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September 13, 2019
Two Wisconsin brothers have been charged in a massive counterfeit vape cartridge operation. Authorities say they produced between 3,000 to 5,000 counterfeit THC cartridges with a team of 10 employees. Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reporter Raquel Rutledge has the latest. And, Here & Now tech analyst Ben Brock Johnson joins us to discuss the carbon footprint of China's data centers, which are still mostly powered by coal. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's September 13, 2019 full broadcast.
September 13, 2019
Mexico is pushing back against a new rule from the Trump administration that the Supreme Court allowed to proceed this week. The rule effectively bars most Central American migrants from seeking asylum in the U.S., unless they have already sought asylum in another country they passed through. Also, the Trump administration is celebrating the repeal of another Obama-era environmental rule, one that aims to protect wetlands and waterways. We speak with E&E News reporter Ariel Wittenberg.
September 12, 2019
In a letter to Congress, 145 CEOs called for expanded background checks and strengthened "red flag" laws. Host Robin Young speaks with Ambition CEO Travis Truett, who signed the letter. Also, 100 years ago this month, hundreds of black residents of rural Arkansas were murdered by their white neighbors, in what became known as the Elaine Massacre.
September 12, 2019
Elizabeth Warren will share a stage with Joe Biden for the first time Thursday night in Houston, as she's surged in polls among Democratic voters. We spoke with NPR political correspondent Asma Khalid, who will be in Houston covering the debate. Also, Irish Ambassador to the U.S. Daniel Mulhall dives into what UK's impending exit from the EU means for Ireland.
September 11, 2019
Republican strategist Alice Stewart and Democratic strategist Bill Press join hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson discuss the departure of Trump national security adviser John Bolton and the upcoming Democratic presidential debate. Also, to mark the 18th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, we revisit part of our conversation with Mitchell Zuckoff, author of "Fall and Rise: The Story of 9/11."
September 11, 2019
"Hurricane Man" Josh Morgerman joins Here & Now after returning from witnessing Hurricane Dorian in the Bahamas. Starting Sunday, TV viewers can watch his travels to every hurricane over the 2018 storm season. Also, hard seltzer has soared in popularity among American consumers. Craig Giammona, reporter for Bloomberg News, tells us about the drink's meteoric rise.
September 10, 2019
British Parliament began a five-week suspension on Tuesday. We spoke to Amanda Sloat, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, about what this means for the UK and Prime Minister Boris Johnson, who lost a second bid for a snap election Monday. And, mortician and author Caitlin Doughty joins Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson to discuss questions about death that she explores in her new book, "Will My Cat Eat My Eyeballs: Big Questions from Tiny Mortals About Death."
September 10, 2019
Eco-friendly sneaker company Allbirds started with a Kickstarter in 2014, and just five years later, the company has reported it's worth $1.4 billion. We spoke to co-founder Tim Brown about the company's rapid growth. Also, host Jeremy Hobson talks with CNN political analyst Julian Zelizer about the history of diplomacy at Camp David, where Trump's secret meeting with the Taliban could have occurred.
September 9, 2019
More than 40 people are confirmed dead in the Bahamas after Hurricane Dorian. NPR's Jason Beaubien gives an update on the recovery efforts underway on Great Abaco Island. Also, host Robin Young speaks with author Malcolm Gladwell about his new book, "Talking to Strangers: What Should We Know About the People We Don't Know."
September 9, 2019
The future of peace in Afghanistan is uncertain after President Trump announced that he was canceling secret talks with the Taliban at Camp David. We get reaction from former Navy Admiral James Stavridis. Also, in our conversation with 2020 presidential candidates, Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with Sen. Amy Klobuchar.
September 6, 2019
Eighty years after the German invasion of Poland that started World War II, we speak to a historian about the toll the conflict took on the country. Also, for nearly six weeks, coal miners in eastern Kentucky have been blocking a train car full of coal from a company they say owes them thousands of dollars each in backpay. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with one of the miners. And there are new clues as to what might be causing the rapid onset of illnesses striking some individuals who used ...
September 6, 2019
The death toll in the Bahamas is now at 30 and is expected to rise. Host Peter O' Dowd speaks with Marvin Dames, minister of national security of the Bahamas, about the relief efforts underway for Hurricane Dorian victims. Also, Oct. 1 will mark 70 years since Mao Zedong, leader of China's Communist Party, founded the People's Republic of China. A new book out this week says Mao's influence on global politics was far greater than is typically recognized, and that its impact continues today. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with author Julia ...
September 5, 2019
The National Weather Service refuted Trump's inclusion of Alabama on the list of places Hurricane Dorian would impact, but the White House doubled down. On Wednesday, Trump was displaying a new map, this time with a little spur jutting out from the end of the storm's projected path, seemingly drawn with a black marker, to include Alabama in the forecast. Also, Diana Sanchez, a Colorado woman, delivered a baby in jail last year. Now she's suing those involved. We speak with Mari Newman, Sanchez's lawyer.
