Detailed
Compact
Art
Reverse
February 17, 2020
Speaker(s): Professor Sara Hobolt, Sir Anthony Seldon, Professor Tony Travers | Is Brexit a transformative moment, with lasting consequences? Or will identities and allegiances return to ‘normal’? When might politics move on from Brexit? Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is Sutherland Chair in European Institutions and Professor at the Department of Government and the European Institute at LSE. Anthony Seldon (@AnthonySeldon) is Vice Chancellor of The University of Buckingham, a contemporary historian, commentator and political author. He is an alumnus of LSE having obtained his PhD in Economics from the School. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. Erik Berglof (@ErikBerglof) is Director of the Institute of Global Affairs at LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBrexit This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. Tickets will be available from 12noon on Monday 10 February. Browse the full programme
February 14, 2020
Speaker(s): Arundhati Roy, Professor Amartya Sen | Join us for this Eva Colorni Memorial Lecture which will see Arundhati Roy read selected extracts from her literary and political work and engage in discussion with Amartya Sen. Arundhati Roy is the author of The God of Small Things (1997) for which she won the Man Booker Prize, and more recently of, The Ministry of Utmost Happiness (2017). Her non-fiction works include My Seditious Heart, The Shape of the Beast and Listening to Grasshoppers. She is also a political activist involved in human rights and environmental causes. Amartya Sen is Thomas W Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University and an LSE Honorary Fellow. Sumi Madhok is Associate Professor of Transnational Gender Studies in the Department of Gender Studies, LSE. The Department of Gender Studies (@LSEGenderTweet) was established in 1993 to address the major intellectual challenges posed by contemporary changes in gender relations. This remains a central aim of the Department today, which is the largest research and teaching unit of its kind in Europe. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. The Eva Colorni Memorial Trust was established by Amartya Sen to commemorate the life and work of Eva Colorni and to reflect and further her belief in the possibility of social justice. Eva was an excellent teacher and writer whose work and passion were concerned with analysing and redressing inequality. The main activities of the Trust are to award bursaries to undergraduate students of economics who are experiencing hardship at London Metropolitan University, where Eva taught for many years, and to hold lectures on the theme of social justice. The first five lectures were published in a book, called Living As Equals and includes an essay by Amartya Sen on Social Commitment and Democracy. There is more information about the Trust and past lectures on the Eva Colorni Memorial Trust website. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEInequalities LSESU RAG - the fundraising arm of the Students' Union are this academic year raising money for 3 charities, one local, The Felix Project, one national, Refugee Action, and one international, Doctors without Borders. Students from RAG will be collecting funds for their charities outside LSE’s public events during RAG week. Please give what you can to support three worthwhile causes. Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at The Shape of the Beast. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.
February 13, 2020
Speaker(s): Professor Etel Solingen | The 2020 Susan Strange lecture will pay tribute to Professor Strange's contributions by focusing on the international political economy dimensions of nuclear choices, for or against nuclear weapons. Whereas relative power and security dilemmas have dominated the study of nuclear proliferation for decades, an approach centered on the "cui bono" (who benefits) question reveals how domestic distributional implications related to the global economy have systematic effects on states’ nuclear choices. Etel Solingen is the Thomas T. and Elizabeth C. Tierney Chair in Peace and Conflict Studies at the University of California Irvine and the Susan Strange Visiting Professor, 2019-20 at LSE. She received the 2018 William and Katherine Estes Award from the National Academy of Sciences recognizing basic research on issues relating to nuclear weapons. She is a former President of the International Studies Association and the recipient of the 2019 Distinguished Scholar award in International Security. Karen E Smith is a Professor of International Relations and Head of the Department of International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and Director of the European Foreign Policy Unit (within the International Relations Department). The International Relations (IR) Department (@LSEIRDept) is one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. We are ranked 4th in the QS World University Ranking by Subject 2019 tables for Politics and International Studies. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEIR LSESU RAG - the fundraising arm of the Students' Union are this academic year raising money for 3 charities, one local, The Felix Project, one national, Refugee Action, and one international, Doctors without Borders. Students from RAG will be collecting funds for their charities outside LSE’s public events during RAG week. Please give what you can to support three worthwhile causes.
February 11, 2020
Speaker(s): Professor Patricia Clavin | Starring the League of Nations, and featuring the students, staff, and archives of the London School of Economics and Political Science, the lecture recovers the entangled history of LSE with the practices of global governance. This international history lecture reveals a wide-ranging preoccupation with the material conditions of peace, alongside the more familiar concern of disarmament. Patricia Clavin is Professor of International History, and Zeitlyn Fellow and Tutor in History at Jesus College Oxford. She is an editor of the Oxford History Monographs series, and serves on the editorial board of Past and Present. In 2008-09, she held the British Academy ‘Thank-Offering-to-Britain’ Senior Research Fellowship, and in 2015 was awarded a Major Research Fellowship from the Leverhulme Trust. She is a Fellow of the British Academy and the Royal Historical Society, and a Foreign Member of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. In 2015, Patricia was awarded the British Academy Medal, which recognises a ‘landmark achievement that has transformed understanding’ for her book Securing the World Economy: The Reinvention of the League of Nations, 1920-1946. Matthew Jones is Professor of International History and Head of the Department of International History at LSE. The LSE's Department of International History (@lsehistory) teaches and conducts research on the international history of Britain, Europe and the world from the early modern era up to the present day. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHistory LSESU RAG - the fundraising arm of the Students' Union are this academic year raising money for 3 charities, one local, The Felix Project, one national, Refugee Action, and one international, Doctors without Borders. Students from RAG will be collecting funds for their charities outside LSE’s public events during RAG week. Please give what you can to support three worthwhile causes.
February 10, 2020
Speaker(s): Sanam Naraghi-Anderlini | 2020 started with a threat of a new regional war in the Middle East, the continuing spread of authoritarian regimes with identity-driving extremist ideologies, a gridlocked multilateral system and an assault on international human rights norms and processes. At the UN it is hard to ignore the cognitive dissonance of a discredited Security Council and seeming fatigue at the wave of crises facing the world on the one hand, and on the other, the perfunctory conferences on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and Climate Action, women peace and security and other visionary agendas. How does this flailing of the global peace and security architecture impact people, especially the civilians living daily with the threat of violence and oppression. Two decades after the adoption of the watershed UN Security Council resolution 1325 (2000) on women, peace and security (WPS), Sanam Naraghi Anderlini will discuss the role, experiences and ongoing contributions of women, particularly national and transnational women's movements in tackling some of the world's most intractable security threats and conflicts. Drawing on over two decades of research, advocacy and practical work with the United Nations, civil society organisations across countries affected by war and violent extremism globally, she will reflect on how and why gendered analysis is essential to understanding emerging threats, and the strategic and practical ways in which locally rooted women's peace and security movements are harnessing the power of cultural indigenous practices and together with the promise of the global WPS agenda to raise uncomfortable truths, challenge conventional wisdoms, and offer solutions that are urgently needed On the 5th anniversary of the Centre for Women, Peace and Security, take a look ahead with the new Director. Sanam Naraghi-Anderlini (@sanambna) is the Director of the Centre for Women, Peace and Security. The Centre for Women, Peace and Security (@LSE_WPS) is an academic space for scholars, practitioners, activists and policy makers to develop strategies to promote justice, human rights and participation of women in conflict affected areas. Professor Dilly Fung is the LSE Pro-Director for Education Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWPS This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. Tickets will be available from 12noon on Monday 10 February. Browse the full programme. LSESU RAG - the fundraising arm of the Students' Union are this academic year raising money for 3 charities, one local, The Felix Project, one national, Refugee Action, and one international, Doctors without Borders. Students from RAG will be collecting funds for their charities outside LSE’s public events during RAG week. Please give what you can to support three worthwhile causes. Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at When the Going Gets Tough: women and the future of global peace and security. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.
February 6, 2020
Contributor(s): Professor Thomas Piketty | In the epic successor to one of the most important books of the century, Thomas Piketty challenges us revolutionize how we think about politics, ideology, and history. Join us for this event at which Thomas will discuss his new book, Capital and Ideology. LSE alumnus Thomas Piketty (@PikettyLeMonde) is Professor at EHESS and at the Paris School of Economics. He is the author of numerous articles published in journals such as the Quarterly Journal of Economics, the Journal of Political Economy, the American Economic Review, the Review of Economic Studies, Explorations in Economic History, Annales: Histoire, Sciences Sociales, and of a dozen books. He has done major historical and theoretical work on the interplay between economic development, the distribution of income and wealth, and political conflict. In particular, he is the initiator of the recent literature on the long run evolution of top income shares in national income (now available in the World Inequality Database). These works have led to radically question the optimistic relationship between development and inequality posited by Kuznets, and to emphasize the role of political, social and fiscal institutions in the historical evolution of income and wealth distribution. He is also the author of the international best-seller Capital in the 21st Century. To pre-order a copy of Thomas' new book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Capital and Ideology. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWealth
February 4, 2020
Speaker(s): Dr Louise Arimatsu, Dr Robin Dunford, Dr Rachel Julian, Dr Michael Neu | What factors promote peace and what actions are justified to achieve it? Join us as we discuss the history, ethics, and politics of peace. Peace is highly valued, but how is it achieved? Why are some periods in world history relatively peaceful compared to others? What can we, as ordinary citizens, do to promote peace? Is pacifism a justified response to war? What are we justified in doing to ensure peace? Louise Arimatsu (@larimatsu10) is Distinguished Policy Fellow in the Centre for Women, Peace and Security at LSE, where she works on the AHRC project 'A Feminist International Law of Peace and Security' and the ERC project 'Gendered Peace'. Her current research projects include 'A Feminist Foreign Policy' and 'Women and Weapons'. Louise is an alumna of LSE. Robin Dunford is Principal Lecturer at the Centre for Spatial, Environmental and Cultural Politics, University of Brighton. Rachel Julian is Reader in Peace Studies, Leeds Beckett University. Michael Neu is Senior Lecturer at the Centre for Applied Philosophy, Politics and Ethics, University of Brighton. Jonathan Birch (@birchlse) is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy and an Associate Professor of Philosophy, LSE. Founded in 1996, the Forum for Philosophy (@forumphilosophy) is a non-profit organization that has gained widespread recognition for its work as initiator and sponsor of engaging and thoughtful events that facilitate wider participation in academic philosophy.
February 3, 2020
Speaker(s): Professor Catherine Barnard, Professor Anand Menon, John Mills, Vicky Pryce, Sir Ivan Rogers | January 31st is another key date in the Brexit saga, a point of the UK's final departure from the EU. It is an important transition and one in need of expert interpretation. This panel will assess developments to this point and the implications for the UK going forward. The panellists will bring together a range of expertise, covering British politics, knowledge of Whitehall, the economy, and UK-EU law. Catherine Barnard (@CSBarnard24) is Professor of European Union and Labour Law at Trinity College, University of Cambridge. Anand Menon (@anandMenon1) is Professor of European Politics and Foreign Affairs at King’s College London, and Director of The UK in a Changing Europe. John Mills (@John_Mills_JML) is an entrepreneur, economist, and author. He is the founder and Chairman of JML, and was a Labour Councillor in Camden for over 30 years. Vicky Pryce (@realVickyPryce) is Chief Economic Advisor, Centre for Economics and Business Research and former Joint Head of the UK Government Economic Service. Ivan Rogers is the former UK Permanent Representative to the EU. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy, LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. The event is held in collaboration with The UK in a Changing Europe (@UKandEU), a research initiative funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), which is part of UK Research and Innovation, and based at King’s College London. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBrexit
January 31, 2020
Speaker(s): Professor Catherine Barnard, Professor Anand Menon, John Mills, Vicky Pryce, Sir Ivan Rogers | January 31st is another key date in the Brexit saga, a point of the UK's final departure from the EU. It is an important transition and one in need of expert interpretation. This panel will assess developments to this point and the implications for the UK going forward. The panellists will bring together a range of expertise, covering British politics, knowledge of Whitehall, the economy, and UK-EU law. Catherine Barnard (@CSBarnard24) is Professor of European Union and Labour Law at Trinity College, University of Cambridge. Anand Menon (@anandMenon1) is Professor of European Politics and Foreign Affairs at King’s College London, and Director of The UK in a Changing Europe. John Mills (@John_Mills_JML) is an entrepreneur, economist, and author. He is the founder and Chairman of JML, and was a Labour Councillor in Camden for over 30 years. Vicky Pryce (@realVickyPryce) is Chief Economic Advisor, Centre for Economics and Business Research and former Joint Head of the UK Government Economic Service. Ivan Rogers is the former UK Permanent Representative to the EU. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy, LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. The event is held in collaboration with The UK in a Changing Europe (@UKandEU), a research initiative funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), which is part of UK Research and Innovation, and based at King’s College London. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBrexit
January 30, 2020
Speaker(s): Professor Jonathan Rigg | Southeast Asia’s growth story is as impressive as it is well-known, with epithets like ‘miracle’, ‘tiger’ and ‘dragon’. There is, however, an accompanying narrative: of inequality, injustice, environmental crisis, and social malaise. Jonathan Rigg holds a professorship in the School of Geographical Sciences at the University of Bristol in the UK. Until this year, he was Director of the Asia Research Institute at the National University of Singapore. Hyun Bang Shin (@urbancommune) is Director of the Saw Swee Hock Southeast Asia Centre, and Professor of Geography and Urban Studies in the Department of Geography and Environment. The Saw Swee Hock Southeast Asia Centre (@LSESEAC) is a cross-disciplinary, regionally-focused academic centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science.
