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June 26, 2020
New antibody data from the CDC indicates that only 1 in 10 COVID-19 cases in the country have been identified. That still means more than 90 percent of the country hasn’t had the virus. Incidences of police brutality continue to be reported around the country. Three officers resigned and the police chief offered his resignation in Tucson, where Carlos Ingram-Lopez died in police custody. In New York, an NYPD officer was charged with using an illegal chokehold. And in headlines: the Supreme Court says asylum seekers can’t challenge their deportations in court, the Democratic Republic of the Congo ends its Ebola outbreak, and The Dixie Chicks reinvent themselves.  We’re taking a weeklong summer hiatus! We’ll be back on Monday, July 6th.
June 25, 2020
Democrats in the Senate blocked a Republican police reform bill yesterday, and Democrats in the House are expected to bring their police reform bill to the floor today. In Colorado, millions are calling for a new investigation into the death of Elijah McClain, who was killed in police custody last year.  The country hit its single-day high in new confirmed coronavirus cases yesterday. A new trend is emerging of local jurisdictions making their own calls in the absence of state and federal leadership.  And in headlines: early results from Tuesday’s primaries, GNC goes bankrupt, and Roundup pays out 10 billion to settle cancer suits.
June 24, 2020
An estimated 25,000 cases of COVID-19 are tied to U.S. meatpacking plants, where employees work in close quarters and enclosed spaces. We speak with a Smithfield Foods employee out of South Dakota about what it's been like at her facility.  Dr. Fauci says the US is experiencing a “disturbing surge” of infections after states reopened too quickly. But he’s cautiously optimistic about a vaccine, suggesting that one could be available as soon as the end of this year.  And in headlines: federal prosecutors will testify against Bill Barr, Seattle’s CHAZ to be dismantled, and celebrities continue to say sorry for doing blackface.
June 23, 2020
Trump signed a new executive order yesterday temporarily barring new foreign workers from coming to the US until the end of the year. The tech industry has warned that this order hinders their ability to recruit top talent.  In Minneapolis, a city council pledge to dismantle the police department could be harder to implement than expected. And one county jail is facing criticism for allegedly blocking non-white correctional officers from guarding former police officer Derek Chauvin.  And in headlines: CARES Act stimulus checks prevented poverty, four authors quit JK Rowling’s agency, and the FDA advises against nine brands of hand sanitizer.
June 22, 2020
New York, Virginia, and Kentucky have primaries on Tuesday. We speak with two progressive candidates for congress: Jamaal Bowman, who’s running against incumbent Rep. Eliot Engel for New York’s 16th congressional district, and Charles Booker, who’s running against Amy McGrath, for senate in Kentucky. COVID-19 is still happening in the US, whether government officials recognize it or not. New daily cases have hit record highs in 12 states, with about 30,000 new daily cases countrywide.  And in headlines: an 18-year-old security guard is killed by police in Los Angeles, Bill Barr tries to fire someone quietly and fails, and a new name for Columbus, Ohio. Head to crooked.com/podcast/to-the-left-to-the-left/ to read a transcript of our full interview with Jamaal Bowman.
June 19, 2020
The Supreme Court ruled that Trump can’ t immediately end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or DACA, because his administration’s reasons for ending it are not sufficient. We explain what comes next.  Today is Juneteenth, a day that commemorates the end of slavery in the United States. We discuss the day’s significance and why this year’s Juneteenth feels different than others.  And in headlines: Seattle’s largest labor group votes to expel the police union, California’s mask law, and a high-tech new ring for the NBA.
June 18, 2020
COVID-19 cases have plateaued in the US at around 20,000 a day as some states are seeing outbreaks grow. That hasn’t stopped Texas governor Greg Abbot from enforcing his executive order that bans cities from making face coverings mandatory.  The police officer who killed Rayshard Brooks in Atlanta, Georgia is now facing 11 charges including felony murder.  Contact tracers are working around the country to cut off chains of coronavirus transmission. We interview one of them, Alexander Miamen, about what a typical day is like for him and how he speaks to his community’s needs.  And in headlines: a price-fixing tuna CEO is going to prison, genetically modified mosquitos in Florida, and why you don’t need to buy John Bolton’s book.
June 17, 2020
Trump signed a fairly inconsequential executive order yesterday that is supposed to incentivize police departments to adopt reforms. Across the country, local officials are continuing to respond to protests against police brutality and systemic racism—some making more impactful moves than others.  We interview Massachusetts Rep. Ayanna Pressley about federal legislation on policing, and why ending qualified immunity is a central goal. And in headlines: violent clashes along China and India’s border, the Black Lives Matter Foundation versus Black Lives Matter, and an aggressive cyberstalking campaign from eBay.
June 16, 2020
Yesterday the Supreme Court ruled that the Civil Rights Act protects LGBTQ+ employees from workplace discrimination in a 6-3 ruling. This is the first major case involving transgender rights, and it comes from a decidedly conservative court. We get into what it means, and how we got here. Plus, the latest on coronavirus, where cases are on the rise and how states and business are reacting. And in headlines: BLM protestor Oluwatoyin Salau found dead in Florida, hummingbirds see secret colors, and Christopher Nolan’s ‘Tenet’ delayed at movie theaters.  Akilah & Gideon’s book recommendations:  Obviously: Stories From My Timeline by Akilah Hughes Wow, No Thank You by Samantha Irby Go Tell It On The Mountain by James Baldwin Patsy by Nicole Dennis-benn Where to buy:  The Lit Bar: thelitbar.com Black-owned independent bookstores: lithub.com/you-can-order-today-from-these-black-owned-independent-bookstores/
June 15, 2020
Rayshard Brooks was shot and killed by a white officer in Atlanta this weekend, in another horrific instance of police violence. Atlanta’s police chief subsequently announced she would step down and the officer who shot Brooks was fired.  Tens of thousands of people protested violence against Black trans people this weekend in cities across America. These protests came just as the Trump administration moved to revoke discrimination protections for trans people in health care and health insurance.  And in headlines: an update on COVID-19 in the US and around the world, African nations call on the UN to address racism and police brutality, and FKA Lady Antebellum just can’t get it right. Follow and donate to groups working to protect black trans people: The Okra Project pays Black trans chefs to go into the homes of Black trans people to cook them a healthy and home-cooked meal: theokraproject.com Black and Pink is an LGBTQ prison abolitionist organization working to support LGBTQ and HIV positive prisoners: blackandpink.org The Marsha P. Johnson Institute protects and defends the human rights of Black trans people through organizing and advocacy: marshap.org Find more: actblue.com/donate/black_led_lgbtq Support our sponsors: 60 in 6 available on Quibi: link.quibi.com/60in6
June 12, 2020
