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June 3, 2020
Even those who can distance themselves are unsure whether to do so—in part because President Jair Bolsonaro mocks the science and rails against lockdowns. The private-equity industry has ballooned since the last financial crisis; does that make it weaker or stronger in this one? And our correspondent investigates a Mexican-mummy mystery. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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June 2, 2020
China and America are clashing over Hong Kong. Can the multi-trillion-dollar financial centre survive the fall out? Also, property developer Hamid Moghadam explains why the rise of e-commerce has made warehouses hot property. And the lockdown has led to a bicycle boom—will it last? Patrick Lane hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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June 2, 2020
The pandemic is driving up the number of impoverished people for the first time in more than two decades. Lockdown-policy calculations are simply different in the poor world. The ill effects of China’s hydropower boom are trickling down to the tens of millions who depend on the Mekong River. And a meditation on the merits of reading others’ diaries. Additional audio from 'caquet' at Freesound.org. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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June 1, 2020
Demonstrations against police violence have only amplified. We ask why George Floyd’s death touched a nerve, and why these events keep happening in America. A look at the country’s cyber-defences reveals considerable weaknesses—what are states to do as electronic attacks outpace the conventional kind? And what museums are doing now to document the history unfolding around them. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 31, 2020
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how the world’s most powerful country is handling covid-19, China’s decision to impose a security law on Hong Kong threatens a broader reckoning (10:04). And why mercenaries are still hired by African governments (18:30). For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub. 
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May 29, 2020
America has passed a grim milestone: 100,000 deaths from covid-19. Many Americans think the country has been hit uniquely hard and that the president’s bungled response is to blame. That view is not borne out by international comparisons. But, as all 50 states reopen with the virus still prevalent, Americans are right to be nervous. How will America’s efforts to recover impact the presidential race? John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. US policy correspondent Idrees Kahloon and Henry Curr, our economics editor, also join. For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/pod2020. 
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May 29, 2020
The organisation is not that organised, and attention has waned since its calls for change first gripped America. Will it seize the current moment of outrage? The pandemic may threaten London’s place as Britain’s undisputed centre of gravity. And a researcher spooks spooks by revealing a decades-old spy pact. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 28, 2020
America’s independent restaurants face a future in which half their tables stand empty. Anne McElvoy asks award-winning chef and restaurateur Marcus Samuelsson how restaurants can reinvent their business models to survive. They talk about converting chic eateries into community kitchens in the covid-19 crisis and why he thinks Joe Biden deserves a chance. Also, what does Mr Samuelsson make of racial tensions following the fatal police brutality case in Minnesota? And he takes Anne McElvoy on a culinary tour from chicken stew in his native Ethiopia via Swedish lingonberry vodka to red-velvet cake in Harlem. For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 28, 2020
China’s parliament voted today to draft legislation that would utterly undermine the territory’s independence. What now for protesters, for Western powers, for the region’s foreign firms? The pandemic has quashed some crimes but has also created new nefarious opportunities. And it may be closing time for the golden age of the booze business. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 27, 2020
How can mathematics help us understand our lives and predict the world around us? Host Alok Jha speaks to David Sumpter of Uppsala University about the equations that can help people make better decisions. Christl Donnelly, an epidemiologist at the University of Oxford and Imperial College London details the role mathematics plays in modelling covid-19. Moon Duchin of Tufts University explains how maths can stop gerrymandering. And physicist Graham Farmelo on why he thinks the universe speaks in numbers. For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 27, 2020
President Donald Trump’s failures of leadership have compounded the crisis. But America’s health-care and preparedness systems have problems that predate him. South Korea marks the 40th anniversary of a massacre that remains politically divisive even now. And, today’s space-launch plan in America blazes a trail for a new, commercial space industry. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 26, 2020
Travel has virtually ground to a halt during the pandemic, exacerbating the global economy’s woes—by complicating trade ties, upending business and devastating the tourist trade. Host Simon Long explores the future of the travel industry, staycations in South Korea and future consolidation in the airline industry. Also, could travel bubbles offer a route to economic recovery?     For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 26, 2020
The pandemic has caused a shift in how drug firms are viewed: their capacity for big-money innovation will give them immunity in the crisis. Widespread homeworking will have broad consequences, from commercial-property values to urban demographics. And a seemingly innocuous Hong Kong history exam is a window into the territory’s increasingly fraught politics. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 25, 2020
The North Korean leader’s recent disappearance for three weeks led to intense speculation about his health. What would happen if Mr Kim's regime collapsed? Peter Singer, an author and political scientist, explains how his novel, set in the near future, is helping policymakers respond to artificial intelligence. And how feasible is wireless charging for electric cars? Tom Standage hosts 
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May 25, 2020
Emissions have plummeted as the pandemic slowed the world. It could be a mere blip—but it is an unprecedented opportunity for a greener, more sustainable economy. Serving in America’s armed forces is a long-established path to citizenship, but that path is narrowing. And we ask how sport will emerge from the pandemic, even if the stands stay empty. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 24, 2020
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the chance to flatten the climate curve, when, why and how to lift coronavirus lockdowns (9:25) and the arrest of Africa’s most wanted man (17:25).   Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 22, 2020
Taiwanese firm TSMC plans to build a new fab, or computer chip factory, in Arizona. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo called the $12bn investment a boost for American “economic independence” amid China’s creeping dominance in tech. A geopolitical tug-of-war is being fought over nanoscopic wafers of silicon. What do microchips tell us about what’s happening to globalisation? And, as the coronavirus stokes anti-China sentiment, will trade barriers remain no matter who wins November’s election? John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. Asia technology correspondent Hal Hodson and Soumaya Keynes, trade editor, also join. For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/pod2020. 