January 29, 2020
Speaker(s): Professor Neta C. Crawford | The Pentagon was a leader, in the 1980s and 1990s, in the United States in recognising climate change as a looming security concern. The US Department of Defence has thus prepared for climate change with plans for responding to climate caused disruption to operations. The DoD is also predicting and preparing for climate change caused war. What are the security threats that will flow from climate change? Is ‘climate war’ inevitable? The DOD is also the US government’s largest fuel user and perhaps the world’s largest institutional greenhouse gas emitter — with annual emissions larger than the annual emissions of many countries. Tracking the causes and trends DOD fuel use from 1975 to 2018 and linking it to military doctrine shows a strategic disconnect: the Pentagon’s fuel use and military doctrine undermines its security objectives. What explains this? Neta C. Crawford is Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at Boston University. She is also a co-director of the Costs of War Project based at Brown University and Boston University. Crawford has served on the Governing Council of the American Political Science Association and the editorial board of the American Political Science Review. She is currently on the editorial board of Journal of Political Philosophy and Bristol Studies in International Theory. She is the author of more than four dozen academic articles and her books include Argument and Change in World Politics: Ethics, Decolonization and Humanitarian Intervention (Cambridge University Press) and Accountability for Killing: Moral Responsibility for Collateral Damage in America's Post-9/11 Wars (Oxford University Press). Karen E Smith is Professor of International Relations and Head of the Department of International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and Director of the European Foreign Policy Unit (within the International Relations Department). LSE Shape the World Series - to celebrate the completion of LSE’s newest building, a series of public events organised by some of the academic departments who are now housed in the Centre Building will take place this term. The Department of International Relations (@LSEIRDept) is now in its 92nd year, making it one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. The twitter hashtag for this event is #PartofLSE
January 29, 2020
Speaker(s): Professor Jane Green, Ana Oppenheim, Polly Toynbee | What do the results of the British general election mean for Labour and the left? A panel of leading analysts and activists discuss. Jane Green (@ProfJaneGreen) is Director of the Gwilym Gibbon Centre for Public Policy, Oxford, Co-Director of the British Election Study, Professorial Fellow at Nuffield College and an election analyst for ITV News. Ana Oppenheim (@AnaOpp) is a Momentum activist and co-founder of the Labour Campaign for Free Movement. Polly Toynbee (@pollytoynbee) is an author and Guardian columnist. Robin Archer is Associate Professor (Reader) in Political Sociology, Department of Sociology, LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@rmilibandlse) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSELabour
January 28, 2020
Speaker(s): Professor Jane Green, Ana Oppenheim, Polly Toynbee | What do the results of the British general election mean for Labour and the left? A panel of leading analysts and activists discuss. Jane Green (@ProfJaneGreen) is Director of the Gwilym Gibbon Centre for Public Policy, Oxford, Co-Director of the British Election Study, Professorial Fellow at Nuffield College and an election analyst for ITV News. Ana Oppenheim (@AnaOpp) is a Momentum activist and co-founder of the Labour Campaign for Free Movement. Polly Toynbee (@pollytoynbee) is an author and Guardian columnist. Robin Archer is Associate Professor (Reader) in Political Sociology, Department of Sociology, LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@rmilibandlse) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSELabour
January 27, 2020
Speaker(s): Dr Gerard Lyons, Vicky Pryce, Professor John Van Reenen | This panel discussion will focus on assessing the likely impacts of any Brexit outcome on the UK economy, across sectors and regions. How robust are the economic forecasts? What might change their predictions? Gerard Lyons (@DrGerardLyons) is a leading international economist. He is chief economic strategist at challenger wealth manager Netwealth and on the Board of Bank of China (UK), and is on a number of advisory boards, including Vivid Economics, Warwick Business School and the Grantham Institute on Climate Change and the Environment at LSE and Imperial. Vicky Pryce (@realVickyPryce) is Chief Economic Adviser, Centre for Economics and Business Research and an alumna of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Her new book is Women vs Capitalism: Why We Can't Have It All in a Free Market Economy. John Van Reenen (@johnvanreenen) is Ronald Coase Chair in Economics and Professor in Economics, Department of Economics, LSE. Waltraud Schelkle is Professor in Political Economy at the European Institute, LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBrexit
January 22, 2020
Speaker(s): Professor Lee Elliot Major, Dr Sam Friedman, Dr Katharina Hecht | This event will launch a report from a research project at the International Inequalities Institute supported by the Sutton Trust to investigate whether British elites are pulling ahead, not just economically but also socially. Economic research has demonstrated that the richest 1 per cent in terms of income in the UK have increased their relative advantage since the 1980s but we know less about whether their social mobility and self-identities are becoming more exclusive and hence whether there is a more general process of ‘elites pulling away’. Lee Elliot Major (@Lem_Exeter) is Professor of Social Mobility, University of Exeter and Visiting Senior Fellow, LSE. Sam Friedman (@SamFriedmanSoc) is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology, LSE. Katharina Hecht is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Pennsylvania and a Visiting Fellow at the International Inequalities Institute (III). Mike Savage (@MikeSav47032563) is Martin White Professor of Sociology at LSE and Director of the International Inequalities Institute. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.
January 22, 2020
Speaker(s): Noga Levy-Rapoport, David Powell | Noga Levy-Rapoport (@Noga_LR)is a core organiser for the UK Student Climate Network. David Powell (@powellds) is Head of Environment and Green Transition, New Economics Foundation. Robin Archer is the Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@rmilibandlse) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEGreenNewDeal
January 21, 2020
Speaker(s): Professor Michael Burleigh | How have Britain and Russia dealt with loss of empire and what impact has it had on their self-understanding and politics? Britain and Russia have often been extremely suspicious of each other’s intentions, yet they share some fundamental things in common, beyond an unhealthy preoccupation with secret agents. Some claim that after 60 years Britain has still not adjusted to the post imperial era, and that this is reflected in Brexit - with its inability to accept that Ireland is a separate country, not to mention calls for an ‘Anglosphere’ or Empire 2.0 as an alternative to EU membership. The Russian loss of empire was a much more sudden affair in the early 1990s as 13 states became independent and Russia emerged from the polyglot Soviet carapace. Some claim that Russia is suffering from phantom limb syndrome, with President Putin pillaging the imperial past to create a new Russian identity, which does not mask the failure of his regime to diversify and modernise the Russian economy. The lecture will show how the imperial theme can be used to illumine trends in both societies. Michael Burleigh (@BurlM11) is the first Engelsberg Chair for 2019/20 at LSE IDEAS. Michael is a historian who focuses primarily on Nazi Germany. He is the author of The Third Reich: a new history, which won the 2001 Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction. His most recent book is The Best of Times, the Worst of Times. He has also won a British Film Institute Award for Archival Achievement and a New York Film and Television Festival Award Bronze Medal. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEIDEAS
January 16, 2020
Speaker(s): Professor Akosua Adomako Ampofo, Dr Wangui wa Goro, Dr Romina Istratii, | A crucial conversation with leading thinkers on current attempts to decolonise Eurocentric knowledge systems in Africa, and their role in challenging the enduring effects of colonialism in African and global society. To kick-start 2020’s acclaimed Africa Talks series, we are delighted to host Professor Akosua Adomako Ampofo, Dr Wangui wa Goro and Dr Romina Istratii to discuss decolonisation and African knowledge systems. Across Africa, governments, universities and activist groups are making spirited efforts to decolonise the Eurocentric systems of knowledge that continue to pervade the continent. But what does this mean and how can it be achieved? More than transforming how knowledge is taught and produced in the academy, the ‘decolonisation of African knowledge systems’ can be seen as a tool in a wider toolbox aimed at challenging the incessant sway of colonialism on understanding present-day African society. The speakers will examine some of the progress made in decolonising Africa’s knowledge systems, discussing present ideas on how these systems can be rethought, re-framed and reconstructed, and the complicated role played by global North-South knowledge exchange programmes in attempts to further the continent’s epistemological agency.
January 14, 2020
Speaker(s): Professor Cass R. Sunstein | How does social change happen? Why is it so hard to anticipate? A key reason is the existence of hidden preferences, which may or may not be unleashed. Cass R. Sunstein (@CassSunstein) is currently the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard. From 2009 to 2012, he was Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. He is the founder and director of the Program on Behavioral Economics and Public Policy at Harvard Law School. His latest book is How Change Happens. To pre-order a copy of How Change Happens, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to How Change Happens. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science at the London School of Economics. He is Head of Department in Psychological and Behavioural Science and Director of the EMSc in Behavioural Science. He is author of the Sunday Times best-selling book Happiness by Design, and Happy Ever After. The Department of Psychological & Behavioural Science (@LSE_PBS) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHowChangeHappens This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020. Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at How Change Happens. Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.
January 9, 2020
Speaker(s): Professor Randall Abate, Dr Emily Barritt, Tessa Khan, Professor Hari Osofsky, Professor Jaqueline Peel, Dr Joana Setzer, Megan Bowman | Climate change litigation continues to expand across jurisdictions as a tool to strengthen climate action. But are courts prepared to protect the rights of future generations, wildlife and natural resources – collectively referred to as “the voiceless” - from the impacts of global climate change? This panel brings together leading scholars and practitioners in the field of climate litigation to discuss the potential and challenges for the law in addressing climate change. Randall Abate is Professor in the Department of Political Science and Sociology, Monmouth University. Emily Barritt (@emilymbarritt) is Lecturer in Tort Law and the Co-Director of the Transnational Law Institute at Kings College London. Megan Bowman is Associate Professor in Law, King’s College London, The Dickson Poon School of Law. Tessa Khan is a lawyer with the Urgenda Foundation and co-founder of the Climate Litigation Network. Hari Osofsky (@HariOsofsky) is Dean of Penn State Law and the Penn State School of International Affairs. Jaqueline Peel is Professor of Law, University of Melbourne. Joana Setzer (@JoanaSetzer) is Research Fellow, Grantham Research Institute, LSE. Veerle Heyvaert is Professor of Law, LSE. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE) was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEClimateLitigation This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.
January 8, 2020
Speaker(s): Dr Ursula von der Leyen | Join us for a lecture by Ursula von der Leyen, LSE alumna and President of the European Commission. Prior to her current position she was Germany's Minister of Defence, a position she held from 2013-19. Before she was appointed Minister of Defence, she served as Federal Minister of Labor and Social Affairs since November 2009. From 2005 to 2009, she was Federal Minister for Family Affairs, Senior Citizens, Women and Youth. Dr von der Leyen (@vonderleyen) studied at Göttingen and Münster, Hanover Medical School and the London School of Economics and Political Science. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England.
December 5, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor José Antonio Ocampo | This talk by José Antonio Ocampo will look at the different dimensions of IMF reform on the occasion of its 75th anniversary: the role of the international monetary system, global macroeconomic cooperation, prevention and management of crises, and the governance of the system. It will be based on his book, Resetting the International Monetary (Non)System. José Antonio Ocampo is Professor at Columbia University SIPA and a member of the Board of Directors at the Colombian Central Bank. Jean-Paul Faguet (@jpfaguet) is Professor of the Political Economy of Development at LSE, and Co-Programme Director of the MSc in Development Management. The Department of International Development (@LSE_ID) promotes interdisciplinary postgraduate teaching and research on processes of social, political and economic development and change. The Latin America and Caribbean Centre (@LSE_LACC) opened in January 2016 to serve as a focal point for LSE’s research and public engagement with Latin America and the Caribbean, the Centre builds upon the School’s long and important relationship with the region. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEIMFReforms
December 4, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Paul Embrechts | In its broad interpretation, “risk” is omnipresent in modern society. What does science, in particular mathematics, have to offer in a societal discourse on the topic? During the night of January 31 - February 1, 1953, a heavy winter storm battered the coastal areas of South West Holland and South East England killing over 2000 people. As a consequence, the Dutch started their famous Delta project. Paul Embrechts will discuss some of the scientific discourse related to the ensuing dike building process. The Twin Towers attack of 9/11 yields a very different kind of risk which will be contrasted with the flood event. Some methodological links to the financial crisis of 2006-2008 will be highlighted. The talk concludes with a discussion on the public communication and understanding of risk and the need for more interdisciplinary research. Paul Embrechts is Emeritus Professor of Mathematics at the ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich) where he taught insurance and financial mathematics. Jan van den Heuvel (@JanvadeHe) is Head of the Department of Mathematics at LSE. The Department of Mathematics is internationally recognised for its teaching and research in the fields of discrete mathematics, game theory, financial mathematics and operations research. Twitter Hashtag for this
December 3, 2019
Speaker(s): Dr Swati Dhingra, Dr Spyros Economides, Dr Sara Hagemann, Professor Sara Hobolt | 2019 has been a momentous year for Europe, and 2020 promises more of the same. This public discussion will take stock of political, economic, and social events in Europe and the European Union during this past year and try to look forward to the next. Panelists will touch on issues such as the EP and national elections, the new leaders of EU institutions, Brexit, the European economy, Europe’s relationship with the US, and a number of others. Swati Dhingra (@swatdhingraLSE) is Associate Professor in Economics, Department of Economics, LSE. Spyros Economides is Associate Professor in International Relations and European Politics, European Institute, LSE. Sara Hagemann (@sarahagemann) is Academic Director, School of Public Policy, LSE. Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is Sutherland Chair in European Institutions, Department of Government, LSE. Chris Anderson (@soccerquant) is Professor in European Politics and Policy at LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEEurope
November 28, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Barry Buzan, Professor Margaret MacMillan, Professor David Stevenson, Professor Linda Yueh | A panel of distinguished scholars will here discuss the legacy of the First World War, the Versailles Peace Treaty which followed, and why the treaty has been so hotly debated ever since by critics and defenders alike. This event will also mark the relaunch of John Maynard Keynes’s justly famous The Economic Consequences of the Peace, first published in December 1919 and now republished with a new, definitive introduction by Professor Michael Cox, Director of LSE IDEAS. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to The Economic Consequences of the Peace. Barry Buzan is Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE (formerly Montague Burton Professor); honorary professor at Copenhagen, Jilin, and China Foreign Affairs Universities, and the University of International Relations in Beijing; a Senior Fellow at LSE IDEAS; and a Fellow of the British Academy. Margaret MacMillan became the fifth Warden of St Antony’s College in July 2007, and stepped down in October 2017. Prior to taking on the Wardenship, Professor MacMillan was Provost of Trinity College and professor of History at the University of Toronto. David Stevenson is Professor of International History at LSE. His main fields of interests lie in international relations in Europe during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; origins, course, and impact of the First World War. Linda Yueh (@lindayueh) is Visiting Professor at LSE IDEAS and Chair of the LSE Economic Diplomacy Commission. She is Fellow in Economics at St Edmund Hall, Oxford University and Adjunct Professor of Economics at London Business School as well as Associate Fellow (Global Economy and Finance Department & U.S. and the Americas Programme) at Chatham House and was Visiting Professor of Economics at Peking University. She is a widely published author and Editor of the Routledge Economic Growth and Development book series. Her latest book, The Great Economists: How Their Ideas Can Help Us Today is The Times's Best Business Books of the Year. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEVersailles
November 27, 2019
Speaker(s): Dr Fiona Adamson, Dr Joseph Downing | Joseph Downing will present his latest book on Muslims in France in a comparative social, political and media perspective. Fiona Adamson is Reader in International Relations at SOAS. Joseph Downing (@JosephDowning1) is Fellow in Nationalism in the European Institute, LSE and author of French Muslims in Perspective: Nationalism, Post-Colonialism and Marginalisation under the Republic. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to French Muslims in Perspective. Dr. Angelo Martelli is an Assistant Professor in European and International Political Economy in the European Institute at LSE.The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.
