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July 10, 2020
Now that you’ve made it through your Netflix queue, you might be wondering when sports are coming back. After sports leagues postponed their seasons back in March, some - like the National Women’s Soccer League - are stepping back onto the field for the first time. We’ll break down the efforts and challenges in keeping players safe. And talk to one league that’s knocking it out of the park: the Women’s Flat Track Derby Association (aka: roller derby.) Also, in case you missed it: the Chinese government has taken its boldest step yet in eliminating freedoms of Hong Kong residents. We’ll tell you how this latest move by China has a global impact.  And finally, we’re talking about getting into 'good trouble.' As in the new documentary "John Lewis: Good Trouble." The film’s producer Erika Alexander shared how lessons from Lewis’s life fighting for social justice starting in the 1960s are just as relevant to social movements today.  On this episode, you’ll hear from:  Kelley O’Hara, two-time World Cup champion, Utah Royals FC defender and member of the US Women's National Team, and host of the new podcast, Just Women’s Sports Dr. Jonathan Kim, chief of sports cardiology in the division of cardiology at Emory University Erica Vanstone, Executive Director of the Women's Flat Track Derby Association Erika Alexander, producer of "John Lewis: Good Trouble"  Let us know what questions you have about what’s going on in the news right now. Email us at audio@theskimm.com or call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370. You might hear your message on the show.  If you want to add theSkimm to your daily routine, sign-up for our free newsletter the Daily Skimm. It’s everything you need to know to start your day, right in your inbox.
July 3, 2020
In some states, primary voting during COVID-19 has been off to a rocky start. Long lines and crowds at the polls aren’t great for social distancing. And as cases continue to spike across the US, some states are looking to expand their ‘vote by mail’ options ahead of November. We’ll break down what voting for president could look like in a global pandemic and what experts say election officials and lawmakers should start doing now to prepare us.  Also: ahead of the fourth of July, some lawmakers are pushing to add a 51st state to the union. We’ll explain the (long) history of Washington DC’s quest for statehood and why it’s coming up again.  And finally, the new documentary “(In)Visible Portraits” has been described as “a love letter to Black women, from Black women.” We sat down with the filmmaker to discuss how she’s looking to reveal history you may not have learned about in school.  On this episode, you’ll hear from:  Myrna Pérez, Director, Voting Rights & Elections Program, Brennan Center for Justice  Oge Egbuonu, director of “(In)Visible Portraits” Let us know what questions you have about what’s going on in the news right now. Email us at audio@theskimm.com or call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370. You might hear your message on the show.  If you want to add theSkimm to your daily routine, sign-up for our free newsletter the Daily Skimm. It’s everything you need to know to start your day, right in your inbox.
June 26, 2020
As the number of new COVID-19 cases rises in some states, the debate continues about what role the government should play in helping people protect each other. And specifically: whether masks need to be required. We’ll explain why there’s been confusion over masks, what scientists and the CDC are saying now, and why local and state officials are at odds.  Also: a recent Supreme Court ruling has given the LGBTQ+ community something to celebrate during Pride Month. We’ll break down the SCOTUS decision about protecting LGBTQ+ Americans at work. And why activists and politicians are saying: there’s more to be done.  On this episode, you’ll hear from:  Dr. Jade Pagkas-Bather, infectious diseases attending physician, clinical epidemiologist and Instructor of Medicine at the University of Chicago Department of Medicine Let us know what questions you have about what’s going on in the news right now. Email us at audio@theskimm.com or call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370. You might hear your message on the show.  If you want to add theSkimm to your daily routine, sign-up for our free newsletter the Daily Skimm. It’s everything you need to know to start your day, right in your inbox.
