Detailed
Compact
Art
Reverse
July 10, 2020
COVID-19 cases are on the rise, and communities that were on a path to reopening their economies are now facing renewed shutdowns and restrictions. Businesses have had to adapt their operations for the pandemic. That’s not easy, because it turns out (appropriate) touching is a pretty big part of the economy. Plus: the Goya boycott, college sports and back-to-school shopping when it’s not clear who’s going back to school.
July 9, 2020
The pandemic has exacerbated the challenges of juggling full-time work with caring for and home-schooling children. Uncertainty around school reopenings has many families facing the prospect of doing double duty indefinitely, which could have an effect on job security. Plus: What’s ahead for airlines, pharmacies and retail as the pandemic stretches into another month.
July 8, 2020
There are millions of vacant and abandoned houses around the country. But in some parts of Baltimore, vacant buildings have become an intractable, even deadly, problem. Today, we take a deep dive into why. Plus: How some states are starting to close the racial pay gap, what bankrupted Brooks Brothers and why Disney World is reopening as COVID-19 cases spike.
July 7, 2020
The federal government has released the names of companies that received loans of $150,000 or more through the Paycheck Protection Program. There are some surprisingly big names in there. Today, we’ll look at how one business spent its  $90,000. Plus: Why test shortages persist, what fall holds for foreign students and the problem with the Beige Book.
July 6, 2020
All the way back to the civil rights era, McDonald’s has had a strange relationship with unrest and Black Americans. Today, we’ll explore what the Golden Arches has and hasn’t done for Black business owners. Plus: Corporate debt, home equity and other things that will help businesses and families survive this crisis.
July 3, 2020
Cheap gas coupled with uncertainty about traveling by air or rail during COVID-19 has vacationers turning to their cars. But summer travel decisions continue to be complicated during the pandemic. New York, New Jersey and Connecticut just issued a two week quarantine on any out-of-state visitors. Plus: the story of Janet’s List and the continuously rising cost of cord-cutting.
July 2, 2020
Nearly four months into this pandemic, and we’re starting to see evidence that the rental market is softening, if only in the highest-price cities. Today, we’ll do the numbers on New York real estate and what might happen to the rest of the country. Plus: The ongoing ad boycott at Facebook, arts organizations’ turn to streaming and the June jobs report.
July 1, 2020
We’re getting the June jobs report Thursday, a little early because of the holiday. The unemployment rate is expected to drop for the second month in a row, but the picture might not be as accurate as we’d like. That’s partly because since the start of the pandemic, the Bureau of Labor Statistics has said it might be  undercounting furloughed workers. Today, we’ll dig into the BLS survey and what you should make of it. Plus: How enforceable are interstate travel restrictions?
June 30, 2020
The $600 a week in extra benefits provided to every jobless worker who’s on unemployment insurance right now — about 29 million Americans — is set to expire by July 31. And if Congress doesn’t do something before then, things could get ugly in this economy. Plus: Why black-owned banks are undercapitalized and a conversation with Visa CEO Al Kelly.
June 29, 2020
Coronavirus cases are surging in Arizona, Florida, Texas and California, and hospitals are becoming overwhelmed with patients. Other parts of the country have been there — and we all saw what happened. Today, we spend some time checking in on N95 masks, gowns and other protective gear. Plus: The latest Paycheck Protection Program loan deadline and what it’s like reopening a museum right now.
June 26, 2020
As we continue exploring structural economic racism, today we’re looking at a huge source of the wealth gap between Black and white Americans: homeownership. Plus: Facebook’s about-face on ads and Texas’ influx of Californians.
June 25, 2020
Systemic economic racism is fundamental to understanding this moment, so why not teach it that way? Today, we talk with Gary Hoover, chair of the economics department at the University of Oklahoma, about why he folds race into his intro courses. Plus: Virginia is set to become the first state mandating COVID-19 workplace safety measures, and bars are adapting to takeout cocktails.
June 24, 2020
Arizona, Florida, California, Texas and other states are seeing sharp increases in coronavirus cases as they reopen restaurants and other businesses. So what happens when those places have to shut their doors all over again? Today we look at it. Plus: The IMF’s grim forecast, unemployment data as sound and “The Great Indoors.”
