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March 27, 2020
Comedy theaters are among the many entertainment outlets struggling with the economic fallout of the coronavirus pandemic. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with Charna Halpern, owner of The iO Theater in Chicago. Also, Dr. Larry Brilliant has been on the front lines in the fight against disease for decades. He shares his thoughts on COVID-19.
March 27, 2020
There's been an outcry on social media: Millenials don't think their boomer parents are taking warnings about coronavirus seriously enough. NPR's Ina Jaffe profiles a father and daughter. Also, we talk to John Lex, a truck driver for Walmart, about some of the challenges he is facing on the road due to the coronavirus, and the newfound respect he feels truckers are finally earning.
March 26, 2020
Nearly 3.3 million people filed for unemployment last week as the coronavirus pandemic brought many industries to a standstill. We get an expert view from Diane Swonk, chief economist at Grant Thornton LLP. Also, so many people are worried about family and loved ones right now. WBUR's Anthony Brooks's mother, Esther Brooks, is in Italy — one of the hot spots of the global pandemic.
March 26, 2020
Host Robin Young speaks with cellist Yo-Yo Ma about the music he's been tweeting using the hashtag #SongsOfComfort. Also, some physicians are speculating that vaping could make some young people more susceptible to the worst COVID-19 complications. Cleveland Clinic pulmonologist Dr. Humberto Choi joins us to talk about the issue.
March 25, 2020
Parents know how important being outdoors is for their kids. But how safe is it for people to be outside right now? Dr. Anita McElroy has answers. Plus, grocery store employees are some of the workers on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic — putting their health at risk to keep store shelves stocked and grocery carts full. Noah Glick from KUNR talked to some store workers in Reno, Nevada.
March 25, 2020
Washington Post's Yasmeen Abutaleb joins us to discuss concerns that Trump is sidelining his scientific advisers during the coronavirus crisis. Also, cooped up at home? Try birdwatching! Houston Audubon ornithologist Richard Gibbons reminds us that many birds migrating this week, many who are experiencing "zugunruhe," a German word meaning migratory restlessness. So are all of us, it seems.
March 24, 2020
Actor Jesse Eisenberg has two films coming on digital and video on demand on Friday: "Vivarium" and "Resistance." We speak to him about both movies opening during this turbulent time. Also, warehouse workers are calling on Amazon to do more to defend against the spread of coronavirus after the company confirmed its first case of COVID-19 at a warehouse in New York last week. We get the latest from Elizabeth Dwoskin of The Washington Post.
March 24, 2020
The Senate is getting closer to a deal on an economic relief package to deal with the fallout from the coronavirus pandemic. Democrat Sen. Jeanne Shaheen joins us to discuss. And, the reason why the coronavirus spreads so quickly is because many people don't even know they have it. Jeffrey Shaman, professor of environmental health sciences at Columbia University Mailman School, explains how asymptomatic carriers spread COVID-19.
March 23, 2020
New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy ordered the state's residents to stay home, except for essential trips, in order to help reduce the spread of coronavirus. He joins us to discuss how he plans to enforce the order. And, resident chef Kathy Gunst shares some recipes for cooking at home while isolated.
March 23, 2020
As COVID-19 spreads in this country, people are struggling to adjust to the new rules: stand six feet apart, work from home, don't get a haircut, home school your children. Lawrence Gostin, professor of global health law at Georgetown University, joins us to discuss the balance between personal freedom and public health. Also, some medical professionals are warning of a potential shortage of life-saving ventilators as the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in the U.S. tops 35,000. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with Dr. Lewis Kaplan.
March 20, 2020
At a few colleges, the answer to closed campuses has been the 'faux-memcement' — a quickly cobbled together ceremony, where garbage bags take the place of gowns, but the emotions and the sentiment are real. We talk to a senior at Olin College in Massachusetts and the dean of faculty. Also, access to broadband internet connection is vital for most Americans. Host Jeremy Hobson talks to Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai about how to shrink the digital divide during the pandemic.
March 19, 2020
A pandemic of a novel coronavirus is causing a global shortage of masks. It turns out that a simple face mask is surprisingly hard to make. NPR's Emily Feng reports. And John Horn, host of the KPCC show 'The Frame," joins host Tonya Mosley to share his film favorites for folks looking for something to stream.
March 19, 2020
Congress is considering a $1 trillion rescue package designed to provide some relief for Americans grappling with the deepening coronavirus crisis. NPR's Susan Davis joins us to discuss what would be the third major bill passed to deal with the pandemic. And, CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield is facing criticism for the slow pace of testing for the coronavirus in the U.S., a charge that echoes controversy Redfield faced as an infectious disease specialist for the military during the AIDS epidemic of the 1980s.