Police in Seattle abandoned their East Precinct building and ceded about six blocks of the city to protestors, who have now set up the Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone or CHAZ. Some conservatives are comparing that area to “Lord of the Flies,” while those on the ground say it’s more like orientation week at Evergreen State College. Another 1.5 million workers filed for unemployment last week. Trump plans to hold rallies again starting next Friday, building up to a packed RNC speech that’s now officially set for Jacksonville. And in headlines: a giant fuel spill in Siberia, a new police unit in Hong Kong, and Twitter wants you to read. Plus, Erin Ryan fills in for Akilah Hughes. Listen to her podcast! http://apple.co/hysteria
June 11, 2020
More than a third of states are seeing increases in Covid-19 cases in the last week. It’s hard to draw conclusions about what’s behind that trend—among states that reopened early, some are seeing cases plateau, while others are seeing cases ramp up.  Plus, journalist and lawyer Josie Duffy Rice fills in for Akilah Hughes. We discuss the culture of policing in this country and how shifting money from law enforcement to social services could cut down on the need for law enforcement. And in headlines: Amazon won’t let police use its facial recognition for one year, racist statues and monuments keep coming down nationwide, and the pandemic’s effects on king coffee chain Starbucks. Check out Josie's work at The Appeal: theappeal.org Listen to Josie's podcast: theappeal.org/topics/justice-in-america/
June 10, 2020
Georgia held its primary yesterday, and in a state where officials have been accused of voter suppression, the elections were rife with issues. Polling stations saw hours-long lines that invariably led some voters to give up.  Raquel Willis, writer and trans activist, fills in for Akilah Hughes. We discuss how we can better support black queer and trans leadership in this moment. And in headlines: Brazil’s Supreme Court orders Bolsonaro to stop hoarding COVID data, an art dealer’s buried treasure, and the legal battle for a radio in the Titanic. Find more of Raquel's work: raquelwillis.com Support these Black-led LGBTQ+ organizations: actblue.com/donate/black_led_lgbtq
June 9, 2020
Democrats in Congress introduced the Justice In Policing Act yesterday, which includes a ban on chokeholds, a ban on no-knock warrants, and makes it easier to prosecute police officers. Plus, what New York's legislature is doing to reform policing in their state. Guest-host Dylan Marron fills in for Akilah Hughes. He shares lessons from his podcast “Conversations With People Who Hate Me," on how to have important discussions with people who disagree with you. And in headlines: Governor Andy Beshear to provide free health insurance for black Kentuckians, Chuck E. Cheese could file for bankruptcy, and Chris Cuomo shows ass on IG. Check out Dylan's podcast: dylanmarron.com/podcast
June 8, 2020
Minneapolis City Council members have said they intend to disband the Minneapolis Police Department and replace it with a community-based public safety model. On the federal level, Democrats will introduce reform legislation today that, among other things, will change the standard for use of force. We interview Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison, who recently took the lead in the prosecuting cases related to George Floyd’s killing by police. We ask him why it's so difficult to prosecute officers, and what he makes of moves to disband police departments. And in headlines: India experiences its highest day of cases, unemployment numbers are better but still terrible, and former VP Joe Biden has enough delegates to win the nomination. Plus, Erin Ryan fills in for Akilah Hughes.
June 5, 2020
Trump’s former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis published a scathing indictment of his presidency, and he’s been backed up by Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski. Lawmakers in the Congressional Black Caucus are preparing a piece of police legislation that will aim to end racial profiling and qualified immunity. We speak with Dr. Keisha Blain, a professor of African American History at University of Pittsburgh, about how what’s happening now is an extension of the work civil rights leaders began long ago. And in headlines: Trump signs executive order to weaken environmental protections, Zoom makes users pay for end-to-end encryption, and loud blonde man Jake Paul charged with looting.
June 4, 2020
Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison has upgraded charges against George Floyd’s killer Derek Chauvin by adding a charge of second-degree felony murder. The three officers on the scene who did nothing to protect Floyd have also been charged, with offenses that include aiding and abetting second-degree murder.  One full week of protests has produced immediate changes nationwide. Confederate statues and other relics to racism have come down in several states. And city council members in Minneapolis are calling to disband the city's police department. And in headlines: the NBA readies plans to resume its season, Defense Secretary Mark Esper opposes then supports using soldiers as police, and Elle Jones becomes the first black woman to be elected mayor of Ferguson.
June 3, 2020
Trump’s threat to deploy military to states to help squash unrest would require him to use the Insurrection Act of 1807. We discuss that law’s history and whether Trump would need support from governors to invoke it.  Former VP Joe Biden spoke on Monday, discussing inequality, racial injustice, and calling for unity. Biden is now proposing federal legislation to reform police, and has committed to addressing institutional racism if elected.  And in headlines: Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg doubles down on allowing Trump’s terrible posts, Australia’s PM calls for an investigation into US police violence towards reporters, and Fuller House explains a distinct lack of Aunt Becky.
June 2, 2020
Protests against racial violence continued in well over 100 cities, leading local officials to continue to take drastic measures like curfews and calling up the National Guard. Police in Washington, DC charged a group of peaceful protestors so that Trump could take a bad photo in front of a church.  The organization Campaign Zero gathers data on policies aimed at ending police violence. We discuss the policy changes they’ve found to be successful and unsuccessful.  And in headlines: the United States sends a dubious COVID-19 drug to Brazil, seven states hold their primaries today, and Trump brings big bridezilla energy to planning the RNC. Gideon & Akilah's recommendations: Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor twitter.com/KeeangaYamahtta Ethel's Club instagram.com/ethelsclub Rachel Cargle instagram.com/rachel.cargle Watchman (HBO)
June 1, 2020
Protests in response to the police killing of George Floyd continued throughout the weekend. There were demonstrations in over 75 American cities, leading local officials to activate the National Guard in at least 11 states, and impose curfews. At one point, Trump hid underground.  Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter for his role in George Floyd's killing, but three other officers who stood by have not been charged.  And in headlines: Trump says the US will stop working with the WHO, the CDC releases guidelines for how to reopen offices, and Chrissy Teigen demonstrates the ‘spite donation.’ Where to Donate: Minnesota Freedom Fund: minnesotafreedomfund.org/donate Brooklyn Bail Fund: brooklynbailfund.org/donate Reclaim the block: reclaimtheblock.org Black Visions Collective: blackvisionsmn.org Mass Defense Program: nlg.org/donate/massdefense
May 29, 2020
President Trump signed an executive order aimed at social media companies yesterday. We explain what's behind it and why legal experts don't think it's going anywhere. Varshini Prakash is the co-founder and executive director of Sunrise Movement. She's also an advocate for the Green New Deal who’s been appointed to Joe Biden’s climate change task force. We speak with her about what she’s pushing for with Biden.  And in headlines: the Justice Department announced that investigating the death of George Floyd is a "top priority," NASA wants Tom Cruise in space, and Cyprus invites the world to visit for a “corona-cation.”