June 23, 2020
We’ve said it before: Immigration is a labor force story. So today we’re going to look at the ways the White House’s new restrictions on H-1B visas could ripple through this economy: offshoring jobs, worker shortages and so on. Plus, a look at the history of discriminatory and family-based immigration policies in the 20th century.
June 22, 2020
Those big online groups are giving themselves some credit for spamming ticket reservations and driving down attendance at President Trump’s campaign rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, this weekend. It’s not clear how much that (and COVID-19 fears) depressed turnout, but they definitely did give the Trump campaign a whole lot of bad data. Today we look at how expensive that data is to clean up. Plus: drive-ins across the pond, racist film classics and “Diversity, Inc.”
June 19, 2020
The fiscal relief for the coronavirus pandemic is set to run out at the end of July, but many Americans are still out of work. Today, we’ll look at what could happen to this economy if Congress allows that aid to expire. Plus: How companies decide which holidays, like Juneteenth, to take off and Tulsa’s eviction problem.
June 18, 2020
The U.S. Supreme Court blocked the White House’s effort to end legal protections for 650,000 young immigrants today. We’re going to look at the role those Dreamers play in this economy. Plus: Checking in on the financial health of historically black colleges and universities, and we talk with Howard University professor William Spriggs about his open letter to economists about systemic racism in their field.
June 17, 2020
The CBS soap “The Bold and the Beautiful” was one of the first scripted series to turn cameras back on after officials allowed filming to resume in Los Angeles with restrictions to slow the spread of COVID-19. But movies and TV produced during a pandemic will look a little different. Plus: Racism in tech, unemployment in the U.K. and the difference between the debt and the deficit.
June 16, 2020
Just down the road from the Smithfield pork-processing plant where hundreds of employees are off the job after a coronavirus outbreak is Grand Prairie Foods. They make eggs and breakfast sandwiches for hotel chains and convenience stores. Today, we’ll talk with the CEO about how they’re managing, along with a Black business owner in Utah who’s seeing a boom. Plus: Chinese unemployment and why the Fed started buying corporate bonds.
June 15, 2020
Atlanta Fed President Raphael Bostic wrote recently that “systemic racism is a yoke that drags on the American economy.” We’ll spend much of today’s show talking with Bostic about that essay and what’s next for the economy in a turbulent year. Plus, today’s big Supreme Court ruling on LGBTQ workplace discrimination, online internships and the transparency (or lack thereof) around who gets half a trillion in Paycheck Protection Program money.
June 12, 2020
The national outcry over systemic racism has pushed employers big and small to examine their own failings in diversity and inclusion. Today, we’ll look at why so many companies’ efforts haven’t worked — some have even made things worse — and whether this time could be any different. Plus: Some people are getting lax on masks even as COVID-19 cases rise, and we’re short on contact tracers.
June 11, 2020
It’s not just big corporations feeling the pressure to respond to the protests against police violence around the country — small businesses are trying to figure out what to do, too. And, oh yeah, there’s still a pandemic going on. Today we’ll follow two different businesses to see how they’re managing. Plus: cops on TV, Zoom in China and annualized GDP, explained.
June 10, 2020
When the coronavirus pandemic hit, all other research froze. Some scientists packed it in, others pivoted to searching for a vaccine. Now, along with the rest of the economy, labs across the country are looking to reopen. Today, we’ll look at what that means. Plus: Hollywood inequality past and present, and a recap of Fed Chair Jerome Powell’s press conference.
June 9, 2020
In order to understand the structural economic racism that lead to this moment, you need to know your history. So today we head to Thomas Jefferson’s plantation to look at business strategies of slaveholders, and the legacy of those strategies today. Plus: How the National Bureau of Economic Research makes a call on what’s a recession, and the racial wage gaps at Bon Appetit and beyond.