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May 22, 2020
Legislation signalled at the annual meeting undermines the “one country, two systems” approach to Hong Kong’s rule—and may inflame rather than quell protests. Argentina finds itself at the doorstep of default once again; the pandemic is sharpening the hardship ahead. And remembering the woman who expanded Irish poetry with the gloriously quotidian. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 21, 2020
The writer of “The Wire” and “The Deuce” takes a break from the dark side of real life to explore an alternative history in which Franklin D Roosevelt lost the 1940 presidential election to an anti-Semitic isolationist—on a platform to lead America towards fascism. As the country prepares for a very different election, Anne McElvoy asks David Simon about the roots of anti-immigrant feeling in America and whether individuals can change the course of history. Plus, when does a storyteller need to learn to let go? And they swap lockdown binge-watching favourites from the streaming archives. For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 21, 2020
A central bank struggling for independence, dwindling foreign reserves to prop up the currency and a president who just hates rates: Turkey’s economy looked shaky even before covid-19. Online dating carries on apace amid lockdowns, and it seems people are forging more emotionally intimate bonds. And the risk that humans might pass the coronavirus to their primate cousins. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 20, 2020
An apparent spike in a rare childhood illness, Kawasaki disease, suggests the coronavirus may manifest very differently in children and raises questions over the role they play in spreading the pandemic. America’s latest offensive against Huawei pushes the global semiconductor industry into uncharted territory; it may also harm American interests in the process. And, flattening the other curve—could fossil fuels be added to covid-19’s casualty list? Kenneth Cukier hosts For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 20, 2020
Rhetoric and posturing at the World Health Organisation’s annual assembly reveal an agency under geopolitical stresses just when global co-operation is needed most. Illegal logging has become an existential threat for the Amazon; under the cover of covid-19, a new bill in Brazil could hasten its decline. And reflections on the vast musical legacy of Kraftwerk’s Florian Schneider. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 19, 2020
America and Europe face a wave of corporate bankruptcies as a result of covid-19. But will some businesses be able to restructure rather than go broke? Also, why some are calling for the Federal Reserve to turn to negative interest rates to alleviate the slump. And, is now the time for entrepreneurial true grit? Rachana Shanbhogue hosts For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 19, 2020
Extremists are cropping up at protests and expanding their reach online. They see the pandemic as proof of their worldview, and as an opportunity to spread their messages. After systematically ignoring mental-health concerns for decades, China’s authorities are at last tackling the issue—somewhat. And lockdowns prove that Britain is a nation of gardeners. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 18, 2020
Which firms will fly above the covid-19 clouds? Big, low-cost carriers with strong finances seem likeliest, but either way consolidation is inevitable. The Indian state of Kerala seems to be handling its outbreak far better than others; blame an unassuming but wildly popular health minister. And whether New York’s beloved Irish pubs will craic on past the pandemic. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 17, 2020
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, has covid-19 killed globalisation? Why the European Union is having a bad crisis (10:55) and how Mike Pompeo is confusing leadership with bashing his opponents (19:20). Zanny Minton Beddoes hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 15, 2020
A row over the president’s tax returns has arrived in the Supreme Court. Donald Trump is challenging subpoenas that seek to disclose his finances. The court’s power over the presidency is being tested while the justices face the frustrations of remote working. How might the Supreme Court affect the election? John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. Steven Mazie, the Economist’s Supreme Court correspondent, and legal historian Mary Ziegler also join. Read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus. For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/pod2020. 
