Microaggressions: preparing to experience, witness, and commit them
Published November 21, 2019
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50 min
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    Good intentions are everywhere. Good behavior...well, that's more complicated. Such is the case with microaggressions, the term coined by Harvard University psychiatrist Chester Pierce in 1970 to describe minor yet hurtful comments. Pierce's original definition encompassed statements aimed at African Americans, but of course one can accidentally or purposefully put down any minority individual--women, LGBTQ+ individuals, non-white ethnicities, and more.

    Unfortunately, nearly 50 years after Dr. Pierce proposed the term, microaggressions are still a thing. Dave admits to his sins, and M1s Sahaanna Arumagam and Nathen Spitz, along with SCP intern Joel Horne discuss how to prepare for the inevitability of witnessing, experiencing, and committing microaggressions.

    Plus, can this week's co-hosts diagnose their weird patients' quirks?

    This Week in Medical News: Speaking of good intentions gone awry, hospitals are relying on AI algorithms to direct extra treatment at those who need it, except the AI thinks wealthy white people are needier than African American patients. And researchers announce an effective treatment for 90% of cystic fibrosis patients.

    We Want to Hear From You: What are your microaggression stories? Tell us at 347-SHORTCT anytime or email theshortcoats@gmail.com.
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