June 8, 2020
Almost two weeks after George Floyd was killed in police custody, a veto-proof majority of the Minneapolis City Council has come out in favor of dismantling the city’s police department. Today, we look at how reallocating cities’ large police budgets could work. Plus: Why the jobs report needed a correction, how aggregated economic data contributes to racial inequality and the problem of child care during a pandemic.
June 5, 2020
If there’s one lesson to take from today’s show, it’s that economists are just as confused as you are. We’ll talk with experts and analysts about what to make of the May jobs report, how much of it has to do with PPP loans and what it says about the changing state of the economy. Plus: The New York Times’ Wesley Morris calls in to talk about why the protests against the police killing of George Floyd feel different.
June 4, 2020
After more than a week of protests following the death of George Floyd in police custody, businesses small, large and super-massive are declaring solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement. But words are one thing, action is another. Today, we’ll take you beyond the PR of it all. Plus: America’s overnight food deserts, who’s paying overdraft fees and COVID-driven state budget cuts.
June 3, 2020
From coast to coast, communities are coming together to clean up after protests over the death of George Floyd in police custody. But some neighborhoods are better equipped to recover than others. Today, we take you inside one rebuilding effort in the Bronx. Plus, why black women entrepreneurs are missing out on startup funding and a conversation with the director of “Do Not Resist.”
June 2, 2020
George Floyd’s death in police custody sparked nationwide protests, but the kindling has been building for decades. Today we’re going to take some time to talk about the deep racial economic divide in this country. Plus: we do the numbers on states of emergency, what brands are and aren’t saying around Black Lives Matter and the disconnect between Wall Street and Main Street right now.
June 1, 2020
As protesters across the U.S. call for justice in the death of George Floyd, people are showing support by donating to bail funds, known as bail activism. The Minnesota Freedom Fund has received $20 million in donations and is focusing on the hundreds of activists being arrested nationwide. The argument is that the bail system disproportionately affects low-income people and people of color. Bail activism is just one component of the current protests against police brutality. Plus: Activists call for cuts to police budgets, the U.S.-China trade war has continued during the pandemic and the long recovery communities face after protests.
May 29, 2020
More than 40 million Americans have filed for unemployment insurance since mid-March. Many of them told the Labor Department that they considered their layoffs “temporary,” that they’d been furloughed and would be back at work at some point. But “some point” seems to be dragging on, and coming back from layoffs might not happen at all for some. Today, we do the numbers. Plus: tourism, bar reopenings and problems in the supply chain.
May 28, 2020
Another 2.1 million Americans filed for unemployment insurance this week. About  55% of the people who lost their jobs last month are women, which is a contrast from the last financial crisis. Today, we’ll look at the dynamics playing out now and why benefits have been historically hard for people to get. Plus: life on the farm and on the reservation.
May 27, 2020
Most colleges in the U.S. have been shut down for months in an effort to slow the spread of COVID-19. But NYU’s campus in Shanghai could provide an example of how to reopen mid-pandemic. Today, we take you there. Plus: the PPP extension, a literal economic slowdown and how breweries are adapting to social distancing.
May 26, 2020
Some companies have been experimenting with the four-day workweek to improve productivity and morale. Will the coronavirus pandemic finally push more workplaces to make the switch? Plus: what it’s like to quarantine in an RV, and will Q3 be the “fastest-growing quarter in U.S. history”?
May 25, 2020
States — and counties within those states — are reopening at different stages with different rules and guidelines. Business owners are navigating the uncertainty around those rules as they try to determine which apply to their businesses. A bar owner in Boise, Idaho, thought she might be able to reopen, but realized her bar doesn’t serve enough food to meet the state requirement. Plus: a program in California focused on housing the homeless during the pandemic, high school seniors are facing a difficult decision and the life-saving properties of soap.
May 22, 2020
It’s been about two months since Congress passed the big coronavirus relief bill, and 10 weeks since President Donald Trump declared a state of emergency. We’ll talk with some of our contributors and historians about the state of the economy and the historical context. Plus: China abandons GDP targets, Americans settle into working from home for the long haul and we chat with the president of the New York Stock Exchange.