September 5, 2019
The U.S. and Taliban are in the midst of peace negotiations, but many Afghan women fear losing their rights if a deal comes to fruition. Also, as Democrats debate which candidate will be the most electable on the ballot next to President Trump in November 2020, we look at how voters determine candidates' electability chances. And host Jeremy Hobson speaks with the researchers behind a device that could detect THC — the main psychoactive ingredient in cannabis — in someone's breath.
September 4, 2019
Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam has announced the government will formally withdraw an extradition bill that has sparked months of demonstrations in the city. The bill would have allowed Hong Kong residents to be sent to mainland China for trials. Also, in new study, scientists have documented how brain structure varies across dog breeds.
September 4, 2019
As Hurricane Dorian moves toward the U.S., relief and recovery efforts begin in the Bahamas, amid widespread damage to Abaco and Grand Bahamas. Robin Young speaks with Bahamian senator Fred Mitchell, who provides a view from Nassau. Also, we speak with the parents of one of the victims of the Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 crash, who filed a lawsuit against Boeing executives in April.
September 3, 2019
In 2017, people in Illinois and Wisconsin saw a green streak blazing across the sky: a meteorite careening into Lake Michigan. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with one of the scientists now trying to find it. Also, since it's tomato season, resident chef Kathy Gunst shares three recipes that make full use of the plant. T
September 3, 2019
Uber upended transportation throughout the world. In a new book, author Mike Isaac details the company's remarkable rise, and the misdeeds that forced the resignation of its founder and CEO. Isaac joins host Jeremy Hobson to discuss how Uber's willingness to break rules led to both success and scandal. Also, Brazil's president faces criticism over a huge increase in intentionally set fires in the Amazon. We speak with environmental science professor Mark Cochrane.
September 2, 2019
The U.S. Coast Guard in Los Angeles says it "has launched multiple rescue assets to assist more than 30 people in distress on a 75-foot boat near Santa Cruz Island" in response to reports that the vessel was on fire. NPR's Kirk Siegler has the latest. Also, host Robin Young talks to Uber and Lyft driver Moustafa Maklad about his experience in the gig economy, and how a new bill up for consideration in California could fundamentally alter it by making companies like Uber and Lyft treat their workers ...
September 2, 2019
We track Hurricane Dorian as the Category Four storm barrels into Florida. Also, while communities in West Texas mourned seven people killed in a shooting over the weekend, loosened gun restrictions took effect in the state Monday. And, we revisit a conversation host Robin Young had with the subject and co-director of the documentary "Free Solo," which is up for seven Emmy awards.
August 30, 2019
Young climate justice activists are striking outside of the U-N headquarters in New York City today. Among them is 16-year old Swedish activist Greta Thunberg, who completed a two week voyage across the Atlantic to attend a series of climate justice events in the city. Host Femi Oke speaks with 17-year-old Xiye Bastida, one of the strike's organizers. Also, Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte is promising to lead a more united and inclusive country, a week after the collapse of his government. We speak with NPR's Sylvia Poggioli in ...
August 30, 2019
Hurricane Dorian is expected to become a Category 4 storm this weekend as it nears Florida. WMFE's Brendan Byrne tells us how people in the state are preparing for the storm's approach. Also, comedian Dave Chappelle has a new special on Netflix, and it may be his most incisive and provocative yet. NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans discusses with host Femi Oke how Chappelle's unapologetic commentary fits uneasily with the #MeToo era.
August 29, 2019
The Trump administration is expected to release a proposal that would roll back requirements on detecting and plugging methane leaks at oil and gas facilities. NPR's Jeff Brady joins us to discuss how the new rules change may be implemented. And, as ransomware attacks hit dozens of U.S. cities, two city managers join us to discuss why they made two different decisions about paying hackers ransom. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's August 29, 2019 full broadcast.
August 29, 2019
Dr. Emily Chapman, chief medical officer of Children's Minnesota, speaks with Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd about the serious lung illnesses she is seeing this summer among young people who use electronic cigarettes. The CDC is investigating nearly 200 illnesses and one death since June in 22 states. Also, this week, Indonesia announced that it will move its capital from Jakarta to a new development on the island of Borneo. We speak with Rita Padawangi of Singapore University of Social Sciences.
August 28, 2019
Opposition leaders in British Parliament are blasting Prime Minister Boris Johnson's request to suspend Parliament ahead of the Brexit deadline. Labour Party politician David Lammy joins us to discuss. And, every time you wash your clothes, millions of microfibers are released into the water. It is contributing to the growing problem of plastic pollution in the oceans. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's August 28, 2019 full broadcast.
August 28, 2019
Tropical Storm Dorian is gaining strength as it moves toward Puerto Rico. Forecasts are showing it could become a hurricane before hitting Florida's coast. We speak with Florida meteorologist Jeff Huffman. Also, how early can a child know that their gender is not what they've been assigned at birth? Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with Dr. Diane Ehrensaft, a developmental and clinical psychologist, about how parents should respond when their child expresses gender creativity.
August 27, 2019
Inmates at the Pennsylvania State Correctional Institution at Chester are telling their stories through animated short films in a project called "Hidden Lives Illuminated." Here & Now's Robin Young talks with project manager Sean Kelley and inmate artist Paul M. And, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio joins Here & Now to discuss his campaign for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's August 27, 2019 full broadcast.