November 26, 2019
Speaker(s): Anna Coote, Professor Louise Haagh | What are the arguments for Universal Basic Income and for Universal Basic Services? How do they relate to each other and what might the difficulties be? Anna Coote is Principle Fellow at the New Economics Foundation. Louise Haagh is Professor in Politics at the University of York. Robin Archer is the Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@rmilibandlse) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.
November 22, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Henk W de Regt | Lakatos Award winner Henk W de Regt will deliver his lecture on his book Understanding Scientific Understanding. The Lakatos Award is given for an outstanding contribution to the philosophy of science, widely interpreted, in the form of a book published in English during the previous five years. Henk W de Regt (@RegtHenk) is Professor of Philosophy of Natural Sciences, Institute for Science in Society, Radboud University Nijmegen. Roman Frigg is Professor of Philosophy in the Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method, Director of the Centre for Philosophy of Natural and Social Science (CPNSS), and Co-Director of the Centre for the Analysis of Time Series (CATS) at the London School of Economics and Political Science. The Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method (@LSEPhilosophy) at LSE was founded by Professor Sir Karl Popper in 1946, and remains internationally renowned for a type of philosophy that is both continuous with the sciences and socially relevant. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSELakatosAward
November 20, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Shahidha Bari, Yashka Moore, Professor Heather Widdows | Does fashion allow us to express our individuality or is it a case of the Emperor’s new clothing? Can we judge a book by its cover or is beauty just another manifestation of sexist and racist ideals? Does is even make sense to think of our judgements about beauty as being ethically right or wrong? Whether you wear your heart on your sleeve for fashion or think beauty should be given the boot, join us to discuss the cultural, political, and philosophical dimensions of fashion and beauty. Shahidha Bari (@ShahidhaBari) is Fellow of the Forum for Philosophy and Professor of Fashion Cultures, UAL and author of Dressed. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Dressed. Yashka Moore (@YASHKAMOORE) is a fashion designer. Heather Widdows (@ProfWiddows) is John Ferguson Professor of Global Ethics, University of Birmingham and author of Perfect Me. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Perfect Me. Founded in 1996, the Forum for Philosophy (@forumphilosophy) is a non-profit organization that has gained widespread recognition for its work as initiator and sponsor of engaging and thoughtful events that facilitate wider participation in academic philosophy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum
November 19, 2019
Speaker(s): Alasdair Bell, Umberto Gandini, Ebru Koksal, Gabriele Marcotti | Football is the world’s most popular sport; Europe is the continent with the biggest leagues and home to FIFA and UEFA, the most powerful governing bodies in the sport. A panel of high profile experts from the world of journalism, elite clubs, regulatory bodies, and playing the game will discuss issues of access and equality, financial sustainability, and the best ways of making the game future-proof. Alasdair Bell is Deputy Secretary General of FIFA. Umberto Gandini (@UmbertoGandini) is Vice Chairman of the European Club Association; former CEO of AS Roma and former CEO of AC Milan. Ebru Koksal is Chair of Women in Football and Former FIFA and UEFA Consultant. Gabriele Marcotti (@Marcotti) is Senior Writer for ESPN and a correspondent for Italian sports newspaper Corriere dello Sport. Chris Anderson (@soccerquant) is Professor in European Politics and Policy at LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.
November 14, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor John Hills, Dr Sonia Exley, Professor Howard Glennerster | In November 1959, Richard Titmuss, Head of the then Department of Social Science and Administration (now Social Policy) at LSE, gave a lecture on ‘The Irresponsible Society’. In it he pointed to the features of Britain in the late 1950s that added up to irresponsibility: the power of unaccountable financial interests; the way ‘welfare for the better-off’ undermined social security; the view of education simply as economic investment; irresponsible newspapers; and the tolerance of inequality. Sixty years on from the lecture John Hills, Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy at LSE will discuss how we might judge today’s society by similar – and new – criteria. John Hills is Richard Titmuss Professor of Social Policy, LSE. Sonia Exley is Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Policy, LSE. Howard Glennerster is Emeritus Professor of Social Policy, LSE. Anne West is Professor of Education Policy in the Department of Social Policy, LSE. The Department of Social Policy (@LSESocialPolicy) provides top quality international and multidisciplinary research and teaching on social and public policy challenges facing countries across the world. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEIrresponsibleSociety
November 13, 2019
Speaker(s): Sahraa Karimi, Anne-Claire de Liedekerke, Staffan de Mistura, Rahela Sidiqi, Marika Theros | As talks between the US and Taliban raise hopes for peace in Afghanistan, mothers are mobilising inside and outside the country to hold on to their right to educate their daughters. Sahraa Karimi is a film director living in Afghanistan. She comes from the 2nd generation of refugees who fled Afghanistan for a new life in Iran. Sahraa has received huge acclaim for her fiction feature debut film "Hava, Maryam, Ayesha” that had its world premiere at the recent Venice Film Festival. Shot entirely in Kabul with Afghan actors, the film reflects Karimi’s desire to “go beyond [Western] clichés, and to find new stories, new perspectives” about life as an Afghan woman. Anne-Claire de Liedekerke (@MMM4Mothers) is President of Make Mothers Matter - MMM is an international NGO that believes in the power of mothers to make the world a better place and supports the worldwide campaign in solidarity with Afghan mothers. Staffan de Mistura is Former Under-Secretary-General & UN Special Envoy for Syria, Afghanistan, Iraq and Lebanon. Rahela Sidiqi (@FarkhundaTrust) is Founding Director of Farkhunda Trust for Afghan Women’s Education. Marika Theros (@meeksas) is Research Fellow at the Conflict and Civil Society Research Unit, LSE. The Conflict and Civil Society Unit ( @LSE_CCS) builds on the work of the Civil Society and Human Security unit and was renamed in 2017 to reflect the changing focus of the research being undertaken. The core concern of the unit remains the desire to better understand the ways in which ordinary people seek to shape the decisions that affect their lives, with a particular focus on those experiencing conflict, prolonged violence, or war. The Department of International Development (@LSE_ID) was established in 1990 as the Development Studies Institute (DESTIN) to promote interdisciplinary postgraduate teaching and research on processes of social, political and economic development and change. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMothers
November 12, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Michael Burleigh | What can history contribute to an understanding of contemporary European populism, which is now as much in power as insurgent? Is this just a reprise of what we have seen before, or something that reveals deeper problems with liberal democracy and capitalism in the post-financial crisis era? The lecture will focus on continental Europe with Brexit Britain, joining Putin’s Russia in the second lecture, taking place in January. Professor Michael Burleigh is the first Engelsberg Chair for 2019/20 at LSE IDEAS. Michael is a historian who focuses primarily on Nazi Germany. He is the author of The Third Reich: a new history, which won the 2001 Samuel Johnson Prize for Non-Fiction. His most recent book is The Best of Times, the Worst of Times. He has also won a British Film Institute Award for Archival Achievement and a New York Film and Television Festival Award Bronze Medal. Christopher Coker is Director of LSE IDEAS and Professor of International Relations at LSE. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPopulism
November 11, 2019
Speaker(s): Vicky Pryce | The free market as we know it cannot produce gender equality. This is the bold but authoritative argument of Vicky Pryce, the government’s former economics chief. Vicky Pryce (@realVickyPryce) is Chief Economic Adviser, Centre for Economics and Business Research and an alumna of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Her new book is Women vs Capitalism: Why We Can't Have It All in a Free Market Economy. Vicky's recent posts have included: Senior Managing Director at FTI Consulting; Director General for Economics at the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS); and Joint Head of the UK Government Economics Service where she was responsible for evidence based policy and for encouraging measures that promoted greater productivity in the UK economy. She had previously been Partner and Chief Economist at KPMG and earlier held chief economist positions in banking and the oil sector. Vicky co-founded GoodCorporation, a company set up to promote corporate social responsibility. At various stages in her career she has been on the Council of the Royal Economic Society, on the Council of the University of Kent, on the board of trustees at the RSA, on the Court of the London School of Economics and Political Science, a fellow of the Society of Business Economists, on the Executive Committee and the Council of the IFS, an Academician of the Academy of Social Sciences, a Visiting Professor at the Cass Business School, a Visiting Fellow at Nuffield College, Adjunct Professor at Imperial College and Visiting Professor at Queen Mary, University of London. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Women vs Capitalism: Why We Can't Have It All in a Free Market Economy. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy, LSE. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.
November 8, 2019
Speaker(s): Heather Boushey | Do we have to choose between equality and prosperity? Many think that reducing economic inequality would require such heavy-handed interference with market forces that it would stifle economic growth. Heather Boushey, one of Washington’s most influential economic voices, insists nothing could be further from the truth. Presenting cutting-edge economics with journalistic verve, she shows how rising inequality has become a drag on growth and an impediment to a competitive United States marketplace for employers and employees alike. Boushey makes this case with a clear, accessible tour of the best of contemporary economic research, while also injecting a passion for her subject gained through years of research into the economics of work–life conflict and policy work in the trenches of federal government. Unbound exposes deep problems in the U.S. economy, but its conclusion is optimistic. We can preserve the best of our nation’s economic and political traditions, and improve on them, by pursuing policies that reduce inequality—and by doing so, boost broadly shared economic growth. Heather Boushey (@HBoushey) is President and CEO of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth and former Chief Economist on Hillary Clinton’s transition team. She is the author of Finding Time: The Economics of Work-Life Conflict and coeditor of After Piketty: The Agenda for Economics and Inequality (both from Harvard). The New York Times has called Boushey one of the “most vibrant voices in the field” and Politico twice named her one of the top 50 “thinkers, doers, and visionaries transforming American politics.” Dr Tahnee Ooms (@TahneeOoms) is a researcher at the International Inequalities Institute whose research focusses on how capital incomes feed back into rising overall income and wealth inequality, with a specific focus on the measurement of economic inequality using quantitative methods, and how to shape and communicate findings in a way they can be of practical use for policy and the real world. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.
November 7, 2019
Speaker(s): Sanchia Berg, Professor Lee Elliot Major | What can we do to improve Britain’s low social mobility - one of the most pressing issues facing young people growing up today? Boris Johnson continues a tradition that has stood for generations. Every Prime Minister since the end of World War Two who has attended an English University has attended just one institution: Oxford. Meanwhile 100,000s of children leave school each year without the basics to get on in life. Britain suffers from low social mobility. But how can we improve it? Our panel will discuss potential solutions, and you the audience will vote on the solution. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Social Mobility And Its Enemies. Sanchia Berg (@Sanchia7) is a senior BBC reporter/correspondent. She works on Radio 4's Today Programme and on BBC2's Newsnight, specialising in Education and Social Affairs. Lee Elliot Major (@Lem_Exeter) is Professor of Social Mobility, University of Exeter and Visiting Senior Fellow, LSE. Stephen Machin (@s_machin_) is Professor of Economics and Director of the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE. CEP (@CEP_LSE) is an interdisciplinary research centre at the LSE. Established by the ESRC in 1990, is now one of the leading economic research groups in Europe. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSESocialMobility
November 5, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Esther Duflo | Join us for the Stamp Memorial Lecture which will be delivered by the 2019 joint winner of the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences Esther Duflo who will be speaking about her new book Good Economics for Hard Times: Better Answers to Our Biggest Problems. Most of the issues that tear us apart today (from trade to immigration to Brexit) are, fundamentally, economic issues, but no one seems to be willing to listen to economists any more. In this lecture, based on her forthcoming book with Abhijit Banerjee with the same title, Professor Duflo will outline how a humane economics, that puts the individual and its wants and needs at the centre of its intellectual project, can guide a better conversation on the core problems that our generations need to resolve, from climate change, to nationalist rivalries, to the rise in inequality. Esther Duflo is the Abdul Latif Jameel Professor of Poverty Alleviation and Development Economics in the Department of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a co-founder and co-director of the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL). In her research, she seeks to understand the economic lives of the poor, with the aim to help design and evaluate social policies. She has worked on health, education, financial inclusion, environment and governance. Professor Esther Duflo’s first degrees were in history and economics from Ecole Normale Superieure, Paris. She subsequently received a Ph.D. in Economics from MIT in 1999. Duflo has received numerous academic honors and prizes including the 2019 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences (awarded jointly with Abhijit Banerjee and Michael Kremer), the Princess of Asturias Award for Social Sciences (2015), the A.SK Social Science Award (2015), Infosys Prize (2014), the David N. Kershaw Award (2011), a John Bates Clark Medal (2010), and a MacArthur “Genius Grant” Fellowship (2009). With Abhijit Banerjee, she wrote Poor Economics: A Radical Rethinking of the Way to Fight Global Poverty, which won the Financial Times and Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year Award in 2011 and has been translated into more than 17 languages. Duflo is the Editor of the American Economic Review, a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a Corresponding Fellow of the British Academy. To pre-order a copy of Esther's new book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to Good Economics for Hard Times. Robin Burgess is Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE and Director of the International Growth Centre. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEStamp This lecture is in memory of Josiah Charles Stamp who obtained a degree in economics from LSE in 1916. His thesis was published as British Incomes and Property in 1916 and launched his academic career. In 1919 he served on the Royal Commission on Income Tax and in the same year he joined Nobel Industries Ltd as secretary and director from which Imperial Chemical Industries later developed. In 1926 he became the president of the executive of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway and two years later he was appointed director of the Bank of England. He also served as a governor and vice chairman of LSE. Stamp also held lectureships in economics at several universities, including Cambridge, Oxford and Liverpool. In 1938 he was raised to the peerage as Baron Stamp of Shortlands, Kent. Stamp died on 16 April 1941. In 1942 a trust was set up jointly by the Bank of England, the London Midland and Scottish Railway, ICI and the Abbey Road Building Society to pay for the organisation of a Stamp memorial lecture.
November 4, 2019
Speaker(s): Dr Ann Pettifor | To protect the systems that sustain life on earth, we need to do more than just reimagine the economy – we have to change everything. From one of the original thinkers of the program that helped ignite the US Green New Deal campaign, Ann Pettifor explains how we can afford what we can do. We have done it before – and can do it again. Ann Pettifor (@AnnPettifor) is the Director of Prime, an Honorary Research Fellow at City University, a Research Associate at SOAS and a Fellow of the New Economics Foundation. Her new book is The Case for the Green New Deal. To pre-order a copy of the book, which can be collected from independent bookshop Pages of Hackney at the event, please go to The Case for the Green New Deal. Sam Fankhauser is Director of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE) was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPettifor This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.