May 28, 2020
The planned site of the Republican National Convention this August is North Carolina, one of the states where coronavirus case numbers are currently on the rise. Governor Roy Cooper’s understandable concerns about this event going forward have led to a low-tier scramble, with Georgia and Florida offering to host.  Also in Florida… key American innovation Walt Disney World has announced reopening plans for July. And the NBA might finally be making its 2019-2020 season return nearby. And in headlines: Mike Pompeo declares that Hong Kong is no longer autonomous from China, Jennifer Carrol Foy seeks to be America’s first black woman governor, and Facebook knew it’s platform turned people into maniacs.
May 27, 2020
George Floyd was killed by police officers in Minneapolis this week, in an abusive and excessive show of force. We discuss his murder and the incident in Central Park this Monday where a white woman threatened Christian Cooper, a black man, distorting the facts in an apparent attempt to evoke an aggressive law enforcement response. Click here for anti-racism resources and organizations to follow. This election will be unlike any other and will require a specialized approach from organizers and activists. We talk to Crooked’s political director Shaniqua McClendon about the Adopt-A-State program, and how we can help get out the vote in key battleground states from the comfort of our homes. Head to votesaveamerica.com/adopt to find out more. And in headlines: Twitter fact checks Trump, SpaceX to launch its first crewed-shuttle today, and St. Louis asks people to self-quarantine if they partied in the Ozarks.
May 26, 2020
The US has imposed a ban on flights from Brazil because of a dangerous surge in COVID-19 cases and deaths. This comes after Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro repeatedly dismissed the severity of the pandemic and mocked social distancing efforts... even as the country became a global hotspot for coronavirus.  A federal judge in Florida has ruled against a state law that required people convicted of felonies to pay off all their court fines and fees before they were eligible to vote. That law was pushed last year by Florida’s Governor Ron DeSantis. Judges said it is akin to a poll tax and therefore unconstitutional.  And in headlines: the FBI is investigating two district attorneys involved in the case of Ahmaud Arbery, Tyler Perry’s ‘Camp Quarantine,’ and an old and oft-slandered gator passes away in Moscow.
May 22, 2020
China’s leaders are poised to impose a controversial new national security law in Hong Kong. The law would reportedly ban secession, subversion of state power, foreign interference, and terrorism. All that will essentially put Hong Kong more under China’s control and political system. Facebook has followed Twitter’s lead and will move to allow employees to work more from home, even after the pandemic. Two Ford factories had grand re-openings and grand re-closings this week. Both factories saw employees test positive for COVID-19 after returning to work and had to shut down. And we’re joined by comedian, writer, and actor Janelle James for headlines: New Zealand’s PM endorses a 4-day work week, Kendall Jenner pays for Fyre Fest post, and Aunt Becky pleads guilty.
May 21, 2020
The CDC has quietly posted a report with detailed suggestions about how to reopen. We dig into it and how the states might or might not use it. More than 900 children have been deported since March under a new pandemic border policy. Before, children had the opportunity to speak with a social worker or make a plea for asylum. Now, they can deported within hours of arrival in the US.  And in headlines: an Ohio county declares racism a public health issue, a QAnon believer scores a Senate nomination in Oregon, and two men are arrested for helping Nissan's ex-CEO escape Japan in a box.
May 20, 2020
Contact tracing apps have been adopted in countries around the world to track the spread of COVID-19, but they’re not being used as much in the US. American tech companies are working to get these apps up-and-running… despite some privacy concerns. Cybersecurity reporter Patrick Howell O'Neill joins the show to update us on how these apps are working worldwide. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin and Fed Chair Jerome Powell took questions from the Senate yesterday on how we’ll get out of the current economic crisis. They offered up starkly different opinions on how the US can avoid permanent economic damage.  And in headlines: major corporations cut ‘hazard pay’ for essential workers, Qatar Airlines takes a pumped-up approach to PPE, and the data scientist who made Florida’s COVID-19 dashboard gets axed for refusing to fudge data.
May 19, 2020
Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin and Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell will testify this morning about the economic crisis and response. We preview the hearing. A biotech company called Moderna reported preliminary results from a phase one trial of their coronavirus vaccine. So far, the results are positive—but the vaccine still has a lot more testing to go. Plus, California starts its program to give out economic relief to people who are undocumented. And in headlines: embattled politicians scuffle inside Hong Kong’s legislature, Edvard Munch’s “The Scream” hates breath, and South Korean pro soccer team gets cheered on by sex dolls.
May 18, 2020
Democrats in Congress are launching an inquiry into Trump’s firing of an inspector general at the State Department. It comes after three other inspector generals were also removed from their positions earlier this year. GrubHub is doing great business during the pandemic as more people rely on delivery. But a recent Buzzfeed report shows that the company is also making money from transactions they’re not involved in—and it’s making it harder for restaurants to stay afloat. And in headlines: Justin Amash won’t run for prez, NYC experiences pandemic fatigue, and Puerto Rico’s governor will hold a vote on whether the territory should try for statehood.
May 15, 2020
Today the House is set to vote on a $3 trillion coronavirus relief package that Senate Republicans say is dead on arrival. They’ll also vote on rules to allow for remote voting—which means we could be seeing a lot more technology barriers and funny Zoom mishaps in the near future. Late Wednesday night, FBI agents showed up to the house of Senator Richard Burr, served him a search warrant and took his cell phone. That’s in relation his sketchy sale of a ton of stock right before the market collapsed as a result of the pandemic.  And writer and comedian Bridger Winegar joins us for headlines: McDonald’s sends US franchises a 59-page guide to reopening their dining rooms, South America’s soccer league issues temporary ban on kissing, and Ikea France snoops on customers and staff.
May 14, 2020
Former vaccine chief Dr. Rick Bright will testify before a house subcommittee today—he’s the guy who says he was removed from his job because he didn’t want to push for widespread use of unproven anti-malaria drugs as a treatment for coronavirus. Bright’s pre-released statement said we’ll be in trouble if we keep following Trump off a cliff.  In their latest show of unity, Former VP Joe Biden and Senator Bernie Sanders announced the members of their joint policy task forces. Names include: Rep Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Rep Pramila Jayapal, and Former Secretary of State John Kerry.  And in headlines: local governments in Brazil are issuing mandatory lockdowns since their president won’t, Flynn’s “unmasking” was normal, and glittery worms of the deep blue sea.
May 13, 2020
Top U.S. health officials took questions from the Senate Health Committee yesterday on coronavirus. The partially teleconferenced testimonies featured weird background filters, quarantine beards, and one notable poster for the Red Hot Chili Peppers. The main takeaway was that the U.S. is far from "out of the woods" in the fight against COVID-19.  House Democrats put out a draft of their new economic relief bill. It’s a 3 trillion dollar package that includes money for states, another round of $1,200 checks for some households, hazard pay for essential workers, and more. Republicans rejected it without even seeing it. And in headlines: investigating the killing of 26-year-old Breonna Taylor in Kentucky, Twitter to let staff work from home forever, and one Australian soap opera resumes production sans kissing.