May 21, 2020
Another 2.4 million people filed for unemployment benefits last week. That’s down from the week before, but still about the population of Houston. There are two ways the government measures joblessness in this country, and it’s important to keep an eye on both. We’ll explain. Plus: how emerging markets are faring in this crisis, why evictions could surge in Texas and a conversation with the CEO of the travel company Booking Holdings. By the way, this is the last day of our last fundraising drive for our fiscal year. If you can, make a donation today at Marketplace.org/donate.
May 20, 2020
Restaurants, already operating on thin margins, have to balance keeping customers safe and making them feel safe, while trying to restore some normalcy. Today, we look at how one Atlanta Vietnamese spot is doing it. Plus: How Americans spent their relief checks, the coming wave of farm bankruptcies and the fight over hazard pay.
May 19, 2020
Today we’re going to dig into some ripple effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. While companies are looking for breaks from their rent, Home Depot says sales are up, and animation is about the only entertainment production still working. Plus: How remote work in oil and gas … works.
May 18, 2020
We asked the CEO of digital education company Chegg. Plus, we’ll dig into the auto supply chain, examine how banking has changed and get a preview of the new season of “The Uncertain Hour.”
May 15, 2020
…Now they might dip into those funds. Today on the show, we’ll look at the long-term effects of this economic crisis. Plus: new retail sales numbers, travel in a reopened China and the Americans staying away from hospitals even when they need care.
May 14, 2020
As colleges and universities across the country plan virtual graduations for the class of 2020, many new graduates are looking for their first jobs in a very different world than they were planning for just a couple months ago. Today we check in with some of them. Plus: how rural libraries are holding up, how consumer spending is changing and the tense dynamic between reopening companies and employees who don’t feel safe coming back.
May 13, 2020
Fed Chairman Jay Powell is live-streaming during this crisis like everyone else, and today he warned of a prolonged recession caused by the COVID-19 outbreak. Today we’ll break down his remarks and what Congress might do about it. Plus: why home prices aren’t falling and how children’s TV changed America.
May 12, 2020
Over 200 economists have signed a letter asking the Trump administration not to impose its new “Buy American” restrictions on medical supplies over fears they’ll exacerbate shortages and raise prices. Today, we do the numbers. Plus: the life of a hairstylist in a reopening state, what it would look like if a major American airline went under and a conversation with the CEO of Twitch.
May 11, 2020
Across the country, many nonessential businesses and restaurants are reopening. But when the public is scared of the ongoing pandemic, we might be opening the door for more demand shock. Plus: 78% of the people who lost their jobs last month were temporarily laid off. Should they feel optimistic about going back to their original jobs? And we’ll look at the market for masks and rental housing.
May 8, 2020
Nearly twenty-two million jobs lost and unemployment at 14.7% for April. It was a bad jobs report, no way around it. But there’s more to it then that. Today we dive into how furloughs are counted, what this means for people trying to make rent and what the “diffusion index” can tell us. Plus: We’re watching a lot of TV, but do people want to watch shows about the pandemic?
May 7, 2020
Today the NASDAQ closed up for the year. We’re not sure how you square that, except by once again digging into why the stock market is not the economy. We’ve also got Chinese trade and small business loan forgiveness on the docket today. Plus: How are you sleeping?
May 6, 2020
The economic effects of this pandemic are not equal. In our latest Marketplace-Edison Research Poll, we found a third of people have lost work, while about one-sixth of them are working more hours. Today we dig into why. Plus, the view on the ground as Texas reopens, a conversation with the CEO of Land O’Lakes and how the flower business is faring ahead of Mother’s Day.
May 5, 2020
The newest Marketplace-Edison Research Poll is out today, and it paints a stark picture of how Americans are feeling amid the coronavirus crisis. We’ll dig into one figure in particular: more than four in 10 Americans say they couldn’t come up with the money for an unexpected $250 expense. Plus, how the health care system is changing, what it’s like to be making COVID-19 tests right now and how hazard pay works.