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May 15, 2020
What started as a public-health crisis is developing into an existential one. The most fundamental question to be addressed is: what is the European Union for? Hopes of helpful change by El Salvador’s millennial president are dimming as he becomes increasingly dictatorial. And why so many Indonesians are draping themselves in the sun. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 14, 2020
Liberty is curtailed around the world during the global pandemic. With the costs of lockdown mounting, Americans are divided over how far and how fast to reopen. Anne McElvoy asks Dan Crenshaw, a rising star in the Republican ranks in Congress, whether the coronavirus is forcing conservatives to embrace a new era of big government. As his own state of Texas eases restrictions, the congressman argues Americans are ready to accept the risks. Plus, is a post-oil future possible for the Lone-Star State? And why, though born in Scotland, he could still have the White House in his sights.  For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 14, 2020
After three elections and 16 months, the unity government between sworn rivals Binyamin Netanyahu and Benny Gantz gets to work tonight. Can it withstand the coming political storms? Frenetic research into the coronavirus is upending some long-established ways of disseminating science, perhaps for good. And we examine the merits of outlawing an awkward job interview question. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 13, 2020
Will humans ever discover intelligent life in space? Since the 1960’s, scientists have been working on the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. They have not found it yet but their research is moving up a gear. Better telescopes, faster computers and more funding means that the chances of discovering ET in the next few decades have dramatically increased. Alok Jha hosts. For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 13, 2020
After a series of government missteps, people in Britain—and, increasingly, outside it—are lambasting the covid-19 response. That has great reputational costs. In a story suited to a television drama, a Filipino network popular with the people but critical of the president has been forced off the air. And our columnist finds surprising modern resonance in a 1950s Argentinian novel. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 12, 2020
The global food network has so far weathered the challenge of covid-19 and largely kept shelves and plates full. As the pandemic continues, more people are at risk of going hungry. But unlike past crises, the problem this time will not be supply. Rachana Shanbhogue and Matthieu Favas trace an $8trn food chain back from fork to farm to investigate the weak links. Can governments hold their nerve and resist protectionism? And could the crisis reveal an opportunity for a greener food future? Read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus. For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 12, 2020
The vast network moving food from farm to fork has shifted gears mightily in response to covid-19. But some will still go hungry; governments must resist the urge to crimp exports. Inflation statistics are often tallied in store aisles and at restaurant tables; how to gather those data now? And why being a warm-up act is cold comfort for many bands. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 11, 2020
The pandemic overshadowed a striking spate of uprisings around the world. In Lebanon economic conditions have only worsened since—and the protesters are back. A look at urban architecture reveals how past diseases have shaped the world’s cities; we ask how much covid-19 will leave its mark. And, can Corona beer, Latin America’s first global brand, escape its associations with the coronavirus?   For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 10, 2020
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the dangerous gap between Wall Street and Main Street in America, (10:22) high-speed science—new research on the coronavirus is being released in a torrent. (21:00) And, casual sex is out, companionship is in. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 8, 2020
Amid the lockdown some American students have filed lawsuits to get refunds on their tuition fees. Shifting classes online has rekindled concerns about the high cost of college education. Last year an FBI investigation exposed wealthy parents paying to cheat elite university admissions. The perception that university is no longer a driver of social mobility - but the opposite - fuels the political divide. How true is that? In this episode US policy correspondent Idrees Kahloon reports on a scheme that helps poor students complete college, we unpick the complicated history of American meritocracy, and hear from the frontline of the admissions process. John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. Read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus. For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/pod2020. 
