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October 17, 2019
From ASM Microbe 2019 in San Francisco, Vincent speaks with Victoria McGovern, Carl Nathan, and Dan Portnoy about advancing human health through innovative collaborations.
October 3, 2019
The TWiM holobionts pay tribute to Stuart Levy, and reveal the remarkably diverse array of cyclic nucleotides synthesized by bacteria that likely mediate interactions with animal and plant hosts.
September 20, 2019
The tetracoccal TWiM team visits Tardigrades on the Moon, and the twelve year quest to isolate an archaeon that provides insights into the emergence of the first eukaryotic cell.
September 6, 2019
Vincent meets up with Nick and Tal to explain how they engineered E. coli to lyse within tumors and deliver an antibody that causes tumor regression in mice.
August 22, 2019
The TWiM team reveals thousands of small novel genes in the human microbiome, and a mutualistic symbiosis between marine protists covered with magnetosome-containing bacteria.
August 8, 2019
Julie joins the TWiM team to reveal how microbiome and gut anatomy of a wood-feeding beetle promotes lignocellulose deconstruction, and bacteria that degrade PET plastic.
July 26, 2019
Mark Martin joins Vincent and Michael to present compelling papers suitable for teaching microbiology to undergraduate students.
July 12, 2019
Vincent, Michele, and Michael travel to San Diego to reminisce with Elio about his career, his work in microbiology, and his love for microbes and mushrooms.
June 28, 2019
From ASM Microbe 2019, the Microbials meet up with Susanna L. Harris and Alex Politis to talk about mental health in graduate school and NIH peer review.
June 1, 2019
The TWiM team presents an extracellular bacterium associated with Paramecium, and induction of antiviral immunity by a bacteriophage that prevents bacterial clearance.
April 26, 2019
The Microbials reveal how a chemosynthetic symbiont stores energy for its marine flatworm host, and extraction of nutrients from host cells by E. coli injectisome components.
March 29, 2019
The Microbials discuss how ambrosia beetles utilize ethanol to farm fungi, and how cleaved cochlin protein sequesters bacteria in the inner ear to preserve hearing function.
March 4, 2019
Michael and Vincent discuss the finding of immunity to Cas9 protein in humans, and a potential role for an oral bacterium in Alzheimer’s disease.
February 14, 2019
How a bacterium helps dengue virus replicate in the mosquito gut, and minicells as a damage disposal mechanism in E. coli.
January 31, 2019
The TWiM team explore how Lactobacillus reuteri can rescue social deficits in three mouse models of autism spectrum disorder, and the role of Salmonella persisters in undermining host defenses during antibiotic treatment.
January 18, 2019
The TWiM team reveals an extremely low rate of mutation in a 2500 year old, 185 acre fungus in Michigan, and how a host-produced quorum sensing autoinducer controls the phage switch between lysis and lysogeny.
December 21, 2018
The TWiM team reveals the oldest human plague from 4,900 years ago in Sweden, and engineering E. coli to become an endosymbiont in yeast, modeling the evolution of mitochondria.
December 7, 2018
The TWiM-opods consider two stories about exosomes, vesicles that are shed from cells: those that eliminate airway pathogens, and those from the plants we eat that shape our gut microbiome. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, and Michele Swanson. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Android, RSS, or by email. Get the entire ASM Podcast Network via our Microbeworld app. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode Exosome swarms eliminate airway pathogens (J Aller Clin Immunol) Exosome release from Bacteria, Eukaryotes, Archaea (Infect Immun) Plant exosomes shape gut microbiome (Cell Host Microbe) Image credit Subscribe to MicrobeTV on YouTube TWiM Listener survey Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or recorded audio) to twim@microbe.tv
November 16, 2018
The TWiM team considers the state of the world’s fungi as revealed by a report from the Kew Royal Botanical Gardens, and how Salmonella loses motility to evade host defenses.
October 31, 2018
The TWiM rock stars show how to modify gram-positive antibiotics so they can kill gram-negative cells, and bacteria that have both DNA and RNA in their genome.
October 19, 2018
The TWiM people reveal that phages must cooperate to overcome CRISPR-Cas defenses, and the effect of the herbicide glyphosate on the gut microbiome of honey bees.
October 5, 2018
The TWiM team describe the involvement of a microbiome in snail metamorphosis, and using Listeria to kill tumors.
September 21, 2018
The TWiM team considers the increasing tolerance of Enterococcus to handwash alcohols, and how the study of DNA in ancient dung reveals the diet and parasite burden of extinct New Zealand birds.
September 7, 2018
Sam Sternberg discusses his work on exploring and exploiting CRISPR-Cas immune systems, beginning as a graduate student with Jennifer Doudna, at a biotech start-up, and in his laboratory at Columbia University.
August 23, 2018
The TWiMpeeps discuss two symbioses: a parasitoid bacterium of a heterotrophic protist, and fungal parasites in cicadas.
August 9, 2018
The TWiM hosts reveal how to test antimicrobial susceptibility in less than 30 minutes, and a carbonate-sensitive phytotransferrin in diatoms that controls iron uptake.
July 26, 2018
Vincent speaks with John Warhol about state microbes, the Periodic Table of the Microbes, and why microbiology is cooler than astrophysics, but they have better TV shows. Host: Vincent Racaniello Guest: John Warhol Subscribe to TWiM (free) on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Android, RSS, or by email. Get the entire ASM Podcast Network via our Microbeworld app. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode State Microbe (Wikipedia) Micro Minutes! (tumblr) Warhol Science on Etsy Periodic Table of Microbes (Amazon) Image credit Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or recorded audio) to twim@microbe.tv
July 13, 2018
Vincent speaks with Mark O. Martin about microbial centricity, teaching undergraduates microbiology, lux art, painting with glowing bacteria, tardigrades and much more at ASM Microbe 2018. Host: Vincent Racaniello Guest: Mark O. Martin Subscribe to TWiM (free) on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Android, RSS, or by email. Get the entire ASM Podcast Network via our Microbeworld app. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode Microbial menagerie All creatures great and small Carski Award Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or recorded audio) to twim@microbe.tv
June 29, 2018
The TwiModulators discuss aerosolization of bacteria and viruses in an ocean-atmosphere mesocosm, and how the common practice of decontaminating produce with chlorine produces viable but non-culturable pathogens. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode: Taxon-specific aerosolization of bacteria and viruses (Nat Commun) Chlorine produces viable but non-culturable bacteria (mBio) Chlorine washing fails bacteria test (Guardian) Foodborne illness in US: Major pathogens (CDC) Chlorine dilution calculator (Public Health Toronto) Multistate foodborne outbreak investigations (CDC)
June 15, 2018
The TWiM team travels to ASM Microbe 2018 in Atlanta, Georgia to speak with Christina Kellogg about her career and her research on coral microbial ecology.