March 18, 2020
Dr. Jonathan Woodson, former assistant secretary of defense for health affairs, joins us, to discuss how the U.S. military is keeping its forces safe overseas and the role it could play in keeping Americans safe at home. And, at least 13 American journalists stand to be expelled from China in retaliation for a new limit imposed by the Trump administration on visas for Chinese state-owned media operating in the U.S. NPR's Jackie Northam joins us with the latest.
March 17, 2020
Comedian Jesse Appell's visit back to the United States from China has been prolonged indefinitely by the COVID-19 epidemic. Back in China, his comedian friend Storm Xu has been quarantined in China for the last three months — so long that he now fears going outside. Also, we talk with business owners and employees from across the country about how the coronavirus is impacting their place of work: the owner of a Pennsylvania toy store, co-founder of a California cannabis dispensary and a Seattle hotel worker.
March 17, 2020
Researchers in Canada are working to develop treatments for COVID-19 by isolating the virus responsible for the pandemic. Arinjay Banerjee, a fellow at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, joins us to discuss. And, several California counties have ordered residents to shelter in place, except for essential travel, such as grocery shopping. KQED's Marisa Lagos breaks down the state's response to the spread of coronavirus.
March 16, 2020
In an effort to slow the rate of transmission of COVID-19, many public school districts have made the decision to shut down for many weeks, including New York City, Boston and Los Angeles. Los Angeles Unified School District Superintendent Austin Beutner discusses his decision to close the nation's second-largest school district, and what it's doing to support students, teachers and parents. Also, New York Times dance critic and former dancer in Riverdance Siobhan Burke shares why she thinks the dancing in the new 25th-anniversary show is "spectacular."
March 16, 2020
Researchers are working to quickly develop a vaccine for the coronavirus. One of them is Dr. Dan Barouch, director of the Center for Virology and Vaccine Research at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. And, a New York hospital CEO says the group's 23 hospitals in the state are bracing for an influx of coronavirus patients.
March 13, 2020
As speculation and misinformation about coronavirus continue to spread online, host Tonya Mosely debunks some of the top myths spreading about COVID-19 with Stanford University's Dr. Seema Yasmin. Also, Parkinson's disease eventually robs its patients of their ability to move. About a million Americans have the neurological disease, and it might surprise you to hear that one of the most effective treatments of Parkinson's is exercise. WBUR's Cloe Axelson has the story.
March 13, 2020
This year's census will help determine how states redraw their electoral maps. At least 17 states have committed to using nonpartisan commissions or other nontraditional methods in their redistricting this year in an effort to prevent partisan gerrymandering. We talk to Jessika Shipley of Colorado's Legislative Council. Also, we explore the growth of the so-called "aspirational class" and what our consumer habits can tell us about the current state of social class and cultural cohesion in the U.S.
March 12, 2020
The city of Detroit will temporarily restore running water to thousands of households who have been disconnected due to unpaid bills. This action comes on the heels of public outcry that lack of water poses a serious public health threat amidst the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. We talk with Dr. Abdul El-Sayed. Also, health care has become a high-risk job in the wake of the coronavirus. We look at the impact on home care workers with Ai-jen Poo, director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance.
March 12, 2020
NPR White House Correspondent Tamara Keith joins us to discuss the Trump administration's coronavirus response, including a temporary travel ban on some travelers from parts of Europe. And, the 2020 census ramps up Wednesday as the first invitations to respond online arrive in the mail. NPR's Hansi Lo Wang joins us to discuss the unique challenges to this year's census.
March 11, 2020
JetBlue CEO Robin Hayes joins us to discuss the impact of the spread of the coronavirus on the airline industry and what steps the company is taking to overcome this latest challenge. And, with more than 10,000 cases, Italy has been hit harder by coronavirus than any country but China. Doctors in the country's northern provinces say that hospitals are overwhelmed.
March 11, 2020
We speak with "Men in Black" and "Addams Family" filmmaker and writer Barry Sonnenfeld about his new memoir, "Barry Sonnenfeld Call Your Mother." Also, three major domestic airlines are cutting back on domestic and international flights as fears over the coronavirus cause bookings to plummet. Here & Now transportation analyst Seth Kaplan explains how the airline industry is fairing.
March 10, 2020
When Duane Allman, the late lead guitarist of the Allman Brothers, played the iconic song "Layla," his Les Paul Gold Top guitar licks were the highlight. As Grant Blankenship reports, that guitar will be on stage at the 50th Allman Brothers reunion. Also, like many cities across the country, Raleigh has experienced tremendous growth. And with that growth has come gentrification which threatens to change the fabric of the historically black communities. Jason deBruyn of WUNC reports.
