Detailed
Compact
Art
Reverse
July 7, 2020
A deadly triangle of factors is killing off U.S. honeybees. Entomologist Sammy Ramsey tells host Maddie Sofia what's going on, and how to help.
July 6, 2020
Though Black Americans make up 13% of the U.S. population, they represent only 5% of physicians. How does that lack of diversity affect Black patients?
July 3, 2020
The story of Typhoid Mary is about journalism, the powers of the state, and the tension between personal freedom and public health.
July 2, 2020
Ornithologist Viviana Ruiz Gutierrez has a primer on backyard bird watching. Don't worry about arcane knowledge; just bring curiosity.
July 1, 2020
After coronavirus outbreaks in meatpacking plants, large-scale employee testing by some companies has helped slow the virus's spread. It could be a lesson for other industries.
June 30, 2020
NASA is on a mission to explore Titan — the largest moon of Saturn. To do that, scientists are building a nuclear-powered, self-driving drone called Dragonfly.
June 29, 2020
Climate scientist Kim Cobb on her journey to fly less for work and what happened when the pandemic suddenly made that idea a reality.
June 26, 2020
Approximately 200 COVID-19 vaccines are being actively developed, a process that health officials are expediting to help end the pandemic.
June 26, 2020
Approximately 200 COVID-19 vaccines are being actively developed, a process that health officials are expediting to help end the pandemic.
June 25, 2020
Racial discrimination shaped the map of Minneapolis. Then zoning locked many of those patterns into place. Now the city has a plan to tackle housing disparities and climate change.
June 24, 2020
The main source of that smell is geosmin, a chemical compound produced by soil-dwelling bacteria. But why do the bacteria make it in the first place? It's a bacteria-based mystery!
June 23, 2020
There's growing evidence these algorithmic systems are riddled with gender and racial bias.
June 22, 2020
With cases rising in some states, you may have heard there's a 'second wave' of coronavirus. There's not. America is still stuck in the first wave.
June 19, 2020
Encore episode. Researchers discovered that a kazoo could offer insights into the vocal abilities of orangutans — and the evolution of human speech.
June 18, 2020
Marine biologist Ayana Elizabeth Johnson explains the ways the fight around climate change and racial justice go hand in hand.
June 17, 2020
It's called asymptomatic spread — and a scientist with the World Health Organization created confusion when she seemed to suggest it was "very rare." It's not.
June 17, 2020
It's called asymptomatic spread — and a scientist with the World Health Organization created confusion when she seemed to suggest it was "very rare." It's not.
June 16, 2020
In which Katherine Wu shares her reporting on how determining immunity to the coronavirus is a really complicated question.
June 15, 2020
A federal court has ordered farmers to stop spraying one of the country's most widely used herbicides. Then the Environmental Protection Agency came out with an order of its own.
June 12, 2020
Scientists can only guess. Many battle to be believed. But their stories are an important part of understanding the pandemic.
June 11, 2020
Get excited because today, we're talking about the Spinosaurus, the first known swimming dinosaur.
June 10, 2020
In protests around the country, law enforcement agencies have used tear gas to disperse crowds. But is it safe?
June 9, 2020
In this episode, Maddie Sofia talks with Invisibilia's Alix Spiegel about the bioethics of conducting human challenge trials with the aim of producing a viable coronavirus vaccine.
June 8, 2020
Why novelist Brandon Taylor made the hard decision to walk away from science — and the lessons his story contains for any community working to be more inclusive.
June 6, 2020
The last few weeks have been filled with devastating news — stories about the police killing black people. So today, we're turning the mic over to our colleagues at NPR's Code Switch. Now, as always, they're doing really important work covering race and identity in the United States. In this episode, they spoke with Jamil Smith, who wrote the essay "What Does Seeing Black Men Die Do For You?" for The New Republic. Thank you for listening.
June 5, 2020
Across the country, demonstrators are protesting the death of George Floyd and the ongoing systemic racism that is woven into the fabric of the United States. The protests come in the middle of an unprecedented pandemic that is disproportionately killing people of color — particularly black Americans. We talk to public health expert David Williams about how these two historic moments are intertwined.
June 4, 2020
Happy #BlackBirdersWeek! Co-founder Chelsea Connor shares how black birders are changing the narrative about who gets to be safe in nature.
June 3, 2020
Short Wave's Emily Kwong and NPR science correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce discuss the fuzzy green "glacier mice" that roll around glaciers in a herd, baffling scientists.
June 2, 2020
We examine the Unidos en Salud testing effort in San Francisco's Mission District. Doctors there noticed coronavirus was disproportionately affecting the Latinx community.
June 1, 2020
Helium is the second-most common element in the cosmos, but it's far rarer on planet Earth.
May 29, 2020
There's no doubt that we're living through a Big Historic Event, but that doesn't necessarily mean we'll remember it all that well.