May 12, 2020
The governor of South Dakota threatened to sue two Sioux tribes over road checkpoints they have set up to prevent the spread of COVID-19 to their reservations. Members of the tribe say that establishing checkpoints is a matter-of-life and death. South Dakota’s governor, who never issued a stay-at-home order for her state, says the checkpoints are illegal and causing traffic.  The Supreme Court will hear arguments in three cases regarding Trump’s financial records today. These cases will help determine the limits of Trump’s power to ignore subpoenas from Congress and state prosecutors. And in headlines: Georgia’s AG appoints a new prosecutor to oversee the case of Ahmaud Arbery, Poland holds a “ghost election,” and Shanghai Disneyland re-opens.
May 11, 2020
Top US health officials are self-isolating and quarantining after a couple White House employees tested positive for coronavirus. Plus, new data reveal a racial bias in enforcement of stay-at-home orders in the US. South Korea has been held up as a model for fighting coronavirus to the rest of the world. Last week, they were faced with a new breakout in Seoul. Now, bars and clubs have been closed to stem the spread in that city. Following arrests in the killing of Ahmaud Arbery, calls are growing for an investigation into the handling of the case and local law enforcement. And in headlines: the Justice Department drops its case against Michael Flynn, Tekashi 6ix9ine goes live to 2 million people, and one salon owner’s grift-y GoFundMe in Texas.
May 7, 2020
The vaccine race is on, with several companies, governments, and academic labs working on lots of different potential options at once. We dig into the radical ideas to speed things along. Protestors and activist groups in Georgia are calling for the resignation of the district attorney who chose not to arrest the killers of 25-year-old Ahmaud Arbery, who was shot while jogging unarmed in that state. A look at the activists and leaders who are speaking out. And in headlines: Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos makes things more difficult for college sexual assault victims, Facebook unveils 20 members of its content Supreme Court, and one brave Belgian llama stands up to Covid-19.
May 6, 2020
Vice President Mike Pence says the federal coronavirus task force could be disbanded within a month because of “the tremendous progress we’ve made as a country.” We discuss what that could possibly mean.  Wisconsin's Republican-controlled legislature is suing over the state's stay-at-home order, in a case that’s currently being heard by Wisconsin's conservative Supreme Court. We talk to Justice-elect Jill Karofsky, who will begin her term on that court in August. And in headlines: Georgia prosecutors will bring the case of Ahmaud Arbery to a grand jury, California sues Uber and Lyft, and meat shortages mean no junior bacon cheeseburgers at certain Wendy’s.
May 5, 2020
A leaked government projection shows the US daily death toll from Covid-19 reaching 3,000 by June, which would almost double the current rate. Both the model's creator and the White House say that number shouldn’t be taken at face value.  The FDA announced that companies selling antibody tests have to submit data that proves their accuracy within the next 10 days or face the possibility of getting removed from the market.  And in headlines: a former VP at Amazon resigns over the company’s treatment of whistleblowers, Costco limits meats, and former Governor Matt Bevin predicts a Pulitzer prize.
May 4, 2020
As dozens of states reopen, Senator Mitch McConnell wants liability protections for businesses, so that employers won't face the possibility of lawsuits if an employee gets COVID-19. Critics say that puts the economic wellbeing of businesses over the health and safety of workers. Presumptive democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden responded directly to an allegation of sexual assault made by Tara Reade, a former junior staffer in his senate office. And in headlines: the return of Kim Jong-Un, man versus murder hornet, and a once-in-a-lifetime chance to say what’s up to an eel.
May 1, 2020
It’s the first of the month, which means rent is due for millions of Americans, workers are going on strike, and more states are reopening.  We bring you the latest on strikes from renters and workers. Plus, what’s up with Trump pushing intel agencies for dirt on China.  And we’re joined by comedian Whitmer Thomas for headlines: Elon Musk hates fascism, ventilator grifters make out, and Switzerland tells grandparents to hug their grandchildren.
April 30, 2020
New GDP data show the economy shrank at a 4.8% annual rate in January, February and March. That’s the worst quarterly decline since the 2008 recession, and unfortunately, the current quarter is probably going to be worse.  There’s an experimental drug called Remdesivir that the FDA is reportedly planning to approve for emergency use in treating symptoms of Covid-19. It’s not a cure, but some early trial data show that it reduces the length of the disease for some patients.  And in headlines: a 1-mile asteroid picks the wrong time to scare Earth, NCAA to allow athletes to make money, and "Trolls World Tour" brings equal parts pain and pleasure.
April 29, 2020
Trump signed an executive order aimed at keeping meat-processing plants open by designating them as “critical infrastructure.” The union representing workers at these plants is concerned about being compelled to stay open without proper safety equipment, worker protections, and enforcement.  We interview Ed Yong, science writer at The Atlantic, about what we know about the virus so far, and what we're still learning. And in headlines: YouTube to ramp up fact-checking, Kentucky governor Andy Beshear v. Kentucky resident Tupac Shakur, and one reporter goes full Daffy Duck on Good Morning America.
April 28, 2020
Scientists at Oxford University have developed at Covid-19 vaccine that’s safe and effective in monkeys. Now, they’re moving into wide-scale human trials, and are hoping to test thousands of people by the end of May. In the US, the small business loan program had an imperfect relaunch.  Plus, we’re joined by Crooked’s own Jon Favreau for a politics update. We talk about the next relief bill, what Trump’s daily press conferences are doing for his re-election prospects, and more.  And in headlines: Florida puts voting rights on trial, Belgium calls on its citizens to eat frites, and the Pentagon releases footage of UFOs.
April 27, 2020
President Trump might be doing away with his hour-plus daily coronavirus briefings, which is a relief for so-called “privately concerned Republicans” who think they might scare away voters in November. The White House coronavirus response coordinator Dr. Birx hit the Sunday shows this weekend in Trump’s absence.  In states like Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Indiana, Tennessee, and Minnesota, a mix of Republican and Democratic governors are preparing to ease some restrictions on businesses starting this week.  And in headlines: Hungary may pass a new law to end the legal recognition of trans people, Taiwan’s “Home Alone” baseball games, and the end of horse-drawn carriages in Chicago.
April 24, 2020
Senator Mitch McConnell thinks states should declare bankruptcy rather than get bailed out by the federal government. Georgia Governor Brian Kemp gives the green-light to reopen some essential businesses today, including bowling alleys.  Some northern regions of China are being subjected to new limitations on movement in response to Covid-19 outbreaks. China is also giving the World Health Organization a much-needed 30 million dollars now that the US has withdrawn funding.  And in headlines: tornadoes batter the south, virus-sniffing dogs, and bikers descend on a sandy skatepark.
April 23, 2020
The doctor in charge of US government’s effort to develop a coronavirus vaccine was dismissed this week. He says it has to do with his opposition to untested treatments for Covid-19 pushed by President Trump.  School closures nationwide have created a massive disruption for students, parents, and teachers. We talk to Monise Seward, a 6th grade special education teacher in Georgia, about the difficulties of taking the classroom online.  And in headlines: Trump pops off about boats in Iran, Netflix sees big numbers under lockdown, and M.I.A.’s Vogue feature gets pulled due to very questionable takes.