June 1, 2018
The TWiM team discuss bacteriophage evolution in a dairy plant, and killing of less fit cells among social microbes.
May 17, 2018
Vincent, Michael and Elio note the passing of Stanley Falkow, give E. coli an archaeal membrane, and show how the microbiome can make worms live longer.
May 2, 2018
The TWiM team notes the passing of Allan Campbell, and explains how aminoglycoside antibiotics like neomycin enhance host resistance to viral infection.
April 19, 2018
The TWiMsters explain why untreatable typhoid fever might be on the way, and the evolution of fungal virulence in tropical frogs.
March 30, 2018
The Masters of the Microbiological Universe discuss the humongouest fungus, and a commensal bacterium that protects against skin neoplasia.
March 15, 2018
The TWiMmers discuss culture-independent discovery of malacidin antibiotics, and unfolding of relaxase during bacterial conjugation.
February 22, 2018
The TWiM team explores a stingless bee that requires a fungal steroid to pupate, and colonic biofilms containing tumorigenic bacteria in patients with colorectal polyps. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, and Elio Schaechter. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iPhone, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode Bee larvae require fungal steroid to pupate (Sci Rep) Biofilm refuge for tumorigenic bacteria (Science) Letters read on TWiM 171 Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or recorded audio) to twim@microbe.tv
February 8, 2018
The TWiM team reveals that spread of plague was likely by human ectoparasites, not rats, and deconstruct a durable, broadly protective protein nanoparticle influenza virus vaccine. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, Michele Swanson and Elio Schaechter. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode Ectoparasites and plague (PNAS) SIR model for spread of disease (MAA) Protein nanoparticle flu vaccines (Nat Commun) Food washing (USDA) Image credit Letters read on TWiM 170 Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or recorded audio) to twim@microbe.tv  
January 23, 2018
The cast of TWiM reveals how uropathogenic E. coli use a copper-binding protein to treat copper as a nutrient or a toxin, and Antarctic soil bacteria that survive on trace atmospheric gases. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, Michele Swanson and Elio Schaechter. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iPhone, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode Copper import in E. coli (Nat Chem Biol) Conversion of OD to cells/ml for E. coli Nutritional immunity with Jennifer Bomberger (TWiM#141) Microbes live on atmospheric trace gases in Antarctic soil (Nature) Antarctic terrestrial ecosystem (SciHub) Hypolith (Wikipedia) Breatharians (Broadly) Image credit Letters read on TWiM 169Letters read on TWiM 169 Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or recorded audio) to twim@microbe.tv
January 5, 2018
Dickson joins the TWiM team to discuss the nasal microbiota of dairy farmers, and attenuation of bacterial virulence by quorum sensing in the maize weevil. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, and Michele Swanson. Guest: Dickson Despommier Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iPhone, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode: Nasal microbiota of dairy farmers (PLoS One) Measuring species richness, diversity, similarity (pdf one, pdf two) Quorum sensing attenuates virulence (Cell Host Micr)   Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or recorded audio) to twim@microbe.tv    
December 22, 2017
How pandemic influenza viruses suppress immunogenic cell death, and 3D printing of bacteria into functional materials.
December 7, 2017
Vincent and Elio discuss the reason for poor efficacy of one of the influenza virus vaccines, and using a hyperthermophilic anaerobe to produce hydrogen from fruit and vegetable wastes in seawater. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello and Elio Schaechter. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iPhone, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the ASM Podcast app. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode Glycosylation site on influenza H3N2 viruses (PNAS) Biohydrogen production by Thermotoga (Waste Man) Image credit Letters read on TWiM 166 Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or recorded audio) to twim@microbe.tv
November 30, 2017
The TWiM team discusses the use of copper on exercise weights to reduce bacterial burden, and the mechanism of antigenic variation by which a fungus that causes severe pneumonia escapes the immune system. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Elio Schaechter, Michael Schmidt, and Michele Swanson Links for this episode: Reducing bacteria on exercise weights with copper (Am J Inf Contr) Antigenic variation in Pneumocystis jirovecii (mBio) Letters read on TWiM 165
November 16, 2017
From Indiana University, Vincent speaks with Ankur, Julia, and Xindan about their careers and their work on horizontal gene transfer, quorum sensing, and chromosome organization in bacteria. Guests: Ankur Dalia, Julia Van Kessel, and Xindan Wang Watch the video version! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifGCe-qfnA0 Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode: Dalia laboratory Van Kessel laboratory Wang laboratory Indiana U Dept of Biology Vibrio DNA uptake and chitin (Environ Micro) Activation of quorum-sensing genes (Mol Micro) Structural maintenance of chromosome complexes (Science)
November 2, 2017
This episode is all about saliva: how certain bacteria survive in it, and how swallowing saliva might cause intestinal inflammation. Links for this episode: Genes for the Streptococcus pyogenes fitness in human saliva (mSphere) Swallowed bacteria drive colonic inflammation (Science) Intestinal inflammation induced by oral bacteria (Science) Human oral microbiome (J Bact) T cell subsets (Nat Rev Imm) Image credit
October 13, 2017
The TWiM hosts and associated microbiomes review a fungus destroying salamanders in Europe, and genes for flagella in intracellular bacteria. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, Michele Swanson and Elio Schaechter. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iPhone, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode Fungus killing fire salamanders (Nature) Chlamydia with flagella (ISME J) Flagellar movement in rickettsia (PLoS One) Image credit Letters read on TWiM 162 Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or recorded audio) to twim@microbe.tv This episode is brought to you by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. Part of the U.S. Department of Defense, the Agency’s Chemical and Biological Technologies Department hosts the 2017 Chemical and Biological Defense Science & Technology Conference to exchange information on the latest and most dynamic developments for countering chemical and biological weapons of mass destruction. Find out more at http://www.cbdstconference.com  
September 21, 2017
From the TWiM team, a discussion of Hurricane Harvey microbiology, and a bacterial enzyme that induces eukaryotic mating. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, Michele Swanson and Elio Schaechter. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iPhone, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode Tainted Houston floodwaters (NYTimes) Peter Hotez on TWiP 29 FAQ: Microbiology of Built Environments, American Academy of Microbiology Microbiomes of the Built Environment:  A Research Agenda for Indoor Microbiology, Human Health, and Buildings, The National Academies of Sciences Eukaryotic mating induced by bacterial enzyme (Cell) Image credit: Arielle Woznica Nicole King on TWiEVO 11 Letters read on TWiM 161 Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or recorded audio) to twim@microbe.tv This episode is brought to you by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. Part of the U.S. Department of Defense, the Agency’s Chemical and Biological Technologies Department hosts the 2017 Chemical and Biological Defense Science & Technology Conference to exchange information on the latest and most dynamic developments for countering chemical and biological weapons of mass destruction. Find out more at http://www.cbdstconference.com
September 8, 2017
The TWiM team provides an update on Zika virus, and reveals a plasmid on the road to becoming a virus.