May 4, 2020
The Small Business Administration says that as of Friday, banks have loaned out $175 billion from the federal Paycheck Protection Program. That’s good news for businesses and the banks lending to them. Today, we look at how long that money will last amid a new surge of applications. Plus, what’s going on with Texas oil, how consumer prices are changing and what to expect from Disney’s first-quarter earnings.
May 1, 2020
Even as the economy reopens, returning to work could mean more than just changes to the physical space. Workers could be on staggered schedules and shorter weeks with scheduled remote days. Today, we look at office life post-coronavirus. Plus, fiscal vs. monetary policy, the crush of customer service calls and where those $1,200 checks are going.
April 30, 2020
We now know that more than 30 million people have filed for unemployment since early March. That’s roughly 1 in 5 people who had a job back in February, before the COVID-19 pandemic hit. But when we get unemployment numbers for April, the rate will likely be far below 20%. So what gives? Today we do the numbers. Plus: AMC bans Universal Pictures, corporate earnings are terrible and influencers are still … influencing.
April 29, 2020
We’re starting to get a picture of just how much damage the pandemic is doing to the economy: GDP fell 4.8% in the first quarter, and this is the beginning. Plus: Why businesses don’t see the point in applying for emergency loans, the power and limitations of OSHA, and Michael Schur talks about bringing back “Parks and Recreation.”
April 28, 2020
With China a little further along in restarting its economy, it might be reasonable to assume that a company whose supply chain is deeply intertwined with China might have a leg up right now. But it doesn’t really work that way. We’ll take a deep dive into those supply chains today. Plus, how Hollywood productions might work around COVID-19 and a conversation with the CEO of GoFundMe.
April 27, 2020
Banks began accepting applications for $320 billion in new emergency payroll protection loans this morning. Last time, the process was unclear and bottlenecked. How’d things go today? We spent the day calling banks and small businesses to find out. Plus: The view from Shanghai, surprising essential businesses and why the stock market is not the economy.
April 24, 2020
Throughout the economy, you’re seeing businesses pivot in response to COVID-19. Auto plants are making ventilators, distilleries are making hand sanitizer and many clothing retailers are making masks. Plus: that Congressional Budget Office report about how bad things will get, what happens when bodegas close down and love in the time of coronavirus.
April 23, 2020
With 27 million jobs vaporized in just five weeks, economists, analysts and other observers are realizing that quarterly and monthly economic data just isn’t cutting it anymore. Today, we look at how looking at the economy has changed. Plus: the need for more contact tracers, the states leading on small business loans and putting a dollar value on human life.
April 22, 2020
How’s your savings account looking? According to the data, not great. But it’s not your fault. Today, we’ll look at the cultural and economic forces that make Americans bad at saving money. Plus: how businesses are preparing to reopen, state funding in a crisis and Netflix is (surprise!) doing pretty well right now.
April 21, 2020
Home health care workers are fighting COVID-19 by trying to keep their clients out of emergency rooms, which sometimes means quarantining with them. Plus: Oil’s storage shortage, declining home sales and how we talk to each other on Venmo now.
April 20, 2020
U.S. crude oil prices plunged into negative territory today for the first time, falling to minus $37.63 per barrel. That’s possible because storage is the most valuable commodity in the commodity market. We’ll explain. Plus: how experts reckon with COVID-19’s impact on GDP and a conversation with a banker who’s giving small business loans.
April 17, 2020
China’s first-quarter GDP contracted for the first time since 1992, and a new survey shows more American executives seeing the two countries “decoupling” economically. Today we look at another dimension of the pandemic and what it means for global supply chains. Plus: what it’s like to run an unemployment insurance program right now.
April 16, 2020
Five million more people filed for unemployment insurance last week, bringing the total past 20 million for the month. But the real number is actually much higher. Today, we look at who isn’t counted. Plus, earnings season’s new “COVID metrics,” the New Yorkers not paying rent and the high delivery app fees squeezing restaurants.
April 15, 2020
As of today, the Small Business Administration’s pandemic emergency lending program has approved more than 1.3 million loan applications worth nearly $300 billion. We’ll check in on the state of the program and some businesses that have applied. Plus, the spring clothing stranded in stores, coronavirus’ effect on college admissions and the country’s yeast shortage.