April 22, 2020
Trump is preparing an executive order that will suspend the issuing of green cards for 60 days. We speak to Ali Noorani, executive director of the National Immigration Forum, who says following through on Trump’s order would amount to turning our backs on the same people who are fighting Covid-19 on the front-lines. The Senate passed the interim relief deal yesterday. It funds small businesses, hospitals and testing, but doesn’t address hazard pay or vote-by-mail -- issues that Dems have been pushing for. And in headlines: Joe Biden’s fundraising numbers, Idris Elba’s bad quarantine idea, and a major comedy theatre closes its doors in NYC.
April 21, 2020
As Congress continues to negotiate their next relief bill, Democrats are pushing for a requirement that the administration develop a national testing strategy. Meanwhile, the National Restaurant Association is pushing for an industry bailout. Then, an update on case numbers around the country and the world. Plus, why Georgia, Tennessee, and South Carolina think it’s a good idea to reopen right now. And in headlines: the Supreme Court knocks down split jury convictions, John Stamos has a Dumbo, and Whole Foods' anti-unionization map is revealed.
April 20, 2020
Congress is nearing a deal on a new round of funding for small businesses, hospitals and to ramp up testing — which experts say is still in too short supply. Plus, the latest on antibody tests and why they are so unreliable.  Around the world, Norway debuts a new voluntary tracking app and 100,000 people go to a funeral in Bangladesh, in defiance of social distancing rules. And in headlines: a mass shooting in Nova Scotia, Kim Jong-un denies “nice note,” and San Clemente sands its skatepark.
April 17, 2020
The Trump administration is now saying what everyone else knew all along: it’s up to the states to determine how and when they begin easing out of lockdowns. The CDC is going to hire hundreds of people to ramp up efforts at contact tracing. And the White House is hoping to get 5 million people tested for coronavirus by the end of the month.  Around the world, fears around COVID-19 have exacerbated bigotry. We discuss how this is manifesting in China, where the government is suggesting that foreign visitors are the main risk to the health of Chinese citizens.  And we're joined by comedian and writer Caroline Goldfarb for headlines: Fashion Nova’s bad text, Keystone XL pipeline hits a setback, and Cory Booker’s quarantine binge-watch.
April 16, 2020
Over 80 million Americans should have seen their coronavirus stimulus payments deposited in their bank accounts yesterday. For the rest of us, we'll have to wait for the mail version. Small businesses are seeing their loan program, which has been overloaded and clunky, run out money. Conservative activists gathered in Ohio and Michigan yesterday to protest the pandemic lockdown status in those states. But polls show they are in the minority. And in headlines: universities are dropping standardized testing requirements for fall applicants, retirees discover lost apples, and Reese Witherspoon’s dress company bungles a giveaway.
April 15, 2020
After suggesting that he had “total authority” to determine when states reopen their economies, Trump now says the states can decide. Governors are making their own plans, with California, Oregon, and Washington forming a west coast group that will coordinate together.  Countries around the world are at different stages of their fight against coronavirus. Some like India are extending their lockdowns, while others like Austria are beginning to loosen restrictions.  And in headlines: Obama endorses Biden, Animal Crossing banned in China, and the British press gets the go-ahead to talk about a lady’s attraction to chandeliers.
April 14, 2020
We interview Congresswoman Ilhan Omar about what progressives want from presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden and what steps Congress should take next to address the pandemic.  Neighboring states are forming coalitions to make plans to lift restrictions. Coronavirus will delay the result of the census by an estimated four months.  And in headlines: Amazon to resume normal sales of non-essential items, the Supreme Court plans to argue on the phone, and Yosemite is for the bears.
April 13, 2020
States are trying different approaches to address coronavirus racial disparities, from forming a task force in Louisiana to opening new testing centers in New York City. We speak to Dr. Abdul El-Sayed about what he’s seen in Detroit, and how structural racism leaves minority communities vulnerable. A new investigation in The New York Times says Trump was told about what this pandemic might look like in January and February and that he didn’t heed the warning.  And in headlines: OPEC countries reach a deal to cut oil production, Trump hates the postal service, and Dutch tulips against coronavirus.
April 10, 2020
Another 6.6 million people filed for unemployment benefits last week, meaning that more than 16 million jobs have been lost in the last three weeks. That puts more pressure on Congress to sort out more economic relief. The White House is reportedly going to announce a coronavirus-economic task force to look into when the economy can be re-opened.  Then, we're joined by comedian and writer Jamie Loftus for headlines: new jack Bob Dylan tops the Billboard charts for the first time, Biden makes concessions to the left, and Maryland engineers turn breast pumps to ventilators.
April 9, 2020
Senator Bernie Sanders has dropped out of the 2020 presidential race, but his ideas may live on. Vice President Joe Biden is now the presumptive democratic presidential nominee. We look at how we got here. Then, we talked to Clare Malone, senior political writer at Five Thirty Eight, about the Defense Production Act - and why the administration may not fully understand it. And in headlines: Nicaragua's missing president, detainees released, and why President Trump thinks now is a good time to mine the moon.
April 8, 2020
Lawmakers are considering a second relief package to provide assistance to people who were left out of the last bill. Some also want to add a rent moratorium, Medicare and Medicaid expansion, and more. We talk to Representative Pramila Jayapal (D-WA) to learn about those efforts. And in headlines: a naval secretary steps down after comments about commander Brett Cozier, the UFC moves its octagon to a private island, and historians uncover one of the earliest uses of the F-bomb.
April 7, 2020
Wisconsin will be moving forward with in-person voting today, despite efforts to postpone the election for the sake of public health. We check in on what’s happening there and in other states set to vote soon. Plus, we interview Wisconsin Lieutenant Governor Mandela Barnes about the election and what this means for November. And in headlines: the ACLU sues to block parts of Puerto Rico’s coronavirus curfew, chaste pandas mate in Hong Kong, and the Mississippi governor makes time to honor fallen racists.
April 6, 2020
We interview Keri Blakinger, a reporter at The Marshall Project who covers prisons, on how jails and detention centers are managing release of inmates to prevent the spread of coronavirus, and how the urgent push to get people out is affecting former inmates.  Government officials say the coming two weeks could be the most difficult yet as some states approach their potential peaks for COVID-19. Other states have begun to ramp down. We discuss that as well as new demographic data that paints an early picture of who is disproportionately affected by the virus.
April 3, 2020
We interview Dr. Shaoli Chaudhuri, a resident at Columbia Medical Center in Manhattan, about what she’s seeing in the Covid-19 epicenter as doctors treat a growing number of patients with the virus - and healthcare workers themselves are getting sick.  An astonishing 6.6 million people filed for unemployment benefits in the US last week, and there’s a growing concern that coronavirus tests aren’t as accurate as many thought.  And in headlines: four major storms predicted for the 2020 Atlantic Hurricane season, lock up your Zoom, and Jeff Sessions clings on to a fake friend.