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May 8, 2020
How can stockmarkets be so healthy when many businesses are so unwell? We look at the many risks that are clearly not priced in. China’s documentary-makers are having to find clever ways to get past censors—which is why one famed filmmaker is just giving his work away online. And remembering a legendary rock-climber who always wanted to find a new way up. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 7, 2020
Seventy-five years after the end of the second world war in Europe, armed forces around the world have been mobilised to fight a new common enemy. Anne McElvoy asks General Sir Nick Carter, Britain's chief of the defence staff, what lessons past wars hold for conquering the coronavirus. He explains the work of the secretive 77 Brigade in fighting disinformation and his view on rumours about the origins of the coronavirus. Plus, why neither NATO nor Russia is "taking its foot off the gas” during the pandemic. And, how he will be commemorating VE Day virtually. For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 7, 2020
As Russia’s leader marks two decades in power, he faces almighty headwinds—not only covid-19 but also cut-price oil and an increasingly leery citizenry. The pandemic is hitting different tech firms in different ways but on balance it seems to be further consolidating the power of the big ones. And the surprisingly upbeat music that comes about during downturns. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 6, 2020
Could repurposing existing drugs, such as remdesivir, be the answer to the search for treatments for covid-19? Also, the winner of this year’s Marconi Prize, Andrea Goldsmith of Stanford University, on her pioneering work in wireless communications technology. And, the mission to give rivers their wiggle back. Kenneth Cukier hosts. For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 6, 2020
Many were shocked when armed groups heeded a call for a global ceasefire; given a squabble at the UN it would now be shocking if those pockets of peace continue to hold. We examine a century-old technique as a possible treatment for covid-19. And a family feud involving Britain’s most-reclusive octogenarians heads to court. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 5, 2020
Germany’s constitutional court has given the European Central Bank an ultimatum. The ruling could prompt further challenges to both the EU’s economic recovery plan and the authority of its highest court. The pandemic is a moment of reckoning for America’s health-care industry; but could patients ultimately benefit? And host Patrick Lane gets a glimpse of the—contactless—office of the future. For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 5, 2020
Many universities were on thin ice financially before the pandemic. Now, with foreign travel slumping and distancing measures the norm, a global reckoning is coming. In many Asian countries, Ramadan seems largely untouched by pandemic-protection measures; we ask why. And the vexing question of how many people live in North Macedonia. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 4, 2020
As Nigeria tentatively lifts its lockdown today, we examine the decisions African leaders face: pandemic policies may do more harm than the pandemic itself. There’s a curious dearth of smokers among covid-19’s most severe cases; that may point to a treatment. And on its 150th anniversary, a reflection on the history and the mission of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 3, 2020
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, a 90% economy—life after lockdowns will be hard in ways that are difficult to imagine today. Also, a bust-up in Brasilia (10:10), and solitude is both a blessing and a curse (17:25). Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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May 1, 2020
The pandemic has been grim for admirers of America's preeminence. The country that rallied allies to defend democracy and lead the world in scientific endeavour has been hit hardest by the coronavirus. China has sent medical supplies to American states, while the president brainstorms unlikely cures on live TV. Is America ceding global leadership? Maybe. One certainty is that fretting over the demise of the Republic is a longstanding American tradition. In this episode we trace the origins of declinism in modern American politics and hear from someone who spent years preparing for societal breakdown, only for those plans themselves to unravel. John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. Read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus. For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/pod2020.  
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May 1, 2020
Scientists may soon understand how the new coronavirus got its start; that could help head off future outbreaks. In the meantime, politicians are clouding the discussion. America and Europe are taking different approaches to keeping small businesses afloat, but it’s a struggle on both sides of the Atlantic. And tuning in to the global boom in community radio stations. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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April 30, 2020
In a year of plagues, power struggles and star-crossed lovers divided by lockdown, Anne McElvoy asks James Shapiro, author of “Shakespeare in a Divided America”, what the bard would make of it all. Shakespeare is claimed by Americans of all political stripes. But how can a lad from 16th-century Stratford-upon-Avon illuminate the past and future of the republic now? Plus, what the president might teach the professor about Shakespeare’s work. And, Shapiro prescribes a verse for the trials and tribulations of 2020. For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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April 30, 2020
The pandemic is hitting emerging markets particularly hard, and the crisis is likely to widen the gap between the strongest and the weakest among them. Physical distancing is making life even harder for people with dementia, and their carers. And a few tips on learning a new language in lockdown. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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April 29, 2020
The immune system plays a vital role in protecting humans from infections, but how is it faring against covid-19? Pascal Soriot, chief executive of the pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca, tells host, Kenneth Cukier, about potential treatments for covid patients. Plus, do people build up an immunity to covid-19 if they have recovered from it, or can they catch it again? And, Sonja Lyubomirsky, professor of psychology at the University of California, Riverside, on how acts of kindness can boost the immune system. Read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus. For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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April 29, 2020