April 14, 2020
In a normal year, the nation’s procrastinators would be firing up tax software or digging around for a W-2 tonight. But now that tax day is delayed three months, there’s a different kind of chaos unfolding for accountants. Plus: a new IMF outlook, the challenges of managing staff remotely and an unexpected essential business: livestock auctions.
April 13, 2020
Whether it’s TP or a Nintendo Switch, if you’ve had trouble finding an item in stores or online recently, it all comes back to the supply chain. Today, we’ll break it down. Plus: The U.S. Postal Service’s financial trouble, how social distancing is changing the urban landscape and a conversation with the CEO of Feeding America.
April 10, 2020
As state after state encourages people to stay home, therapists and psychiatrists have moved their practices onto the internet and over the phone. While mental health care can make that switch relatively easily, getting it covered is another matter. Plus, America’s truck driver shortage and the psychology of app-based tipping.
April 9, 2020
About 17 million Americans filed unemployment claims in the past three weeks and the actual number of jobs lost is almost certainly higher. Today, we’ll try to figure out how high unemployment might go by the summer. Plus: how food banks are coping with the crisis and how credit markets might indicate recession.
April 8, 2020
People of color are being hit especially hard by the coronavirus pandemic, in part because they are disproportionally represented among frontline workers. Today, we do the numbers on this country’s labor force and how workers’ families are affected. Plus, converting hotels into homeless shelters, when unemployment turns recession into depression and our new embrace of processed food.
April 7, 2020
With so many “essential” workers putting themselves at risk, hazard pay has become a national topic of debate. Today, we’ll spend some time looking at exactly what it is and how it’s used. Plus, we explain deflation, the new distressed property market and why unemployment numbers are even higher than the data suggests.
April 6, 2020
A new report from the American Enterprise Institute offers a roadmap — today we’ll talk with a co-author. Plus: consumer spending’s drop-off, what happens when retailers stop paying rent and how social distancing can lead to social media overload.
April 3, 2020
We got the March jobs numbers this morning — 4.4% unemployment, more than 700,000 jobs lost, and it’s going to get a lot worse. Lenders are bracing themselves for missed mortgage payments and investors are avoiding loans that aren’t backed by the government. Today, we’ll dig into the economic ripple effects. Plus, small businesses trying to apply for emergency loans and the impact of COVID-19 on both funeral homes and the ad industry.
April 2, 2020
Unemployment claims passed 6.6 million last week, more than double the week before. Many workers who still have their jobs are now doing them for reduced pay. We’ll ask how those pay cuts might ripple through the economy. Plus: the huge number of immigrants who will miss out on checks from the government, and the logistical challenge of giving small businesses emergency loans.
April 1, 2020
States and FEMA are separately competing for ventilators, which is driving prices up to roughly $25,000 each. Today, we look at the market forces at work. Plus: What it’s like to run a barge company right now, why employers are backing off 401(k)s and how the housing market is adapting to low interest rates and no in-person showings.
March 31, 2020
We’re starting to see some devastating economic indicators around the coronavirus pandemic. But just how bad are things going to get? Today we assembled a group of historians to talk about the economic crises of the past, and why it’s unlikely this one will look like the Great Depression. Plus, Britain’s ventilator shortage, insurance hikes and the science of setting the markets to music.
March 30, 2020
If your inbox looks anything like ours, you’re seeing a bunch of ads for online sales. With nonessential businesses closed all over the country, many retailers are doing what they can to drum up business. It’s true that consumer spending is a primary engine of this economy, but is it right to splurge on fancy sweats right now? Plus: how deep this recession will get, how Americans are confronting the bills due this week and a conversation with rapper, singer and writer Dessa.
March 27, 2020
Lawmakers have finally passed a $2 trillion COVID-19 relief package. When it comes to saving small businesses, will the aid be enough? We talk with some business owners who are barely getting by. Plus: the new economies of Canadian border towns, retailers’ rush to staff up and a conversation with the president of the Dallas Fed.