June 19, 2020
In recent weeks, there’s been a renewed push to remove symbols of the Confederacy: including flags, statues and the names of some military bases. Some protestors have been tearing statues down. And local officials are also making moves to remove them. We’ll break down why the debate around getting rid of these statues is really a debate about how we understand history- and the legacy of slavery in the US.   Also: all 50 states have started reopening. But health experts are warning: COVID-19 is still here. And as cases spike, state and local governments are at odds.  And finally, we ‘press pause’ with some sea turtle news. Here are some soothing sea turtles videos to kick off your weekend.  On this episode, you’ll hear from:  LeAndrea Mack, Miss Juneteenth 2019 in Kansas City Dr. Jalane Schmidt, associate professor in the Department of Religious Studies, University of Virginia, co-founder of the Charlottesville, VA chapter of Black Lives Matter Let us know what questions you have about what’s going on in the news right now. Email us at audio@theskimm.com or call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370. You might hear your message on the show.  If you want to add theSkimm to your daily routine, sign-up for our free newsletter the Daily Skimm. It’s everything you need to know to start your day, right in your inbox.
June 12, 2020
As protests continue in the US, some demonstrators are now calling to ‘defund the police.’ And those calls are already having an impact. Cities like Minneapolis, New York, and Los Angeles are considering some major changes to their police departments. We’ll break down what it actually means to defund the police, and why some protestors say that doesn’t go far enough.  Also: we’re still in a global pandemic. But many public health experts don’t think protests should stop. We’ll explain why medical professionals say it’s important that demonstrators are still able to protest against racism and police brutality. And finally, you may have seen that viral video from former NFL athlete Emmanuel Acho, host of the new online series, “Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man.” We spoke to Acho about why these conversations are necessary, and how he plans to grow the series.  On this episode, you’ll hear from:  Lynda Garcia, Policing Campaign Director for The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, former trial attorney in the Special Litigation Section in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice Kimberly Burke, research fellow at the Center for Policing Equity Dr. Jaime Slaughter-Acey, social epidemiologist and Assistant Professor in the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health at the University of Minnesota Emmanuel Acho, former NFL athlete, current NFL analyst and host and creator of “Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man.”  Let us know what questions you have about what’s going on in the news right now. Email us at audio@theskimm.com or call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370. You might hear your message on the show.  If you want to add theSkimm to your daily routine, sign-up for our free newsletter the Daily Skimm. It’s everything you need to know to start your day, right in your inbox.
June 5, 2020
People across the US have flooded into the streets to protest police violence against black Americans. We’ll break down some of the concerns protests are highlighting, including disparities in how law enforcement treats black Americans, as well as police militarization. We’ll also talk to an expert about some potential solutions. Also: if you’re seeing calls to donate to a bail fund and wondering how those work, we’ll explain.  And finally, we’re ‘pressing pause’ to highlight the creative ways people are documenting their lives during the COVID-19 pandemic.  On this episode, you’ll hear from:  Kimberly Burke, research fellow at the Center for Policing Equity Bernadette Rabuy, senior policy analyst at the Prison Policy Initiative Let us know what questions you have about what’s going on in the news right now. Email us at audio@theskimm.com or call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370. You might hear your message on the show.  If you want to add theSkimm to your daily routine, sign-up for our free newsletter the Daily Skimm. It’s everything you need to know to start your day, right in your inbox.
May 29, 2020
As of this week, one in four US workers has filed for unemployment benefits. But economists say the historic numbers don’t tell the whole story. And they’re warning that women, and in particular women of color, are being disproportionately affected. We’ll break down what this record unemployment means, how the situation compares to past recessions, and what the impact is on women and women of color.  Also: now that unemployment is at a record-high, a lot of people are looking for work. We spoke to a career expert to get some tips on how to job search during a pandemic.  And finally, you asked and we Skimm’d: who’s even hiring right now? Not a trick question. Think: anyone who’s seeing an increase in demand. Like food and delivery services.  On this episode, you’ll hear from:  Kathryn A. Edwards, associate economist at the RAND Corporation Amanda Augustine, career expert for TopResume  What’s something about the COVID-19 pandemic that you’ve been looking for more answers on? Email us at audio@theskimm.com and call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370. You might hear your message on the show and have your question answered.  If you want to add theSkimm to your daily routine, sign-up for our free newsletter the Daily Skimm. It’s everything you need to know to start your day, right in your inbox.