The world’s students are falling behind and lockdown is only exacerbating prior disparities in their progress; we examine a compelling back-to-school argument. America’s Environmental Protection Agency is rolling back yet more pollution protections, but who stands to gain is unclear. And why so many urban Kenyans understate their salaries to the villagers back home. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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April 28, 2020
Lockdowns worldwide have brought the automobile industry to a standstill. Hakan Samuelsson, the CEO of Volvo, explains why the solution to the crisis will not be as simple as getting factories moving again. Host Rachana Shanbhogue asks Simon Wright, industry editor, and Patrick Foulis, business affairs editor, whether carmakers can still afford to invest in the cutting-edge technologies that could transport them to a greener, safer future. Has the world passed peak car? Read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus. For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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April 28, 2020
The state’s all-postal primaries vote could be seen as a trial run for November’s presidential election. Might voting by mail be the least-bad option? The BBC’s canny response to covid-19 has quietened its critics, but bigger problems await after the pandemic. And how a few once-feuding families are pushing Bolivian wine onto the world stage. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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April 27, 2020
The covid-19 pandemic has triggered an economic crisis, but how will this change the way people use technology—and which of these changes will last? Host Tom Standage speaks to guests from Ark Invest, the Brookings Institution and Alphabet’s drone-delivery company, Wing, to explore which technologies stand to benefit from an acceleration in the pace of adoption.    Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0)   Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer or here for The World in 2020   
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April 27, 2020
The country is aiming for complete elimination of the coronavirus; so far, so good. But renewed freedom within its borders requires that virtually no one cross them. Restrictions in Europe on movement of agricultural labour could leave crops to rot in the fields. And why cologne is the hand-sanitiser of choice in Turkey. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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April 26, 2020
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how will governments cope with the expensive legacy of covid-19? (11:05), unscrupulous autocrats in the pandemic of power grabs (17:52), and, why Netflix’s success will continue. Zanny Minton Beddoes hosts. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer 
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April 24, 2020
"We can corral the coronavirus," Gov. Greg Abbott said, announcing his plan to reopen the Texas economy. Floridians have returned to the beaches and other Southern states are starting to relax restrictions on restaurants, gyms and hair salons. But public support for maintaining the lockdown remains strong. Can America reopen while keeping covid-19 at bay? In this episode we hear how Wisconsinites view the lockdown and a Bronx medic tells us what it’s like on the frontline. We also find out where ending social distancing might be most risky. John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. Read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus. For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/pod2020. 
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April 24, 2020
Some governors are co-ordinating mutual lockdown plans, others are already reopening their states. That haphazardness bodes ill in the absence of widespread testing and tracing. The pandemic is kicking an industry that was already down: newspapers’ readerships are up, but profits are through the floor. And, reflecting on the life of a saintly obstetric surgeon in Ethiopia. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 23, 2020
As billions of people remain in lockdown to stem the coronavirus, Anne McElvoy asks the Chilean author whether imagination is the cure for isolation. Allende, who lives in California, talks about why she loves her adopted home and her hopes for the political future of Latin America. Plus, long lunches, hard truths with Pablo Neruda, and the urgent beauty of falling in love and getting married again in her seventies. For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 23, 2020
The Rohingya genocide was just one of many sectarian flashpoints in Rakine state; now a slick separatist insurgency is getting the better of Myanmar’s army. America is floundering in its bid to win the 5G mobile-technology race; we ask what options it has. And denying locked-down Sri Lankans booze has driven them to home-brewing. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 22, 2020
Tech firm Microsoft has announced plans to embrace open data. Jeni Tennison, from Britain’s Open Data Institute, says it marks a milestone in the way big companies share data. Also, could mass testing for covid-19 provide a way out of the global lockdown? And, what is causing the worst drought in over 1,000 years in the south-west of the United States? Kenneth Cukier hosts   You can read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus. Please subscribe for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 22, 2020
Even before the pandemic, companies were accused of returning too much money to shareholders. As a recession looms, dividends and share buy-backs should be cut—but not everywhere. Coral bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef is more widespread than ever, and each event makes a full recovery less likely. And the animals are out to play as humans are locked away. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 21, 2020
Hedge funds are usually seen as the risk-takers of the financial world, but how have they been performing in these times of economic turmoil? And, why the coronavirus pandemic could lead to the deaths of millions of small businesses. Plus, the problem of moral hazard—could government bail-outs have unintended consequences? Patrick Lane hosts You can read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus. Please subscribe for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 21, 2020