May 29, 2020
There's no doubt that we're living through a Big Historic Event, but that doesn't necessarily mean we'll remember it all that well.
May 28, 2020
An NPR analysis of a key air pollutant showed levels have not changed dramatically, which reveals a lot about what really makes our air dirty.
May 28, 2020
An NPR analysis of a key air pollutant showed levels have not changed dramatically, which reveals a lot about what really makes our air dirty.
May 27, 2020
Black holes are one of the most beguiling objects in our universe, where the laws of physics break down. We explore their fascinating properties.
May 26, 2020
Tomorrow, two NASA astronauts are set to head up into space on a brand new spacecraft, built by the company SpaceX.
May 25, 2020
We're back with a new episode tomorrow.
May 22, 2020
One man's unusual approach to correcting misinformation in his family and what experts say actually works.
May 22, 2020
One man's unusual approach to correcting misinformation in his family and what experts say actually works.
May 21, 2020
The 1997 film adaptation of Carl Sagan's 'Contact' got a lot of things right ... and a few things wrong.
May 20, 2020
More than 100 cities are monitoring sewage for the coronavirus. Scientists think wastewater surveillance could provide an early warning for future spikes.
May 19, 2020
What causes the brain-tingling sensation known as ASMR? And why slime videos are a trend for some but a sensory pleasure-trigger for others.
May 18, 2020
We talk with neuroscientist Dean Buonomano about his research into how the brain tells time. We'll also ask him what's behind the pandemic time warp.
May 15, 2020
The surface of the Earth is constantly recycled through the motion of plate tectonics. So how do scientists study what it used to look like?
May 14, 2020
All viruses mutate. It doesn't necessarily mean the coronavirus itself is becoming more dangerous or transmissible. Ed Yong explains.
May 14, 2020
All viruses mutate. It doesn't necessarily mean the coronavirus itself is becoming more dangerous or transmissible. Ed Yong explains.
May 13, 2020
Theanne Griffith discusses her new children's book series, Magnificent Makers, and the importance of diversity in the sciences.
May 12, 2020
MIT engineering professor Markus Buehler explains his method for making music out of proteins, including the spike proteins that surround the coronavirus.
May 11, 2020
The U.S. needs to be testing more people for the coronavirus. Could antigen testing be the answer?
May 8, 2020
Entomologist Samuel Ramsey explains just how much of a threat Asian giant hornets could be to honeybees throughout the United States.
May 7, 2020
Today, the science of what talking to complete randoms can do for you and what we're missing by not bumping into strangers these days.
May 6, 2020
The Trump administration has advanced the theory that the coronavirus was released through a lab accident in Wuhan, but scientists disagree.
May 6, 2020
The Trump administration has advanced the theory that the coronavirus was released through a lab accident in Wuhan, but scientists disagree.
May 5, 2020
We ponder dark energy, one of the universe's mysteries.
May 4, 2020
The 1918 flu outbreak was one of the most devastating pandemics in world history. Medical historian Dr. Howard Markel shares lessons learned.
May 1, 2020
A public health effort called sentinel surveillance was supposed to detect the early spread of the coronavirus in six cities. It fell weeks behind as cases multiplied.
April 30, 2020
We chat with wildlife ecologist Rae Wynn-Grant about all the unique things that go down as black bears hibernate.
April 29, 2020
Optimism is often thought as a disposition, something you're born with. So Alix Spiegel, co-host of NPR's Invisibilia, was surprised to discover the concept of "learned optimism."
April 28, 2020
We chat with material scientist Ainissa Ramirez about her new book, The Alchemy of Us.
April 27, 2020
Ventilators have been considered a vital medical tool to treat critically-ill COVID-19 patients. But early evidence is suggesting that those who go on a ventilator — don't survive.
April 24, 2020
Before wide-scale reopening is safe, the U.S. made need 100,000 workers for contact tracing in order to slow the spread of the coronavirus.
April 24, 2020
Before wide-scale reopening is safe, the U.S. made need 100,000 workers for contact tracing in order to slow the spread of the coronavirus.
April 23, 2020
From toilets to toothbrush holders, bioethicist and journalist Elizabeth Yuko explains how infectious diseases like tuberculosis and influenza have shaped American bathroom design.
April 22, 2020
Is it accurate to say "eat like a bird?" Is "birdbrained" justified? NPR's Short Wave investigates the scientific validity of these common phrases.
April 21, 2020
April 22nd is the 50th Anniversary of Earth Day. We put a simple question to two leaders on climate change. What can individuals and households do to reduce their carbon footprint?
April 20, 2020
Scientific models of the coronavirus — like the influential IHME model from the University of Washington — are now forecasting when states might reopen.
April 17, 2020
On a recent night in New York, some critically ill COVID-19 patients had to be evacuated from overwhelmed hospitals in Queens. It took 3 branches of the military to get it done.