August 31, 2017
The TWiM team pays a tribute to Chris Condayan, and investigates the synergy between virus and the innate immune system for clearing bacterial pneumonia by phage therapy.
August 10, 2017
prokaryotic viral DNA in mammalian brain, and how diarrhea is beneficial, by clearing enteric pathogens.
July 27, 2017
The TWiMbionts explore the role of bacteria in the genesis of moonmilk, and how ancient host proteins can be used to engineer resistance to virus infection.
July 13, 2017
The TWiM team explains the use of microbial genome mining to identify new drugs, and how a bacterial symbiont protects flies against parasitoid wasps. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, Michele Swanson and Elio Schaechter. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iPhone, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode Molecular beacons identify gifted microbes (J Antibiot) Defensive symbiosis (PLoS Path) Letters read on TWiM 156 Image Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or recorded audio) to twim@microbe.tv  
June 29, 2017
Michele updates the TWiMers on Legionella in the Flint water supply, and Elio informs us about how horizontally acquired biosynthesis genes boost the physiology of Coxiella burnetii. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, Michele Swanson and Elio Schaechter. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iPhone, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode Legionella in Flint water (The Scientist) Q fever with Robert Heinzen (TWiM Special) Horizontally acquired genes boost C. burnetii (Front Cell Inf Micro) Image credit Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or recorded audio) to twim@microbe.tv
June 14, 2017
At Microbe 2017 in New Orleans, the TWiM team speaks with Arturo Casadevall about his thoughts on the pathogenic potential of a microbe, rigorous science, funding by lottery, and moonshot science. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, Michele Swanson and Elio Schaechter. Watch the video version recorded live at ASM Microbe 2017! Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iPhone, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode Pathogenic potential of a microbe (mSphere) Rigorous science (mBio) Funding by lottery (mBio) Moonshot science (mBio) Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or recorded audio) to twim@microbe.tv
May 30, 2017
The TWiM team ventures into preprint space with an analysis of type VI secretion across human gut microbiomes, and provide insight into urinary tract infection: how bladder exposure to a member of the vaginal microbiota triggers E. coli egress from latent reservoirs. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, Michele Swanson and Elio Schaechter. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iPhone, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode ASM Microbe 2017 TWiM Live from ASM Microbe 2017 Landscape of type VI secretion (BioRxiv) Type VI secretion structure (jpg) Activation of dormant E. coli in urinary tract infection (PLoS Path) Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or recorded audio) to twim@microbe.tv
May 19, 2017
The TWiMmers get cozy with symbionts: the bacteria that allow a giant shipworm to oxidize sulfur, and algae that live within salamander cells. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, and Elio Schaechter. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iPhone, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode ASM Microbe 2017 Chemoautotrophic symbiosis in giant shipworm (PNAS) There’s gold in them hills (TWiM 97) Vertebrate-algal symbiosis (eLife) Letters read on TWiM 152 Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or recorded audio) to twim@microbe.tv
May 4, 2017
The TWiMsters discuss potential new sources of antimicrobial compounds from unusual places: the skin of bats and the intestines of moths. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, Elio Schaechter, and Michele Swanson. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iPhone, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode JMBE science communication issue Bat sources of novel antifungals (AEM) White nose syndrome in US (jpg) White nose syndrome fact sheet (pdf) Symbiont-derived antimicrobials (Cell Chem Cell) Bacteriocins (Wikipedia) Letters read on TWiM 151 Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or recorded audio) to twim@microbe.tv
April 20, 2017
In recognition of National Medical Laboratory Professionals Week, Robin Patel speaks with the TWiM team about directing a clinical bacteriology laboratory, and how an observation made by a laboratory technologist lead to the finding that Ureaplasma species can cause a system metabolic disturbance, hyperammonemia. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Elio Schaechter, Michael Schmidt, and Michele Swanson Guest: Robin Patel Links for this episode: National Laboratory Professionals Week Mayo Clinic Clinical Microbiology Laboratory Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Mayo Clinic Murine model of Ureaplasma hyperammonemia (Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis) Ureaplasma and human hyperammonemia (Sci Transl Med) Become a patron of TWiM.  