March 10, 2020
U.S. stock markets jumped on Tuesday morning after President Trump announced his proposed economic stimulus package to deal with the effects of coronavirus. NPR chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley joins us for the latest. And, the public history project "All That Philly Jazz" seeks to document and preserve the jazz history of Philadelphia.
March 9, 2020
Host Tonya Mosley talks with musical artist and social media sensation Marc Rebillet about his creative process and how his growing fanbase influences in the music he makes. Also, as the world reacts to the coronavirus, we take a look back at the history of pandemics and epidemics — beginning with the devastating Black Plague, through the HIV/AIDs epidemic.
March 9, 2020
Prep for Prep, a nonprofit education program in New York City, helps students of color attend private schools but some argue that it fails to mitigate segregation in the city's public schools. We reexamine these types of programs with The New Yorker's Vinson Cunningham. Also, a new book tells the story of Massachusetts v. EPA, a watershed case for environmental law that was decided by the U.S. Supreme Court in 2007. We talk with author Richard J. Lazarus.
March 6, 2020
Colleges, universities and boarding schools are trying to figure out how to best manage student travel for upcoming spring breaks. We talk to Brad Seifers, who handles emergency management at Indiana University, which is going on spring break. Also, since December, women have held slightly more non-farm payroll jobs than men. It's only the second time in history this has happened. Professor Betsey Stevenson talks about the changing workforce.
March 6, 2020
Climate change is accelerating the erosion of beaches around the world, according to a recent study. We talk with the lead author of the study, which found that as many as half of the world's sandy shorelines could disappear by the end of the century. Also, the U.S. now has more than 200 cases of COVID-19, public health officials confirmed on Friday. We speak with Carl Goldman, who is in quarantine after testing positive for the novel coronavirus.
March 5, 2020
New show "Zoey's Extraordinary Playlist" airs Sunday nights on NBC. Host Robin Young speaks with creator Austin Winsberg and star Jane Levy. Also, on March 4, 1865, President Abraham Lincoln tried to bind up the nation's wounds after four years of bloody civil war in his Second Inaugural Address. Edward Achorn's new book "Every Drop Of Blood: The Momentous Second Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln" looks back at what Lincoln said that day and the other historical figures were there.
March 5, 2020
The journal Nature reports that a key bulwark against runaway climate change is breaking down. The study finds that tropical forests are losing their ability to absorb carbon dioxide. Daniel Grossman, supported by the Pultizer Center, has our story. Also, Bernie Sanders calls himself a democratic socialist. We talk to professor Sheri Berman about what democratic socialism is and how it compares to socialism more broadly.
March 4, 2020
Joe Biden won Super Tuesday primaries in nine of 14 states, including delegate-rich Texas, while Bernie Sanders won just four of those states, but picked up California. Michael Bloomberg quit the presidential race after winning only American Samoa. And, there are signs that Chinese airlines may be rebounding after canceling thousands of flights due to coronavirus. Here & Now transportation analyst Seth Kaplan joins us to talk about the toll the outbreak is taking on airlines.
March 3, 2020
Michael Bloomberg is using part of his $65 billion fortune to run for president. He started making his money betting on the power and future of computers. As NPR's Jim Zarroli reports, it transformed Wall Street. Also, a long-time battle against a proposed copper mine in southwestern Alaska has divided communities. As KUOW's John Ryan reports, the potential move has locals split on what's best for the sockeye salmon ecosystem.
March 2, 2020
Sen. Bernie Sanders is expected to take home the most delegates of any candidate on Super Tuesday. We speak with Sanders surrogate Rep. Ro Khanna. Also, for the first time, cheetah cubs have been born by in vitro fertilization to a surrogate mother. Researchers see this as a promising step forward for the future of cheetahs. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with Adrienne Crosier, a cheetah biologist who helped perform the procedure.
March 2, 2020
Some airlines no longer allow economy passengers to choose their seats in advance. In some cases, passengers are being told they can't sit next to their children who are older than 2 years old. The Consumer Reports will be testifying before the House Subcommittee on Aviation in an attempt to change the rule. Also, Here & Now has asked listeners for questions about COVID-19. We answer them with Dr. William Schaffner.
February 28, 2020
The federal government has warned schools to start preparing for a possible U.S. COVID-19 outbreak. What does that mean for public school districts across the country? We ask Melinda Landau, who runs health programs at the San Jose Unified School District in California. Also, the spotlight is on South Carolina ahead of Saturday's primary. We talk to undecided voters in Charleston and Columbia as they weigh their options and their values.