August 27, 2019
Democrats running for president have floated some of the most progressive criminal justice reform ideas in years. They're running against President Trump, who signed a bipartisan criminal justice reform bill into law last year. Criminologist Kimya Dennis of the Notre Dame of Maryland University joins Here & Now's Sue Davis to discuss how criminal justice reform is playing out on the campaign trail. Also, blue-green algae in lakes and ponds has caused several dog deaths this summer. We speak with Melissa Martin, whose three dogs died earlier this month, and ...
August 26, 2019
Is it morally wrong to take a wildlife photo? Here & Now's Robin Young speaks with wildlife photographer and conservationist Melissa Groo about her National Geographic article "How To Photograph Wildlife Ethically." Also, the number of seniors in the U.S. will grow by more than 40 million, approximately doubling between 2015 and 2050. Changing demographics have sparked questions about how to care for aging Americans, as a society and as individual caregivers. Here & Now's Susan Davis talks to Elizabeth Eckstrom, geriatrician and author of "The Gift of Caring."
August 26, 2019
President Trump continued to send mixed messages about the escalating trade war with China at the G-7 summit in France this weekend. NPR's Frank Langfitt joins us to break down the president's statements. And, SIM card swapping is when hackers take over your cellphone and gain access to all of the information on it. KUOW reporter Deborah Wang has been following this new type of fraud and joins us to discuss. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's August 26, 2019 full broadcast.
August 23, 2019
The National Rifle Association has had President Trump's ear this week when it comes to the conversation about guns in America. But the NRA has been facing continued internal troubles. We speak with Rob Pincus, a member of the NRA and a spokesperson for Save the Second, a pro-gun rights group. Also, women, especially women of color, are underrepresented in management and board positions in the workplace. Tonya Mosley speaks with Minda Harts, author of "The Memo: What Women of Color Need To Know To Secure A Seat At ...
August 23, 2019
Would you know what to do in an emergency situation? From natural disasters and everyday accidents, the Stop the Bleed campaign encourages bystanders to become trained and equipped in an emergency situation. Also, major telecommunications companies, including AT&T, Sprint and Verizon, are teaming up with the attorneys general of all fifty states plus Washington, D.C., to stop robocalls in a new agreement. Host Tonya Mosley speaks with Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge.
August 22, 2019
Host Tonya Mosley speaks with 13-year-old jazz pianist Brandon Goldberg, who not only plays keyboard but also arranged all of the music for his debut album "Let's Play." Also, the U.S. Department of Education is investigating female-only scholarships, awards, workshops and camps at more than two dozen universities. We talk to Erin Buzuvis, a Title IX expert and law professor at Western New England University, about these programs, many of which are focused on STEM fields.
August 22, 2019
There are a record number of fires in the Amazon rainforest this year. Conservationists are blaming Brazil's government, saying the country's far-right president Jair Bolsonaro has encouraged the clearing of rainforest land. Bolsonaro says NGOs may be setting the fires to embarrass him. Here & Now's Tonya Mosley speaks to Carlos Nobre, a climate scientist in Brazil. Also, at least 35 children in the U.S. have died this year after being left in hot cars, according to the nonprofit Kids and Cars. Stephanie Salvilla, who's 5-month-old son died in her ...
August 21, 2019
The Trump administration announced a change to the decades-old Flores Settlement Agreement that regulates how children are treated when they cross the Southern border into the United States. Host Tonya Mosley talks to NPR's Richard Gonzales about the Trump administration's change. Also, Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd speaks with Marjie Alonso, a dog trainer and director of the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants (IAABCT), about different dog breeds involved in attacks and what to do if a dangerous canine approaches you.
August 21, 2019
Since June, two high-profile black writers who write about race have been "swatted," an occasionally deadly form of online harassment involving a hoax call to police and a SWAT team rushing to the house of an often unaware victim. Leonard Pitts, Jr., a columnist for The Miami Herald, joins us to talk about his experience. Also, Tonya Mosley speaks with Julianne Holt-Lunstad, a psychologist at Brigham Young University, about loneliness and social isolation, and possible medications which might help.
August 20, 2019
There are 60 million Chinese expats living abroad. We talk to Sarah Cook from Freedom House about how the Chinese government is influencing global opinion on Hong Kong and more through a far-reaching campaign of propaganda. Also, what happened to tumblr? That's what some fans of the blogging site are asking after tumblr sold to the parent company of former rival Wordpress last week for as little as $3 million. In 2013 Yahoo paid $1.1 billion for it. Host Peter O'Dowd speaks to Kara Swisher, editor-at-large at Recode.
August 20, 2019
San Jose Mayor Sam Liccardo has proposed introducing a gun insurance requirement for all gun owners except police, less than a month after a mass shooting in Gilroy. Proponents say it's a common sense solution to reduce gun violence and defray the cost of tens of thousands of deaths each year from guns. Critics worry about increasing illegal gun ownership and violating the constitutional rights of gun owners. Also, on Tuesday, Democratic presidential hopefuls will address the first presidential candidates forum focused entirely on Native American issues in more ...