April 6, 2017
The TWiM team speaks with Pat Schloss about assigning sequence data to operational taxonomic units, and his experience with mSphere Direct, a new way of submitting papers for publication. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, Elio Schaechter, and Michele Swanson. Special guest: Pat Schloss Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iPhone, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode Schloss Laboratory OptiClust (mSphere) This episode is brought to you by Blue Apron. Blue Apron is the #1 fresh ingredient and recipe delivery service in the country. See what’s on the menu this week and get your first 3 meals free – WITH FREE SHIPPING – by going to blueapron.com/twim Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or recorded audio) to twim@microbe.tv
March 23, 2017
Vincent, Elio, and Michael reveal what Neanderthals ate from analysis of DNA in their teeth, and new CRISPR-Cas systems found in the genomes of uncultured microbes. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Elio Schaechter, and Michael Schmidt. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iPhone, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode Ancient DNA in Neanderthal teeth (Nature) New CRISPRs from metagenomics (Nature) CRISPR/cas explained (Wikipedia) ASM Conference for Undergraduate Educators Image credit Letters read on TWiM 148 This episode is brought to you by Blue Apron. Blue Apron is the #1 fresh ingredient and recipe delivery service in the country. See what’s on the menu this week and get your first 3 meals free – WITH FREE SHIPPING – by going to blueapron.com/twim Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or recorded audio) to twim@microbe.tv 
March 10, 2017
The TWiM hosts reveal why phosphorus is essential for fungal brain disease, and how bacteria kill local competitors to favor the evolution of public goods cooperation. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello, Michele Swanson, Michael Schmidt, and Elio Schaechter. Links for this episode Phosphate needed for Cryptococcus brain disease (mSphere) Type VI killing drives phase separation (Nat Rep) Type VI secretion review (Phil Trans Roy Soc) Microbial cooperation and conflict (TedX) Image credit Letters read on TWiM 147 Become a patron of TWiM. This episode is brought to you by Blue Apron. Blue Apron is the #1 fresh ingredient and recipe delivery service in the country. See what’s on the menu this week and get your first 3 meals free with your first purchase – WITH FREE SHIPPING – by going to blueapron.com/twim Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@microbe.tv 
February 23, 2017
Vincent, Elio and Michael discuss the finding of a prion in bacteria, and how communication between bacteria guides the decision between lysis and lysogeny. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, and Elio Schaechter. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode ASM 2017 Election is Open! VOTE HERE Prions in bacteria (Science) Communication guides lysis-lysogeny decisions (Nature) This episode is brought to you by Blue Apron. Blue Apron is the #1 fresh ingredient and recipe delivery service in the country. See what’s on the menu this week and get your first 3 meals free – WITH FREE SHIPPING – by going to blueapron.com/twim Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@microbe.tv 
February 16, 2017
Host: Vincent Racaniello Guest: Robert Heinzen At the Rocky Mountain Laboratory in Hamilton, Montana, Vincent speaks with Robert Heinzen about the work of his laboratory on Q fever and its causative microbe, Coxiella burneti.   Become a Patron of TWiM! Links for this episode Rocky Mountain Laboratory Heinzen Laboratory Small town, big science (TWiM 140) Music used on TWiM is composed and performed by Ronald Jenkees and used with permission. Send your microbiology questions and comments to twim@microbe.tv
February 9, 2017
Vincent meets up with Catharine Bosio, Michael Merchlinsky, and Shilpa Gadwal at the ASM Biothreats meeting to talk about careers for scientists outside of the ivory tower. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode: ASM Biothreats 2017 Rocky Mountain Laboratory BARDA  
January 26, 2017
The TWiMers discuss how changes in domestic laundering affect the removal of microorganisms, and assembly of a nucleus-like structure during viral replication in bacteria. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, Elio Schaechter, and Michele Swanson. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode Laundry hygiene (J Appl Micro) Nucleus-like structure in infected bacteria (Science) Video of nucleus assembly in bacteria (YouTube) Image credit Letters read on TWiM 144 This episode is brought to you by Blue Apron. Blue Apron is the #1 fresh ingredient and recipe delivery service in the country. See what’s on the menu this week and get your first 3 meals free – WITH FREE SHIPPING – by going to blueapron.com/twim Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@microbe.tv 
January 12, 2017
Vincent, Michael, and Michele explain the use of an electrochemical gradient to eliminate bacterial biofilms, and how phage susceptibility can be transferred by exchange of receptor proteins. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, and Michele Swanson. Right click to download TWiM#143 (32 MB .mp3, 66 minutes). Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Become a patron of TWiM. Links for this episode Electrochemical scaffold to eliminate persistent biofilms (npj Biofilms Microbiomes) Experimental setup for electrochemical treatment of biofilm (pdf, from article) Acquisition of phage sensitivity by transfer of cell receptors (Cell) Image credit Letters read on TWiM 143 This episode is brought to you by CuriosityStream, a subscription streaming service that offers over 1,400 documentaries and non­fiction series from the world's best filmmakers. Get unlimited access starting at just $2.99 a month, and for our audience, the first two months are completely free if you sign up at curiositystream.com/microbe and use the promo code MICROBE. Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or recorded audio) to twim@microbe.tv 
December 29, 2016
Vincent, Elio and Michele wind up a year of microbial podcasts with a story about the lack of resistance to a crop antifungal compound, and how a bacterium uses a molecular caliper to measure membrane thickness. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello, Elio Schaechter, and Michele Swanson. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode Phenylpyrroles: Nearly no resistance (Front Micro) Membrane-thickness caliper (J Bact) Letters read on TWiM 142 This episode is brought to you by CuriosityStream, a subscription streaming service that offers over 1,400 documentaries and non­fiction series from the world's best filmmakers. Get unlimited access starting at just $2.99 a month, and for our audience, the first two months are completely free if you sign up at curiositystream.com/microbe and use the promo code MICROBE. Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or recorded audio) to twim@microbe.tv 
December 15, 2016
Jennifer joins Vincent, Elio, and Michael to talk about the work of her laboratory on how a respiratory virus enhances bacterial growth by dysregulating nutritional immunity. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello, Elio Schaechter, and Michael Schmidt. Guest: Jennifer Bomberger Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode Virus dysregulation of nutritional immunity (PNAS) Podcast article mentioned by Michael Compromised defenses (PLoS Path) This episode is brought to you by CuriosityStream, a subscription streaming service that offers over 1,400 documentaries and non­fiction series from the world's best filmmakers. Get unlimited access starting at just $2.99 a month, and for our audience, the first two months are completely free if you sign up at curiositystream.com/microbe and use the promo code MICROBE. This show is sponsored by Drobo, a family of safe, expandable, yet simple to use storage arrays. Drobos are designed to protect your important data forever. This Holiday season give someone a Drobo to keep all their files and memories safe forever Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@microbe.tv 
December 1, 2016