February 28, 2020
Earth has a mini-moon that has been orbiting our planet since 2017. Astronomers in Arizona first observed the object earlier this month, giving it the provisional name 2020 CD3. Also, a court in the U.K. has ruled that plans for a third runway at London's Heathrow airport are illegal because they don't address the impact of climate change. The ruling could influence decisions on infrastructure projects around the world.
February 27, 2020
Two days ahead of the South Carolina primary, host Tonya Mosley talks with presidential candidate Tom Steyer about his campaign in the state and what defines a successful campaign in such a crowded Democratic field. Also, American Jesse Appell studied comedy in China as a disciple of Chinese Xiangsheng master Ding Guangquan. Appell returned to the United States over the Chinese New Year to visit his family in Massachusetts and has been unable to return because of the COVID-19 outbreak.
February 27, 2020
This year will mark the 5th anniversary of the tragic death of nine black churchgoers at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina. As the state grapples with how to stop hate-motivated violence, the church and grieving family members seek to heal through the radical act of forgiveness. Also, we talk with Betty Bonwell, a Charleston voter, about an issue that's important to her: flooding. In 2019, Charleston flooded an average of one of nearly every five days.
February 26, 2020
Federal health officials are warning Americans about the potential spread of the new coronavirus in the U.S. Mark Harvey, former senior director for resilience policy at the National Security Council, talks about how the U.S. is responding. And, lawmakers in Utah are considering a bill that would decriminalize polygamy, or multiple marriages, among consenting adults. We speak with V. Lowry Snow, a Republican in Utah's State House of Representatives who is sponsoring the bill.
February 26, 2020
Fans of Tame Impala, the genre-defying brainchild of multi-instrumentalist Kevin Parker, held their breath for half a decade waiting for his newest album, "The Slow Rush." We talk to Parker about themes throughout his album. Also, the new coronavirus outbreak is turning into an economic pandemic as well as a global health crisis. Jeremy Hobson talks with Grant Thornton's chief economist about the economic impacts.
February 25, 2020
China has been detaining and surveilling its Uighur Muslim minority. We talk to Harvard professor Bill Kirby about the long-standing human rights crisis in the country. Also, in celebration of Black History Month, we honor trailblazer Ida B. Wells. She was a dogged investigative reporter and publisher who stood up against racism and violence toward black Americans. David Freudberg, executive producer of Human Media, reports.
February 24, 2020
The World Health Organization says officials don't consider the spread of COVID-19 a pandemic yet. We can an update from Larry Gostin, director of the WHO Center on Global Health. And, the new PBS documentary "Always In Season" explores the death of 17-year-old Lennon Lacy, which was ruled a suicide, though some suspected it was a lynching.
February 24, 2020
Host Peter O'Dowd tries out a new virtual reality game — called Orion13 — to find out if 2020 really is the year VR gaming will live up to the hype. Also, cities around the world are hoping home quarantine will help contain the spread of COVID-19. In Seattle, public health workers are trying to help some of the highest-risk people in isolation by getting their groceries. We speak with a medical epidemiologist who is leading containment efforts for Seattle and King County, Washington.
February 21, 2020
Should playgrounds be a little less safe? That's what some play specialists are advocating. We talk to Rebecca Faulkner, who runs the nonprofit play:ground NYC. Also, the federal government is allowing a small number of people with treatment-resistant post-traumatic stress disorder to use psychedelics as part of their therapy. KQED's Laura Klivans has the story.
February 21, 2020
The death of Kobe Bryant has had a profound impact on the public despite most not knowing him personally. We speak with a clinical psychologist about why we grieve celebrities when they die. Also, the Nevada caucuses are Saturday and the winner will likely appeal to the most diverse electorate yet in the nominating process. Many of those voters are also active in Nevada's powerful labor unions. Host Peter O'Dowd reports from Las Vegas.
February 20, 2020
Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg took the debate stage for the first time in the 2020 Democratic campaign. The debate in Las Vegas comes ahead of Saturday's Nevada caucuses. Host Peter O'Dowd went to a debate watch party with a group of Las Vegas Democrats. Also, Tyler and Rachel Torres were on their honeymoon on the Diamond Princess when COVID-19 hit. After nearly two weeks of quarantine on the ship, they're now in another quarantine in Texas. They tell us about their experience.