Authorities have re-ignited tensions by arresting some of the democracy movement’s most prominent figures—and Beijing seems to be piling more pressure on. Shortages of protective equipment are not just about supply; we look at the global scramble for kit. And Brazil’s universally beloved “telenovelas” are on hold; how will they eventually deal with covid-19? For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 20, 2020
Non-essential businesses are opening; schools soon will be, too. The country’s fortunes are down to a mix of science-minded leadership, functional federalism and a bit of luck. Saudi Arabia has halted its brutal air campaign in Yemen, ostensibly for humanitarian reasons; there is more to it than that. And a look at the wave of female avengers in drama. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 19, 2020
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, is China the pandemic’s big geopolitical winner? (8:30) Saudi Arabia has declared a ceasefire in Yemen, but the Houthis are fighting on. (14:13) And, how Britain's glossy magazines are adjusting to a gloomy world. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 17, 2020
President Trump scored a big diplomatic win by pushing the main oil producing countries to agree to cut output. A price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia, combined with the slump in demand caused by the coronavirus, had halved oil prices. Trump said the deal would save thousands of American energy jobs. But pushing for higher oil prices in an election year is a ploy more common in Caracas or Moscow than Washington DC. Has Donald Trump made America an energy superpower? How reliable is his bet on oil as an electoral strategy? In this episode we assess Trump’s deal, trace the origins of America’s obsession with energy independence, and debate whether fossil fuels or climate consciousness will win more votes. John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. Read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus. For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/pod2020. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 17, 2020
The covid-19 pandemic has caused the country’s first GDP dip in more than four decades. What struggles still lie ahead for the world’s second-largest economy? Decisive action to help the homeless amid the crisis offers hope for what comes after it. And a look back at the life of Joseph Lowery, a firebrand preacher and rhyming civil-rights activist. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 16, 2020
A global contagion requires global solutions. The big technology platforms that have been targets of politicians and regulators are now at the centre of efforts to fight the coronavirus. Anne McElvoy asks Margrethe Vestager, EU competition commissioner, whether the pandemic has killed the techlash. The “giant-slayer” in charge of the EU’s digital strategy weighs trade-offs between personal privacy and public health. As parts of Europe contemplate reopening, can Brussels coordinate the exit strategy or is it every country for itself? And, Vestager reveals why we won't find her shopping at Amazon. For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 16, 2020
The prime minister is still convalescing; Parliament is still finding ways to meet virtually. Meanwhile questions are growing about how the government has handled the pandemic. In China authorities are promoting unproven traditional remedies to treat covid-19—treatments they would love to export. And the role that animals play in making wildfires worse, and in preventing them. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 15, 2020
Scientists are working at an unprecedented pace to find a vaccine for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes covid-19. The stakes are high. Natasha Loder, The Economist's health policy editor, explains how an effective vaccine might be developed. Dr Trevor Drew of the Australian Centre for Disease Preparedness speaks to host Kenneth Cukier about two trials which have reached the animal-testing stage. Plus, once a vaccine is discovered, what can be done to make sure it is distributed fairly? Dr Seth Berkely, chief executive of GAVI, the vaccine alliance, explains the importance of global cooperation. For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub. And please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 15, 2020
Today’s legislative elections in South Korea are the world’s first to take place amid the covid-19 crisis. How have masked campaigners managed, and how are masked voters likely to respond? “Contact tracing” is crucial in following the coronavirus’s progression; we look into nascent technological approaches to the task. And a look at whether the pandemic will give way to a baby boom. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 14, 2020
With countries accounting for more than half of global GDP in lockdown, the collapse of commercial activity is unprecedented. Falling demand and a bitter price war had pushed the price of crude oil to its lowest since 1999. Could a historic deal between oil producers be enough to stabilise the market? Plus, those companies that survive the coronavirus crisis will have to adapt to a very different environment. And, how to reopen factories after covid-19. Patrick Lane hosts  For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.   And please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 14, 2020
We speak to Albin Kurti, a reformist prime minister, after his ouster—and ask how American officials may have played a role in his downfall. Gloomy forecasts will dominate this week’s virtual meetings of the IMF and the World Bank, with more countries than ever begging for financial help. And the connection between Instagram, Indonesian lovers and conservative Islam. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 13, 2020
This week, some European countries are beginning to switch their economies back on, but leaders face a grim trade-off between economic health and public health. Meanwhile, bids to finance Europe’s fiscal-stimulus programmes re-ignite old debates on financial interdependence. And why a bad-boy Belgian is making chocolate in Congo. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 12, 2020