August 19, 2019
Here & Now's Lisa Mullins speaks with Bill Barclay, director of music at Shakespeare's Globe, about his musical exploration of the life of Chevalier de Saint-Georges, the biracial 18th-century virtuoso swordsman and musician known as the "Black Mozart." Also, the Trump administration is extending a license allowing the Chinese telecommunications company Huawei to buy goods from American companies. The Commerce Department blacklisted the company earlier this year because of national security concerns, but the license allows Huawei to continue doing business with some American companies.
August 19, 2019
President Trump was asked Sunday about the possibility of the U.S. entering a recession, something that many experts see as likely. "I don't see a recession," he said. Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd speaks with NPR's Jim Zarroli. Also, Faiza Patel of the Brennan Center talks to Here & Now's Tonya Mosley about why the FBI has all the authority it needs to combat domestic terrorism, and why increased surveillance is not a substitute for gun control when it comes to preventing more mass shootings.
August 16, 2019
Rep. Rashida Tlaib is cancelling her trip to Israel, after Israel said she is allowed to see her grandmother in the West Bank on a humanitarian visit. Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson talks with Neri Zilber, journalist, analyst and an adjunct fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. Also, Harry Markopolos, a financial analyst who raised concerns over Bernie Madoff before his fraud was discovered, said GE is hiding major losses from investors. GE responded that Markopolos is trying to manipulate the market.
August 16, 2019
Hospital administrators from Texas to Maine say adopting a single-payer government health care program that covers all Americans would force more rural hospitals to close. Host Peter O'Dowd visited the hospital emergency department in a small Maine town to see how the debate Democrats are having over "Medicare for All" is resonating in rural America. Also, scientists, academics and world leaders will soon gather on a mountain in Iceland to memorialize the first major Icelandic glacier to disappear due to climate change. Researchers are installing a memorial plaque to ...
August 15, 2019
NBC drama "This Is Us" is among the contenders at next month's Emmy Awards, racking up nine nominations. The series tells the story of one American family through flashbacks and flash-forwards through different time periods. Host Robin Young speaks with two of the stars, Mandy Moore and Milo Ventimiglia. Also, Dr. Peter Simi says white supremacy can become an addiction. He's spent the last two decades studying white supremacy. He joins host Robin Young to discuss what is known about addiction to hate groups and how those trying to ...
August 15, 2019
Wall Street opened slightly higher Thursday morning, a day after the Dow plunged 800 points in one of the biggest ever one-day sell-offs on Wall Street. We discuss the growing fears of a global economic recession. Also, we look back at the last time the country impeached a president. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with Peter Baker, chief White House correspondent for the New York Times. He's co-author of "Impeachment: An American History", with Tim Neftali, Jon Meacham and Jeff Engel.
August 14, 2019
Here & Now's Robin Young speaks with Grammy-winning country artist Vince Gill about his new album, "Okie." Also, American runner Tyler Andrews finished Peru's challenging 40-mile Salkantay Inca Trail to Machu Picchu in about six hours, a trek that takes most hikers four days. He joins us to discuss breaking the record for the fastest known time to complete the trail. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's August 14, 2019 full broadcast.
August 14, 2019
On Wednesday, a woman who says Epstein sexually abused and raped her sued his estate and alleged co-conspirators. Ghislaine Maxwell, Epstein's longtime confidant, was the only named defendant in the case. Maxwell has denied procuring girls for Epstein. NPR's Sasha Ingber discusses the latest about the case with host Robin Young. Also, host Jeremy Hobson visits Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst's home in Maine to find out how to make salads with meat (or other protein) for light summer dinners.
August 13, 2019
The Showtime series "Escape at Dannemora" tells the story of two inmates who escaped from a prison in upstate New York in 2015. Director Ben Stiller talks about the series, which has been nominated for 12 Emmys. And, the parents of missing journalist Austin Tice have released an open letter urging everyone to push for their son's release. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's August 13, 2019 full broadcast.
August 13, 2019
An environmental group in France is suing the city of Paris for failing to properly warn and inform residents about the risk of lead contamination from the devastating fire in the Notre Dame Cathedral back in April. Robin Young speaks with Jacky Bonnemains, director of Robin des Bois, about the group's concerns. Also, host Jeremy Hobson talks to Ophelia Watahomigie-Corliss, a Havasupai Tribal Councilwoman, about the tribe, which lives below the rim of the Grand Canyon.
August 12, 2019
More than 150 flights were cancelled at Hong Kong's international airport on Monday as thousands of protesters crammed into the terminal. We check in with NPR international correspondent Anthony Kuhn for the latest. And, nearly 80 million Americans carry medical debt, so two former collection agency executives started a charity to buy and forgive that debt. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's August 12, 2019 full broadcast.
August 12, 2019
Accused child molester and sex trafficker Jeffrey Epstein's death will not end the legal probe into his actions and his associates. The spotlight has now shifted to the people who may have helped Epstein recruit young women, and also to others to whom he had personal and professional connections. Here & Now's Robin Young talks to Wall Street Journal reporter Nicole Hong. Also, we talk to cultural anthropologist Angela Stuesse about how poultry workers went from being mostly white women in the 1950s to Hispanic immigrants today.