February 20, 2020
Actors Lesley Manville and Liam Neeson join us to talk about their new film "Ordinary Love," which explores a couple's relationship when the wife is diagnosed with breast cancer. Also, the Australian government is working alongside scientists to help wildlife recover from habitat loss after massive bushfires burned tens of millions of acres of land and killed an estimated 1 billion animals.
February 19, 2020
Alison Brie co-wrote and stars in the new Netflix film "Horse Girl." We talk with Brie about the film, which centers around a young woman who experiences a series of disturbing incidents that lead her to believe she's being abducted. Also, 25-year-old Giannis Antetokounmpo has taken the NBA by storm. The forward has one particularly dedicated fanbase: American Greeks who are inspired by his rise and his family's immigration story. WBEZ's Dan Mihalopoulos reports.
February 18, 2020
The Boy Scouts of America filed for bankruptcy Tuesday amid several expensive sex-abuse lawsuits. We talk with lawyer Michael Pfau, whose firm represents nearly 300 people who report being abused as Scouts. Also, a new NPR/PBS Newshour/Marist poll shows Bernie Sanders leading by double digits nationally, with Michael Bloomberg polling second.
February 18, 2020
Michael Bloomberg has qualified to join Joe Biden, Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar, Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren in Wednesday night's Democratic debate in Nevada. Democratic strategist Maria Cardona discusses what to expect from the candidates. And, Colorado Colorado State University Pueblo will soon offer a cannabis-focused bachelor's degree.
February 17, 2020
Many interns are still not paid in the U.S., and students often struggle trying to balance the opportunity while also going to class, paying off student loans and working part-time jobs. We talk to Carlos Mark Vera, who is working to change experiences for interns. Also, the California attorney general is looking into an allegation that the LAPD misused a state-wide gang database and added innocent people to the list.
February 14, 2020
People in the vinyl business are warning of a global bottleneck in the record industry after a fire last week destroyed Apollo Masters Corp. in Banning, California. We talk with a vinyl-production consultant about how a critical component of vinyl production will now be in short supply. Also, in Utah, some public workers are able to fly to Canada or Mexico to buy costly prescription drugs at a steep discount.
February 13, 2020
Attorney General William Barr agreed to testify in the House next month after furor over the sentencing of President Trump ally Roger Stone. Democrats have accused Barr of using the Justice Department to do Trump's bidding. And, some architects are criticizing reports of a draft executive order requiring most new federal buildings to be designed in the classical style. Chicago Tribune architecture critic Blair Kamin explains why federal rules on style are bad for democracy.
February 13, 2020
Americans are divided on lots of issues. But a new survey shows that people across partisan lines agree that the U.S. health care system needs fixing. Christine Herman of Side Effects Public Media and America Amplified reports. Also, Congress is stepping into the debate over compensating college athletes. Sports analyst Mike Pesca has the latest on lawmakers pressing the NCAA to move quickly.
February 12, 2020
Democratic strategist Bill Press and Republican strategist Alice Stewart join us to discuss the results of Tuesday night's New Hampshire presidential primary. And, American Airlines has suspended direct flights to China and Hong Kong through the end of April due to the spread of COVID-19. Several other airlines have also suspended flights from major U.S. hubs to China.
February 12, 2020
Airbnb was valued at $31 billion in its last funding round in 2017 and said last year it plans to go public in 2020. We speak with the company's co-founder and CEO. Also, the U.S. could soon have its first new particle collider in decades. Last month, the Department of Energy announced Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York, will be home to The Electron-Ion Collider.
February 11, 2020
The issue of guns — whether to protect our right to have them or protect ourselves from them — remains a divisive one in the United States. On New Hampshire's primary day, we check in with Josh Rogers about the importance of guns to voters and the state's recent attempts to enact new, stricter laws. Also, fears are mounting in Africa around coronavirus, where there has yet to be one confirmed case. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with the head of the emergency response for the World Health Organization in Africa, about ...
February 11, 2020
It's primary day in New Hampshire. Gov. Chris Sununu recently told viewers of "Fox & Friends" to "grab their popcorn" because "it's going to be fun to watch." Sununu joins us to discuss the New Hampshire primary. Also, due to the coronavirus, many offices and factories in China have been closed for the time being as a precaution and the tech industry is starting to feel the impact. We talk with Ben Brock Johnson, who covers tech for Here & Now.
February 10, 2020
As vaping news makes headlines, black smokers in Cleveland still struggle to quit cigarettes. Ideastream's Anne Glausser reports on a texting program that might help some of those smokers. Also, art galleries are opening their own restaurants. What does that tell us about the art market? We talk to an expert about this relatively new phenomenon.
