) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
September 17, 2018
Ken Nowack: Envisia Learning Ken Nowack is a licensed psychologist and President and Chief Research Officer of Envisia Learning. Ken also serves as Chief Learning Officer of Organizational Performance Dimensions and is a member of the Consortium for Research on Emotional Intelligence in Organizations and is a lecturer at UCLA’s Anderson School of Management. Key Points The three types of assessments: Personality and style-based tools Skills and abilities Interests, values, and motives Resources Mentioned talenttools.org Clueless* by Sandra Mashihi and Kenneth Nowack Envisia Learning Finding the Career That Fits You* The Ultimate Guide to Using Your Strengths to Get Hired* Related Episodes Susan Cain on The Power of Introverts (episode 44) Leverage StrengthsFinder for Your Team (episode 293) How to Leverage Your 360 (episode 341) Activate Your Free Coaching for Leaders Membership Get immediate access to my free, 10-day audio course, 10 Ways to Empower the People You Lead. Give me 10 minutes a day for 10 days to get the most immediate, practical actions to become a better leader. Join at CoachingforLeaders.com.
September 10, 2018
Russ Laraway: Career Conversations Russ is the Vice President of People at Qualtrics and was previously the Co-Founder and COO of Candor, Inc. working with Kim Scott, the author of Radical Candor*. He’s also been an executive at both Twitter and Google — and a company commander in the United States Marine Corps. Key Points The three career conversations: The life story The career vision The career action plan Questions to help ask when career visioning: What size company What industry What title Four steps of the career action plan: Develop your role Get news skills through training Develop your network Talk about next step in your career Resources Mentioned Radical Candor* by Kim Scott Radical Candor Related Episodes An Astronaut’s Guide To Life On Earth (episode 149) How Superbosses Master the Flow of Talent (episode 236) How to Challenge Directly and Care Personally (episode 302) What Great Technical People Leverage From Leadership (episode 312) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
September 8, 2018
Steve Schroeder Steve Schroeder is a member of the Coaching for Leaders Academy and is a clinical practice manager in the pharmacy industry. Key Points Listen to what the other person is saying instead of trying to come up with an answer for what they’re doing. Don’t worry about solving all the problems — just ask yourself if you asked the right questions to help people solve their own problems. In some cases, by not holding people accountable you’re actually hurting their future career. Resources Mentioned The Coaching Habit* by Michael Bungay Stanier Leading Change* by John Kotter Success Talks podcast: Shawn Achor on the Secret to Reaching Big Potential Related Episodes These Coaching Questions Get Results (episode 237) How to Succeed with Leadership and Management (episode 249) The Truth and Lies of Performance Management (episode 361) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
September 3, 2018
Tom Henschel: The Look & Sound of Leadership Tom Henschel of Essential Communications grooms senior leaders and executive teams. An internationally recognized expert in the field of workplace communications and self-presentation, he has helped thousands of leaders achieve excellence through his work as an executive coach and his top-rated podcast, The Look & Sound of Leadership. Listener Questions Jennifer asked about how to not take criticism personally when she receives it. Matt wondered if highly emotional intelligent leaders experience self-doubt. Lillian asked how she could influence the work that is being delegated to her. Amber wanted to know what she could do to address organizational change fatigue. Resources Mentioned Jennifer Garvey Berger at Growth Edge Coaching How to Stop Worrying and Start Living* by Dale Carnegie Leading Change* by John Kotter Our Iceberg is Melting* by John Kotter Start With Why* by Simon Sinek The EQ Edge* by Steven Stein and Howard Book Difficult Conversations* by Douglas Stone, Sheila Heen, and Bruce Patton Thanks for the Feedback* by Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen Who Moved my Cheese* by Spencer Johnson Related Episodes The Seven Steps You Follow To Delegate Work (episode 117) How to Get Way Better at Accepting Feedback, with Sheila Heen (episode 143) Start With Why, with Simon Sinek (episode 223) Turn Followers Into Leaders, with David Marquet (episode 241) Essentials of Adult Development, with Mindy Danna (episode 273) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
August 27, 2018