March 26, 2020
Ventilators, masks, gloves and other supplies American hospitals need are produced in China, Italy, Malaysia and elsewhere. That puts the U.S. at a disadvantage in its fight against COVID-19. We’ll look through the supply chain and potential solutions. Plus: the new lifestyles of working parents and the non-traditional workers being hit especially hard by this crisis.
March 25, 2020
Tomorrow’s first-time unemployment claim numbers are expected to be exponentially higher than a typical week, and many states have cut back on unemployment insurance in recent years. What about the people losing employer-sponsored health care? Today we’ll do the numbers and check in on the status of the stimulus bill that could provide some relief. Plus: What a 90-day tariff deferral would do for the people paying (that’s us).
March 24, 2020
When you’re losing work because of COVID-19, it might not feel like there’s much difference between getting laid off and furloughed. But it’s an important distinction. We’ll talk about it, plus the unemployment claim numbers coming this week, how the repo market works and the nationwide mask shortage.
March 23, 2020
When you’re staring down a financial crisis, you want to talk to someone who’s been there before. So today we called up Ben Bernanke, who’s both a scholar of the Great Depression and ran the Federal Reserve during the Great Recession. He says fiscal policy is going to have to “get its act together.” Plus: what an economic “restart” looks like, how small businesses in China are still under pressure and encrypted social platforms’ struggle to fight COVID-19 misinformation.
March 20, 2020
We have pretty good, near-real-time data on the COVID-19 virus, the number of new cases, tests and so on (you can find daily updates on our website). But the economic impact? Not so much. Today, we’ll tell you what to keep an eye on. Plus: A few stories from a tidal wave of layoffs, and is Boeing too big to fail?
March 19, 2020
The floor of the New York Stock Exchange is usually full of people, but on Monday it will move to electronic trading only to combat coronavirus. Today, we talk about how that will work and ask Nasdaq President and CEO Adena Friedman why markets are still open at all. Plus, the state of mental health benefits, economic impacts of the 1918 Spanish flu and a conversation with “World War Z” author Max Brooks.
March 18, 2020
In just a few weeks, coronavirus has completely reshaped the way Americans are working. Today, we’re looking at the layoffs, the newly housebound office workers and the folks who still have to go out and risk spreading the virus, sometimes for minimum wage. Plus, more listener questions, like: What’s the difference between a recession and a depression? And can’t the Fed just pay for a stimulus?
March 17, 2020
President Donald Trump acknowledged Monday that the economy may be headed toward a recession. Is that just due to the coronavirus, or is it the recession economists have been predicting for years? Today we talk a bit about the difference and what’s on the horizon. Plus: remote education in the digital divide, Americans stocking up, and why stocks are up.
March 16, 2020
We’re answering more of your questions about the coronavirus pandemic today. Starting with: What exactly did the Fed do this weekend, and what would happen to the global economy if activity in the U.S. shut down? Plus, how China’s 270 million students are learning at home, what’s changing for supply chains along the border, and why working from home is great for hackers. Of course, we’ll also talk about stocks, which had their biggest single-day drop of the crisis so far.
March 13, 2020
The COVID-19 pandemic isn’t causing an economic slowdown in the United States, it’s causing an economic stop. You probably have a lot of questions, like where the Fed’s $1.5 trillion went, how algorithmic trading is affecting volatility and what numbers to watch as we prepare for a recession. We’re going to answer all of them and more. Plus: What it’s like to run a movie theater right now and the increased risks for the hundreds of millions of homeless Americans.
March 12, 2020
Stocks had their worst day since 1987 and the economy is experiencing uncertainty unseen since 2008. Today, we’ll help you understand what’s happening and what’s coming. We’ll talk with experts, business owners, a farmer and a doctor (who’s also school board president) about how they’re feeling the spread of COVID-19 and what they’re bracing for. Plus: the millions of uninsured or underinsured Americans who can’t afford to see a doctor even if they suspect they might have the new coronavirus.
March 11, 2020
With a the Dow in bear market territory and a bunch of stimulus proposals under consideration, the COVID-19 pandemic might be giving you flashbacks to the financial crisis of 11 years ago. Today we compare current economic conditions to 2008. Plus, online dating and stockpiling “essentials” during the outbreak.