May 22, 2020
Back in March, Congress passed a historic $2 trillion stimulus bill that reached millions of Americans. You may have received a check in the mail or a boost in unemployment insurance. But researchers and economists are saying the money Congress spent so far may not be enough. We’ll break down what still needs work, and what experts say Congress should prioritize.  Also: you may have seen some headlines this week about some big stores going bankrupt. We’ll tell you why COVID-19 has pushed them into bankruptcy. And why it could impact what your next trip to the mall looks like.  And finally, you asked and we Skimm’d: how is COVID-19 more dangerous than the seasonal flu? We’ll tell you why experts say it’s not a fair comparison. Hint: even though the symptoms are similar, they’re caused by different viruses.  On this episode, you’ll hear from:  Dr. Jay Shambaugh, director of the Hamilton Project at the Brookings Institution and former member and chief economist of the White House Council of Economic Advisers Henrietta Treyz, founder, managing partner and the director of economic policy at Veda Partners  Dr. Gloria Gonzalez-Rivera, professor of economics at University of California-Riverside Nancy Rapoport, Garman Turner Gordon Professor of Law, William S. Boyd School of Law at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas Vince Tibone, retail sector head at Green Street Advisors  On next week’s episode, we’re devoting our entire show to the topic of unemployment. Have you recently been impacted? If so, we’d love to hear your story and perhaps include it on next week’s show. Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370.  If you want to add theSkimm to your daily routine, sign-up for our free newsletter the Daily Skimm. It’s everything you need to know to start your day, right in your inbox.
May 15, 2020
The race for a COVID-19 vaccine is underway. But don’t hold your breath. This race could take years. We’ll tell you why, and what’s being done to try to speed up the process. Also: you may have seen some headlines this week about COVID-19 and children. New research shows kids are more at risk of getting sick than realized. On top of that: a mysterious illness that could be linked to COVID-19 is infecting children around the country. We’ll break down what this means for parents on the lookout.  And finally, you asked and we Skimm’d: why is it taking so long to get your stimulus check? Hint: you may need to check your mailbox.  On this episode, you’ll hear from:  Dr. Maria Elena Bottazzi, co-director of Texas Children's Hospital Center for Vaccine Development and Associate Dean, National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine  Dr. Rinke Bos, Principal Scientist at Janssen Vaccines & Prevention in Leiden, the Netherlands Dr. Roderick Slavcev, Associate Professor, School of Pharmacy, University of Waterloo Dr. Lawrence Kleinman, professor and vice chair of the Department of Pediatrics at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and attending physician at Bristol-Myers Squibb Children's Hospital What’s something about the COVID-19 pandemic that you’ve been looking for more answers on? Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370. You might hear your message on the show and have your question answered.  If you want to add theSkimm to your daily routine, sign-up for our free newsletter the Daily Skimm. It’s everything you need to know to start your day, right in your inbox.
May 8, 2020
The CDC has been working on new guidelines for how states should start to reopen. But the White House is putting them on ice and telling the agency to make some changes. Meanwhile: the unemployment rate is now the highest it’s been since the Great Depression. We’ll tell you why the real picture might be even more bleak. Also on today’s show: Tara Reade’s allegations against former VP Joe Biden make more headlines, and an update on the fatal shooting of Ahmaud Arbery. Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.  If you want to add theSkimm to your morning routine, sign-up for our free newsletter the Daily Skimm. It’s everything you need to know to start your day, right in your inbox.
May 7, 2020
The latest unemployment numbers are in, and no surprise: they’re not very good. We’ll explain why -- despite all the bad economic news -- the stock market is doing relatively okay. Meanwhile: some small schools in Montana are among the first to reopen since the pandemic began. But local superintendents are finding ways to enforce social distancing measures in the classroom. Also on today’s show: we’ll dive into why the death of Ahmaud Arbery in February sparked widespread public outcry this week.  Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.  If you want to add theSkimm to your morning routine, sign-up for our free newsletter the Daily Skimm. It’s everything you need to know to start your day, right in your inbox.