Host: Vincent Racaniello Guests: Marie Antonioli, Bryan Hansen, Forrest Jessop, Kyle Shifflet and Jim Striebel At the Hamilton, Montana Performing Arts Center, Vincent speaks with three local high school graduates and two high school teachers about how Rocky Mountain Laboratories influenced school science programs and opened up career opportunities.   Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Become a Patron of TWiM! Links for this episode Poster of this event (jpg) Rocky Mountain Laboratories Hamilton, MT high school Video of this episode on YouTube This episode is brought to you by CuriosityStream, a subscription streaming service that offers over 1,400 documentaries and non­fiction series from the world's best filmmakers. Get unlimited access starting at just $2.99 a month, and for our audience, the first two months are completely free if you sign up at curiositystream.com/microbe and use the promo code MICROBE. Music used on TWiM is composed and performed by Ronald Jenkees and used with permission. Send your microbiology questions and comments to twim@microbe.tv
November 18, 2016
The TWiM team discusses microbial DNA found on ATM machines in New York City, and how hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, alters microbial ecosystems deep in the Earth. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, Elio Schaechter, and Michele Swanson. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode Microbial DNA on ATM machines in NYC (mSphere) NYC OpenData Altering deep microbial ecosystems by fracking (Nat Micro) Marcellus Shale Energy and Environment Laboratory Chemicals used for fracking (FracFocus) Marcellus and Utica shale formation map Consequences of fracking (GasBuddy) Image credit This episode is brought to you by CuriosityStream, a subscription streaming service that offers over 1,400 documentaries and non­fiction series from the world's best filmmakers. Get unlimited access starting at just $2.99 a month, and for our audience, the first two months are completely free if you sign up at curiositystream.com/microbe and use the promo code MICROBE. Register today for the 2017 ASM Scientific Writing and Publishing Online Course at bit.ly/swpoc17 Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@microbe.tv 
November 3, 2016
The TWiM team brings you a bacterium from a Colorado field site that grows on uranium, and copper resistance in the emerging pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii. Hosts:  Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, Elio Schaechter, and Michele Swanson. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode Kavli Microbiome Ideas Challenge Uranium-respiring bacterium from a field site (PLoS One) Acid mine drainage (Wikipedia) Copper resistance of Acinetobacter baumannii ASM Grant Writing Online Course TWiM #132: Bacteria learn long division Image credit This episode is brought to you by CuriosityStream, a subscription streaming service that offers over 1,400 documentaries and non­fiction series from the world's best filmmakers. Get unlimited access starting at just $2.99 a month, and for our audience, the first two months are completely free if you sign up at curiositystream.com/m​icrobe ​and use the promo code MICROBE​. This episode is also brought to you by Drobo, a family of safe, expandable, yet simple to use storage arrays. Drobos are designed to protect your important data forever. Visit www.drobo.com to learn more. Listeners can save $100 on a Drobo system at drobostore.com by using the discount code Microbe100. Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@microbe.tv 
October 20, 2016
Highlights of the Recent Advances in Microbial Control meeting in San Diego, and expansion of a gut pathogen by virulence factors that stimulate aerobic respiration. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Elio Schaechter, Michael Schmidt, and Michele Swanson. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode Fred Neidhardt obituary Recent Advances in Microbial Control Science hero Bill Fenical Virulence factors and aerobic respiration (Science) Image credit Letters read on TWiM 137 This episode is brought to you by CuriosityStream, a subscription streaming service that offers over 1,400 documentaries and non­fiction series from the world's best filmmakers. Get unlimited access starting at just $2.99 a month, and for our audience, the first two months are completely free if you sign up at curiositystream.com/m​icrobe ​and use the promo code MICROBE​. This episode is also brought to you by Drobo, a family of safe, expandable, yet simple to use storage arrays. Drobos are designed to protect your important data forever. Visit www.drobo.com to learn more. Listeners can save $100 on a Drobo system at drobostore.com by using the discount code Microbe100. Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@microbe.tv 
October 7, 2016
Them TWiM team discusses the importance of neutrophils in microbial infections, and evidence that ancient bacteria had two cell walls. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Elio Schaechter, Michael Schmidt, and Michele Swanson. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode Conquering neutrophils (PLoS Path) Ancestral outer membrane in firmicutes (eLife ) Were gram positive rods the first bacteria? (Cell) Image credit Letters read on TWiM 136 This episode is brought to you by CuriosityStream, a subscription streaming service that offers over 1,400 documentaries and non­fiction series from the world's best filmmakers. Get unlimited access starting at just $2.99 a month, and for our audience, the first two months are completely free if you sign up at curiositystream.com/m​icrobe ​and use the promo code MICROBE​. This episode is also brought to you by Drobo, a family of safe, expandable, yet simple to use storage arrays. Drobos are designed to protect your important data forever. Visit www.drobo.com to learn more. Listeners can save $100 on a Drobo system at drobostore.com by using the discount code Microbe100. Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@microbe.tv 
September 23, 2016
Links for this episode Dysbiosis of microbiome in critical illness (mSphere) Consequences of sewage spill into aquatic environment (App Env Mic) EPA recreational water guidelines (pdf) VRE following sewage spill (Outbreak Radio) FAQ: Human microbiome American gut project British gut project Rob Knight on human microbiome (TED) Rob Knight on TWiM Image credit TWiM 135 Letters This episode is brought to you by CuriosityStream, a subscription streaming service that offers over 1,400 documentaries and non­fiction series from the world's best filmmakers. Get unlimited access starting at just $2.99 a month, and for our audience, the first two months are completely free if you sign up at curiositystream.com/m​icrobe ​and use the promo code MICROBE​. This episode is also brought to you by Drobo, a family of safe, expandable, yet simple to use storage arrays. Drobos are designed to protect your important data forever. Visit www.drobo.com to learn more. Listeners can save $100 on a Drobo system at drobostore.com by using the discount code Microbe100. Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@microbe.tv 
September 8, 2016
Design of a synchronously lysing bacterium for delivery of anti-tumor molecules in mice, and hopanoids, the lipids that live forever, brought to you by the four Microbies of TWiM. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Elio Schaechter, Michael Schmidt, and Michele Swanson. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode Bacterial lysis for in vivo delivery (Nature) Coley’s toxins (Iowa Orthop J) Hopanoids, stress tolerance, and nutrient storage (Geobiol) Lipids that last forever (STC) Fattening up microbial geological biomarkers (STC) Money spreads infection (Fut Micro) This episode is brought to you by CuriosityStream, a subscription streaming service that offers over 1,400 documentaries and non­fiction series from the world's best filmmakers. Get unlimited access starting at just $2.99 a month, and for our audience, the first two months are completely free if you sign up at curiositystream.com/m​icrobe ​and use the promo code MICROBE​. This episode is also brought to you by Drobo, a family of safe, expandable, yet simple to use storage arrays. Drobos are designed to protect your important data forever. Visit www.drobo.com to learn more. Listeners can save $100 on a Drobo system at drobostore.com by using the discount code Microbe100. Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@microbe.tv 