April 2, 2020
We talk to acting President and CEO of Planned Parenthood Alexis McGill Johnson about the state of reproductive rights during the pandemic, and the efforts several Republican-governed states have taken to restrict abortion access as part of their coronavirus response.  Congress is looking at a Phase 4 deal, which could include infrastructure projects. And the Trump administration will not reopen the ACA marketplace, which would’ve allowed uninsured people and people who recently lost their jobs to easily enroll.  And in headlines: Public Enemy pulls this year’s only April Fools prank, T-Mobile eats Sprint, and the FCC might make our Internet faster.
April 1, 2020
We interview New York Times reporter Caitlin Dickerson about the far-reaching effects the pandemic is having on people in our immigration system: asylum seekers, DACA recipients, undocumented workers, ICE detainees and more.  The Trump administration has finally spoken up about their projections for the loss of life that America might experience as a result of Covid-19. Plus, we discuss the current recommendations on face-masks as protection against the virus.  And in headlines: Hungarian PM Viktor Orban is given unchecked power, Idaho's governor passes transphobic laws, and a fancy baby clothes company pitches in for coronavirus relief.
March 31, 2020
Efforts to bring unhoused people inside have been growing as the coronavirus outbreak takes hold, but advocates say there’s more to be done. We talk to Chris Ko, of the United Way in Los Angeles, to learn more about the situation in that city.  Workers across the country are feeling the impact of the pandemic. Employees at Macy’s, The Gap, and Kohl’s have been furloughed, while employees at Amazon, Instacart, and Whole Foods are going on strike.  And in headlines: the DOJ investigates Senator Richard Burr’s stock trades, sold-out chickens, and an astrophysicist fights Covid-19 by putting metal in nose.
March 30, 2020
Mutual-aid networks, which allow neighbors and community members to pool resources, have blossomed during the coronavirus crisis. We interview Christine Gatson-Michalak, co-founder of the Claremont Mutual Aid Project, about the biggest needs right now.  Trump held a press conference yesterday, where he said among other things that social distancing measures will continue until April 30. So our promised Easter Egg hunts will be taking place in our apartment living rooms.  And in headlines: Shaq misses meetings at Papa John’s, twisters in Arkansas, and the EPA rolls back protections during the pandemic.
March 27, 2020
The United States now has the most known COVID-19 cases in the world. We discuss the areas that have been hit hardest and how they’re handling the outbreak  Epidemiologist and host of “America Dissected” Dr. Abdul El-Sayed answers more of your most pressing COVID-19 questions. And in headlines: the US indicts Maduro, a half-billion dollar legal win for Maryland HBCUs, and Meghan Markle’s first post-Royal gig.
March 26, 2020
The senate approved a nearly $2 trillion relief package to respond to the coronavirus pandemic yesterday, after a day of delays and a lot of debate. We discuss what made it into the bill and what didn’t with Ohio Senator Sherrod Brown. And in headlines: three states restrict abortion access during Covid-19, everyone’s getting a pandemic pet, and Dr. Dre and Mister Rogers get recognized by the Library of Congress.
March 25, 2020
Equipment shortages, exposure, and empathy: we hear from healthcare workers who are fighting Covid-19 on the front lines.  Plus, what Democrats are fighting for in the government coronavirus relief package and what Republicans are willing to concede. And how authorities are handling things in New York now that it’s become the epicenter of the US coronavirus outbreak.  And in headlines: Liberty University re-opens its doors, Colorado abolishes the death penalty, and YouTube goes low rez.
March 24, 2020
Is America’s internet prepared for all of us to be online all of the time? We interview FCC commissioner Jessica Rosenworcel to get her answer. And we discuss how to close digital divide to make sure all students can continue their education online through the pandemic. Trump is suggesting that the economic slowdown resulting from social distancing could be “worse” than the pandemic, and more in the latest Covid-19 news.  And in headlines: Bloomberg sued, New Jersey releases inmates, and alcohol brands get busy making hand sanitizer.
March 23, 2020
We interview Alexis Madrigal, staff writer at the Atlantic and founder of The COVID Tracking project, about the current state of coronavirus testing and why it took so long to get started.  Congress still hasn’t reached a deal on the coronavirus relief bill. We discuss where things stand, with five Republican senators in self-isolation and one recently diagnosed with Covid-19.  And in headlines: Kentucky does voter suppression while no one is looking, less traffic and pollution, and streaming services cut bit rates in the EU.
March 20, 2020
We’re joined once again by physician and former Detroit health commissioner Dr. Abdul El-Sayed to discuss Covid-19. We ask him how to evaluate the success of containment strategies, whether you can get coronavirus twice, and more. Congress is still hashing out the details on a the relief bill. Meanwhile, unemployment claims are skyrocketing.  And in headlines: Senators sell off stock ahead of the pandemic, free cheesecake at The Factory, and Representative Tulsi Gabbard drops out of the race.
March 19, 2020
Senator Cory Booker joins us to discuss a proposal he’s drafted with fellow senators to give payments to Americans to help them through the pandemic, and how the current situation reveals the flaws in America’s safety net systems.  The Senate passed the House Bill on paid sick leave to help some US workers affected by Covid-19.  And in headlines: an earthquake near Salt Lake City, Russian archeologists discover bone house, and the US and China have an old fashioned journalist fight.
March 18, 2020
Yesterday, three states voted in the first post-pandemic-declaration elections of the presidential primary, and former Vice President Joe Biden won in all three.  Plus, we interview Democratic Senator Ron Wyden of Oregon about switching to vote by mail as the primaries continue.  And, Several Democratic Senators have been calling for direct cash payments for all Americans under a certain income level. And in headlines: Tom Brady leaves the Patriots, Duncan Hunter sentenced, and Big Brother’s german cast finds out about coronavirus.
March 17, 2020
Covid-19 has hit the US economy hard, devastating the stock market and prompting limited hours and layoffs around the country. We talk to Annie Lowrey, a staff writer at the Atlantic, to help us parse the economic impact of the virus.  Florida, Illinois, Ohio, and Arizona were set to go to the polls today on yet another important day of voting in the presidential primary. We go through the different ways states are planning to hold a vote (or not) during a pandemic.  And in headlines: France fines Apple $1 billion, Starbucks doesn’t want you to stick around, and the SCOTUS postpones arguments due to Covid-19 concerns.
March 16, 2020
Covid-19 continues to upend events, entire healthcare systems, and economies worldwide. We discuss the latest updates, including a new CDC recommendation on gatherings of 50 people or more and a bill working its way through congress that would help workers who’s jobs have been affected by the pandemic.  Sunday brought us the first one-on-one debate between former VP Joe Biden and Senator Bernie Sanders. The two candidates were asked about everything from their hand hygiene to their prior, extensive voting records.  And in headlines: Bill Gates steps away from Microsoft, Disney gives us Babu Frik early, and Israeli opposition leader Benny Gantz wins a thin majority in Israel.