October 31, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Catherine Barnard, Vicky Pryce, Sir Ivan Rogers, Professor Tony Travers | October 31st has been set as the new deadline by which the UK will formally cease being a member of the European Union. By this stage, we may have a new Brexit agreement or a “no-deal”. This panel will assess developments to this point and the implications for the UK going forward. The panellists will bring together a range of expertise, covering British politics, knowledge of Whitehall, the economy, and UK-EU law. Catherine Barnard (@CSBarnard24) is Professor of European Union and Labour Law at Trinity College, University of Cambridge. Vicky Pryce (@realVickyPryce) is Chief Economic Advisor, Centre for Economics and Business Research and former Joint Head of the UK Government Economic Service. Sir Ivan Rogers is the former UK Permanent Representative to the EU. Tony Travers is Associate Dean of the School of Public Policy, LSE. Kevin Featherstone is Professor in European Politics and Director of the Hellenic Observatory, European Institute, LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBrexit
October 30, 2019
Speaker(s): John Maeda | From data bias, to political meddling and self-learning algorithms – machines are more powerful than ever in today’s society. But so few of us understand how these systems work. A leading thinker on the crossover between design, technology and business, reveals how essential it is that we educate ourselves about the laws of our digital age, and how to do just that. John Maeda (@johnmaeda) is Chief Experience Officer at Publicis Sapient. An engineer, computer scientist and designer by training, Maeda is also the former president of the Rhode Island School of Design, was Head of Computational Design and Inclusion at Automattic and a partner at Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, the venture capitalist firm. His Ted talks on design are hugely popular, and he is the author of the books The Laws of Simplicity and Redesigning Leadership. His new book is How to Speak Machine: Laws of Design for a Computational Age. Dr Carsten Sørensen is an Associate Professor (Reader) of Information Systems and Innovation at LSE’s Department of Management. The Department of Management (@LSEManagement) is a world class centre for education and research in business and management. At the heart of LSE’s academic community in central London, we are ranked #2 in the world for business and management studies. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMaeda This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.
October 29, 2019
Speaker(s): Dr Gro Harlem Brundtland, Juan Manuel Santos Calderón | Around the world we see stark reminders of increasing division within and between nations and a vacuum of moral leadership committed to addressing the root causes of democratic deficits. Join us as we explore how this generation of rising grassroots leaders are tackling our challenges through collective purpose, changing culture and policy, and how leaders from across the generations can support and amplify them. Gro Harlem Brundtland was the first woman Prime Minister of Norway, serving for more than 10 years over three terms until 1996. Following this she was Director-General of the World Health Organization from 1998-2003 and UN Special Envoy on Climate Change from 2007-2010. She is a member of the Elders serving as Deputy Chair from 2013-2018, and is an Honorary Fellow of LSE. Juan Manuel Santos Calderón (@JuanManSantos) is the former President of the Republic of Colombia, serving two terms, from 2010 to 2018. Throughout his public sector career, President Santos has held important ministerial roles. He was Colombia’s first Foreign Trade Minister, has been Minister of Finance and before being elected President, was Minister for National Defence. Prior to entering politics, President Santos was deputy director of El Tiempo newspaper, and wrote a weekly opinion column. He was awarded with the King of Spain International Journalism Award and named president of the Freedom of Expression Commission for the Inter American Press Association (IAPA). In 2016 he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He is a member of The Elders and a Honorary Graduate of LSE. President Santos studied for a Master of Science in the Department of Economics at LSE in 1975. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. An economist by training, Dame Minouche Shafik has spent most of her career straddling the worlds of public policy and academia. After completing her BSc in economics and politics at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst, she took an MSc in economics at LSE before completing a DPhil in economics at St Antony’s College at the University of Oxford.
October 28, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Cathie-Jo Martin | Cathie-Jo Martin examines differences in literary narratives on education, the individual and society, and its influence on education policy choices in Britain and Denmark. Differences in literary narratives about education, the individual, and society influence education policy choices in Britain and Denmark. British narratives helped to construct an individualistic educational culture (initially for upper- and middle-class youth) by portraying schooling as essential to individual self-development. Re-formers later sought general, rather than vocational, secondary schools to assure equality of educational opportunity across classes. Conversely, Danish narratives nurtured a collectivist educational culture that posited schooling as crucial for building a strong society. Early mass education constituted social investment, and differentiation of secondary education tracks was necessary to meet diverse societal needs. Writers are political agents in this story. They collectively debate is-sues in their works and thereby convey their views to political leaders in predemocratic regimes prior to reform episodes. They rework cultural symbols and themes from an earlier age to address new challenges, and embed assumptions about education, the individual, and society in their stories. Authors’ narratives contribute to cognitive frames about social and economic problems and help other elites to formulate preferences regarding education options. Fiction is particularly well-suited to imbuing issues with emotional salience, as readers are moved by the suffering and triumphs of protagonists in ways that scholarly essays find difficult to achieve. Thus fiction may enhance the emotional commitment to schooling and influence assessments of marginal groups. Writers’ depictions are not deterministic, but like political policy legacies, the cultural touchstones of these created worlds constrain political institutional development. Cathie-Jo Martin is Professor at Boston University and Director, BU Center for the Study of Europe. David Soskice is School Professor of Political Science and Economics and Research Director of the International Inequalities Institute at LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEIII
October 25, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Marion Fourcade | Join us for the annual British Journal of Sociology Lecture. The expansion of social citizenship in the 20th century mitigated the brute effects of economic inequality in people’s lives. The institutionalization of universal rights and entitlement programs recognised that access to a “civilized” life should not depend on wealth only. Economic and social difference did not disappear—far from it—but it could now legitimate itself through the opportunities offered by, among others, the educational system. The new rights also created new social divisions, however, separating citizens according to their ability to do well through them. In this lecture, Professor Fourcade will explore how these twin dynamics of inclusion and stratification play out in the 21st century. As digital technologies have enabled a broadening of economic and social incorporation, the possibilities for classifying, sorting, slotting and scaling people have also grown and diversified. New ways of measuring and demonstrating merit have sprung up, some better accepted than others. Institutions, both market and state, find themselves compelled to build up and exploit this efficient, proliferating, fine-grained knowledge in order to manage individual claims on resources and opportunities. This process, she argues, creates new social demands for self-care and individual fitness that possibly erode the universal and solidaristic basis upon which the expansion of citizenship historically thrived. Marion Fourcade is Professor of Sociology at the University of California at Berkeley. She received her PhD from Harvard University (2000) and taught at New York University and Princeton University before joining the Berkeley sociology department in 2003. A comparative sociologist by training and taste, she is interested in variations in economic and political knowledge and practice across nations. Her first book, Economists and Societies, explored the distinctive character of the discipline and profession of economics in three countries. A second book, The Ordinal Society (with Kieran Healy), is under contract. This book investigates new forms of social stratification and morality in the digital economy. Other recent research focuses on the valuation of nature in comparative perspective; the moral regulation of states; the comparative study of political organization (with Evan Schofer and Brian Lande); the microsociology of courtroom exchanges (with Roi Livne); the sociology of economics, with Etienne Ollion and Yann Algan, and with Rakesh Khurana; the politics of wine classifications in France and the United States (with Rebecca Elliott and Olivier Jacquet). A final book-length project, Measure for Measure: Social Ontologies of Classification, will examine the cultural and institutional logic of what we may call "national classificatory styles" across a range of empirical domains. Fourcade is also an Associate Fellow of the Max Planck-Sciences Po Center on Coping with Instability in Market Societies (Maxpo), and a past President of the Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics (2016). The Department of Sociology (@LSEsociology) seek to produce sociology that is public-facing, fully engaged with London as a global city, and with major contemporary debates in the intersection between economy, politics and society – with issues such as financialisation, inequality, migration, urban ecology, and climate change. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBJS
October 24, 2019
Speaker(s): Dr Zanna Clay, Dr Simone Schnall, Professor Philip Pettit | Where do our ideas of right and wrong come from? Can the evolutionary processes that produced human beings explain the moral frameworks adopted by human societies? And what can developmental biology tell us about the emergence of ethical behaviour in children? From anthropology to cognitive science, philosophy to evolutionary biology, we shed some light on the complex story of Homo moralis. Zanna Clay is Assistant Professor of Anthropology, Durham University. Simone Schnall is Reader in Experimental Social Psychology, University of Cambridge. Philip Pettit is LS Rockefeller University Professor of Politics and Human Values, Princeton University. Clare Moriarty (@quiteclare) is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy. Founded in 1996, the Forum for Philosophy (@forumphilosophy) is a non-profit organization that has gained widespread recognition for its work as initiator and sponsor of engaging and thoughtful events that facilitate wider participation in academic philosophy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.
October 23, 2019
Speaker(s): Dr Hope M Harrison | This public lecture will examine the arc of memory politics in Germany since 1989, including the impact of the rise of the far right as well as German plans for the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Wall. The history, meaning and legacy of the Berlin Wall remain controversial three decades after its fall. Approaching the 30th anniversary on 9 November, Germans are engaged anew in debates about the history and aftermath of communist East Germany and its Wall. This public lecture will examine the arc of memory politics in Germany since 1989, including the impact of the rise of the far right as well as German plans for the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Wall. Hope M Harrison is Associate Professor of History and International Affairs at the George Washington University. Her new book is After the Berlin Wall: Memory and the Making of the New Germany, 1989 to the Present and has been called “a tour de force,” “riveting,” and “superbly informed and often moving”. She is the prize-winning author of Driving the Soviet up the Wall: Soviet-East German Relations, 1953-1961 (2003) and has appeared on the BBC, CNN, and Deutschlandradio. She serves on the board of three institutions in Berlin connected to the Cold War and the Berlin Wall. Roham Alvandi is Associate Professor of International History at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Director of the LSE IDEAS Cold War Studies Project. He is the author of Nixon, Kissinger, and the Shah: The United States and Iran in the Cold War (Oxford University Press, 2014), which was selected by the Financial Times as one of the best history books of 2014. He edited the recent volume The Age of Aryamehr: Late Pahlavi Iran and its Global Entanglements (Gingko Library, 2018). LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. The LSE's Department of International History (@lsehistory) teaches and conducts research on the international history of Britain, Europe and the world from the early modern era up to the present day. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBerlinWall
October 22, 2019
Speaker(s): Mustafa Briggs, Martha Ojo | Straight from his US tour, Mustafa Briggs will present on the history of Islam in the Americas. Don't miss out on the exclusive and exciting opportunity to learn about black history from a different perspective. Mustafa Briggs' (@MustafaBriggs) profile rose from his ‘Beyond Bilal: Black History in Islam’ lecture series which saw him explore and uncover the deep rooted relationship between Islam and Black History; and the legacy of contemporary African Islamic Scholarship. Mustafa is a graduate of Arabic & International Relations from the University of Westminster whose dissertation focused on Arabic Literature and Literacy in West Africa. Started an MA in Translation at SOAS with a specialisation in Arabic and Islamic Texts, before going onto al-Azhar University in Cairo, Egypt where he is currently doing another degree in Islamic Studies & Arabic. Martha Ojo is the LSE Student's Union Education Officer (2018-2020). Martha is the Union's authoritative voice on all academic issues and has organised the Black History Month programme. She is a graduate of the Department of International History. Zulum Elumogo is General Secretary of LSE Student's Union and LSE Governor (2018-2020). In his role, Zulum represents students at high level meetings while delivering his own projects and initiatives. These include a Students' Union Fund, LSESU Creative Network and a Graduate Support Fund. The London School of Economics Students' Union (@lsesu) is the representative and campaigning body for students at The London School of Economics and Political Science. LSESU is a not-for-profit organisation run by LSE students, for LSE students. LSESU aims to give students the life-changing experiences. Black History Month is one of the key dates in the Union calendar. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBlackHistory
October 21, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Stephen M. Walt Professor Stephen M. Walt | Since its victory in the Cold War, U.S. foreign policy has been largely a failure. Neither Republicans nor Democrats seem able to manage world affairs as successfully as they once did. Donald Trump took office pledging to fix the problem and “make America great again,” but his actions as president have done nothing to make Americans or the world either safer or more prosperous. What would a more realistic and successful foreign policy look like, and what needs to change in order to implement it? Stephen M. Walt (@stephenWalt) is the Robert and Renée Belfer Professor of International Affairs at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. He previously taught at Princeton University and the University of Chicago, where he served as Master of the Social Science Collegiate Division and Deputy Dean of Social Sciences. He has been a Resident Associate of the Carnegie Endowment for Peace and a Guest Scholar at the Brookings Institution, and he has also served as a consultant for the Institute of Defense Analyses, the Center for Naval Analyses, and the National Defense University. He presently serves on the editorial boards of Foreign Policy, Security Studies, International Relations, and Journal of Cold War Studies, and he also serves as Co-Editor of the Cornell Studies in Security Affairs, published by Cornell University Press. Additionally, he was elected as a Fellow in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in May 2005. Professor Walt is the author of The Origins of Alliances (1987), which received the 1988 Edgar S. Furniss National Security Book Award. He is also the author of Revolution and War (1996), Taming American Power: The Global Response to U.S. Primacy (2005), and, with co-author J.J. Mearsheimer, The Israel Lobby (2007). His latest book is The Hell of Good Intentions. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Professor of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEUSForeignPol This event is part of the LSE US Centre's Phelan Family Lecture series. Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at Can America Still Have a Successful Foreign Policy? Podcasts and videos of many LSE events can be found at the LSE Public Lectures and Events: podcasts and videos channel.
