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September 11, 2017
A new study in Annals of Internal Medicine confirms that too much time spent sitting increases your risk for death.
July 10, 2017
Two studies published in Annals of Internal Medicine found drinking coffee lowers your risk for death.
June 19, 2017
Yoga is as effective as physical therapy for easing low back pain according to a study published in Annals of Internal Medicine. The study is unique in that participants were mostly economically disadvantaged and racially diverse.
May 15, 2017
A new study published in Annals of Internal Medicine says more than half of U.S. travelers who are eligible to receive a pre-travel measles vaccine are not getting it, which could result in outbreaks here in the U.S.
May 8, 2017
The American College of Physicians (ACP) recommends in an evidence-based clinical practice guideline published today in Annals of Internal Medicine that physicians treat women with osteoporosis with bisphosphonates (alendronate, risedronate, or zoledronic acid) or denosumab, a biologic agent. ACP recommends that physicians offer drug treatment with bisphosphonates to reduce the risk for vertebral fracture in men with osteoporosis.
April 3, 2017
People who are obese or overweight at some point in their adult lives have an elevated risk of death from cardiovascular disease, cancer and other causes. Analyzing weight history over a period of time, rather than at a single point, reversed the paradoxical association between excess weight and reduced mortality that had been seen in previous studies. The findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.
March 27, 2017
Citing the rising epidemic of deaths from drugs particularly from opioids and heroin the American College of Physicians(ACP) is advocating treating substance use disorders rather than criminalizing them.
February 13, 2017
The American College of Physicians (ACP) recommends in an evidence-based clinical practice guideline published in Annals of Internal Medicine that physicians and patients should treat acute or subacute low back pain with non-drug therapies such as superficial heat, massage, acupuncture, or spinal manipulation.
August 2, 2011
ACP collaborated with three other physician organizations develop a clinical practice guideline on COPD. The guideline aims to help physicians diagnose and manage stable COPD, prevent and treat exacerbations, reduce hospitalizations and deaths, and improve the quality of life of patients with COPD.
July 4, 2011
According to a study published in Annals of Internal Medicine, massage therapy may be the best treatment for those suffering from chronic low back pain. Massage patients were twice as likely as those receiving standard care to report significant improvements in both their pain and function.
June 7, 2011
A study In the Annals of Internal Medicine found that women who smoke cigarettes had ten times the risk for developing peripheral artery disease or PAD than women who never smoked. The study also found that while quitting helped, women who had quit smoking for as long as twenty years still were at greater risk for PAD than women who had never smoked.
February 1, 2011
The American College of Physicians (ACP) has found strong evidence that routine imaging for low back pain with X-ray or advanced imaging methods such as CT scan or MRI does not improve the health of patients.
November 30, 2010
In support of World AIDS Day on December 1, the American College of Physicians (ACP) is reminding physicians to adopt routine screening for HIV and encourage patients to be tested. Physicians should offer screening to all patients older than 13 years, regardless of their risk factors, and should determine the need for repeat screening intervals on a case-by-case basis. The recommendations are part of ACP's Screening for HIV in Health Care Settings guidance statement.
October 5, 2010
When dieting to lose weight, how much you sleep may be as important as how much you eat. According to a new study being published in Annals of Internal Medicine, lack of sleep may hinder a dieter’s ability to shed excess body fat. Researchers found that dieting adults who slept 8.5 hours a night, lost 56 percent more body fat than those that slept only 5.5 hours. The dieters in the sleep restricted group lost less fat and more lean body mass. They also concluded that even short periods of sleep deprivation can undermine weight loss efforts. In addition to promoting fat retention, the study also showed that lack of sleep reduces energy levels, stimulates hunger and food intake and increases glucose production in the body.
October 5, 2010
When dieting to lose weight, how much you sleep may be as important as how much you eat. According to a study published in Annals of Internal Medicine, lack of sleep may hinder a dieter’s ability to shed excess body fat. Researchers found that dieting adults who slept 8.5 hours a night, lost 56 percent more body fat than those that slept only 5.5 hours. The dieters in the sleep restricted group lost less fat and more lean body mass. They also concluded that even short periods of sleep deprivation can undermine weight loss efforts. In addition to promoting fat retention, the study also showed that lack of sleep reduces energy levels, stimulates hunger and food intake and increases glucose production in the body.
October 20, 2009
The American College of Physicians issued recommendations for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED). ACP strongly recommends that physicians initiate therapy with an oral PDE-5 inhibitor in men who seek treatment for ED.
August 31, 2009
A study published in Annals of Internal Medicine found that newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients following a Mediterranean diet were significantly less likely to need medicine after four years than those on a low-fat diet.
April 29, 2009
The American College of Physicians (ACP) announced the ACP COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) Portal (http://copd.acponline.org). The Web site provides concise answers to specific clinical and practice-management questions for internists, other health care professionals, and patients and their families.
April 6, 2009
A study published in Annals of Internal Medicine says that doctors should treat smoking as a chronic disease if they want to help patients quit and they may require repeated or intensive interventions that include medication and counseling. Video from American College of Physicians.