February 10, 2020
The New Hampshire primary is Tuesday, but many voters there say they still haven't made up their minds. And that was evident in Durham, New Hampshire, this weekend when five neighbors gathered to watch the Democratic candidates debate. We hear what they have to say. Also, we talk to Dr. Amesh Adalji of John Hopkins Center for Health Security about how to treat the coronavirus.
February 7, 2020
It's been 100 years since the end of Prohibition. We look back at the 13-year-ban on alcohol and how it shaped American drinking culture with William Rorabaugh, author of "Prohibition: A Concise History." Also, Arizona Public Service, the state's largest utility company, recently announced plans to be carbon free by 2050. Host Peter O'Dowd speaks with APS CEO Jeff Guldner about how the company plans to reach its goals.
February 7, 2020
Democratic presidential candidates are set to debate Friday night in New Hampshire ahead of the state's primary on Tuesday. The primary looms as the results of the Iowa caucuses are still unknown. And in the #MeToo era, the demand for intimacy coordinators, professionals who work with actors and production staff to ensure safe and consensual sex scenes, is on the rise.
February 6, 2020
President Trump touted his acquittal in his impeachment trial Thursday when he brandished the front page of USA Today at the National Prayer Breakfast in Washington. And, China's plan to cut $75 billion in tariffs on American-made goods is a sign the trade truce with the U.S. is working. But the new coronavirus outbreak could throw a wrench in the agreement.
February 6, 2020
Scientists are still a long way off of finding a cure for cancer, but researchers in the U.K. have recently made a significant step toward the creation of a universal treatment for cancer. Host Tonya Mosley speaks with one of the researchers. Also, atmospheric scientist Neil Lareau from the University of Nevada joins us to discuss some of the long-term environmental impacts of the Australia fires, from fire-generated thunderstorms to plumes of smoke and chemicals that penetrate the troposphere.
February 5, 2020
You may not be as hot as you think. Scientists now say the normal human body temperature is 97.5 degrees, slightly cooler than the once-accepted 98.6 degrees. Also, as quickly as the new coronavirus is spreading globally, so is anti-China sentiment. Some restaurants and bars in Italy are turning away Chinese customers and a recent issue of a German weekly news magazine featured a headline on its cover that read "Coronavirus. Made in China."
February 4, 2020
Iowa's state Democratic party said there were inconsistencies in precinct results from Monday night's caucuses. A technical glitch with a new app to report results appears to be at the root of the problem. Also, we talk to a historian at Rutgers about the USDA's Economic Research Service and how the Trump administration's decision to move the ERS last year resulted in about 60% of its employees quitting.
February 4, 2020
A Super Bowl commercial from Google depicted an elderly widower asking Google Voice Assistant to help him remember his late wife, Loretta. We discuss the ad and the technology behind it. Also, conservative thinker Bill Kristol has been critical of President Trump for years, even while many on the right who were once critical came to support the president. Host Robin Young speaks with Kristol.
February 3, 2020
One model for the transition to carbon neutrality can be found in the town of Wolfhagen, Germany, which already gets 100% of its electricity from renewable energy sources. Host Tonya Mosley speaks a member of the city parliament in Wolfhagen. Also, we talk to Jerry Mitchell, founder of the Mississippi Center for Investigative Reporting, about the state's policy failures that he says contributed to 15 inmate deaths inside Missippi prisons since Dec. 29.
February 3, 2020
The Iowa caucuses are Monday night, and recent polls suggest young voters could swing the outcome. They propelled Bernie Sanders to a virtual tie with Hillary Clinton in Iowa in 2016. What role will the youth vote play in 2020? Also, the president of the Nigerian American Multicultural Council responds to the recent expansion of the Trump administration's travel ban.
January 31, 2020
This week, Jeremy Hobson hosted Here & Now from Iowa to cover the state's first-in-the-nation caucuses.
January 31, 2020
Senators are set to vote Friday on whether to call witnesses in the impeachment trial of President Trump. Republicans believe they have enough votes to block witnesses and acquit the president. For more, we're joined by NPR's Ayesha Rascoe. And, the United Kingdom officially leaves the European Union on Friday. But the U.K. Ambassador to the U.S. Michael Tatham says he's not feeling so "starry-eyed" about Brexit.
January 31, 2020
The Iowa caucuses are first, which is why they matter. We look at the history of how and why Iowa became home to the first-in-the-nation presidential contest. Also, with the Kansas City Chiefs taking the field at this year's Super Bowl, the big game will reopen an ongoing conversation over Native American imagery and appropriation in U.S. sports.