August 9, 2019
The new tax law created Opportunity Zones to encourage investment in poor neighborhoods. Noah Buhayar of Bloomberg News reports they may ultimately do more to enrich developers and fuel gentrification than help the communities they were intended to. Also, the Iowa State Fair is a required stop for the Democratic presidential candidates who want to win over voters ahead of the Iowa caucus in February. We speak with NPR's Scott Detrow about Joe Biden's visit on Thursday and who else will be there this week.
August 9, 2019
Authorities are investigating two separate mass shootings in Gilroy, California, and El Paso, Texas, as possible acts of domestic terrorism. Host Tonya Mosley speaks with Christian Picciolini, founder of the Free Radicals Project and author of the forthcoming book, "Breaking Hate: Confronting the New Culture of Extremism," about why young white men join white supremacy groups. Also, Uber announced its largest quarterly loss ever. It's partly because of increasing global competition from regions such as Latin America.
August 8, 2019
Washington Governor Jay Inslee is one of more than 20 Democrats vying for the chance to face President Trump in the general election next year. He has been focusing his campaign on climate change. Here & Now's Robin Young speaks with Inslee about the recent mass shootings and his clean energy plan. Also, Seamus Blackley, the man who invented the Xbox, is also a self-described amateur Egyptologist and bread maker. This week, he baked a loaf of bread using what he believes is 4,500-year-old yeast from ancient Egyptian pottery.
August 8, 2019
Mayor Chokwe Antar Lumumba of Jackson, Mississippi, joins Here & Now's Robin Young to discuss the fallout from Wednesday's immigration raids around the city. Also, for many veterans, coming home from war is more difficult than what they experienced on the battlefield. The hardest step for some veterans who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder is admitting they need help. Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with two veterans who have been on that journey.
August 7, 2019
On Saturday, Ben McGuire was raising money at Walmart in El Paso for a soccer team he helps coach when the mass shooting there happened. Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with McGuire about the shooting. Also, Air France is the latest carrier to announce it will stop flying the Airbus A380. Airbus announced early this year that it would end production of the aircraft. We speak with Here & Now's transportation analyst Seth Kaplan.
August 7, 2019
Trump is visiting families and survivors in El Paso and Dayton Wednesday. Meanwhile, disturbing new details are emerging about the 24-year-old Dayton shooter. Friends and acquaintances describe the shooter as having a decade-long obsession with violence, guns, and death. Dayton Daily News reporter Will Garbe speaks with us. Also, three people were killed on a beach in Encinitas, California, this month. A slab of sandstone broke free from a cliff and crushed them. The state has long dealt with beach erosion and coastal landslides, but climate change could make ...
August 7, 2019
Neil Pasricha, author of "The Happiness Equation," explains why he thinks retirement isn't such a great concept. And, Toni Morrison has died at 88. Jeremy Hobson talks with NPR arts Correspondent Lynn Neary about the author's life and work. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's August 6, 2019 full broadcast.
August 7, 2019
The Trump administration is hoping to reduce the number of asylum seekers at its borders by requiring that they seek asylum first in a third country, like Guatemala. Robin Young talks with investigative reporter and author about what's urging people to leave countries like Honduras. And, we look at new data revealing that July was the hottest month ever recorded. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's August 5, 2019 full broadcast.
August 5, 2019
President Trump called for "strong background checks" after two mass shootings this weekend left at least 30 people dead in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio. Jeremy Hobson gets the latest in the investigation in Dayton. And, Florida newsrooms are tackling climate change head-on. Robin Young talks with journalists there about their efforts. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's August 5, 2019 full broadcast.
August 5, 2019
The nation is grieving with two cities — Dayton, Ohio and El Paso, Texas — after two mass shootings over the weekend. Robin Young gets the latest from El Paso. And, a historian breaks down the similarities and differences between President Trump's race-fueled campaign and that of Civil Rights era segregationist George Wallace. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's August 5, 2019 full broadcast. You can read and hear more at hereandnow.org, follow us on Twitter and join the conversation on Facebook.
August 2, 2019
The U.S. economy added 164,000 jobs in July, but that was overshadowed by President Trump's announcement that he would be placing new tariffs on $300 billion worth of Chinese goods. And, President Trump held a rally in front of a huge crowd of supporters in Cincinnati on Thursday night. Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson was there and gives his impression of the event. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's August 2, 2019 full broadcast.
August 2, 2019
While Democrats are debating who will lead their party in 2020, President Trump's re-election campaign is already underway. Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson spoke with Trump supporters at the president's rally in Cincinnati Thursday night. And, California billionaire Tom Steyer talks with Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd about his vision for the country and his campaign for the Democratic nomination. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's August 2, 2019 full broadcast.
August 1, 2019
Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson discusses the second Democratic candidates debate with a group of Democratic voters from Cincinnati. Also, two British pilots are determined to fly a newly restored original Spitfire warplane around the globe in a world first. We speak with one the pilots, Steve Brooks. And, Congress is considering whether to provide more benefits for service members and veterans whose war injuries left them infertile. Texas Public Radio's Carson Frame reports.