March 2, 2009
A study in the Annals of Internal Medicine finds the "connection" or relationship you have with your doctor may affect your health, saying that patients who were not connected to a particular physician were less likely to receive recommended care.
February 16, 2009
According to a study published by the American College of Physicians, telephone support for lifestyle changes may help obese patients on medication lose more weight.
December 15, 2008
Colonoscopy is the "gold standard" for evaluation of the colon. Now, a new study published in Annals of Internal Medicine finds colonoscopy may not be as effective as previously believed.
December 1, 2008
To help prevent the unwitting spread of HIV, the American College of Physicians (ACP) recommends that physicians adopt a routine screening policy for HIV and encourage their patients older than 13 to get tested, regardless of their risk factors.
November 17, 2008
The American College of Physicians is publishing a new guideline for the treatment of depression that found no substantial differences in efficacy or quality of life among 2nd-generation antidepressants used to treat depressive disorders.
October 20, 2008
After reviewing the evidence, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concluded that primary care providers can increase breastfeeding rates and duration by encouraging and supporting breastfeeding. The USPSTF recommends primary care interventions before, around, and after childbirth to advocate and support breastfeeding. The recommendation appears in the October 21, 2008, issue of Annals of Internal Medicine, the American College of Physicians’ flagship journal. For the study, the Task Force evaluated more than 25 randomized trials of breastfeeding interventions conducted in the United States and in developed countries around the world. The Task Force concluded that coordinated interventions throughout pregnancy birth, and infancy can increase breastfeeding initiation, duration, and exclusivity. The intervention emphasized primary care provider assistance with initiating and maintaining breastfeeding and lactation and postnatal breastfeeding support. Breastfeeding has substantial health benefits to babies and their mothers. Babies who are breastfed have fewer infections and allergic skin rashes than formula-fed babies and also are less likely to have sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). After breastfeeding ends, children who were breastfed are less likely to develop asthma, diabetes, obesity, and childhood leukemia. Women who breastfeed have a lower risk for type 2 diabetes, breast cancer, and ovarian cancer than women who have never breastfed. In 2005, 73 percent of new mothers initiated breastfeeding, nearly reaching the U.S. Healthy People 2010 goal of 75 percent. However, only 14 percent of infants were exclusively breastfed for their first six months, as recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Family Physicians, and the U.S. Surgeon General.
September 15, 2008
A new study in the Annals of Internal Medicine found that massage therapy may have immediate benefits on pain and mood among patients with advanced cancer. Following treatment improvement in pain and mood was greater with massage than with simple touch.
August 18, 2008
A new study published in Annals of Internal Medicine show the prognosis for patients with West Nile virus may not be as bad as expected. It found that regardless of how severe a case a patient has, most return to normal health within a year.
July 14, 2008
A new study published in Annals of Internal Medicine finds that prehypertension—systolic blood pressure 120 to 139 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure 80 to 89 mmHg— during young adulthood is common and associated with coronary atherosclerosis. Researches analyzed blood pressure measurements of 3,560 adults aged 18 to 30 over the course of 20 years and found that nearly 20 percent of the study participants had developed prehypertension before the age of 35. Although blood pressure levels between 120/80 and 139/89 are below the cutoff for hypertension, the young adults with prehypertension were more likely than those with lower blood pressure to have coronary calcium later in their lives. Coronary calcium is a marker of atherosclerosis and a predictor of future heart attacks and strokes. Prehypertension was most common in young adults who were black, male, overweight, and of low socioeconomic status. Participants with low annual income (less than $25,000) and no college education were about twice as likely to have had early prehypertension as were participants with postgraduate education and an annual income greater than $100,000. Prehypertension before the age of 35 also was associated with having diabetes, low HDL cholesterol levels, and higher exposure to blood pressure elevation later in life. Annals of Internal Medicine (www.annals.org) is one of the most widely cited peer-reviewed medical journals in the world. The journal has been published for 80 years and accepts only 7 percent of the original research studies submitted for publication. Annals of Internal Medicine is published by the American College of Physicians, the nation’s largest medical specialty society.
June 16, 2008
): This month’s Internal Medicine Report looks at two key studies: Coffee drinking and mortality, and a connection between diabetes and hearing loss. There is good news for coffee drinkers. A new study published in Annals of Internal Medicine found that regular coffee drinking (up to 6 cups per day) is not associated with increased deaths in either men or women. In fact, both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee consumption is associated with a somewhat smaller rate of death from heart disease. The study looked at data on more than 84,000 women between 1980 and 2004 and nearly 42,000 men between 1986 and 2004 to examine the relationships between coffee drinking and risks for dying from heart disease, cancer, or any cause. The study found that women consuming two to three cups of caffeinated coffee per day had a 25 percent lower risk of death from heart disease and an 18 percent lower risk of death caused by something other than cancer or heart disease as compared with non-consumers during follow-up. In this report you’ll hear from one of the study’s authors, Rob Van Dam, PhD, of the Harvard Medical School. There is also B-Roll of coffee and coffee drinkers. The second study focuses on the link between diabetes and hearing impairment. Here researchers found a link between the two and suggest that diabetes patients may want to have their hearing screened. The study found that 28 percent of people with diabetes had hearing impairment in the lower mid frequency range, and 68 percent of people with diabetes had hearing impairment in the high frequency range. In this report you’ll hear from the lead study author, Kathleen Bainbridge, PhD, plus Laura Baldwin, a woman who was diagnosed with diabetes at age 30, then suffered hearing impairment several years later. There is also B-Roll of a hearing screening and hearing aids.