March 13, 2020
Physician and former Detroit health commissioner Abdul El-Sayed comes on the show to discuss Covid-19. We ask him about the government response, how to avoid overloading our healthcare system, and what we can take from the way other countries have responded. Subscribe to the new season of his podcast “America Dissected” to stay up to date on everything you need to know about coronavirus.  Plus, we’ll look at Covid-19 on the campaign trail: both former VP Joe Biden and Senator Bernie Sanders gave remarks on Thursday offering blistering critiques of the Trump administration’s handling of coronavirus and spoke about their own plans for the pandemic.  And in headlines: the stock market chews through a big money infusion, a planet rains hot iron, and the ACLU investigates facial recognition technology.
March 12, 2020
The WHO has officially declared COVID-19 a global pandemic. And last night, President Trump announced new travel restrictions on foreign nationals coming from Europe. We tell you everything you need to know about where we’re at.  Senator Bernie Sanders spoke yesterday in his first event since Tuesday’s elections. He said he will stay in the race and previewed how he plans to go after Vice President Joe Biden in Sunday’s debate.  And in headlines: Weinstein gets 23 years, Covid-19 grifters, and Rockstar Energy is worth 3.9 billion dollars.
March 11, 2020
It was another good night for former Vice President Joe Biden, who has taken command of the race for the democratic presidential. He won overwhelming victories in Mississippi and Missouri plus a victory in Michigan and Idaho. We discuss the results and where we go from here.  COVID-19 cancel culture is in full swing, with some events like Coachella getting pushed and others like the democratic presidential debates going forward without an audience. The current approach aims to “flatten the curve”—we’ll talk about what that means.  And in headlines: the second person to ever be cured of HIV, a very independent dragon, and Putin’s forever presidency.
March 10, 2020
Yesterday, US stock markets had their worst day since the financial crisis in 2008. So many investors were selling off assets that trading was temporality halted in the morning and by the day’s end, the Dow finished down nearly 8 percent. We discuss this and more COVID-19 updates.  Six more states are voting today just a week after Super Tuesday, where former VP Joe Biden won big and became the leader in delegates. We zero in on Michigan, the state with the most delegates today and one that Democrats narrowly lost to President Trump in 2016.  And in headlines: New York state has a problematic new hand sanitizer, horse doping, and former Mayor Bloomberg returns to giving his money away.
March 9, 2020
The presidential primary is in full swing, and unfortunately, so is COVID-19. We look at the precautions campaigns are taking against coronavirus and what states are doing to ensure that voting goes smoothly.  Women across Mexico are striking today, in protest of the rise of gender-based violence and killings in the country. Activists are calling on women to boycott work, school, shopping, and even using social media. And in headlines: President Trump’s newest chief of staff, Blackwater founder Erik Prince spies on teachers, and a fake cure for coronavirus.
March 6, 2020
Senator Elizabeth Warren exited the presidential race on Thursday following disappointing results in her home state and beyond on Super Tuesday. Now, like princes at a formal ball, both Biden and Sanders are vying for her affection. We reflect on Warren's campaign and discuss what’s coming next.  It's been 10 years so that means it's census time: the great big test everyone loves to take comes out next week. We discuss what's different about this year’s census and why it’s important.  And in headlines: Perry pregnant, UAW’s “Irishman 2020,” and COVID-19’s impact on the stock market.
March 5, 2020
Super Wednesday kicked off with a bang: former NYC Mayor Mike Bloomberg dropping out of the race. Plus, the race in Maine was narrowly called for Biden. Now we wait as Senator Elizabeth Warren reassesses her path forward after a disappointing night.  Some coronavirus updates: the death toll from COVID-19 rose to 11 on Wednesday. American cases have surpassed 100, with at least 50 in California and 39 in Washington State. The Trump administration won’t say who will cover the cost of testing for uninsured Americans. Plus, info on the situation in Italy and Iran.  And in headlines: a peace deal with the Taliban, extreme wait-times at the polls in CA and TX, and the exciting debut of “fleets.”
March 4, 2020
Yesterday was Super Tuesday, where 14 states and one territory voted in the presidential primary. Former VP Joe Biden over-performed in what some (read: none) are already calling "Joebal Warming," while Senator Bernie Sanders didn’t do as well as some predicted. Final delegate totals are still coming in—we’ll talk you through what we know.  And in headlines: deadly storms in Tennessee, an election update in Israel, and the Knicks lose their biggest fan.
March 3, 2020
Today is Super Tuesday, where 14 states and one territory will vote. It’s the biggest day of the presidential nominating contest so far… and 1,357 delegates are up for grabs.  Tomorrow, the Supreme Court will hear arguments in a major abortion rights case out of Louisiana, over a law that requires abortion providers to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital. We explain. And in headlines: Uber and Lyft do political activism in California, astronauts wanted, and the return of Batterygate.
March 2, 2020
The government is beginning to dole out COVID-19 testing kits, and hundreds of medical centers in the US have begun developing their own version of testing in the meantime. The South Carolina primary was this weekend, with former VP Joe Biden scoring a decisive victory. A poor showing from former South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg led him to drop out on Sunday. Now, it’s onward to Super Tuesday, where 14 states and one territory will vote. And in headlines: a union representing Starbucks workers says minority baristas have faced discrimination, the acting director of the USCIS was never really appointed, and the latest on adult child Lizzie McGuire.
February 28, 2020
South Carolina goes to the polls on Saturday. There are 54 delegates at stake and it’s the first state where black voters make up a majority of the electorate. More coronavirus updates: a whistleblower says more than a dozen federal employees in California weren’t given proper training or protective gear when they were assigned to interact with quarantined Americans who were evacuated from Wuhan. And Gavin Newsroom says 8,400 California residents are being monitored for the virus after one woman there tested positive. Plus, we’re joined by assistant producer Sonia Htoon for headlines: the moon’s little brother, Clearview AI is watching, and Scotland offers free pads and tampons.
February 27, 2020
President Donald Trump held a press conference yesterday in conjunction with the CDC to update the nation on the COVID-19 preparedness plan. That plan involves appointing Vice President Mike Pence to oversee the government's response to the epidemic—but importantly, he’s not really a coronavirus czar, so don’t call him one.  The House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed legislation that would make lynching a federal hate crime on Wednesday — more than 100 years since the first measure against it was introduced to Congress.  And in headlines: a mass shooting in Milwaukee, a humanitarian crisis in Syria, and Maria Sharapova hangs up her racquet.
February 26, 2020
Last night seven democratic presidential candidates took the stage in Charleston, South Carolina for the tenth debate of this election cycle and the last one before Super Tuesday. Overall, this one was a mess. We’ll talk you through the big moments, and the ways the candidates tried to define themselves against frontrunner Bernie Sanders.  And in headlines: Bob Iger retires, Trump’s least favorite Supreme Court justices, and the CDC weighs in on coronavirus.