August 20, 2016
Insight into the biology of rhinovirus C from cryo-electron microscopy, and a novel antibiotic from a commensal bacterium that grows in the human nose, from the doctors of TWiM. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Elio Schaechter, and Michael Schmidt. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode Cryo-EM of viruses and vaccine design (PNAS) Atomic structure of rhinovirus C (PNAS) Opening windows into the cell (STC) Human commensals produce novel antibiotic (Nature) The nose knows (Nature) Letters read on TWiM 133 Image in audio player: Molecular surface of a Human rhinovirus, showing protein spikes. By: Wiki user: Robin S This episode is brought to you by CuriosityStream, a subscription streaming service that offers over 1,400 documentaries and non­fiction series from the world's best filmmakers. Get unlimited access starting at just $2.99 a month, and for our audience, the first two months are completely free if you sign up at curiositystream.com/m​icrobe ​and use the promo code MICROBE​. This episode is also brought to you by Drobo, a family of safe, expandable, yet simple to use storage arrays. Drobos are designed to protect your important data forever. Visit www.drobo.com to learn more. Listeners can save $100 on a Drobo system at drobostore.com by using the discount code Microbe100. Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@microbe.tv 
August 5, 2016
Vincent, Elio, and Michele present cell division by longitudinal scission in an insect symbiont, and thermally activated charge transport in microbial nanowires. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Michele Swanson and Elio Schaechter. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode Cell division by longitudinal scission (mBio) Bacterium learns long division (STC) Charge transport by microbial nanowires (Sci Rep) Mechanism of nanowire conductance (Nat Comm) Using nature to grow batteries (TED) SEM of Y-shaped S. poulsonii (above) - Image credit Extracellular electron transport (below) - image credit This episode is brought to you by CuriosityStream, a subscription streaming service that offers over 1,400 documentaries and non­fiction series from the world's best filmmakers. Get unlimited access starting at just $2.99 a month, and for our audience, the first two months are completely free if you sign up at curiositystream.com/m​icrobe ​and use the promo code MICROBE​. This episode is also brought to you by Drobo, a family of safe, expandable, yet simple to use storage arrays. Drobos are designed to protect your important data forever. Visit www.drobo.com to learn more. Listeners can save $100 on a Drobo system at drobostore.com by using the discount code Microbe100. Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@microbe.tv 
July 20, 2016
Hosts: Vincent Racaniello and Michael Schmidt Michael and Vincent present Spotlights, brief reviews of classic papers in the Journal of Bacteriology, and explain how a single bacterial species can reverse autism-like social deficits in the offspring of obese mice.   Links for this episode Protein secretion in E. coli (J Bacteriol) Plague pathogenesis (J Bacteriol) Reversal of diet induced social defects (Cell) Letters read on TWiM 131 This episode is brought to you by CuriosityStream, a subscription streaming service that offers over 1,400 documentaries and non­fiction series from the world's best filmmakers. Get unlimited access starting at just $2.99 a month, and for our audience, the first two months are completely free if you sign up at curiositystream.com/microbe and use the promo code MICROBE. Music used on TWiM is composed and performed by Ronald Jenkees and used with permission. Send your microbiology questions and comments to twim@microbe.tv
June 23, 2016
Filmed live in Boston, MA at Microbe 2016, David S. Schneider and Vanessa Sperandio talk about their work on regulation of bacterial virulence in the gut by bacterial adrenergic sensors, and the physiological mechanisms that make us ill and that help us recover.
June 7, 2016
The arrival in the US of plasmid-mediated resistance to colistin antibiotics, a last line of defense against many gram-negative bacilli, and a quorum sensing system in a eukaryote are topics of this episode hosted by Vincent, Michael, and Michele. Image: Etest used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration of an antibiotic for a particular bacterium. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, and Michele Swanson.  Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode E. coli with mcr-1 on a plasmid in the US (AAC) Emergence of plasmid mediated colistin resistance in China (The Lancet) Major breach in last line of defense (The Lancet) Resistance plasmid families in Enterobacteriaceae (AAC) EUCAST MIC breakpoints (ClinCalc) Role of ASM in microbial resistance one, two (bLogphase) Quorum sensing in fungi (Cell Host Microbe) Image credit Letters read on TWiM 129 This episode is brought to you by CuriosityStream, a subscription streaming service that offers over 1,400 documentaries and non­fiction series from the world's best filmmakers. Get unlimited access starting at just $2.99 a month, and for our audience, the first two months are completely free if you sign up at curiositystream.com/m​icrobe ​and use the promo code MICROBE​. Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@microbe.tv 
May 21, 2016
A eukaryote without a mitochondrion, and using a phage enzyme to eliminate intracellular bacteria are two topics discussed by the TWiMers on this episode. Image (right): An entry in the ASM Agar Art Contest which bears an uncanny resemblance to one of the TWiM hosts. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Elio Schaechter, Michele Swanson, and Michael Schmidt. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode Copper and Michael Schmidt in the news (The Scientist) Fair Pay for Postdocs (Huff Post) National Microbiome Initiative (White House) The shrinking mitochondrion (The Scientist) Eukaryote without a mitochondrion (Curr Biol) Why have organelles retained genomes? (Cell Sys) Bugs as drugs (Amer Acad Micro) Phage encoded lysin eliminates intracellular bacteria (eLife) This episode is brought to you by CuriosityStream, a subscription streaming service that offers over 1,400 documentaries and non­fiction series from the world's best filmmakers. Get unlimited access starting at just $2.99 a month, and for our audience, the first two months are completel free if you sign up at curiositystream.com/m​icrobe ​and use the promo code MICROBE​. Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@microbe.tv 
May 5, 2016
The TWiM team explores microbes in snowblower vents on the ocean floor, and cleavage of antibody molecules by a Mycoplasma protease. Image (right): Photograph of the ‘Subway’ snowblower vent on the sea floor at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Visible are white ‘snow’ in the vent and orange floc on the seafloor. Credit: Canadian Scientific Submersible Facility and the University of Washington Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Elio Schaechter, Michele Swanson, and Michael Schmidt. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode Happy Birthday, Elio! In the Company of Microbes Snowblower vents (Front Micro) Deep-sea snowblower vents video (YouTube) Visions 11 cruise photos Mycoplasma capture and cleave IgG (PNAS) Snowblower image (large) Letters read on TWiM 127 This episode is sponsored by ASM Agar Art Contest and ASM Grant Writing Course Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@microbe.tv 
April 22, 2016
The microbiome of hibernating bears, and zebrafish as a model for bacterial sepsis feature in this animal-centric episode of TWiM hosted by Vincent, Michael, and Michele. Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Michele Swanson, and Michael Schmidt. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode Microbiome of hibernating brown bear and energy metabolism (Cell Rep) Ten animals that hibernate (Cons Inst) Zebrafish model of sepsis (mSphere) Image credit Letters read on TWiM 126 This episode is sponsored by ASM Agar Art Contest and ASM Microbe 2016 Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@twiv.tv, or call them in to 908-312-0760. You can also post articles that you would like us to discuss at microbeworld.org and tag them with twim.  