Nada Wentzel: The Jonah Group Nada Wentzel is Global Solutions Director at the Jonah Group. She is a master coach, facilitator and international speaker, with qualifications in mechanical engineering, neuroscience, and organizational psychology. Key Points In terms of decision-making, the brain doesn’t actually know the difference between imaginary and real. The thought of something bad happening can shift our direction. Pain is an 8x stronger motivator than pleasure. We’re designed to respond well to stress, but we are not designed to be in a chronic stress mode. This about a 2-degree shift and how far a little adjustment can take you. Create an optimal stress level that keeps people engaged but not burnt out. Discuss the three H’s: Heartache, hero, highlight Resources Mentioned Nada Wentzel The Jonah Group Related Episodes The Path to Start Leading Your Team, with John Piñeiro (episode 349) The Value of Pivoting for Growth, with Beth Garrison (episode 351) How Personal Clarity Engages Others, with Jeff Phipps (episode 357) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
August 20, 2018
John Sanei: What’s Your Moonshot? John Sanei is a trend specialist, business strategist, keynote speaker, author, entrepreneur, and a Singularity University faculty member, working with clients across industries and around the world. He’s the author of the book What's Your Moonshot?: Future-proof yourself and your business in the age of exponential disruption* and also the newly released book Magnetiize: Stop the chase. Understand the change. Take control of your future*. Key Points The lens we use to look at the world and ourselves is actually how the world reacts back to us. What we look for is what we find. When you finish complaining and moaning, are you empowered or disempowered? We have an incredible privilege of choice to either take responsibility or to blame. The 3 types of victims: Martyr victim - the victim who feels sorry for themselves Arrogant inferior victim - the person who cuts others down so he or she can feel better about themself Arrogant superior victim - the person who thinks all problems are below them, that everybody else is a fool who can’t do anything right Bonus Audio The Importance of Kindness Resources Mentioned What's Your Moonshot?: Future-proof yourself and your business in the age of exponential disruption by John Sanei* Magnetiize: Stop the chase. Understand the change. Take control of your future by John Sanei* John Sanei's site Book Notes Download my highlights from What's Your Moonshot? in PDF format (free membership required). Related Episodes Ten Ways to Pick Yourself Up When You’re Beaten Down (episode 85) How to Manage Your Inner Critic (episode 232) The Power of Solitude (episode 308) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
August 13, 2018
Michelle Maldonado: Mindfulness Michelle is Founder and CEO of Lucenscia, a human potential and business strategy firm dedicated to developing leaders and organizations with positive impact in the world. Michelle is a faculty member and Meta-Coach for Daniel Goleman's inaugural Emotional Intelligence Coaching Certification Program. Her work has been featured by the Human Capital Institute, the Mindful Leadership Summit, Leadership Excellence, and Chief Learning Officer. Key Points Mindfulness is paying attention to what’s happening in the present moment — in the body, in the mind, in the external environment — with an attitude of curiosity and kindness. What are you thinking, and how is that impacting your interaction with the person before you? There is a different quality of experience when you’re paying attention to what’s happening. The easiest way to get started with mindfulness is to focus on your breathing. Bonus Audio Michelle on Clarity and Resilience Resources Mentioned Emotional Intelligence Coaching Certification Search Inside Yourself Leadership Institute Lucenscia (Michelle’s firm) Flourish by Martin E. P. Seligman* In Group vs Out Group with David Eagleman * Recommended Reading Unconscious Bias: Turning Discovery and Awareness Into Action and Impact Finding the Space to Lead: A Practical Guide to Mindful Leadership* by Janice Marturano Search Inside Yourself: The Unexpected Path to Achieving Success, Happiness* by Chade-Meng Tan The Emotional Life of Your Brain: How Its Unique Patterns Affect the Way You Think, Feel, and Live — and How You Can Change Them* by Richard Davidson and Sharon Begley Mindfulness for Beginners: Reclaiming the Present Moment — and Your Life* by Jon Kabat-Zinn The Mindful Day: Practical Ways to Find Focus, Calm, and Joy From Morning to Evening* by Laurie Cameron Creating Mindful Leaders: How to Power Down, Power Up, and Power Forward* by Joe Burton Related Episodes Have Conversations That Matter, with Celeste Headlee (episode 344) Enhance Your Self-Awareness, with Daniel Goleman (episode 353) The Path of Humble Leadership, with Edgar Schein and Peter Schein (episode 363) Discover More Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.
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