May 28, 2008
More than six thousand doctors recently met in Washington for Internal Medicine 2008, the annual meeting of the American College of Physicians. Panel discussions focused on the medical profession's most important issues including e-Health. ACP President David Dale was joined by Dr. Joel Levine, Chair of the Board of Regents for ACP to talk about their new policy paper. The paper states that collaboration among physicians, patients, technology developers, and policymakers must occur if e-health activities like electronic communication between physicians and their patients, remote monitoring of patients, personal and electronic health records, and patients seeking health information online are to transform health care in the U.S.
May 5, 2008
Osteoporosis is often viewed as a women’s health issue, but one in 16 men over 65 suffers from the disease, and few men are currently tested or diagnosed. New guidelines from the American College of Physicians could change that.
February 8, 2008
The program seeks to make changes, or close the gap, between clinical “best practices” and the care actually provided in a physician’s office. The diabetes initiative works by training teams that usually involve an internist, a nurse, and a staff assistant to improve the quality of care for patients with diabetes.
January 14, 2008
A new study of patients suffering from sickle cell anemia found that patients were worse off than was previously believed. The study published in the journal, Annals of Internal Medicine, found that daily pain is far more prevalent and severe than previous large studies have indicated
November 5, 2007
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a slowly progressive lung disease that affects more than 5 percent of the U.S. adult population and results in gradual loss of lung function, typically as a result of smoking. The American College of Physicians now has new guidelines for treatment.
July 9, 2007
A study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine that was designed to find if a popular supplement would help reduce the risk of developing type II diabetes found the opposite. The authors found instead that people who took 200 microgram selenium supplements each day for almost eight years had an increased risk of developing the disease. This data comes from the Nutritional Prevention of Cancer Trial (NPC) that was designed to evaluate whether the supplement can help prevent skin cancer.
July 2, 2007
A new study of published literature that reported the effect of dietary counseling for weight loss finds that, on average, dietary counseling has resulted in weight loss of approximately 6 percent of initial body weight (approximately 10-15 pounds) after one year, compared with people not involved in formal weight loss programs.
June 18, 2007
A new analysis of data in three large national surveys finds that in the 29 years between 1971 and 2000, even though the death rate of men with diabetes has dropped significantly, in line with the overall decline of the death rate for all Americans, the death rate for women with diabetes did not decline at all.
June 4, 2007
Millions of Americans suffer from dementia and many are given antipsychotic drugs for behaviors such as agitation or verbal and physical aggression. But according to a new study published in the June 5 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine adults with antipsychotic prescriptions had a higher risk for death than adults without these prescriptions. The use of older (also called conventional) antipsychotic medications was associated with higher risk for death than the use of newer (also called atypical) drugs. Excess risk was evident at 30 days and seemed to continue to 180 days. The six-year study looked at health and death records of more than 27,000 adults older than 66 with dementia. The researchers could not be certain that they had accounted for all other possible causes for their findings other than prescriptions. The exact cause of the deaths was not known. Examples of conventional drugs are chlorpromazine and haloperidol. Examples of atypical medications are olanzapine, risperidone, and quetiapine.
April 16, 2007
New study in Annals of Internal Medicine finds supplement does not relieve joint pain any better than placebo
January 16, 2007
A new study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, reviewing data on the use of human growth hormone (GH) by otherwise healthy elderly people, revealed that the synthetic hormone had few health benefits and did pose some health risks.
January 1, 2007
A new study says it’s ok for men with high blood pressure to have a drink or two. Moderate consumption of alcohol lowers risk of heart disease. The study followed nearly 12,000 men over a 16-year period and looked at the relationship between alcohol consumption and heart attack, stroke, and death from heart disease.
December 19, 2006
When the Women's Health Initiative stopped its estrogen-progestin study prematurely in 2002, after finding that this hormone therapy increased risk for breast cancer, heart attacks, strokes and blood clots, women began looking for alternative menopause treatments.
December 4, 2001
In a new evidence-based paper, the American College of Physicians analyzes health care in the United States and 12 other industrialized countries and identifies lessons that could be applied to the particular political and social culture of the United States to achieve a high performing health care system, including achieving universal health insurance coverage for all Americans. The recommendations provide evidence-based solutions to our country’s many health care problems – including the appalling lack of access to affordable heath coverage, the impending crisis caused by the insufficient supply of primary care physicians, rising health care costs, and excessive administrative and regulatory costs.
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