October 17, 2019
Speaker(s): Dr Robert Basedow, Professor DING Chun, Dr Yu Jie, Dr Thomas Sampson | The US-China trade conflict opens new opportunities for the EU to position itself. Should it align itself with the US in forcing China to open up its markets? Or should the EU seek to intensify its economic cooperation with China so as to gain a competitive advantage? How should the EU react to Chinese bilateral agreements with EU-members in the framework of its Silk Road initiative? These and other key trade issues between China and the European Union will be debated during this event, which marks the launch of the new LSE-Fudan Double Degree in the Global Political Economy of China and Europe. Robert Basedow is Assistant Professor in International Political Economy, European Institute, LSE. DING Chun is Professor in Economics and Director of the Centre for European Studies, Fudan University. YU Jie (@Yu_JieC) is Senior Research Fellow on China, Chatham House. Thomas Sampson is Associate Professor of Economics, LSE. Paul De Grauwe (@pdegrauwe) is John Paulson Chair in European Political Economy, European Institute, LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEChina
October 16, 2019
Speaker(s): Peter Freeman | In this lecture Peter Freeman will argue that long-term, institutional investors should support mixed-use, master-planned developments because their social and commercial aims create value and reduce risk. Peter Freeman is co-founder of Argent, a UK-based property developer responsible for the redevelopment of King's Cross. Paul Cheshire is Emeritus Professor of Economic Geography at LSE. The Department of Geography and Environment (@LSEGeography) is a centre of international academic excellence in economic, urban and development geography, with particular specialisms in real estate economics and planning
October 15, 2019
Speaker(s): Dr Cara Nine, Yousif M Qasmiyeh, Dr Beth Watts | ‘Home’ means more than a roof over our heads. It can be crucial to our sense of ourselves and our well-being. So what might it mean to have a right to a home? And what is lost when we lose our home? We discuss the politics, philosophy, and poetry of home, exploring the fundamental connection between home and human well-being. Cara Nine is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy, University College Cork. Yousif M Qasmiyeh is Writer-in-Residence, Refugee Hosts, and Creative Encounters Editor, Migration and Society. Beth Watts (@BethWatts494) is Senior Research Fellow, Heriot-Watt University. Sarah Fine (@DrSJFine) is Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy and a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy, KCL. Founded in 1996, the Forum for Philosophy (@forumphilosophy) is a non-profit organization that has gained widespread recognition for its work as initiator and sponsor of engaging and thoughtful events that facilitate wider participation in academic philosophy.
October 14, 2019
Speaker(s): Charles Moore | Charles Moore will speak about the third and final in his series of biographies of Margaret Thatcher, focusing on her last period in office. How did Margaret Thatcher change and divide Britain? How did her model of combative female leadership help shape the way we live now? How did the woman who won the Cold War and three general elections in succession find herself pushed out by her own MPs? Charles Moore’s full account, based on unique access to Margaret Thatcher herself, her papers and her closest associates, tells the story of her last period in office, her combative retirement and the controversy that surrounded her even in death. It includes the fall of the Berlin Wall, which she had fought for, and the rise of the modern EU, which she feared. It lays bare her growing quarrels with colleagues and reveals the truth about her political assassination. Charles Moore is a journalist and former editor of the Daily Telegraph. His latest book is Margaret Thatcher: The Authorized Biography, Volume Three: Herself Alone. Tony Travers is Professor in LSE's Department of Government and Associate Dean of the LSE School of Public Policy. The Department of Government (@LSEGovernment) is home to some of the most internationally respected experts in politics and government; producing influential research that has a global impact on policy, and delivering world-class teaching to our students.
October 10, 2019
Speaker(s): Clive Lewis, Deborah Mattinson | With the Brexit deadline fast approaching, a leading politician and a prominent pollster discuss what Labour can and should do now. Clive Lewis (@labourlewis) is Labour MP for Norwich South and Shadow Minister for the Treasury. Deborah Mattinson (@debmattinson) is a founding partner of Britain Thinks. Robin Archer is the Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@rmilibandlse) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEBrexit
October 9, 2019
Speaker(s): Ed Miliband, James Murray, Farhana Yamin | Can climate activism – from Extinction Rebellion to the school climate strikes – bring about the radical change in government and business that is needed to stop runaway global warming? The Grantham Research Institute hosts a debate about what works in climate politics, and what role street protests can play. Ed Miliband (@Ed_Miliband) is a former leader of the Labour Party and Secretary of State for Energy and Climate Change. He is MP for Doncaster North and an alumnus of LSE. James Murray (@James_BG) is Founder and Editor-in-Chief of BusinessGreen. Farhana Yamin (@farhanaclimate), international lawyer and environmental activist. Robert Falkner is Research Director at the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, LSE. The Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment (@GRI_LSE) was established by the London School of Economics and Political Science in 2008 to create a world-leading centre for policy-relevant research and training on climate change and the environment, bringing together international expertise on economics, finance, geography, the environment, international development and political economy. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEClimateProtest This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.
October 8, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Margaret MacMillan | The Great War of 1914-18 left a shattered Europe and a changed world. Despite a widespread longing for peace and for a new international order, the world was to have a second catastrophic war 20 years later. The peacemakers of 1919 are often blamed for creating the conditions which sent some European nations down the road towards dictatorship and led Europe and the world towards the Second World War. This public lecture will ask why moving from war to peace can be so difficult and examine the particular challenges faced by the peacemakers in 1919. It will ask whether the accepted view, that the peace settlements made then doomed Europe and the world to another war, is a fair one. It will also suggest ways we might learn from the past as we face a turbulent and uncertain present. Margaret MacMillan is Professor of History at the University of Toronto and Emeritus Professor of the University of Oxford. LSE's Department of Law (@LSELaw) is one of the world’s top law schools. The Department ranked first for research outputs in the UK’s most recent Research Excellence Framework and has consistently been among the top 10 departments to study Law in the world according to the QS World University rankings. Our staff play a major role in helping to shape policy debates and in the education of current and future lawyers and legal scholars from around the world. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMakingPeace This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.
October 3, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor G John Ikenberry, Dr Kori Schake, Professor Linda Yueh | Top thinkers from the world of international relations - John Ikenberry, Linda Yueh, Kori Schake and Michael Cox in the Chair - will here debate the idea of 'Anglo-America', what the relationship between the USA and UK has meant for the world in the twentieth century, and how a retreat by both from the world - and perhaps from each other - will impact on the international system. "There is general agreement amongst scholars of IR that the international system is passing through a major and potentially disturbing transition. There are at least two component parts of this: one leading to a real questioning of the liberal order more generally; and another which is asking very serious questions about the longer-term viability of the so-called - but still significant- 'Special Relationship' between the United Kingdom and the United States. The two processes are closely connected. Thus, Brexit and Trump taken together present a genuine threat to the props that have hitherto supported the global economic order. A weakening of these two props in turn poses a threat to the stability of the Transatlantic relationship. And a diminution in the ties binding the Atlantic area together are bound to weaken the leadership of the West." – says Professor Michael Cox. G John Ikenberry is Albert G Milbank Professor of Politics and International Affairs, Princeton University. Kori Schake (@KoriSchake) is Deputy Director-General at the International Institute for Strategic Studies. Linda Yueh (@lindayueh) is Visiting Professor, LSE IDEAS and Chair of the Economic Diplomacy Commission, LSE. Michael Cox is Director of LSE IDEAS and Emeritus Professor of International Relations at LSE. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. The Department of International Relations (@LSEIRDept) is now in its 91st year, making them one of the oldest as well as largest in the world. They are ranked 4th in the QS World University Ranking by Subject 2019 tables for Politics and International Studies. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPopulism
October 2, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Guy Standing, Caroline Lucas, David Lammy | In this event about his new book Guy Standing leads us through a new appraisal of the commons, stemming from the medieval concept of common land reserved in ancient law from marauding barons, to his modern reappraisal of the resources we all hold in common. Accelerated by Margaret Thatcher and then even more so in the austerity era, our Commons have been depleted illegitimately. The commons belong to all commoners, and include the natural resources, inherited social amenities and services, our cultural inheritance, the institutions of civil common law and the knowledge commons. The rights of commoners were first established in the Magna Carta and the Charter of the Forest in 1217. This presentation will draw on a new book to show how all forms of commons have been taken in the neo-liberal era, through enclosure, commodification, privatisation and, most shockingly, colonisation. It will highlight how this has increased inequality. It will conclude by outlining the key components of a 44-Article Charter of the Commons that could be an integrated part of an ecologically progressive politics in Britain and elsewhere. Caroline Lucas (@CarolineLucas) is MP for Brighton Pavilion. She served as leader of the Green Party of England and Wales from 2008-2012, and co-leader from 2016-2018. Guy Standing is Professorial Research Associate, SOAS, and a founder and co-President of BIEN. His new book is Plunder of the Commons: A Manifesto for Sharing Public Wealth. David Lammy (@DavidLammy)is Labour MP for Tottenham. Mike Savage (@MikeSav47032563) is Martin White Professor of Sociology at LSE and Director of the International Inequalities Institute. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEWealth
October 1, 2019
Speaker(s): Joseph Marks, Steve Martin | Why are self-confident ignoramuses so often believed? Why are thoughtful experts so often given the cold shoulder? And why do apparently irrelevant details such as a person’s height, their relative wealth, or their Facebook photo influence whether or not we trust what they are saying? These are just some of the questions that behavioural experts Steve Martin and Joseph Marks tackle in their new book Messengers: Who We Listen To, Who We Don’t, and Why which they will discuss in this talk. Joseph Marks (@joemarks13) is Doctoral Researcher, University College London. Steve Martin (@scienceofyes) is the CEO of Influence At Work and author of Yes! 50 Secrets from the Science of Persuasion. Paul Dolan (@profpauldolan) is Professor of Behavioural Science and Head of the Psychological and Behavioural Science Department at LSE. PBS@LSE (@LSE_PBS) is a growing community of researchers, intellectuals, and students who investigate the human mind and behaviour in a societal context. Our department conducts cutting-edge psychological and behavioural research that is both based in and applied to the real world. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMessengers This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.
September 30, 2019
Speaker(s): Poul Thomsen | Ten years after the start of the Greek crisis, the discussion will centre on the role played by the IMF, its coordination with the European Union, and the lessons to be learned in the case of future crises. Poul Thomsen has been Director of the European Department at the International Monetary Fund since November 2014 supervising the Fund’s bilateral surveillance work for the 44 countries in the Department, its policy dialogue with EU institutions, including the ECB, and its program discussions with European countries with Fund supported programs. As Director Mr Thomsen also has the responsibility for the Fund’s outreach activities in Europe and its interactions with European senior officials. Before taking up his current position, Mr. Thomsen had, as Deputy Director of the European Department, the primary responsibility for the Fund’s programs with European countries affected by the global financial crisis and the subsequent crisis in the Euro Zone, including as mission chief for Iceland, Greece and Portugal and as supervisor of the programs for Romania and Ukraine. Before the global financial crisis, Mr. Thomsen gained extensive knowledge of countries in Central and Eastern Europe, having worked on the region continuously from 1987 to 2008, including as mission chief for multiple countries in the region, head of the Fund’s Russia Division during the 1998 Russian financial crisis, and Director of its Moscow Office from 2001 to 2004. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics and the Director of the Hellenic Observatory. The Hellenic Observatory (@HO_LSE) is internationally recognised as one of the premier research centres on contemporary Greece and Cyprus. It engages in a range of activities, including developing and supporting academic and policy-related research; organisation of conferences, seminars and workshops; academic exchange through visiting fellowships and internships; as well as teaching at the graduate level through LSE's European Institute. The Hellenic Bankers Association UK was founded in 1994 to promote a closer co-operation among bankers and financial professionals of Hellenic origin based in the United Kingdom. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEGreece
September 26, 2019
Speaker(s): Laura Diaz Anadon, Patrick Milton, Minouche Shafik, Aino Rosa Kristina Spohr, Nicholas Stern, Geraint Thomas | This event marks the 80th Anniversary of the war-time evacuation of LSE to Peterhouse. Laura Diaz Anadon is Professor of Climate Change Policy at the University of Cambridge. Former BBC Correspondent, Bridget Kendall was appointed the first female Master of Peterhouse, the University of Cambridge's oldest College, in 2016. Patrick Milton, Research Fellow at Peterhouse, Cambridge and a historian of early modern Europe Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. Aino Rosa Kristina Spohr is Associate Professor in the Department of International History at LSE. Nicholas Stern, IG Patel Professor of Economics and Government, Chairman of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and Head of the India Observatory at LSE. Geraint Thomas is a Fellow at Peterhouse, Cambridge and a historian of twentieth-century Britain. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEatPeterhouse
September 19, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Michael Ignatieff, Professor Pippa Norris | A populist wave has swept across the democratic world. What are the economic and social causes of this wave, and how should democratic leaders respond? Michael Ignatieff (@M_Ignatieff) is President and Rector of Central European University. Born in Canada, educated at the University of Toronto and Harvard, Michael Ignatieff is a university professor, writer and former politician. Between 2006 and 2011, he served as an MP in the Parliament of Canada and then as Leader of the Liberal Party of Canada and Leader of the Official Opposition. He is a member of the Queen’s Privy Council for Canada and holds thirteen honorary degrees. Between 2012 and 2015 he served as Centennial Chair at the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs in New York. Between 2014 and 2016 he was Edward R. Murrow Chair of the Press, Politics and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. Pippa Norris (@PippaN15) is a comparative political scientist who has taught at Harvard for more than a quarter century. She is ARC Laureate Fellow and Professor of Government and International Relations at the University of Sydney, the Paul F. McGuire Lecturer in Comparative Politics at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, and Director of the Electoral Integrity Project and Co-Director of the TrustGov Project. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is Dean of the School of Public Policy at LSE. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPopulism
September 18, 2019
Speaker(s): Sadiq Khan, Afua Hirsch | London is one of the most diverse and progressive cities in the world, but rapid change means social cohesion is being put to the test like never before. In discussion with Afua Hirsch, Mayor of London Sadiq Khan will state why it’s essential that London is a city for all of us. Afua Hirsch (@afuahirsch) is a writer, journalist and broadcaster and is the Wallis Annenberg Chair in Journalism and Communication at USC. She is a columnist for the Guardian, and appears regularly on the BBC, Sky News and CNN. Brit(ish) is her first book and was awarded a Royal Society of Literature Jerwood Prize for Non-Fiction. Sadiq Khan (@SadiqKhan) was elected Mayor of London in May 2016 winning the largest personal mandate in the history of British politics by securing the support of 1.3 million Londoners. Prior to becoming Mayor, Sadiq was the Member of Parliament for Tooting in South London for 11 years. In this time, he attended Cabinet and served as Shadow Secretary of State for Justice from May 2010 and Shadow Minister for London from 2013. Stephan Chambers is the inaugural director of the Marshall Institute at LSE. He is also Professor in Practice at the Department of Management at LSE and Course Director for the new Executive Masters in Social Business and Entrepreneurship. From 2000 to 2014 he directed the University of Oxford’s MBA and was the founding Director of Oxford University's Executive MBA programme. Before joining the Marshall Institute Stephan Chambers was the Co-Founder of the Skoll World Forum, Chair of the Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship and Director of International Strategy at Saїd Business School, Oxford University. He is a Senior Research Fellow at Lincoln College, Oxford and a Director of the Documentary Society Foundation. Stephan Chambers wrote a regular entrepreneurship column for the Financial Times and, in 2014, was special advisor to the Skoll Global Threats Fund in California. The Marshall Institute (@LSEMarshall) works to improve the impact and effectiveness of private action for public benefit. By private action we mean the activities of philanthropic foundations, social entrepreneurs, charities, NGOs and individual citizens, donating their time, money, ideas, knowledge and skills to serve the public good. By public benefit we mean activities that serve an explicitly social goal. Very often these interventions involve significant risk. Almost always they involve outcomes that are hard to measure. They are always improved by understanding. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSELondon
September 17, 2019
Speaker(s): François Villeroy de Galhau | The Governor of the Bank of France will take to the LSE stage to recall the tangible assets that the Euro has already provided to the Euro area and will focus on the efforts needed towards building a stronger Europe, against the backdrop of Brexit, while stressing three priorities: increasing resilience, increasing growth and affirming sovereignty. François Villeroy de Galhau is the Governor of the Bank of France, a position he has held since November 2015. He is a member of the Governing Council of the European Central Bank. From 1990 to 1993, he was European advisor to the Minister of Finance and Prime Minister Pierre Bérégovoy. He then held various posts at the French Treasury in Bercy, before becoming financial advisor at the Permanent Representation of France in Brussels. Under the government of Lionel Jospin, he was chief of staff of the Minister of the Economy and Finance, Dominique Strauss-Kahn from 1997 to 1999 and Christian Sautter from 1999 to 2000. He was head of the General Tax Directorate from 2000 to 2003. In 2003, he became the Chief Executive Officer of Cetelem, the consumer credit company of BNP Paribas group, then headed the group's retail banking activities in France (2008). He served as Chief Operating Officer of BNP Paribas group, in charge of domestic markets then of corporate social responsibility, from December 2011 until May 2015, when the French government entrusted him with an assignment on investment financing. Iain Begg (@IainBeggLSE) is Professorial Research Fellow at the European Institute and Co-Director of the Dahrendorf Forum. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The Dahrendorf Forum (@DahrendorfForum) is a joint initiative by the Hertie School of Governance and the London School of Economics and Political Science, funded by Stiftung Mercator. Since its creation in 2010, the Dahrendorf project has grown into a major research and policy engagement network focused on debating Europe’s future. LSE IDEAS (@lseideas) is LSE's foreign policy think tank. We connect academic knowledge of diplomacy and strategy with the people who use it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEFrance
September 16, 2019
Speaker(s): Hassan Damluji | Today, globalism is seen as a reckless elitist plot. Meanwhile, nationalists are derided as racists and bigots. But what if the two were not so far apart? In this talk, British-Iraqi development expert Hassan Damluji discusses The Responsible Globalist, a manifesto for building an inclusive global nation. Hassan Damluji (@hassandamluji) leads the Middle East team at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. He is a co-founder of the $2 Billion Lives and Livelihoods Fund, the largest multilateral development fund based in the Middle East. He has been named every year since 2015 as one of the 100 most influential Arabs under 40, by Arabian Business magazine. Erik Berglof (@ErikBerglof) became the inaugural Director of the Institute of Global Affairs (IGA) on 1 February 2015. He joined the School as a Professor in Practice in the Department of Economics. The Institute of Global Affairs (@LSEIGA) aims to maximise the impact of LSE's leading expertise across the social sciences by shaping inclusive and locally-rooted responses to the most important and pressing global challenges. The LSE School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) is an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEGlobalist This event forms part of the “Shape the World” series, held in the run up to the LSE Festival, a week-long series of events taking place from Monday 2 to Saturday 7 March 2020, free to attend and open to all, exploring how social sciences can make the world a better place. The full programme will be available online from January 2020.