July 31, 2019
Democratic strategist Jamal Simmons and Republican strategist Matt Mackowiak discuss the Democratic presidential candidates' debate last night and President Trump's re-election chances. Also, a family in Utah is suing their son's school district after it wouldn't allow him to return to class over his diabetes treatment plan. And, KCRW DJ Jason Kramer shares some of his favorite music right now, including a track by Billie Eilish's brother, Finneas. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's July 31, 2019 full broadcast.
July 31, 2019
Greenland is in the midst of a heatwave and scientists expect the island to experience it's second largest ice melt since 1950. We speak with Professor Jason Box, an ice climatologist at the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland in Copenhagen. And, Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst says pizza can be the perfect summer meal. She makes three varieties — white clam pizza, spinach and ricotta pizza, and tomato, mozzarella, anchovy and arugula pizza — for host Jeremy Hobson at her home in Maine.
July 30, 2019
Georgia has awarded a contract with a new vendor to replace its electronic voting machines with a system that prints out paper ballots. Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd talks with Stephen Fowler of Georgia Public Broadcasting about how this could impact upcoming elections. Also, Boston Globe film critic Ty Burr joins Here & Now to give his recommendations on movies to watch on the streaming services. And, the latest Syrian military offensive has claimed the lives of hundreds of civilians in the last three months, according to the United Nations.
July 30, 2019
Democratic presidential hopefuls are gearing up for the second round of debates. Host Peter O'Dowd talks with Michigan Radio's Zoe Clark on what they will have to do in Detroit to stand out to voters. Also, lead poisoning deaths of several loons in New Hampshire this summer have prompted the state to offer a buy-back program, encouraging anglers to trade in illegal lead tackle — sinkers and jigs weighing less than an ounce — which kill loons who ingest them on fresh water lakes. Robin Young talks to Harry Vogel, executive ...
July 29, 2019
Host Robin Young speaks with singer-songwriter Ben Folds about his new memoir, "A Dream About Lightning Bugs: A Life of Music and Cheap Lessons." The singer reflects on being a wise songwriter, but unwise in everything else. Also, Las Vegas has been attracting swarms of grasshoppers. The insects are invading the city and creating a nuisance for visitors and locals. And, we all know the warning: wait an hour after eating before going swimming, or else you might drown. Turns out, it's a myth.
July 29, 2019
President Trump has nominated Rep. John Ratcliffe to replace Dan Coats as director of national intelligence. Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with Jane Harman of the Wilson Center about what to expect from Ratcliffe. Also, we stop to take stock of the lighting industry as LED lighting use has soared over the past decade. And, Here & Now's Robin Young talks with Laura Kaplan, who used to be part of a group that provided abortions before they were legalized by the Supreme Court in the 1970s.
July 29, 2019
An investigation into Marines accused of helping smuggle migrants into the United States led to the arrest Thursday of 16 Marines at California's Camp Pendleton. Also, 16-year-old climate activist Greta Thunberg joins Here & Now's Femi Oke from a protest in Stockholm. And, NPR national security editor Phil Ewing joins us to discuss the Senate Intelligence Committee report on election interference. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's July 26, 2019 full broadcast.
July 26, 2019
Juul CEO James Monsees was questioned by the House Oversight Committee on Thursday about the company's role in the teen vaping epidemic. Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson talks to two activists who are campaigning against the industry. Also, lawmakers in New York City are pushing back against cashless businesses, saying that refusing to accept cash discriminates against low-income residents. And, the 16th annual Homeless World Cup is set to kick off in Cardiff, Wales. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's July 26, 2019 full broadcast.
July 25, 2019
Historian Julian Zelizer joins Here & Now's Robin Young to discuss what's next after former special counsel Robert Mueller appeared before Congress this week. And, author Tim Alberta talks with host Jeremy Hobson about his new book, "American Carnage: On the Front Lines of the Republican Civil War and the Rise of President Trump." That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's July 25, 2019 full broadcast.
July 24, 2019
Former special counsel Robert Mueller is testifying before Congress on Wednesday about his investigation into the Trump campaign and Russian interference in the 2016 election. We get the latest from NPR's Ryan Lucas. And, researchers in Nevada are collecting personal genetic information in the largest health study of its kind. Noah Glick of member station KUNR reports. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's July 24, 2019 full broadcast.
July 24, 2019
Former special counsel Robert Mueller is testifying before the House Judiciary and Intelligence Committees on Wednesday. House members asked for Mueller to confirm details from his two-volume report, but Democrats and Republicans took very different approaches in their questioning. We get the latest. Also, Oscar-winning composer Andre Previn's last piece featured a dream team of collaborators, including playwright Tom Stoppard and soprano Renee Fleming. But the commission was unfinished when Previn died earlier this year. WBUR's Andrea Shea looks at how Previn's last composition made it from the page ...
July 23, 2019
Commuters in large metro areas spend at least 30 minutes on average getting to work every day, according to the U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey. One way to reduce traffic and the number of hours workers spend commuting is to have more people work from home more often. Host Jeremy Hobson talks with Scott Mautz, a former executive at Procter & Gamble who writes about business. Also, Fatou "Toufah" Jallow, who won Gambia's top beauty pageant when she was 18 years old, is one of several Gambia women who came ...