April 7, 2016
Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Michele Swanson, and Michael Schmidt. A deep sequencing study of commercially available probiotics, and design and synthesis of a minimal bacterial genome are the topics tackled by Vincent, Michael, and Michele on this episode of TWiM. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode Culture-independent surveillance of probiotics (mSphere) Design and synthesis of a minimal bacterial genome (Science) J. Craig Venter Institute Image credit Letters read on TWiM 125 This episode is sponsored by ASM Agar Art Contest and ASM Microbe 2016 Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@twiv.tv, or call them in to 908-312-0760. You can also post articles that you would like us to discuss at microbeworld.org and tag them with twim.    
March 24, 2016
Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Michele Swanson, and Michael Schmidt. Vincent, Michael, and Michele reveal how a fungal protease blunts the innate immune response and promotes pathogenicity. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode Michele on Flint Legionella outbreak (Detroit News) Fungal mimicry of a mammalian aminopeptidase (Cell Host Micr)   This episode is sponsored by ASM Agar Art Contest and ASM Microbe 2016 Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@twiv.tv, or call them in to 908-312-0760. You can also post articles that you would like us to discuss at microbeworld.org and tag them with twim.
March 9, 2016
Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, and Elio Schaechter. Guest: Harris Wang Harris joins Vincent, Elio, and Michael to describe multiplex automated genome engineering, a method for targeting many modifications in a population of bacterial cells. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode  MAGE - Multiplex automated genome engineering (Nature) Genome-scale promoter engineering (Nat Methods) Manipulating microbial communities in situ (Trends Genet) Engineering human microbiomes (Meth Mol Biol) Genome-scale engineering (Mol Syst Biol) Economic framework of microbial trade (PLoS One) Tardigrade t-shirt Image credit This episode is sponsored by Microbe Magazine Podcast and ASM Microbe 2016 Music used on TWiM is composed and performed by Ronald Jenkees and used with permission. Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@twiv.tv.  
February 25, 2016
Vincent, Michele, and Michael reveal the discovery of a new species of the spirochaete that causes Lyme disease, and fecal microRNAs that shape the gut microbiome. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode Identification of a novel Borrelia species causing Lyme disease (Lancet Inf Dis) Parasite wonders with Bobbi Pritt (TWiP 75) Reported cases of Lyme disease (CDC) Signs and symptoms of Lyme disease (CDC) Multilocus sequence typing Borrelia MLST database American Academy of Microbiology FAQ Human microbiome Host fecal microRNA shapes gut microbiota (Cell) Image credit C.U.R.E. the game Live Tiny, Die Never - Tardigrade T-shirt This episode is sponsored by Microbe Magazine Podcast and ASM Microbe 2016 Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@twiv.tv, or call them in to 908-312-0760. You can also post articles that you would like us to discuss at microbeworld.org and tag them with twim.  
February 11, 2016
Host: Vincent Racaniello Special guests: Rebekah Kading and Wyndham Lathem From the ASM Biodefense and Emerging Diseases Research meeting, Vincent speaks with Rebekah and Wyndham about their work on Rift Valley Fever virus and other vector-borne pathogens, and the evolution and pathogenesis of Yersinia pestis, the agent of plague. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode  Rift Valley fever virus risk (Emerg Micr Inf) Predicting Rift Valley fever virus transmission (PLoS NTD) Culex in New York City (BioOne) Early emergence of Y. pestis (Nature Comm) Pneumonic plague (Trends Micro) Music used on TWiM is composed and performed by Ronald Jenkees and used with permission. Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@twiv.tv, or call them in to 908-312-0760. You can also post articles that you would like us to discuss at microbeworld.org and tag them with twim.
February 2, 2016
Hosts: Vincent Racaniello and Elio Schaechter. Vincent and Elio marvel in the finding that a phage tail-like structure from a marine bacterium stimulates tubeworm metamorphosis, and reveal Ophidiomyces as a cause of snake fungal disease. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode  Tubeworm metamorphosis by phage tail-like structures (Science) Cell enzyme becomes viral capsid protein (virology blog) Snake fungal disease in the laboratory (mBioi) Snake fungal disease in cottonmouths (PLoS Biol) Snake fungal disease (pdf) Image credit This episode is sponsored by ASM Grant Writing Institute Online Webinar and 32nd Clinical Virology Symposium Music used on TWiM is composed and performed by Ronald Jenkees and used with permission. Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@twiv.tv.  