September 10, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Robert Shiller | Join us to hear from Nobel Prize winning economist and New York Times bestselling author Robert Shiller who will in this lecture talk about his new book which argues that looking at viral stories’ impact on the economy - an approach he coined as “narrative economics” - gives forecasters better tools for predicting a recession. Robert J. Shiller is Sterling Professor of Economics, Department of Economics and Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University, and Professor of Finance and Fellow at the International Center for Finance, Yale School of Management. He received his B.A. from the University of Michigan in 1967 and his Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1972. He has written on financial markets, financial innovation, behavioral economics, macroeconomics, real estate, statistical methods, and on public attitudes, opinions, and moral judgments regarding markets. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences jointly with Eugene Fama and Lars Peter Hansen in 2013. This event marks the publication of Shiller's new book Narrative Economics. Ricardo Reis is the A W Phillips Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics. He is a consultant to central banks around the world, and is former the chief editor of the Journal of Monetary Economics. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) is a research centre that brings together a group of world class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and help design policies to alleviate it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEShiller Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at Narrative Economics.
September 6, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Robert Shiller | Join us to hear from Nobel Prize winning economist and New York Times bestselling author Robert Shiller who will in this lecture talk about his new book which argues that looking at viral stories’ impact on the economy - an approach he coined as “narrative economics” - gives forecasters better tools for predicting a recession. Robert J. Shiller is Sterling Professor of Economics, Department of Economics and Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University, and Professor of Finance and Fellow at the International Center for Finance, Yale School of Management. He received his B.A. from the University of Michigan in 1967 and his Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1972. He has written on financial markets, financial innovation, behavioral economics, macroeconomics, real estate, statistical methods, and on public attitudes, opinions, and moral judgments regarding markets. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences jointly with Eugene Fama and Lars Peter Hansen in 2013. This event marks the publication of Shiller's new book Narrative Economics. Ricardo Reis is the A W Phillips Professor of Economics at the London School of Economics. He is a consultant to central banks around the world, and is former the chief editor of the Journal of Monetary Economics. The Centre For Macroeconomics (@CFMUK) is a research centre that brings together a group of world class experts to carry out pioneering research on the global economic crisis and help design policies to alleviate it. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEShiller Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at Narrative Economics.
August 13, 2019
Speaker(s): Dr. Aaron Reeves, Laura Lane, Daphine Aikens | Welcome to LSE’s award-winning podcast, LSE IQ, where we ask leading social scientists and other experts to answer an intelligent question. In this episode, Joanna Bale asks ‘Why do we need food banks?’ She talks to LSE’s Aaron Reeves and Laura Lane, as well as Daphine Aikens, founder and CEO of Hammersmith and Fulham food bank, and some of her clients.
June 27, 2019
Speaker(s): Michael O'Sullivan | The liberal, globalised world order is withering according to Michael O'Sullivan in his new book The Levelling: What's Next After Globalization which he will talk about in this lecture. The levelling is the process of ironing out imbalances like indebtedness and inequality, and proposing new ideas and frameworks to kickstart the next world order. The Levelling will involve the levelling of political accountability and responsibility between political leaders and “the people”, the levelling of institutional power—away from central banks and defunct twentieth-century institutions such as the WTO and IMF and toward new treaties (on risk and monetary policy) and new institutions (for example, a truly effective and powerful climate body and an institution or agreement that oversees cybersecurity). It will also involve the levelling out of wealth between rich and poor countries and between the very rich and “the rest,” preferably with “the rest” enjoying both better organic growth and a greater share of this growth. Then the levelling out of power between nations and regions is what the concept of the multipolar world is about, and within it, different regions will have different reserves of power. Michael O’Sullivan, is the former chief investment officer at Credit Suisse. Michael joined Credit Suisse in July 2007 from State Street Global Markets. Prior to joining Credit Suisse, Michael spent over ten years as a global strategist at a number of sell-side institutions and has also taught finance at Princeton and Oxford Universities. He was educated at University College Cork in Ireland and Balliol College in Oxford, where he obtained M.Phil and D.Phil degrees as a Rhodes Scholar. He was an independent member of Ireland's National Economic Social Council from 2011 to 2016 Thomas Sampson is an Associate Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSELevelling
June 21, 2019
Speaker(s): David Miliband | This year’s Maurice Fraser annual lecture will take the form of a conversation between David Miliband and Professor Kevin Featherstone, followed by questions from the audience. The discussion will assess the state of play of the UK’s attempt to find a parliamentary majority for leaving the EU, and put into geopolitical context the choices and the stakes in the negotiations about our future relations with our European neighbours. David Miliband (@DMiliband) is the President and CEO of the International Rescue Committee and former British Foreign Secretary. He oversees the agency’s relief and development operations in over 30 countries, its refugee resettlement and assistance programs throughout the United States and the IRC’s advocacy efforts in Washington and other capitals on behalf of the world’s most vulnerable people. From 2007 to 2010, he served as the youngest Foreign Secretary in the United Kingdom, in three decades. In 2016 David was named one of the World’s Greatest Leaders by Fortune Magazine and in 2018 he was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. David Miliband is also the author of the upcoming book, Rescue: Refugees and the Political Crisis of Our Time. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor in Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor in European Politics. He is the Director of the Hellenic Observatory and Co-Chair of LSEE: Research on South-East Europe within the European Institute The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.
June 18, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Sudhir Anand, Professor Amartya Sen | To ensure that people live long and healthy lives it is important to know what kills different groups of people in different places. The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) based on the Disability-Adjusted Life Year has been developed to do this. This lecture shows how this measure leads to various anomalies and biases, in particular it underestimates the health problems experienced by women and children. Sudhir Anand is Research Director of Global Equity Initiative at Harvard University and Centennial Professor at the International Inequalities Institute, LSE. Amartya Sen is Thomas W Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University and an LSE Honorary Fellow. Mike Savage (@MikeSav47032563) is Director of the International Inequalities Institute and Martin White Professor of Sociology at LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. The Eva Colorni Memorial Trust was established by Amartya Sen to commemorate the life and work of Eva Colorni and to reflect and further her belief in the possibility of social justice. Eva was an excellent teacher and writer whose work and passion were concerned with analysing and redressing inequality. The main activities of the Trust are to award bursaries to undergraduate students of economics who are experiencing hardship at London Metropolitan University, where Eva taught for many years, and to hold lectures on the theme of social justice. The first five lectures were published in a book, called Living As Equals and includes an essay by Amartya Sen on "Social Commitment and Democracy”. There is more information about the Trust and past lectures on the Eva Colorni Memorial Trust website. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEEvaColorni
June 18, 2019
Speaker(s): Valerie Jarrett | Join Valerie Jarrett, Senior Advisor to President Barack Obama in conversation with LSE's Peter Trubowitz about her new book. When Valerie Jarrett interviewed a promising young lawyer named Michelle Robinson in July 1991 for a job in Chicago city government, neither knew that it was the first step on a path that would end in the White House. Jarrett soon became Michelle and Barack Obama’s trusted personal adviser and family confidante; in the White House, she was known as the one who “got” him and helped him engage his public life. Jarrett joined the White House team on January 20, 2009 and departed with the First Family on January 20, 2017, and she was in the room–in the Oval Office, on Air Force One, and everywhere else–when it all happened. No one has as intimate a view of the Obama Years, nor one that reaches back as many decades, as Jarrett shares in Finding My Voice. Valerie Jarrett (@ValerieJarrett) was the Senior Advisor to President Barack Obama for his eight years in office. She now serves as a Senior Advisor to both the Obama Foundation and Attn:, Senior Distinguished Fellow at the University of Chicago Law School, and President of the Board of When We All Vote. Her book, Finding My Voice, debuted on the New York Times Bestsellers list this year. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEJarrett
June 6, 2019
Speaker(s): Amit Chaudhuri | How might the modern, rather than the human, be recovered as a way of looking at a common inheritance? And why is modernity resistant to being recovered? Amit Chaudhuri (@AmitChaudhuri) is an essayist, literary critic and the author of seven novels. Robin Archer is the Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme, LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.
