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October 23, 2019
SURPRISE!! You thought it was all over...well, sadly it is but before we part ways we thought we'd give you one final bonus episode to wrap up the Tales From No Man's Land series. Cast your mind back to those long, hazy summer days and reminisce with this live podcast recorded at Latitude Festival. Featuring live versions of songs from the album and a discussion about the album led by Frank. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
September 25, 2019
To round off the series Frank is joined by the remarkable woman who inspired the final song on his album No Man's Land, Rosemary Jane, aka his mum! She might not be a historical figure just yet, but there’s still time! The pair discuss the album as a whole, the tales of each of the women who inspired it and Rosemary offers some choice memories from Frank's childhood - whether he likes it or not! For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
September 18, 2019
Frank is joined by writer and host of the Criminal Broads podcast Tori Telfer to discuss one of the more problematic characters of his album, Nannie Doss. Don't be fooled, she is not as innocent as her name suggests. She was in fact a serial killer who admitted to killing four of her five husbands – one of whom she found in the Lonely Hearts column of a magazine. It's suspected that she also killed her mother, sister, mother-in-law and grandson, although she never admitted to these. Her name the Giggling Granny came about after she showed no remorse for her crimes, simply commenting that she hadn’t met her “perfect mate” yet... For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
September 11, 2019
This episode is about a woman whose love of music was so powerful that she uprooted her life for it. Pannonica Rothschild, or 'Nica' became the black sheep of her famous banking family after she was consumed by a newfound passion for bebop. She ditched her family, relocated from France to New York, and spent the rest of her life as a jazz patroness; befriending many prominent jazz musicians such as Thelonius Monk and Charlie Parker. She was affectionately known as ‘The Jazz Baroness’. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
September 4, 2019
Frank tells the tale of a young woman who drowned in the river Seine in Paris in the 1800's. As was common in this period a cast of her face, known as a 'death mask', was displayed in the morgue for her family to claim. Sadly she was never identified, but her story doesn't end there. Her peaceful expression captivated so many that very quickly moulds were made and her likeness was hung on the walls of homes across Paris. She became known as L'Inconnue de la Seine, or The Unknown Woman of the Seine. Years later, a toy maker discovered her death mask and used it as the face of the first CPR doll, which he named Rescue Annie. Frank meets Art Historian and Curator Katy Hessel to discuss the woman behind the mask. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
August 28, 2019
Huda Sha’arawi was a pioneering Egyptian feminist leader and founder of the Egyptian Feminist Union. In 1923 she famously removed her full-face veil in front of a crowd at Cairo station, which sent a shockwave through the Arab world. Huda's actions became a landmark gesture for women’s rights activists in Egypt and she was often referred to as The Lioness. In this episode Frank speaks to Huda's granddaughter Sania Sharawi Lanfranchi, who has written a biography about her grandmother's life entitled 'Casting Off The Veil." For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
August 21, 2019
Frank meets with record producer Catherine J Marks at Assault and Battery studios in North-West London where he recorded his album No Man's Land. The pair breakdown the recording process behind the song A Silent Key and the story of the woman who inspired it; astronaut and teacher Christa McAuliffe, who was killed in the Space Shuttle Challenger Disaster. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
August 14, 2019
Frank is joined by poet, playwright and translator Sasha Dugdale to discuss the woman behind the song I Believed You, William Blake. Catherine Blake was the wife of the great visionary, painter and poet, who played a crucial role in his life. As well as running the household and keeping him (relatively) sane, she took an active role in his art; assisting with painting, printing and engraving. During his lifetime William Blake enjoyed very little success. It was Catherine who, after his death, began the process of his public rehabilitation and rise to fame. It’s perhaps down to her that we know about him at all. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
August 7, 2019
Kassiani is one of only two women to have been written about from the Byzantine era, which is a somewhat forgotten about period in history. She is most famously known for quipping at the Emperor Theophilos at a bridal show before going on to become an abbess, poet and hymnographer, whose songs are still sung in Greek Orthodox Churches today. Despite being from a distant time, her character shines through in her work. Her quick-witted humour and somewhat rebellious one liners are what brought her to Frank's attention, including the phrase "I hate silence, when it is time to speak". Frank recruits the help of self-professed 'Byzantinist’ and Professor Liz James from the University of Sussex, to tell the story behind the song, The Hymn of Kassiani. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
July 31, 2019
Frank heads to one of his favourite haunts in Camden Town to meet local historian Carol Clancy and learn more about former landlady Jinny Bingham, also known as the Mother Damnable. Described as a witch by many for her fiery temper and disregard for authority, locals claimed that on the day she died they saw the devil enter her house but never leave. Her coachhouse The Mother Redcap was originally on the site of the World’s End pub, with the The Underworld venue underneath, which she is reputed to haunt to this day. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
July 24, 2019
This episode is about the woman known as Mata Hari, which in the Malay language means Eye of The Day. Mata rose to fame as an exotic dancer in the early 20th Century and was one of the most connected socialites in Europe. However, during the First World War she was accused of being a spy and executed by firing squad. She's perhaps one of the most well-known women featured on Tales from No Man's Land and is often cited as the archetypal Femme Fatale in art and film, yet very little is known about her actual life. Frank speaks to film historian Pamela Hutchinson about the legacy of Mata Hari, and the woman behind the myth. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
July 17, 2019
Discover the story behind Frank Turner’s song The Graveyard of the Outcast Dead. The so-called "Winchester Geese" are a group of forgotten women who in medieval times worked in the brothels on the bank of the River Thames. At the end of their lives many were buried in a mass grave for the “outcast dead”, which was closed in 1853. Years later, their bones were rediscovered and the site was turned into a memorial garden, now known as Cross Bones. In this episode Frank meets writer and activist John Constable, who has campaigned for many years to maintain Cross Bones as a garden of remembrance. This episode was produced by Hayley Clarke and the executive producer was Peggy Sutton. There was additional production from Paul Smith, Steve Ackerman, Josh Gibbs and Charlie Caplowe. Tales from No Man’s Land is produced by Frank Turner, Xtra Mile Recordings and Somethin’ Else. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
July 10, 2019
Frank Turner tells the true story of the woman behind his song The Death of Dora Hand. Dora was a vaudeville entertainer, a singing sensation in the bars of the wild west town Dodge City, who was accidentally shot to death by a small-time outlaw in 1878. Frank visits the Boot Hill Museum in Dodge City and talks to director Lynn Johnson about Dora’s colourful life and the love triangle that led to her murder. This episode was produced by Hayley Clarke and the executive producer was Peggy Sutton. There was additional production from Corinne Boyer, Paul Smith, Steve Ackerman, Josh Gibbs and Charlie Caplowe. Tales from No Man’s Land is produced by Frank Turner, Xtra Mile Recordings and Somethin’ Else. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
July 3, 2019
Frank Turner dives into the story behind his song Sister Rosetta. He talks to singer-songwriter Emily Barker and Nwaka Onwusa, curator at Cleveland’s Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, about the life of the original sister of soul, the godmother of rock 'n' roll, the singer and guitarist Sister Rosetta Tharpe. You can pre-order Frank's album No Man's Land here This episode was produced by Hayley Clarke and the executive producer was Peggy Sutton. There was additional production from Elizabeth Emery, Paul Smith, Steve Ackerman, Josh Gibbs and Charlie Caplowe. Tales from No Man’s Land is produced by Frank Turner, Xtra Mile Recordings and Somethin’ Else. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
June 19, 2019
Find out why singer songwriter Frank Turner has made a new podcast and a new album about twelve extraordinary women from history. And his mum. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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