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May 1, 2009
In the May 2009 issue of AJN, Kay E. Schwebke, MD, MPH, a staff physician at Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis, authors an article about her interviews with nurses who served in the armed forces in Vietnam and the meaning of the Vietnam Women’s Memorial to these nurses. AJN Editor-in-Chief Diana Mason, PhD, RN, FAAN, talks with Dr. Schwebke about why she wrote the article and how her discussions with Vietnam nurses have changed how she practices and how she thinks about health providers who serve in war zones.
May 1, 2009
Mary O'Brien Tyrrell reads her poem, “Unseen.”
May 1, 2009
“I am a nurse before I am an officer.”
May 1, 2009
Lynn Kohl reads her poem, “Deep Inside Me.”
May 1, 2009
Lynn Kohl reads her poem, “But I Was.”
May 1, 2009
Lynn Kohl has been on disability with posttraumatic stress disorder since 1982. “You were not there when your loved one died, but I was.”
May 1, 2009
Penny Kettlewell reads her poem, “I Hold Them.”
May 1, 2009
Penny Kettlewell reads her poem, “Coffee Room Soldier.”
May 1, 2009
Diane Carlson Evans reads her poem, “Black Man.”
May 1, 2009
“One of the worst memories of Vietnam was seeing children die. . . . Every time somebody died, I died with them.”
May 1, 2009
Suzanne Constantini’s first patient was 21-year-old Steven, from Iowa. “I can close my eyes and I can see Steven as clear as day.”
May 1, 2009
“After that, I never looked at another ID card.”
May 1, 2009
“The next day, when one of the corpsmen went to get the children, they were all dead.”
May 1, 2009
More than 90% of the people she cared for were Vietnamese.
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