July 23, 2019
The Trump administration is implementing a new rule to fast-track deportation of some people who are in the U.S. illegally. Univision news anchor Enrique Acevedo joins us to discuss the likely impacts of the change. Also, Here & Now's Robin Young speaks with the granddaughter of a survivor of the 1921 Tulsa race riots, which results in the deaths of hundreds of African Americans. And, New York Times reporter Sarah Lyall gives us some background on Britain's new prime minister: Boris Johnson.
July 22, 2019
Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats has appointed Shelby Pierson as the country's first election threats executive. State election chiefs are also reviewing the safety of their election systems ahead of 2020, and some are calling for more money to strengthen their defenses. We speak with New Mexico Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver. Also, advocates are trying to end a type of gerrymandering, called "prison gerrymandering," where prisoners are counted as living at the prison instead of their home addresses. The result is an inflated constituent count in prison ...
July 22, 2019
The heat wave that gripped much of the U.S. put a strain on the power grid with hundreds of thousands in New York and Michigan losing power. We look at the reliability of the power grid with Julie McNamara of the Union of Concerned Scientists. Also, Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson speaks with Ben Levi Ross and Jessica Phillips, who star in the national tour of the Tony-winning musical, "Dear Evan Hansen." And, researchers at the University of Michigan found that patients are being prescribed opioids for ankle sprains.
July 19, 2019
A heat wave is set to blanket much of the U.S. from the Midwest to the Northeast this week. Mark Elliot, a meteorologist with The Weather Channel, joins us to discuss what to expect. And, Austin-based musician Robert Arellano joins Here & Now's Eric Westervelt to discuss his new EP, "On Time." That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's July 19, 2019 full broadcast.
July 19, 2019
We meet JD McCrary and Shahadi Wright Joseph, who voice the young Simba and the young Nala in the new Disney remake of "The Lion King." Also, 50 years ago this month, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin made history by becoming the first humans to walk on the moon. It was such a triumph that it's easy to forget just how difficult and dangerous the Apollo 11 mission really was. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's July 19, 2019 full broadcast.
July 18, 2019
We continue our series of conversations with 2020 presidential candidates by speaking with Rep. Seth Moulton (D-Mass.), a former Marine who's focusing his campaign on veterans issues, foreign policy and voting rights. Also, earlier this year, Here & Now reported on a nationwide shortage of drops and gels that relieve a condition called dry eye. We follow up for the latest on the situation and how sufferers are coping. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's July 18, 2019 full broadcast.
July 18, 2019
An investigation by The Anchorage Daily News and ProPublica found that 1 in 3 villages in Alaska don't have any police officers. Some communities are resorting to hiring officers with criminal records. Also, musician David Crosby and producer Cameron Crowe join Here & Now's Eric Westervelt to discuss the new documentary, "David Crosby: Remember My Name." And, the Eric Garner and Jeffrey Epstein cases are posing questions about inequalities inside the criminal justice system. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's July 18, 2019 full broadcast.
July 17, 2019
Republican strategist Alice Stewart and Democratic strategist Bill Press join Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson and Robin Young to discuss the political fallout from President Trump's racist tweets targeting Democratic congresswomen. And, when it comes to health, medical myths abound, but most of them aren't true. New York Times medical reporter Gina Kolata wrote about this and joins us to discuss. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's July 17, 2019 full broadcast.
July 17, 2019
New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker talks with Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson about his campaign to be the Democratic presidential candidate. Also, scientists at the University of Arizona say they've discovered the oldest instance so far of the genetic code for HIV. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's July 17, 2019 full broadcast.
July 16, 2019
A judge is expected to rule Thursday on whether to grant bail to financier Jeffrey Epstein while he awaits trial on sex trafficking and conspiracy charges. He is accused of abusing dozens of girls. Renae Merle of the Washington Post has the latest on the scandal. Also, Valerie Jarrett, former senior adviser to then-President Obama, spoke to host Robin Young about her time in the White House and her opinion on the current administration and President Trump.
July 16, 2019
NPR's Domenico Montanaro joins Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson to discuss the latest on President Trump's racist tweets about four female freshmen Democrats of color. Also, urinary tract infections, or UTIs, are among women's most common health complaints. But as bacteria become increasingly resistant to antibiotics, many of the frontline drugs for treating the infections are ineffective. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's July 16, 2019 full broadcast.
July 15, 2019
A beloved community activist and founder of Baton Rouge's African American history museum, Sadie Roberts-Joseph, was found dead in the truck of a car on Friday. As news of her death spread, Louisiana state Rep. C. Denise Marcelle paid tribute to the 75-year-old civil rights leader on her Facebook page. Here & Now's Robin Young speaks with Marcelle about Roberts-Joseph's legacy. Also, imitation meat is popping up all over. Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst gives us three meatless burger recipes that are perfect for summer grilling.
July 15, 2019
This morning on Fox News, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) urged President Trump to "aim higher" in criticizing four Democratic congresswomen of color, after Trump tweeted Monday they should "go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came." Also, it took nearly five hours for Novak Djokovic to defeat Roger Federer in the Wimbledon men's final Sunday — the longest final in history and the first to end in a fifth-set tiebreaker. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's July 15, 2019 full ...