January 30, 2020
The Iowa caucuses are just a few days away, and many of the Democratic presidential candidates are stuck in Washington for the impeachment trial of President Trump. Iowa Public Radio lead political reporter Clay Masters joins us to discuss the latest from the campaign trail. And the spread of coronavirus in China is shutting down cities, shops and factories, and disrupting travel, business and manufacturing. For more on the economic impacts of the virus, we're joined by MSNBC anchor and correspondent Ali Velshi.
January 30, 2020
When he ran for president in 2004, Howard Dean finished third in the Iowa Democratic caucus — but what most people remember about that night is what became known as the "Dean Scream" in his speech to supporters. Host Jeremy Hobson speaks with Dean about the 2020 race. Also, Pete Buttigieg is crisscrossing the key state of Iowa while several of his competitors are stuck in Washington for the impeachment trial of President Trump. We catch up with Buttigieg in Iowa.
January 29, 2020
We talk to Here & Now's transportation analyst Seth Kaplan about the White House's warning to airlines it may shut down air travel to China. Meanwhile, Boeing posted its first annual loss since 1997 over fallout from the 737 Max. Also, we talk to Sen. Amy Klobuchar about the 2020 race, including the upcoming Iowa caucuses.
January 29, 2020
Now that the impeachment trial of President Trump has moved to the Senate, questions have been raised by our listeners. NPR's Ron Elving answers questions about the process and potential outcome. Also, an old NASA space telescope and a retired Air Force satellite will pass each other 600 miles above earth on Wednesday night. We ask an expert about the odds of a collision and the danger of space debris.
January 28, 2020
Since the coronavirus outbreak started in China, people in disposable face masks have become a defining image of the outbreak. We talk with an infectious disease expert about whether face masks make a difference. Also, Finneas O'Connell has produced all of his sister Billie Eilish's music. We revisit our conversation with him about synesthesia, his need for control and what it feels like to step out on his own.
January 28, 2020
Louisiana has lost an average of a football field of land every hour over the past 25 years due to coastal erosion. Five tribes have filed a formal climate change complaint with the United Nations. Also, Taco Bell will begin a test to raise the salaries of some general managers in top-performing locations to $100,000 a year. We talk to Sam Oches, editorial director for Food News Media.
January 27, 2020
Host Tonya Mosley talks with KPCC reporter Erick Galindo about Kobe Bryant's legacy and what he meant to the people of Los Angeles. Also, in 2019, approximately 12% of the nation's housing stock was vacant. Vacancy taxes are a new tool cities are implementing to ensure all available housing is used. But do they work? We discuss.
January 27, 2020
Taking on too much student loan debt is just one of the common mistakes seen by Jill Schlesinger, a certified financial planner. Schlesinger shares how to avoid the "dumb things" people do with money. Also, Haiti is now under one-man rule after its Parliament dissolved earlier this month — a result of failed elections last October. Host Tonya Mosley speaks to Jacqueline Charles of the Miami Herald.
January 24, 2020
Trump floated possible budget cuts to social programs in an interview at the World Economic Forum in Davos this week. NPR's Jim Zarroli discusses the implications of those statements and what cuts to benefit programs, including Social Security, would mean. And, the Trump administration is rolling back federal protections for the nation's waterways, which could have a huge impact on more than half of the nation's wetlands.
January 24, 2020
More than 95% of all American apparel is made overseas before it is sold in the U.S. As consumers demand more accountability, that number is starting to slowly change. But making clothes in America is still hard work. We go inside a Massachusetts factory to see how it's done. Also, thousands rallied in Iraq Friday to demand that U.S. troops leave the country. We get the latest from NPR's Jane Arraf in Baghdad.
January 23, 2020
Election security experts say a wider range of aggressors could interfere in the 2020 election. NPR election security editor Phil Ewing joins us to discuss how federal and state governments are working to combat election interference. And, a new poll shows Bernie Sanders peaking ahead of the New Hampshire primary. WBUR's Anthony Brooks reports.
January 23, 2020
The new film "The Last Full Measure" tells the story of the effort to upgrade the posthumous honors awarded to U.S. Air Force pararescue medic William Pitsenbarger to the Congressional Medal of Honor. Also, you may have questions about how preliminary elections work. What's the difference between primaries and caucuses? What's Super Tuesday? We discuss.
January 22, 2020
What if we've got it all wrong, and counting calories is not the way to lose weight? That could be the case and according to one Economist writer, "it's time to bury the world's most misleading measure." Also, as the number of deaths from the coronavirus in China rises to 17, the new outbreak is impacting airline travel.