February 25, 2020
Disgraced Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein has been convicted on two counts of felony sex crimes. The convictions are the culmination of a month-long trial and testimonies brought by six women.  The Supreme Court added a case to its docket on Monday, which will decide whether it was okay for city officials in Philadelphia to end a foster care contract with Catholic Social Services because the agency said it would not accept applications from same-sex couples.  And in headlines: Trump is big in India, marsquakes, and another coronavirus update.
February 24, 2020
Bernie Sanders had a dominating win in the Nevada caucus on Saturday. As of Sunday night, he had captured nearly 47.1 percent of county convention delegates, with former VP Joe Biden in a distant second, followed by Mayor Pete, Senator Warren, and Senator Klobuchar. We discuss the coalition that led Sanders to victory and what to look for in South Carolina. The Wuhan coronavirus is still spreading, having produced its first major outbreak in Italy, along with South Korea and Iran. Just keep washing your hands and reading real verified reporting and you’ll stay healthy and sane.  And in headlines: Florida’s backwards new abortion law, Rihanna’s NAACP speech, and trouble at the Mike Bloomberg status update factory.
February 21, 2020
The Nevada caucuses are on Saturday. It’s the third contest in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary and the first where voters of color will have a huge say in the outcome. We tell you everything you need to know about the “Big Bad Battle In The Desert.” Nine people are dead following a shooting at two hookah bars in Germany on Wednesday. It’s the latest in a tragic pattern of white supremacist violence in the country.  And in headlines: Victoria’s Secret goes private, UC Santa Cruz grad students are striking, and Russia is interfering to help Trump (again).
February 20, 2020
Six presidential candidates took the stage in Las Vegas last night for the last debate before the Nevada Caucuses on Saturday. And folks: it was a street fight. We discuss how Bloomberg fared on his first time out (spoiler alert: not well) and some extremely tense moments between our beloved midwesterners.  And in headlines: hat birds are back, My Own Private Greater Idaho, and California to apologize for the internment of Japanese Americans.
February 19, 2020
President Trump went on a pardoning spree on Tuesday, giving commutations or pardon to 11 individuals convicted of white-collar crime. To make his picks, he took “recommendations” from Rudy Giuliani.  Employees at Kickstarter voted to unionize yesterday, making it the first large-scale union at a well-known tech company. We discuss the ‘state of the unions’ in the world of tech.  And in headlines: Boy Scouts of America scores its “Chapter 11 badge,” Harvard students call for prison divestment, and a preview of tonight’s Democratic debate.
February 18, 2020
An extremely rich man wants to do a good thing: Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos announced a pledge of $10 billion to combat climate change. We discuss how he’s going to spend that money and reactions to the news. Over 73,000 people have been infected with coronavirus and the death toll is above 1,800. The latest on what the outbreak means for travelers and the global economy. And in headlines: floods in Mississippi, Virginia votes down an assault weapons ban, and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg has to regulate.
February 14, 2020
Major US newspaper publisher McClatchy, which owns The Miami Herald and dozens of other daily newspapers around the country, has filed for bankruptcy. We discuss what we’re missing out on when local journalism outfits bite the dust. Former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg has been spending immense amounts of money to promote his presidential campaign and now, it’s brought him attention both good and bad. We look back at some of his more troubling stances. Plus, how he’s running to become the first ‘meme-elected’ president.  And in headlines: the Seattle City Council votes to end winter evictions, Apple retail employees win in court, the US men’s soccer team sticks up for their Valentines. What A Day will be back after's President's Day, see you Tuesday!
February 13, 2020
The sentencing recommendation for former Trump campaign advisor Roger Stone got shortened by the DOJ and it all feels awfully corrupt. We discuss what might've happened and how lawmakers are reacting to a possible overreach by President Trump. The chairman of the Iowa Democratic Party is resigning amid calls for a partial re-canvass and a large union in Nevada is calling out candidates that support Medicare For All. And in headlines: white supremacists are publishing more propaganda, WhatsApp hits 2 billion, and more on Papa John's pizza diet.
February 12, 2020
Senator Bernie Sanders won the New Hampshire primary Tuesday night with around 26 percent of the vote, followed by Pete Buttigieg, Amy Klobuchar, Elizabeth Warren, and Joe Biden. We talk to Sanders voters at his victory event and give the view on the ground from 2020's first primary. And in headlines: Roger Stone’s lighter sentence, beautiful dogs gather in New York City, and T-Mobile and Sprint get approved to get married.
February 11, 2020
Today is the day of the New Hampshire primary, which will hopefully be the first totally worry-free candidate selecting event of the 2020 season. We’re on the ground in NH finding out what’s motivating voters.  The Trump administration announced their 2021 budget proposal yesterday, and it included big cuts to social programs like Medicare and Medicaid and more money for defense and the all-important Space Force.  And in headlines: Amazon’s case against Trump, SeaWorld eliminates dolphin-riding, and Israel’s even worse voting app.
February 10, 2020
The New Hampshire primary is on Tuesday and we’re on-the-ground describing what the 2020 candidates are doing there. We’ll also talk you through a new law passed by the state’s Republican controlled legislature that is causing confusion amongst young voters.  The death toll of Wuhan’s coronavirus continues to rise in China. We talk you through the actions that the Chinese government is taking to control the spread and how it’s affecting the people of China and beyond.  And in headlines: Weinstein’s defense team, Carson defends Trump, and The Oscars get taken over by a Parasite.
February 7, 2020
The Iowa caucuses took place on Monday night and more full results have finally started to come in. 100 percent of precincts have been reported, but most news outlets has yet to declare a winner. Bernie Sanders leads in vote totals and he and Pete Buttigieg differ by just .1 percent in Standard Delegate Equivalents.  Following the recent string of deaths in Mississippi prisons, the Justice Department is now opening a civil rights probe into the state’s prison system. As the lawsuit goes on, inmates are living in an environment that’s proven be unsafe.  And in headlines: Christina Koch makes space history, Trump’s very gracious acquittal speech, and the perils “free” tax filing.
February 6, 2020
Yesterday afternoon the Senate voted to acquit President Trump of two articles of impeachment. Senator Mitt Romney had his “Mitt savior” moment when he voted to convict, drawing the ire of Trump and GOP loyalists.  A nationwide partial vape ban goes into effect today, as a result of an earlier decision by the Trump administration to go after e-flavored cigarettes.  And in headlines: end of NYC broker fees, , No More Deaths gets permission to do good at the border, and Iowa results are still coming in.
February 5, 2020
We are on to day three of the never-ending PTA meeting also known as the Iowa caucus and as of yet there is still no declared winner and the state’s Democratic party has not released 100 percent of the vote totals. We do a post-mortem on the event and look ahead to New Hampshire.  Today is the final day in the Senate impeachment trial of Donald Trump. We discuss the mental gymnastics Republican senators have gone through to admit Trump did wrong, but not wrong enough to convict.  And in headlines: Amazon drones, outsourcing the American dream to Finland, and blowing up the Tesla bubble.
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