July 12, 2019
Tropical Storm Barry is inching closer to Louisiana and heavy, unrelenting rain is a main concern going into the weekend. We check in with meteorologist Jeff Huffman. Also, Richmond, Virginia, has seen a 17 percent bump in transit ridership in the year since it debuted a new bus rapid transit system called GRTC Pulse. Average ridership on the new line was double what planners initially expected. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's July 12, 2019 full broadcast.
July 12, 2019
Leaving the White House on Friday morning with Labor Secretary Alex Acosta by his side, President Trump said Acosta would be resigning in one week. Our politics roundtable breaks down that story and more from the week in politics. Also, ebola has made a resurgence in the eastern provinces of Congo over the past year. There have been more than 1,500 deaths and more than 2,000 reported cases. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's July 12, 2019 full broadcast.
July 11, 2019
After weeks of delay, there are reports that nationwide ICE raids are set to begin Sunday in at least 10 major cities. NPR's Franco Ordoñez speaks about the political ramifications with host Jeremy Hobson. And, Asian American actor and rapper Awkwafina joins us to talk about her role in the new film, "The Farewell," in which she plays a woman whose grandmother is diagnosed with terminal cancer. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's July 11, 2019 full broadcast.
July 11, 2019
Forecasters are predicting a storm picking up steam in the Gulf of Mexico could arrive in Louisiana this weekend as a hurricane. Meanwhile, parts of New Orleans are already flooding. Also, China is looking to increase its footprint in Indonesia. But many Indonesians have a history of hostility toward the Chinese. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's July 11, 2019 full broadcast.
July 10, 2019
Republican strategist Matt Mackowiak and Democratic strategist Maria Cardona join Here & Now's Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson to discuss today's news in politics, including calls for Labor Secretary Alex Acosta to resign. Also, we check in with peach expert Andy Rollins about what makes a good peach. And, KCRW DJ Novena Carmel shares some soulful sounds from the Bay Area and beyond.
July 10, 2019
The World Cup-winning United States women's soccer team is being honored with a ticker-tape parade in New York on Wednesday. The U.S. defeated the Netherlands on Sunday to capture its second-straight World Cup. Also, as our series on China's growing influence in Asia continues, we take a closer look at the country's spending in the Philippines and a brewing controversy involving the South China Sea. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's July 10, 2019 full broadcast.
July 9, 2019
Twenty million Americans could lose health insurance if a federal appeals court rules against the Affordable Care Act. The Obama-era law will get a hearing today in New Orleans, where judges will decide if a Texas judge was right to strike down the law because requiring that all Americans buy health insurance is unconstitutional. Kaiser Health News' Julie Rovner reports. Also, it's a no-brainer to stay off your phone while driving. Yet nearly 9 out of of 10 drivers admit to using their phones while behind the wheel. Why can't we ...
July 9, 2019
Sen. Tim Kaine joins Here & Now's Robin Young to discuss why he is among the lawmakers calling for Labor Secretary Alex Acosta to resign over his role in securing a 2008 plea deal for wealthy financier Jeffrey Epstein. Also, Here & Now Security Analyst Jim Walsh joins us to discuss Iran's announcement that it is exceeding the limits outlined in the nuclear deal. And, Recode's Kara Swisher took an electric scooter for a ride on the streets of Paris.
July 8, 2019
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement is planning to go ahead with a massive raid this week of undocumented immigrants. NPR's Ron Elving joins us to discuss that and more on the week ahead in politics. Also, 250 years ago today, Captain James Cook was embarking on his first of three voyages in the Pacific Ocean. Cliff Thornton of the Captain Cook Society joins Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson to look back on Cook's legacy. And, a market in Vancouver, British Columbia, started using single-use plastic bags with embarrassing slogans on ...
July 8, 2019
Hedge fund manager Jeffrey Epstein is being charged with sex trafficking of minors and paying victims to recruit other underage girls. Host Robin Young gets the latest from NPR's Quil Lawrence. Also, the political debate over abortion appears to be black and white. But many Americans fall into a gray area. We discuss with Frances Kissling, president of the nonprofit Center for Health, Ethics and Social Policy. And, this week, host Jeremy Hobson is looking at four specific countries in Asia and how China's growing economic influence is affecting ...
July 5, 2019
Colorado saw its most destructive wildfire season in years in 2018. It's predicted that wildfires in the state will become even more destructive as the climate changes. Also, Pediatrician Dr. Damon Korb — a father of five — says it's never too late to help create an "organized" child, and that the steps can start in infancy. Here & Now's Lisa Mullins talks with Korb about the path to organization, which he writes about in his new book, "Raising an Organized Child." That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's July 5, 2019 ...
July 5, 2019
The new National Geographic documentary "Apollo: Missions to the Moon" examines the Apollo program using archival footage including NASA film, local TV reports and home movies. Also, Washington Post reporter Matt Zapotosky joins Here & Now's Peter O'Dowd to discuss the latest on President Trump's renewed push this week to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census, despite a Supreme Court ruling against it last week. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's July 5, 2019 full broadcast.
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