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the business of survival—those companies that survive the coronavirus crisis will need to master a new environment. Plus, how to reopen factories after covid-19 (9:23) and Venezuela's navy battles a cruise ship, and loses (17:41).   The Economist is making some of its most important coverage of the covid-19 pandemic freely available to readers of The Economist Today, our daily newsletter. To receive it, register here. For more coverage, see our coronavirus hub.   Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 10, 2020
How do you hold a vote in the middle of a pandemic? Statewide elections in Wisconsin this week showed how hard it is to manage the logistics of democracy during a lockdown. A partisan fight over changes to the way votes are cast went all the way to the Supreme Court. Meanwhile the most expensive campaigns in history have had to rip up their plans and start again online. In this episode we talk to election officials in Wisconsin, hear how electoral campaigns unfolded during the 1918 flu, and figure out what the current pandemic means for this year’s presidential race. John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. Read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus. For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/pod2020. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 10, 2020
Many have forgotten that, even after the second world war, a fascist movement held sway in Britain. Our culture editor recounts the tale of the group that quashed it. Leonora Carrington was an adventurous and pioneering Surrealist artist; our correspondent explores deepest Mexico to discover what inspired her. And the wizard industry that is casting a spell over Myanmar. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 9, 2020
As governments around the world see their finances savaged by the pandemic, emerging economies are crying out for cash. More countries are turning to the International Monetary Fund for support than at any point in its history. In an exclusive podcast interview ahead of its Spring Meetings, host Anne McElvoy and Zanny Minton Beddoes, The Economist’s editor-in-chief, ask IMF's head Kristalina Georgieva how it intends to bail out the global economy. Could issuing “paper gold” provide the answer or does the IMF need new tools for the job? Plus, how jeans and pyjamas made it into the boardroom. The Economist is making some of its most important coverage of the covid-19 pandemic freely available to readers of The Economist Today, our daily newsletter. To receive it, register here. For more coverage, see our coronavirus hub. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 9, 2020
Under Hungary’s shape-shifting prime minister the country has essentially become a dictatorship—and it seems there is little the European Union can do about it. We examine the serious mental-health effects the covid-19 crisis is having—and will have in the future. And Japan’s #KuToo movement aims to reform some seriously sexist dress codes at work. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 8, 2020
The “silent transmission” of covid-19 means people without symptoms could be a major source of its spread. How effective are masks as a defence? Plus, Kenneth Cukier asks Ivan Oransky, co-founder of Retractionwatch.com, whether the race to uncover the mysteries of the virus could lead to a torrent of “bad science”. For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub. And please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 8, 2020
People are spilling from the Chinese metropolis where the global outbreak took hold. But controls actually remain tight, and authorities’ attempts to spin pandemic into propaganda are not quite working. Mozambique’s rising violence threatens what could be Africa’s largest-ever energy project, in a region that has until now escaped widespread jihadism. And “geomythologists” may have uncovered humans’ oldest tale yet. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 7, 2020
Banks have entered this financial crisis in better health than the previous one. But how sick might they get? Emerging-market lockdowns match rich-world ones but their governments cannot afford such generous handouts. Nobel laureate Joseph Stiglitz explains how emerging economies might weather the pandemic. And how Silicon Valley's unicorns are losing their sheen. Simon Long hosts For more on the pandemic, see The Economist's coronavirus hub.   And please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 7, 2020
President Jair Bolsonaro still dismisses the disease as “just the sniffles”, so state and local authorities—and the country’s vast slums—have taken matters into their own hands. The physical and mental needs of the world’s locked-down populations are driving a boom in online wellness. And we look back on the life of the French chef who revolutionised English fine dining. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 6, 2020
To keep track of the spread of covid-19, some governments are turning to digital surveillance, using mobile-phone apps and data networks. We ask whether this will work—and examine the threat to privacy posed by a digital panopticon. Britain’s Labour Party has a new leader. We ask in which direction Sir Keir Starmer will lead the opposition. And we report on the northern hemisphere’s winter that wasn’t. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 5, 2020
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, covid-19 presents grim choices between life, death and, ultimately, the economy (11:02), lockdowns in Asia have sparked a stampede home (17:52) And, Formula 1 comes up with a breathing machine for covid-19 patients. The Economist is making some of its most important coverage of the covid-19 pandemic freely available to readers of The Economist Today, our daily newsletter. To receive it, register here. For more coverage, see our coronavirus hub.   Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 3, 2020
President Trump changed tone and course this week, extending federal guidelines on social distancing to the end of April. New York is now the epicentre of the global pandemic. Yet large parts of the US remain relatively unaffected by covid-19. Public opinion supports tough measures to contain the virus for now. But how sustainable are strict curbs on personal freedom in a country founded on individual liberty? The Economist’s healthcare correspondent Slavea Chankova explains the epidemiological models behind the lockdown, we tell the story of history’s most notorious asymptomatic carrier, and Senator Cory Booker reflects on political division in national crises. John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. Read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus. For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/pod2020. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 3, 2020