January 22, 2020
Members of the public can watch the impeachment trial of President Trump in person if they are able to get tickets from their senator. Host Robin Young talks to Mary Finn and Aidan Hollinger-Miles, who received tickets to watch the first day of the trial from the office of Oregon Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley. Also, chef Kathy Gunst shares three fish dishes that use smoked, frozen and canned fish.
January 21, 2020
The World Economic Forum published a new report on social mobility that ranks countries on how easy it is for a person born to a poor family to reach the middle class. Also, the media is pushing back against restrictions on covering the Senate impeachment trial. What does limited access for reporters mean for the public? We talk to NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik.
January 21, 2020
The 2020 U.S. census officially starts Tuesday in the remote villages of Alaska. NPR's census reporter, Hansi Lo Wang, is there and speaks with Robin Young about the day's events. Also, the recent smoking ban at all Veteran Administration medical facilities has been lauded for creating a healthier environment for veterans and federal employees. But the new smoke-free policy has been difficult for some veterans and staff, Stephanie Colombini of WUSF reports for the American Homefront Project.
January 20, 2020
What does spirituality look like in the classroom? Hundreds of educators, philanthropists and nonprofits recently convened at Columbia University Teachers College's "Spirituality in Education" conference to answer that question. Also, Sharon Langley was the first African American to ride the carousel at the Gwynn Oak Amusement Park in Maryland on the day the park was formally integrated. Langley has now co-written a new children's book about it.
January 20, 2020
Wildfires in Australia have killed at least 28 people and destroyed thousands of homes. Gemma Carey, a professor at the University of New South Wales, talks to us about having a miscarriage during the fires and whether she still wants to have children. Many cannabis companies saw their stock prices soar in the first few months of 2019, only to see their valuations collapse. We speak with Jeremy Berke, senior reporter for Business Insider.
January 17, 2020
Ken Starr and Alan Dershowitz are set to join Trump's impeachment legal team. Barbara McQuade, former U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan, joins us to discuss what this means for Trump's legal team. Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg has spent more on ads in his campaign for president than any of his rivals for the Democratic nomination. Ken Goldstein, a professor at the University of San Francisco, joins us to discuss.
January 17, 2020
More than 95% of clothing sold in the U.S. is imported. But there are signs that "Made in America" is making a comeback. Host Peter O'Dowd takes a closer look. Also, Virginia's governor has declared a state of emergency in anticipation of a gun rights rally planned in Richmond on Monday. The rally has attracted the attention of militia and extremist groups.
January 16, 2020
Where do the 2020 Democratic candidates stand on disability rights? We talk with the director of the Disability Justice Initiative at the Center for American Progress about the major disability policies being discussed this election season. Also, technology and the web can be used to foster empathy, community and even spirituality. As part of our series on secular spirituality, Standford professor Jamil Zaki joins us to discuss the technology of kindness.
January 16, 2020
California Gov. Gavin Newsom talks to us about his plan to address the state's growing homeless population and housing crisis. He has proposed a $1 billion plan. Also, Illinois residents bought nearly $11 million worth of recreational marijuana in the first five days after it became legal. WBEZ's Mariah Woelfel reports the demand sent dispensaries into a frenzy.
January 15, 2020
As the House plans to transmit the articles of impeachment against Trump to the Senate, new evidence has surfaced from Lev Parnas, an associate of Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani. Also, Sonos is suing Google, alleging the company stole its intellectual property to develop its own smart speakers. Their case is the latest front in a growing battle for oxygen in a business increasingly dominated by tech giants.
January 15, 2020
Here & Now's Tonya Mosley speaks with Blair Imani, author of the new illustrated history "Making Our Way Home: The Great Migration and the Black American Dream." The book tells the story of the migration of millions of African Americans to the northern states. And, host Jeremy Hobson speaks with three Democratic voters in Concord, New Hampshire, about last night's Democratic presidential debate.
January 14, 2020
For centuries, scholars assumed that Greek myths about fierce warrior women they called "Amazons" were just that — myths. But new archeology confirms what modern historians like Adrienne Mayor had begun to suspect: Amazons were real, and they were actually Scythian nomads. Also, dozens of Americans have gone to Australia to help battle the wildfires scorching the country. Michelle Moore, a fire program specialist with the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, recently returned from work with an aerial fire crew.
January 14, 2020
What if we thought about swing voters not as Democratic to Republican transplants but as voters who stick with one party — or don't vote at all? Ibram Kendi argues in The Atlantic that we should look at young voters, voters of color and especially young voters of color as "the other swing voters" who could make or break a candidate's fortune, but are rarely central to the political conversation. Also, after banning all commercial airline flights to Cuba's provinces, the Trump administration says it's now stopping charter flights.
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