April 16, 2020
Science writer Jennifer Leman did it. She ranked all 158 moons in our solar system based on interviews with scientists. And her own moonpinions.
April 15, 2020
Bats harbor some of the toughest known zoonotic diseases, and are the likely origin for this coronavirus.
April 15, 2020
Bats harbor some of the toughest known zoonotic diseases, and are the likely origin for this coronavirus.
April 14, 2020
Chemist Patricia Christie explains the science of making bread, and shares a few tips (and emotional support) for when things go wrong.
April 13, 2020
If friends or family are not taking the coronavirus seriously, The Story Collider's Liz Neeley has some tips for how to communicate the risks effectively.
April 10, 2020
Some patients with COVID-19 are experiencing a crash after about a week of showing symptoms of the disease. Doctors are starting to think it might not be the virus.
April 9, 2020
Why novelist Brandon Taylor made the hard decision to walk away from science — and the lessons his story contains for any community working to be more inclusive.
April 9, 2020
Why novelist Brandon Taylor made the hard decision to walk away from science — and the lessons his story contains for any community working to be more inclusive.
April 8, 2020
The 1996 drama 'Twister' got a lot of things wrong...and a few things right.
April 7, 2020
Mónica Feliú-Mójer of the group CienciaPR argues that Spanish-language information about the pandemic needs to be communicated in a timely and culturally relevant way.
April 6, 2020
The design of the Wiffle Ball guarantees you don't need a strong arm to throw a curve ball. But what physics makes that possible?
April 3, 2020
This upcoming fire season could be a tough one for states like California, which had an especially dry winter. Now the spread of the coronavirus is complicating efforts to prepare.
April 2, 2020
A deadly triangle of factors is killing off U.S. honeybees. Entomologist Sammy Ramsey tells host Maddie Sofia what's going on, and how to help.
April 1, 2020
There isn't scientific evidence that loss of smell is a symptom of COVID-19, but the American Academy of Otolaryngology is gathering information to find out more.
March 31, 2020
Nazi Germany tried to build a nuclear reactor. How evidence of that effort was almost lost to history.
March 30, 2020
Bedridden with illness, Maine writer Elizabeth Tova Bailey found an unlikely companion — a solitary snail a friend brought her from the woods.
March 30, 2020
Bedridden with illness, Maine writer Elisabeth Tova Bailey found an unlikely companion — a solitary snail a friend brought her from the woods.
March 27, 2020
The coronavirus appears to be deadlier and more transmissible. What science tells us about how influenza and the coronavirus are alike — and different.
March 26, 2020
The group Skype A Scientist has seen a surge in demand these last couple of weeks for its service of virtually connecting students to scientists.
March 25, 2020
Pioneering ecologist Nalini Nadkarni takes us up into the canopy — the area above the forest floor — where she helped research and document this unexplored ecosystem.
March 24, 2020
Ed Yong, writer for The Atlantic, says the coronavirus has a few traits that seem to make it especially effective at infecting humans.
March 24, 2020
Ed Yong, writer for The Atlantic, says the coronavirus has a few traits that seem to make it especially effective at infecting humans.
March 23, 2020
Sleeping late is more natural for some people. And that's okay. Plus, why sleep is so important for a healthy immune system.
March 20, 2020
It's a phrase we're hearing a lot now, social distancing. Practicing it is essential to slowing the spread of the coronavirus. But what does it look like in our daily lives?
March 19, 2020
A new CRISPR treatment could revolutionize care for diseases that we're previously off limits to this innovative gene-editing technique. In this case, a genetic form of blindness,
March 18, 2020
The coronavirus can survive on certain surfaces — in a laboratory setting — for up to 72 hours. We've got some tips on how to clean frequently touched surfaces and objects.
March 18, 2020
The coronavirus can survive on certain surfaces — in a laboratory setting — for up to 72 hours. We've got some tips on how to clean frequently touched surfaces and objects.
March 17, 2020
As schools across the U.S. shutter for weeks at a time, Short Wave looks at the science behind the decision. Plus, tips from a psychologist on how to cope with long, unexpected periods at home.
March 17, 2020
As schools across the U.S. shutter for weeks at a time, Short Wave looks at the science behind the decision. Plus, tips from a psychologist on how to cope with long, unexpected periods at home.
March 16, 2020
An Arkema chemical plant burned for days after Hurricane Harvey struck Houston. Now the company and several employees face criminal charges.
March 13, 2020
Why testing for coronavirus has been difficult — plus how we can protect the elderly and others at greater risk of infection.
March 12, 2020
In honor of Pi Day, we examine a common math mistake known as the 'off-by-one-error,' which comedian and mathematician Matt Parker explores in his new book, 'Humble Pi.'
March 11, 2020
NPR's Gene Demby says the harassment of Asians and Asian Americans as the coronavirus spreads is part of a longer history of xenophobia and racism in the name of public health.
Loading earlier episodes...
    15
    15
      0:00:00 / 0:00:00