The coronavirus pandemic has sent America’s mighty jobs machine into screeching reverse. How bad might the labour market get? Covid-19 is just one reason why Saudi Arabia’s crown prince, Muhammad bin Salman, is finding 2020 to be a much harder year than he’d hoped. And we report on the fight to save a 44,000-year-old cave painting. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 2, 2020
The global total of confirmed coronavirus cases has exceeded one million; a quarter of them are in America. The new epicentre of this pandemic is the New York tri-state area. As politicians argue over how to save lives and the economy, Anne McElvoy asks Cory Booker, a senator from New Jersey, whether America can unite to fight the virus. They talk about tussles over vital equipment between states and the federal government. Also, does he agree with the mayor of LA on recommending masks to lessen the risk of contracting covid-19? Plus, the former Democratic presidential hopeful shares his “dad joke” for a moment of cheer. The Economist is making some of its most important coverage of the covid-19 pandemic freely available to readers of The Economist Today, our daily newsletter. To receive it, register here. For more coverage, see our coronavirus hub.   Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 2, 2020
Cruise ships had been enjoying a golden era—until covid-19 came along. The pandemic has been a catastrophe for the industry. Stranded passengers have taken ill and even died, ships have been banned from ports, and revenue has collapsed. But lawmakers are unlikely to bail it out. In Sweden, daily life has been pretty normal, despite the coronavirus, but can that continue? And we report on Dutch disease—the language’s unusual affinity for poxy swear words. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 1, 2020
How are location data from mobile phones being used to combat covid-19? And, as more people are forced to stay at home, can broadband and mobile internet connections keep up? Plus, the epidemiologist who helped defeat smallpox, Larry Brilliant, on what needs to be done against the coronavirus. Kenneth Cukier hosts. The Economist is making some of its most important coverage of the covid-19 pandemic freely available to readers of The Economist Today, our daily newsletter. To receive it, register here. For more coverage, see our coronavirus hub. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
April 1, 2020
The Trump administration makes Venezuela’s Nicolás Maduro an offer he seems sure to refuse: an end to sanctions in return for power-sharing and elections. The coronavirus pandemic has crushed oil prices at the same time a price war is raging: the industry has never seen anything like it. And as videoconferencing brings your workmates into your home, we suggest how to create the right impression. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
March 31, 2020
At the beginning of a financial year like no other, millions of newly furloughed or unemployed Americans face rent and mortgage payments. How long can the financial system withstand the strain caused by the coronavirus pandemic? Many employees have had to make a quick transition to remote working. Businesses struggling to make the switch could look to those companies that have never had an office. And, a day in the life of Bartleby—and his cat. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts. The Economist is making some of its most important coverage of the covid-19 pandemic freely available to readers of The Economist Today, our daily newsletter. To receive it, register here. For more coverage, see our coronavirus hub. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
March 31, 2020
New York is at the centre of America’s—and the world’s—coronavirus crisis. The metropolis has also been caught in a damaging three-way political division, involving three of its native sons. In the Middle East and north Africa, governments have imposed unusually harsh covid-19 crackdowns, but will the authoritarians let up afterwards? And we report on a golden age for African art. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
March 30, 2020
As the covid-19 situation worsens, host Tom Standage explores what the pandemic reveals about the perils of prediction and what other future threats we might be overlooking. Also, what a simulation of a future mission to Mars could teach us about self-isolation on Earth today. And, the hit video game “Plague, Inc” is teaching players about the dynamics of pandemics—and how to stop them. Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer or here for The World in 2020 For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
March 30, 2020
Japan has reported a relatively low number of coronavirus cases. But concern is growing. The Olympics have at last been postponed and infections are on the rise. Uganda’s president faces a challenge from a pop star—and has his own backing group. And turtles have a deadly appetite for plastic. To them, it may smell like lunch. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
March 29, 2020
A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the role of big government in the time of covid-19, (10:20) assessing the havoc the pandemic is causing in emerging countries, (17:45) and, a guide to videoconferencing etiquette. Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
March 27, 2020
President Trump worries a sustained lockdown may do more damage than the covid-19 pandemic itself. More Americans have been laid off in the past week than ever before. He wants the country back open for business by Easter. Meanwhile Congress has approved nearly two trillion dollars to avert a prolonged slump. But is it enough? Chicago restaurant workers tell us what happens when an entire sector shuts down. Idrees Kahloon, US policy correspondent, assesses the rescue package. Economics columnist Ryan Avent looks back into history to find out what is missing from the current bailout plan. John Prideaux, The Economist’s US editor, hosts with Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief, and Washington correspondent Jon Fasman. Read The Economist’s full coverage of the coronavirus. For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: www.economist.com/pod2020. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
March 27, 2020
Outbreaks among inmates are all but inevitable. Efforts at prison reform that were already under way will get a boost, because now they will save lives. We examine the international variation in what are considered “essential industries” and “key workers”. And, what our editors and correspondents are doing to pass the time in lockdown. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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