January 16, 2016
Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, and Elio Schaechter. The microbophiles investigate the ratio of bacterial to human cells in our bodies, and how placing solar panels on a bacterium enables it to carry out photosynthesis. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode  Revised estimates of human and bacterial cells in the body (biorxiv) Power of ten (Small Things Considered) Solar-to-chemical production in bacteria (Science) Letters read on TWiM 119 This episode is sponsored by ASM Grant Writing Institute Online Webinar and 32nd Clinical Virology Symposium Music used on TWiM is composed and performed by Ronald Jenkees and used with permission. Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@twiv.tv. Thumbnail image: Cell structure of a gram positive bacterium. This vector image is completely made by Ali Zifan - Own work; used information from Biology 10e Textbook (chapter 4, Pg: 63) by: Peter Raven, Kenneth Mason, Jonathan Losos, Susan Singer · McGraw-Hill Education.  
January 1, 2016
Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Elio Schaechter and Michele Swanson On the last episode for 2015, Vincent, Elio, and Michele discuss how soil amoeba hunt nematodes in packs, and the role of mushrooms as rainmakers. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode  Pack hunting by a common soil amoeba on nematodes (Environ Micro) Mushrooms as rainmakers (PLoS One) Mushroom by Nicholas Money In the Company of Mushrooms by Elio Schaechter Image credit Letters read on TWiM 118 This episode is sponsored by ASM Microbe 2016 and ASM Biodefense Music used on TWiM is composed and performed by Ronald Jenkees and used with permission. Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@twiv.tv.
December 17, 2015
The TWiM team marvels over the finding of a completely nitrifying Nitrospira, and horizontal gene transfer from Wolbachia into an animal genome. Links for this episode: Complete nitrification by Nitrospira bacteria (Nature one, two) Enigmatic comammox (PhysOrg) Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (Ann Rev Micro) Tardigrade controversy (SciAlert) Horizontal gene transfer from Wolbachia to grasshopper (PeerJ) Thumbnail Image (nitrogen cycle) credit Letters read on TWiM 117 This episode is sponsored by ASM Microbe 2016 and ASM Biodefense Music used on TWiM is composed and performed by Ronald Jenkees and used with permission. Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@twiv.tv.
December 2, 2015
Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Elio Schaechter and Michele Swanson The TWiMeriti reveal a Brazilian social bee that must cultivate a fungus to survive, and diet-mediated reduction in gut colonization by Candida albicans. Links for this episode  Bee cultivates fungus to survive (Curr Biol) Diet reduces C. albicans gut colonization (mSphere) mSphere, a new open-access ASM journal Image credit Letters read on TWiM 116 This episode is sponsored by ASM Biodefense and the 32nd Clinical Virology Symposium. Music used on TWiM is composed and performed by Ronald Jenkees and used with permission. Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@twiv.tv.
November 20, 2015
Vincent visits the laboratories of Kit and Joseph Pogliano on the campus of the University of California, San Diego, where he learns about their work on the bacterial cytoskeleton, sporulation, and the effects of antibiotics on bacterial cells. Visit microbeworld.org/twim for complete shownotes including the special video version of this episode. Thanks for listening and watching!
November 6, 2015
Vincent, Elio, and Michele meet with Harry Mobley, Mary O’Riordan, and Vince Young at the University of Michigan, during the designation of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology as a Milestones in Microbiology site. They discuss how the laboratory has advanced the science and teaching of microbiology, and discuss faculty work on uropathogenic E. coli, induction of stress by bacterial infection, and the gut microbiome. Visit microbeworld.org/twim for more including the special video version of this episode.
October 22, 2015
Vincent meets up with Romney and Duncan at the 79th annual meeting of the Southern California branch of the American Society for Microbiology, where they talk about emerging technologies for antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and next generation sequencing and advanced molecular diagnostics. Visit microbeworld.org/twim to watch the video version and for complete shownotes including links mentioned.
September 26, 2015
The TWiM team wonders why definitions in biology often change, and discuss how the small molecule terrein is important for the growth of a soil fungus. Image: Lesion formation on banana surfaces infected with Aspergillus terreus. Source Links mentioned:   ASM Undergraduate Research Capstone Program ASM Undergraduate Fellowship Program Regulation of terrein production in Aspergillus terreus Visit microbeworld.org/twim for more.  
September 10, 2015
Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Michael Schmidt, and Elio Schaechter. The TWiMitos discuss the reconstruction of a 1,000-year-old antimicrobial remedy, and using gallium as an antimicrobial in the battle for iron. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode  1,000 year old antimicrobial (mBio) Siderophore quenching with gallium (Evol Med Pub Health) Evolutionary dynamics of public goods (J Evol Biol) Image credit Letters read on TWiM 111 Music used on TWiM is composed and performed by Ronald Jenkees and used with permission. Send your microbiology questions and comments (email or mp3 file) to twim@twiv.tv, or call them in to 908-312-0760. You can also post articles that you would like us to discuss at microbeworld.org and tag them with twim.
August 19, 2015
The TWiM team focuses on the gut microbiome, from a single member, Akkermansia muciniphila, to the effect of antibiotics on its composition and colonization resistance against C. difficile. Subscribe to TWiM (free) on iTunes, Stitcher, Android, RSS, or by email. You can also listen on your mobile device with the Microbeworld app. Links for this episode  Agar art contest Akkermansia muciniphilia and obesity (Gut) A. muciniphilia genome (Biol Direct) Alterations of gut microbiota and C. difficile colonization (mBio) Science Delivered Girls Who Code F.E.M.M.E.S. Association for Women in Science UMich Host-Microbiome Initiative UMich anaerobic chamber room (png)
August 6, 2015
The TWiM cohort discusses the use of antimicrobial peptides to target specific bacteria in the microbiome, and how the intracellular bacterium Wolbachia selectively kills male hosts.   Links for this episode: Antimicrobial peptides to modulate microbial ecology (PNAS) Targeting specific bacteria in the oral microbiome (Trends Micro) How Wolbachiakills male hosts (PLoS Biol) Wolbachia phage on TWiV 332   Image: Transmission electron micrograph of Wolbachia within an insect cell. By: Scott O'Neill - Genome Sequence of the Intracellular Bacterium Wolbachia. PLoS Biol 2/3/2004: e76.
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