June 4, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg | The Annual Economica Coase lecture is jointly sponsored by the journal Economica and the Department of Economics. Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg is Elihu Professor of Economics at Yale University and Chief Economist of the World Bank Group. She is former Vice-President of the American Economic Association and President elect of the Econometric Society (for 2021). She is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a recipient of both Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and Sloan Research Fellowships, and recipient of the Bodossaki Prize in Social Sciences. She is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economics Research (NBER – currently on leave) and board member of the Bureau of Research and Economic Analysis of Development (BREAD). From 2011-2017 she was Editor-in-Chief of the American Economic Review. She has published widely in the areas of applied microeconomics, international trade, development, and industrial organization. She holds a Ph.D. from Stanford University and a Diplom from the University of Freiburg, Germany. Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is a Professor of Economics, Sir Anthony Atkinson Chair in Economics and Director of STICERD. The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at the LSE is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching. Economica (@EconomicaLSE) is an international peer-reviewed academic journal, covering research in all branches of economics. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECoase
June 3, 2019
Speaker(s): Dr Marjolein Degenaar, Barry Ginley, Dr Brian Glenney | William Molyneux posed the following question: Consider a person who has been born blind and who has learnt to distinguish a globe and a cube by touch. If this person could suddenly see, would they be able to distinguish these objects by sight alone? This seventeenth-century thought experiment, known as ‘Molyneux’s problem’, received attention from some of philosophy’s greatest minds. We discuss how thinkers like Locke and Leibniz, as well as artists with visual impairments, responded to Molyneux’s challenge. Marjolein Degenaar is the author of Molyneux’s Problem: Three Centuries of Discussion on the Perception of Form. Barry Ginley is Equality and Access Adviser, Victoria & Albert Museum. Brian Glenney is Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Norwich University. Clare Moriarty (@quiteclare) is a Fellow, Forum for Philosophy and a Teaching Fellow in Philosophy, UCD The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum
May 30, 2019
Speaker(s): Dr Jonathan Hopkin | At this year’s Annual Lecture, which marks the 10th anniversary of LEQS and follows just days after this year’s European parliamentary elections, Jonathan Hopkin will discuss the recent ruptures in the politics of the rich democracies, signalled by electoral instability across Europe, as well as dramatic events like the election of Donald Trump to the US Presidency and the United Kingdom’s vote to leave the European Union. Dr Hopkin argues that these tumultuous political developments are a consequence of a longer-term crisis of market liberalism, resulting from the abandonment of the post-war model of egalitarian capitalism in the 1970s. This shift in politics entailed weakening the democratic process in favor of an opaque, technocratic form of governance that allows voters little opportunity to influence policy. With the financial crisis of the late 2000s, these arrangements became unsustainable, as incumbent politicians were unable to provide solutions to economic hardship. Electorates demanded change, and it had to come from outside the system. Jonathan Hopkin (@jrhopkin) is Associate Professor of Comparative Politics in the Department of Government at LSE. Miriam Sorace (@MiriamSorace) is an LSE Fellow in EU Politics at LSE’s European Institute. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The LSE 'Europe in Question' Discussion Paper Series (@leqsLSE) was established in May 2009 to publish high quality research on Europe and the European Union from scholars across LSE and beyond. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEEurope
May 28, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Alexander Bird, Dr Laura Fortunato, Professor Marcus Munafò | The hallmark of good science is often supposed to be experiments that produce the same results when repeated. But over the last number of years, scientists have replicated a number of established, high-profile experiments and produced different results. Does it point to serious flaws and biases in the sciences? Or is it evidence of the power of science to self-correct? And what can be done to make science more replicable? We explore whether the replication crisis undermines our trust in science. Alexander Bird is Peter Sowerby Professor of Philosophy and Medicine, KCL. Laura Fortunato is Associate Professor of Evolutionary Anthropology, University of Oxford. Marcus Munafò is Professor of Biological Psychology, University of Bristol. Jonathan Birch is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy and Associate Professor of Philosophy, LSE. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEForum
May 23, 2019
Speaker(s): Dr Judith Scheele | This lecture argues for a return to the study of political institutions in so-called “stateless societies”. Judith Scheele is Directrice d’études, École des hautes études en sciences sociales, France. Deborah James (@djameslse) is Professor in the Department of Anthropology at LSE. This event is the Malinowski Memorial Lecture 2019. Anthropology (@LSEAnthropology) is the comparative study of culture and society. We ask big questions about what we have in common, and what makes us different. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEMalinowski
May 22, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor John Van Reenen | John Van Reenen will discuss the impact of new technologies on jobs, wages and skills, and will assess how this impact will depend on the choices we make now as citizens, managers and voters. John Van Reenen (@johnvanreenen) is Gordon Y. Billiard Professor of Management and Economics at MIT, and BP Professor of Economics at the LSE. Steve Pischke is Head of the Department of Economics at LSE. The Department of Economics (@LSEEcon) at the LSE is one of the leading economics departments in the world. We are a large department, ensuring all mainstream areas of economics are strongly represented in research and teaching. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEFutureJobs
May 21, 2019
Speaker(s): Sophie Pedder | Two years after Emmanuel Macron came from nowhere to seize the French presidency, Sophie Pedder, The Economist’s Paris bureau chief, tells the story of his remarkable rise and time in office so far. In this updated edition, published with a new foreword, Pedder revisits her analysis of Macron’s troubles and triumphs in the light of the gilets jaunes protests. Sophie Pedder (@PedderSophie) is an award-winning journalist and the Paris Bureau Chief of The Economist since 2003. Iain Begg (@IainBeggLSE) is Professorial Research Fellow at the European Institute and Co-Director of the Dahrendorf Forum, LSE. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEFrance
May 17, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Robin D G Kelley | In the context of Afro-pessimism, this lecture will imagine "the Internationale," that great song of international solidarity and revolution transcending the nation, as a blues. Robin D G Kelley is Gary B Nash Endowed Chair in US History, University of California, Los Angeles. Ayça Çubukçu (@ayca_cu) is Associate Professor in Human Rights, Department of Sociology, LSE, and Co-Director of LSE Human Rights. This event is the annual lecture of the Internationalism, Cosmopolitanism and the Politics of Solidarity (ICPS) research group at LSE. LSE Human Rights (@LSEHumanRights) is a trans-disciplinary centre of excellence for international academic research, teaching and critical scholarship on human rights Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSESolidarity
May 16, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Matthew Goodwin, Dr Sara Hagemann, Professor Sara Hobolt | In this especially timely occasion, the panel will consider the impact of the upcoming European elections on the EU as a negotiating actor of Brexit and the future relationship with the UK. Will the balance of power change in the EU institutions? Is this the next stop for the populist wave, after Brexit? Matthew Goodwin (@GoodwinMJ) is Professor of Politics and International Relations, University of Kent. Sara Hagemann (@sarahagemann) is Associate Professor in European Politics, European Institute, LSE. Sara Hobolt (@sarahobolt) is Sutherland Chair in European Institutions and Professor in the Department of Government, LSE. Andrés Velasco (@AndresVelasco) is the inaugural Dean of LSE's School of Public Policy. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. We are an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.
May 14, 2019
Speaker(s): Dr Jo Grady, Dr Martin O'Neill, Dr Waseem Yaqoob | Workers of the world, unite! We discuss the history, politics, and ethics of strikes, and their place in the labour movement. Why do they happen and what makes for a successful strike? What justifies workers in withdrawing their labour to push bosses for improved pay and conditions? And will this event be cancelled due to strike action?! Jo Grady is a Senior Lecturer in Employment Relations, University of Sheffield. Martin O'Neill is a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy, University of York. Waseem Yaqoob is a Lecturer in the History of Modern Political Thought, University of Cambridge. Sarah Fine is a Fellow at the Forum for Philosophy and a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at KCL. The Forum for European Philosophy (@ForumPhilosophy) is an educational charity that organises a full and varied programme of philosophy and interdisciplinary events in the UK.
May 13, 2019
Speaker(s): Paul Mason | We face a triple threat: authoritarian politicians, the possibility of intelligent machines and a secular fatalism and irrationality. But they can all be fought. Paul Mason explains how. Paul Mason (@paulmasonnews) is a British commentator, journalist and author. This event marks the publication of Paul's new book, Clear Bright Future: A Radical Defence of the Human Being. In the 1980s Paul worked as a special needs teacher, a theatre musical director and university lecturer before switching to journalism in the early 1990s. He was deputy editor of Computer Weekly during the dotcom boom and joined BBC Newsnight in 2001. ​He worked as economics editor on Newsnight, switching to Channel 4 News in 2013. During fifteen years as a public service broadcaster he covered stories as varied as Hurricane Katrina, the collapse of Lehman Brothers, Occupy and the Arab Spring. Plus the Greek crisis, the Taksim Square revolt and the 2014 Gaza war. He won the RTS Specialist Reporter Award in 2012 and was the inaugural winner of the Ellen Meiksins Wood prize in 2018. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.
May 10, 2019
Speaker(s): Dr María Ana Lugo, Professor Branko Milanovic, Dr Paul Segal | The panel discuss the evolution of the global distribution of income and political implications, highlighting endogenous forces of rising inequality in liberal capitalism embedded in globalisation. The last quarter century of globalisation has witnessed the largest reshuffle of global incomes since the Industrial Revolution. The global Gini index declined by about 2 points over the twenty-five year period 1988-2013, while within the global distribution of income three changes stand out. First, China has graduated from the bottom ranks, creating an important global “middle” class that has transformed a twin-peaked 1988 global distribution into the single-peaked distribution we observe today. The main “winners” were country-deciles that in 1988 were around the median of the global income distribution, 90% of them representing people in Asia. Second, the “losers” were the country-deciles that in 1988 were around the 85th percentile of the global income distribution, almost 90% of them representing people in OECD economies. Third, the global top 1% was another “winner” whose incomes rose substantially. These three changes open up the following three political issues. In the developing world the big question is how to manage the rising expectations of meaningful political participation in emerging countries like China. In the rich countries, it is how to "placate" the relative losers of the last 30 years so that they do not turn away from globalisation and towards populist anti-immigrant policies. Cutting across all countries, and directly implicated in both of these questions, is how to constraint the rising economic and political power of the global elite. The increasing gap between the Western “top 1 percenters” and the middle classes that is at the origin of many of recent political developments may not be a temporary glitch, but may be driven by endogenous forces of rising inequality in systems of liberal capitalism embedded in globalisation. María Ana Lugo (@MariaAnaLugo) is a senior economist at the Poverty and Equity Global Practice at the World Bank and a council member of the Society for the Study of Economic Inequality (ECINEQ). Branko Milanovic (@BrankoMilan) is Visiting Presidential Professor and LIS Senior Scholar at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. Paul Segal (@pdsegal) is Senior Lecturer in Economics, Department of International Development, Kings College London and Visiting Senior Fellow, International Inequalities Institute, LSE. David Soskice is School Professor of Political Science and Economics at the LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.
May 8, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Daniel Markovits | Merit is not a genuine excellence but rather a pretence, constructed to rationalise an offensive distribution of advantage. Merit, in short, is a sham. The meritocratic ideal—that social and economic rewards should track achievement rather than breeding—anchors the self-image of the age. Aristocracy has had its day, and meritocracy is now a basic tenet of civil religion in all advanced societies. Meritocracy promises to promote equality and opportunity by opening a previously hereditary elite to outsiders, armed with nothing save their own talents and ambitions. But today, middle-class children lose out to rich children at school, and middle-class adults lose out to elite graduates at work. At the same time, meritocracy entices an anxious and inauthentic elite into a pitiless, lifelong contest to secure income and status through its own excessive industry. In spite of its promises, meritocracy in fact installs a new form of aristocracy, purpose-built for a world in which the greatest source of income and wealth is not land but human capital and free labor. And merit is not a genuine excellence but rather—like the false virtues that aristocrats trumpeted in the ancien régime—a pretense, constructed to rationalize an offensive distribution of advantage. Daniel Markovits is Guido Calabresi Professor of Law at Yale Law School and Founding Director of the Center for the Study of Private Law. Markovits works in the philosophical foundations of private law, moral and political philosophy, and behavioral economics. He publishes in a range of disciplines, including in Science, The American Economic Review, and The Yale Law Journal. Markovits’s latest book, The Meritocracy Trap, places meritocracy at the center of rising economic inequality and social and political dysfunction. The book takes up the law, economics, and politics of human capital to identify the mechanisms through which meritocracy breeds inequality and to expose the burdens that meritocratic inequality imposes on all who fall within meritocracy’s orbit. Oriana Bandiera (@orianabandiera) is the Sir Anthony Atkinson Chair in Economics and Director of STICERD. This event is the Morishima Lecture. This lecture series is held in honour of Professor Michio Morishima (1923-2004), Sir John Hicks Professor of Economics at LSE and STICERD's first chairman. STICERD (@STICERD_LSE) brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy.
May 2, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Stephen Skowronek | The presidency of Donald Trump is so readily labeled "not normal" and "off-the charts" that it is hard to think of it any other way. Stephen Skowronek examines long-running patterns in the politics of presidential leadership to sort out what is new, and what is not, in the Trump phenomenon. In Skowronek hands presidential history is not a gauzy backdrop to something anomalous, but a critical source of insight into contemporary American politics. Stephen Skowronek is the Pelatiah Perit Professor of Political and Social Science at Yale University. He has published extensively on the development of American national Institutions and on the American presidency. His books include The Politics Presidents Make, Presidential Leadership in Political Time, and most recently, with Karen Orren, The Policy State: An American Predicament. He is currently the Winant Visiting Professor of American Government at the Rothermere American Institute in Oxford. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States.
April 30, 2019
Speaker(s): Zsuzsanna Szelényi | What is happening in Hungary? How has a party of dissident young democrats become a vehicle for illiberal and semi-authoritarian rule, and what does this mean for contemporary politics in Europe? Zsuzsanna Szelényi (@ZSzelenyi) is a Hungarian psychologist and politician. Robin Archer is the Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme, LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEHungary
April 25, 2019
Speaker(s): Shanelle Hall, Dr Rebecca Newton, Shaheen Sayed, Shaun Sinniah | Authentic leadership drives organisational success, yet is often misinterpreted in the workplace. In this book launch and panel session, Dr Rebecca Newton discusses what it really means to lead with authenticity, how to influence with integrity and drive positive change. Shanelle Hall (@shanellehall) was appointed by the United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon as Deputy Executive Director of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) on 6 June 2016. Shanelle served as Director of UNICEF's Supply Division (2007-2016), the organisation's procurement and logistics headquarters in Copenhagen, where she oversaw UNICEF's global supply activities and emergency supply response, with an annual expenditure exceeding USD 3.4 billion. She helped to expand the Supply function beyond service delivery to being a major strategic contributor to UNICEF results. Prior to that role, Shanelle served as Deputy Director of Supply Division and Chief of Immunization in Supply Division. Rebecca Newton is an organisational and social psychologist and Senior Visiting Fellow in the Department of Management. She has spent the past two decades researching and teaching on leadership, organisational culture, change, collaboration and management practice. Dr Newton has a PhD in Organisational Psychology from the LSE, was a Visiting Fellow at Harvard University, and has run executive education programmes on behalf of the LSE, Duke CE, University of Cambridge and Harvard Law School. She is a regular contributor to Harvard Business Review and Forbes, and serves on the editorial board for the Journal of Change Management. Dr Newton is the CEO of CoachAdviser and has worked with leaders and teams from a range of organisations, including Bank of America, Coca-Cola, Google, HSBC, Microsoft, Nike and more. Her latest book is Authentic Gravitas. Shaheen Sayed (@ShaheenSayed5) is the CEO of Accenture's Government Business in the UK & Ireland. She is a technologist by trade, who has most recently been at the forefront of delivering digital solutions to the Financial Services industry. Recognised as a senior advisor on talent and the workforce of the future, she was included in the Top 100 influential BAME global leaders by the Financial Times as well as Cranfield School of Management’s 100 Women to Watch in their 2018 list. Shaheen is also the Co-Founder Of 'Outsiders' a Not-For-Profit organisation focused on the intersection of youth education and digital technology. Shaun Sinniah works for Guy Carpenter & Company, the wholly owned reinsurance broking subsidiary of Marsh & McLennan, the world's leading professional service firm in the areas of risk, strategy and people. At Guy Carpenter, Shaun is a Managing Director and looks after the Strategy & Sales functions across the International platform. Prior to joining Guy Carpenter, Shaun spent 9 years at Willis Towers Watson and its predecessor firms across group strategy, M&A and reinsurance, where at the age of 29 he became the youngest Managing Director in Willis' 180 year history. Shaun started his career at Goldman Sachs in London and Hong Kong and has a BEng (Hons), MSc and DIC in Engineering from Imperial College. Shaun is a trustee of his local Church and Compassion UK, which provides sponsorship, education and healthcare to over 100,000 children living in poverty around the world. Sandy Pepper joined the Department of Management in September 2008 as an ESRC/FME Fellow. He was appointed Senior Fellow in September 2011 and Professor of Management Practice in January 2013. He previously had a long career at PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) where he held various senior management roles, including global leader of the Human Resource Services consulting practice from 2002-2006.
April 16, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Hiroko Akiyama, Kath Scanlon, Dr Thijs Van Den Broek, Professor Alan Walker | We hope you're enjoying this year's programme of public events and that you'll stay tuned for the exciting events we have lined up, for the summer term. In the meantime we have another podcast series we think you might enjoy. LSE IQ is an award-winning monthly podcast in which we ask some of the smartest social scientists - and other experts - to answer intelligent questions about economics, politics or society. Recent episodes have tackled questions such as 'Is the gentrification of our global cities inevitable?', 'Should we fear the rise of the far right?' and 'How does the modern world affect relationships?'. To give you a taste of LSEIQ the latest episode, which asks 'How can we age better?', is available for you here in our public events podcast feed. To listen to other episodes, search for LSE IQ in your favourite podcast app or visit lse.ac.uk/iq. We'd like to hear your opinion too so why not join the discussion on social media using the hashtag LSEIQ and please also consider leaving a review on iTunes as this makes the podcast easier for new listeners to discover.