March 10, 2020
As new cases of COVID-19 spread across the nation, it’s becoming increasingly clear that the economy is going to take a serious hit. With that in mind, the White House has floated a payroll tax cut and other steps to prevent a recession. Today, we’ll look at how that would work. Plus: canceled flights, canceled classes and a price war on oil.
March 9, 2020
Phew, OK, wow. Like the markets this morning, let’s trip our own “circuit breaker” to recalibrate and talk through everything that just happened with stocks and oil. Plus, we’ll look to Austin, Texas, where residents and businesses are reeling from the cancellation of SXSW, and to Shanghai, where people are ever-so-slowly getting back to work and shopping.
March 6, 2020
The COVID-19 outbreak has virtually shut down the entire movie industry in China, and that’s having ripple effects for big blockbusters, often the only reliable moneymakers in Hollywood right now. We’ll look at what’s happened so far and consider the summer movie season. Plus, what we can get out of today’s jobs report, diminishing returns on the 10-year T-note and a visit to the dark web.
March 5, 2020
They call the Port of Los Angeles, which handles more cargo than any other port in the Western Hemisphere, “America’s Port.” Thanks to COVID-19, February volume was down 25% from last year. Today, we talk with the port’s executive director about what’s going on there and why it matters. Plus, what you need to know about market volatility and algorithmic trading, and the debt collection case in front of the Supreme Court.
March 4, 2020
Markets are down 1,200 points one day, up 1,200 points the next. There’s lots of activity on the bond market and a lot of people looking to the equity index futures market. Today we talk through what that is and how you can read the futures, too. Plus, how airlines and OPEC are reacting to COVID-19, “Women’s Work” and why affordable mental health care can be so hard to find.
March 3, 2020
There’s a lot the Federal Reserve can do to keep credit moving and help businesses weather the storm caused by the new coronavirus disease. Today, the Fed cut interest rates by a half point. But rates are already low, and in a COVID-19 outbreak, what if the economy needs more than the Fed can give? Plus, we’ll talk about what that decision might have been like in the Federal Open Market Committee and the reaction from the G-7 and the Treasury.
March 2, 2020
As COVID-19 spreads to the United States, more workers here are staying home — and boosting telecommuting stocks. Plus: The mood in Shanghai, Jack Welch’s legacy at GE and how Judge Judy made a fortune in syndication.
February 28, 2020
C’mon, have you seen markets this week? Today we’ll talk about stocks, bonds and why millennials are so into astrology. Plus, mortgages are getting cheaper and what a $200 million fine means to billion-dollar wireless carriers.
February 27, 2020
COVID-19 fears have driven stocks down 10% from a 52-week high, putting us officially in a market correction. Goldman Sachs says S&P 500 companies won’t see any earnings growth this year. We’ll talk about what all that means, plus: the CDC’s Emergency Operations Center, the history of corporate buzzwords and we “sundown” our series “United States of Work.”
February 27, 2020
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had pretty straightforward advice for staying healthy during the COVID-19 outbreak: wash your hands and stay home when you’re sick. For a lot of Americans, the former is fine but the latter is easier said than done. Plus: What President Trump talks about when he talks about coronavirus, Silicon Valley’s VC drought, and in the latest installment of “United States of Work,” one woman tells us about working past retirement age.
February 25, 2020
A lot of economic activities in China remain stalled, but as cases of COVID-19 are on the decline, some workers are back on the job. Today, we look at how office life has changed in Shanghai after the outbreak. Plus: more market reaction to the coronavirus and another installment in our series “United States of Work.”
February 24, 2020
You had to know this was coming, right? The Dow dropped more than 1,000 points as COVID-19 spread continued its spread. We spend some time at the top of today’s show getting context for that reaction, and looking at why consumer confidence is still so high. Plus, made-to-order clothing at scale, more seasonal work visas and our series “United States of Work” heads to a private practice in rural Ohio.
    15
    15
      0:00:00 / 0:00:00