April 15, 2019
Speaker(s): Nancy Pelosi | Join us for this conversation between Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives and LSE's Peter Trubowitz, Director of the US Centre at the School. Nancy Pelosi (@SpeakerPelosi) is the 52nd Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, having made history in 2007 when she was elected the first woman to serve as Speaker of the House. Now in her third term as Speaker, Pelosi made history again in January 2019 when she regained her position second-in-line to the presidency, the first person to do so in more than 60 years. Speaker Pelosi is the highest ranking woman in American history and the most powerful Democrat in Washington. Peter Trubowitz (@ptrubowitz) is Department Head of International Relations and Director of the US Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science and Associate Fellow at Chatham House, Royal Institute of International Affairs. The LSE's United States Centre (@LSE_US) is a hub for global expertise, analysis and commentary on America. Our mission is to promote policy-relevant and internationally-oriented scholarship to meet the growing demand for fresh analysis and critical debate on the United States. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEPelosi Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at In Conversation with U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.
April 8, 2019
Speaker(s): Sir Mike Aaronson, Maryam Ahmed, Mary Robinson, Rafia Zakaria | In 2019, Save the Children celebrates 100 years of working at the interface of politics, humanitarianism, and children’s rights. What does the future hold? Bringing together a panel of leading experts, the conversation will analyse how children's rights have transformed over the last 100 years. We will consider how the relationship between politics and humanitarianism is changing amidst transformations in the global ideological landscape, and where this leaves us for the future. Mike Aaronson (@MikeAaronson) was Director General of Save the Children UK 1995-2005. Maryam Ahmed graduated as a youth ambassador for Save the Children Nigeria in 2018. She has advocated for children's rights in Nigeria and in international forums. She particularly campaigns to end child marriage and sexual abuse, and to ensure girls have access to education and reproductive rights. Mary Robinson served as President of Ireland (1990-97) and UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (1997-2002). Rafia Zakaria (@rafiazakaria) is an author and attorney, she served on the Board of Amnesty International USA for two terms between 2009-2015 and was the first Pakistani-American woman to do so. Alcinda Honwana is an LSE Centennial Professor and Inter-Regional Adviser at UN DESA. Based at LSE in Pethick-Lawrence House, the Firoz Lalji Centre for Africa (@AfricaAtLSE) promotes independent academic research and teaching; open and issue-oriented debate; and evidence-based policy making. The Centre accomplishes this by connecting different social science disciplines and by working in partnership with Africa bringing African voices to the global debate. Twitter Hashtags for this event: #LSESave #SCconf100 Video The recording of the Facebook Live of this event is available to watch at Politics, Humanitarianism and Children's Rights.
March 29, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Danny Dorling, Professor Sally Tomlinson, Professor Gurminder K Bhambra, Professor Will Hutton | In 2016, the UK voted to leave the European Union – but has yet to leave its Empire past behind. What part did the long afterlife of the world’s largest-ever Empire play in Britain’s view of itself and world? And could a post-EU Britain, against all the odds, become less unequal? Join us as four eminent scholars turn their attention to often overlooked elements in the story – Britain’s past imperial might, jingoism, mythmaking and racism; deep-set anxieties about change and conflicting visions of the future – and the possibility of an unexpected outcome, namely that its shock to the national system may slow or even reverse the decades-long rise of inequality. In their new co-authored book Rule Britannia: Brexit and the End of Empire, Danny Dorling and Sally Tomlinson argue that while Brexit will almost certainly require the UK to confront its own “shocking, Dorian Gray-like deteriorated image”, “out of the ashes of Brexit could, should and perhaps will come a chastened, less small-minded, less greedy future. There are good reasons to be hopeful.” Danny Dorling (@dannydorling) is Halford Mackinder Professor of Geography at the University of Oxford. He is author of books including Peak Inequality: Britain’s Ticking Time Bomb, The Equality Effect: Improving Life for Everyone and All That Is Solid: How the Great Housing Disaster Defines Our Times, and What We Can Do About It. Sally Tomlinson is Emeritus Professor at Goldsmiths University of London and Honorary Research Fellow in the Department of Education at the University of Oxford. She is author of books including A Sociology of Special and Inclusive Education: Exploring the Manufacture of Inability and Education and Race from Empire to Brexit. Gurminder K Bhambra (@GKBhambra) is Professor of Postcolonial and Decolonial Studies in the School of Global Studies at the University of Sussex. She is author of books including Connected Sociologies: Theory for a Global Age. Will Hutton (@williamnhutton) is principal of Hertford College, Oxford, and Visiting Professor at the University of Manchester Business School. Bev Skeggs(@bevskeggs) is Professor of Sociology and Academic Director of the Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme at the International Inequalities Institute. The Atlantic Fellows for Social and Economic Equity programme is one of seven Atlantic Fellowships around the world, committed to building a global community of leaders working together to advance equity, justice and human dignity. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead cutting-edge research focused on understanding why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges. This event is supported by the Progressive Economy Forum (@PEF_online). PEF brings together a Council of eminent economists and academics to develop and advocate progressive economic policy ideas, and to improve public understanding of key economic issues. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEInequality Update: due to unforeseen circumstances Professor John Weeks is no longer speaking at this event.
March 28, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Catherine Barnard, Professor Sir Charles Bean, Jill Rutter | Editor's note: Unfortunately the last few minutes of the event are missing from the podcast. Our panel reviews what has been decided and resolved on Brexit, as well as the short- and long-term implications for Britain. Catherine Barnard (@CSBarnard24) is Professor in European Union Law and Employment Law at the University of Cambridge, and senior tutor and fellow of Trinity College. She specialises in EU law and employment law. She is author of EU Employment Law, The Substantive Law of the EU: The Four Freedoms, and (with Peers ed), European Union Law. Currently, Catherine is a Senior Fellow in the ESRC’s UK in a Changing Europe project which looks at all aspects of Brexit in its various manifestations. Charles Bean is Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE and former Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. Jill Rutter (@jillongovt) is a programme director for Brexit at the Institute for Government and has co-authored a number of the Institute reports on the implications of Brexit for Whitehall and Westminster. She has also produced reports on better policy making, most recently on making tax policy better, arm’s length governance and on the centre. Before joining IFG, Jill was Director of Strategy and Sustainable Development at Defra. Prior to that she worked for BP for six years, following a career in the Treasury, and a two nd a half years secondment to the No.10 Policy Unit. Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor of Contemporary Greek Studies and Professor of European Politics and Director of the Hellenic Observatory. The LSE European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014) the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector. The School of Public Policy (@LSEPublicPolicy) equips you with the skills and ideas to transform people and societies. We are an international community where ideas and practice meet. Our approach creates professionals with the ability to analyse, understand and resolve the challenges of contemporary governance.
March 27, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor David Spiegelhalter | In his new book, The Art of Statistics, David Spiegelhalter guides us through the essential principles we need in order to derive knowledge from data, showing us why data can never speak for itself. He explains the basic concepts, from regression to P-values (without using mathematics), and introduces the intellectual ideas that underpin statistics. Drawing on numerous real world examples, he shows us how statistics can help us determine the luckiest passenger on the Titanic, whether serial killer Harold Shipman could have been caught earlier, and if the skeleton in the Leicester car park really was Richard III. Sir David Spiegelhalter is a British statistician and Chair of the Winton Centre for Risk and Evidence Communication in the Statistical Laboratory at the University of Cambridge. Spiegelhalter is one of the most cited and influential researchers in his field, and was elected as President of the Royal Statistical Society for 2017-18. Fiona Steele is a Professor of Statistics and Deputy Head of the Department of Statistics at LSE. Fiona first joined in LSE in 1996 as Lecturer in Statistics and Research Methodology. She then worked at the Institute of Education, University of London 2001-2005, followed by the University of Bristol 2005-2013 where she was Professor of Social Statistics and Director of the Centre for Multilevel Modelling. She returned to LSE in 2013. The Department of Statistics (@StatsDeptLSE) offers a vibrant research environment and a comprehensive programme of undergraduate and postgraduate degrees.
March 26, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Axel Gosseries | Do the intergenerational issues raised by climate change differ from those raised by the Brexit vote? And what can we do to address these issues? Axel Gosseries is Professor of Economics and Social Ethics at Louvain University. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry. The Department of Philosophy, Logic and Scientific Method (@LSEPhilosophy) was founded by Professor Sir Karl Popper in 1946, and remains internationally renowned for a type of philosophy that is both continuous with the sciences and socially relevant.
March 20, 2019
Speaker(s): Dr Erica Lagalisse | Erica Lagalisse explores the relationship of 19th century anarchism with the clandestine fraternity, challenges leftist attachments to atheism, and intervenes in current debates concerning “conspiracy theory”. In the nineteenth century anarchists were accused of conspiracy by governments afraid of revolution, but in the current century various “conspiracy theories” suggest that anarchists are controlled by government itself. The Illuminati were a network of intellectuals who argued for self-government and against private property, yet the public is now often told that they were (and are) the very group that controls governments and defends private property around the world. Intervening in such misinformation, Lagalisse works with primary and secondary sources in multiple languages to set straight the history of the Left and will illustrate the actual relationship between revolutionism, pantheistic occult philosophy, and the clandestine fraternity. Exploring hidden correspondences between anarchism, Renaissance magic, and New Age movements, Erica Lagalisse also advances critical scholarship regarding leftist attachments to secular politics. Inspired by anthropological fieldwork within today’s anarchist movements, challenging anarchist atheism insofar as it poses practical challenges for coalition politics in today’s world. Studying anarchism as a historical object, Lagalisse will show how the development of leftist theory and practice within clandestine masculine public spheres continues to inform contemporary anarchist understandings of the “political,” in which men’s oppression by the state becomes the prototype for power in general, how gender and religion become privatized in radical counterculture, a historical process intimately linked to the privatization of gender and religion by the modern nation-state. Erica Lagalisse, author of Occult Features of Anarchism, is an anthropologist and Postdoctoral Fellow at the International Inequalities Institute, LSE. Mathijs Pelkmans is an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology, LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) at LSE brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to lead critical and cutting edge research to understand why inequalities are escalating in numerous arenas across the world, and to develop critical tools to address these challenges.
March 18, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Jay Winter | Silence itself is a language of memory. Jay Winter explores the dialectic between silence and sound in the auditory history of the Great War. Jay Winter is Charles J Stille Professor of History Emeritus, Yale University. Robin Archer is Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme at LSE. Robin Archer is Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme at LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry.
March 14, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Pat Thane | The social and health needs of older people are not easily separable. But care has been institutionally separate since 1948. Did this help create the current crisis? Pat Thane is Research Professor in Contemporary History, King's College London. Robin Archer is the Director of the Ralph Miliband Programme, LSE. The Ralph Miliband Programme (@RMilibandLSE) is one of LSE's most prestigious lecture series and seeks to advance Ralph Miliband's spirit of free social inquiry. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSESocialCare
March 13, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Sir Tim Besley, Professor Amartya Sen | An effective state promotes freedom and the well-being of its citizens. This lecture will discuss the importance of norms, values and institutions in supporting state effectiveness drawing on recent developments in social science. As well as making connections to Amartya Sen's ideas, the lecture will reflect on some of the major policy challenges that the world faces in the turbulent times that we are living through. Tim Besley is School Professor of Economics of Political Science and Sir W. Arthur Lewis Professor of Development Economics in the Department of Economics at LSE. He is also a member of the National Infrastructure Commission and was President of the Econometric Society in 2018. He has published widely on a wide variety of topics, mainly with a policy focus. Amartya Sen is Thomas W Lamont University Professor and Professor of Economics and Philosophy at Harvard University. He is the recipient of the 1998 Nobel Prize in Economics and an LSE Honorary Fellow. Minouche Shafik is Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science. Prior to this she was Deputy Governor of the Bank of England. STICERD (@STICERD_LSE) brings together world-class academics to put economics and related disciplines at the forefront of research and policy. Founded in 1978 by the renowned Japanese economist Michio Morishima, with donations from Suntory and Toyota, we are a thriving research community within the LSE. The International Inequalities Institute (@LSEInequalities) brings together experts from many LSE departments and centres to provide co-ordination and strategic leadership for critical and cutting edge research and inter-disciplinary analysis of inequalities.
March 12, 2019
Speaker(s): Dr Rachel Harris, Professor Jude Howell, Dr Rian Thum | Large numbers of Uyghurs have been detained by the Chinese government in re-education camps. What do we know about these camps? Rachel Harris specialises in Uyghur culture and religion and is based at SOAS. Jude Howell is an expert on authoritarianism and Professor of International Development at LSE. Rian Thum is a historian of Xinjiang based at the University of Nottingham. Hans Steinmuller is Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at LSE. LSE Anthropology (@LSEAnthropology) is world famous and world leading. We are ranked top Anthropology department in the Guardian League Tables 2018. Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEXinjiang
March 11, 2019
Speaker(s): Professor Raghuram Rajan | Lionel Robbins was one of the outstanding men of his time; economist, public servant and supporter of the arts. The lectures, which were established in his name, take place each year and are a major event in the life of the School, featuring eminent economists from around the world. This year Raghuram Rajan, the Katherine Dusak Miller Distinguished Service Professor of Finance at Chicago Booth will deliver the Lionel Robbins Lectures. A bank's issuance of short-term demandable or overnight claims in order to finance illiquid loans leads to panics. Since the dawn of banking in Assyria and Sumeria, long before we had central banks, deposit insurance, or a tax advantage to debt, banks have had this structure, and critics have been troubled by it, as they are today. Professor Rajan will argue that this structure of banks - financing illiquid loans with short term or demandable debt - is not just a bug in the system, it is also a feature. This lecture will focus on why banks have the structure they have - long term illiquid assets financed by short term runnable liabilities. It will explain why the risk of runs is inherent in the business of banking and cannot be eliminated without impinging on that business. Raghuram Rajan was the 23rd Governor of the Reserve Bank of India between September 2013 and September 2016. Between 2003 and 2006, Dr. Rajan was the Chief Economist and Director of Research at the International Monetary Fund. The second of this years Lionel Robbins Lectures will take place on Tuesday 12 March. Established at LSE in 1990 CEP is one of Europe's leading economic research centres. It addresses three related questions: How to foster growth? How to share growth? How to make growth sustainable?
Loading earlier episodes...
    15
    15
      0:00:00 / 0:00:00