May 6, 2020
The White House coronavirus task force is getting a makeover. Sort of. We’ll explain what today’s change-up is all about and how it impacts you. Meanwhile: major grocery and fast food chains are showing cracks in the food supply chain as meat processing plants are forced to close. Also on today’s show: Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is in the hospital. But she was able to call into oral arguments today -- along with the rest of the Supremes -- to hear a case regarding free birth control coverage. We’ll explain why this case is a big deal.   Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.  If you want to add theSkimm to your morning routine, sign-up for our free newsletter the Daily Skimm. It’s everything you need to know to start your day, right in your inbox.
May 5, 2020
This is a rebroadcast of our Skimm Special that originally aired on April 18th. We’ll be back tomorrow with new episodes. Across the world, economies have essentially been on pause due to COVID-19. The unintended consequence? A significant decrease in air pollution and carbon emissions. We talked to climate experts about how the pandemic is highlighting the human impact on the planet. And what that can teach us about the steps individuals and governments need to take to tackle climate change. You’ll hear from: Dr. Elizabeth Sawin, co-director of Climate Interactive, a think tank that builds computer simulations related to climate change solutions. Anthony Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication, which specializes in understanding Americans’ attitudes toward climate change.
April 30, 2020
Federal stay-at-home guidelines are officially expiring tonight. But since it’s states that call the shots on reopening, not much is going to change when the clock strikes midnight. Meanwhile: there’s encouraging news from the world of medicine. We’ll break down two headlines about a COVID-19 treatment and a possible vaccine, and why America’s top infectious disease expert says things are looking up. Also on today’s show: Los Angeles is testing almost everyone for COVID-19, and France is planning a fancy charity auction to support local hospitals. Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.  If you want to add theSkimm to your morning routine, sign-up for our free newsletter the Daily Skimm. It’s everything you need to know to start your day, right in your inbox.
April 29, 2020
We knew the economy wasn’t doing well. But a new report out today shows us just how bad it really is. We’ll dive into what ‘gross domestic product’ is all about and why it matters that it’s down. Meanwhile: a new poll says a lot of Americans are worried that COVID-19 will disrupt this year’s presidential election. We’ll explain why one proposed solution — voting by mail — isn’t exactly easy. Also on today’s show: the recent shake up of the film industry has the Oscars changing its ways.  Earlier this month, we hosted a live online presentation called Recessions, Skimm’d. We explained what recessions are, why they’re a big deal, and how you can be prepared for when one comes up.  Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
April 28, 2020
The White House released new guidelines for how states should ramp-up their testing programs. We’ll explain how this could impact your state. Meanwhile: the Federal Reserve is coming to the rescue for cities and states. We’ll tell you how the new moves could help you. Also on today’s show: JetBlue Airways just became the first major airline to require passengers to wear masks. We’ll look at why this didn’t happen earlier. Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
April 27, 2020
We’re starting to learn more about COVID-19 antibody testing. But these tests might not be ready for primetime yet. We’ll explain what they are and why researchers are telling us to slow our roll. Meanwhile: more Georgia businesses opened their doors today. We’ll tell you what that could mean for your state. Also on today’s show: the CDC added new COVID-19 symptoms to look out for. We’ll dive into what that could mean for the future of testing.   Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
April 24, 2020
President Trump signed the bill to re-up the Paycheck Protection Program.  But: there might be another snag. We’ll dive into why it still may not get small businesses the help they need. Meanwhile: a new study out of New York says that the outbreak may have been more widespread than initially thought. We’ll tell you why that might actually bring some good news to the fight against the virus. Also on today’s show: a survey of artists finds nearly all have been impacted by COVID-19. We’ll tell you how.  If you or someone you know is an artist or creative worker who needs help, the National Endowment for the Arts has a list of resources you can check out, including Artist Relief.  If you’re interested in helping seniors who need help shopping for groceries, you can donate to Meals on Wheels, which has a COVID-19 response fund. You can also join Nextdoor, where lots of communities are discussing how to help local seniors.  This morning we hosted a live online presentation called, “How to Save Money During COVID-19.” We talk about how to cut back expenses, negotiate with businesses you pay every month, and lower your debt payments.
April 23, 2020
The House of Representatives is expected to pass another major stimulus bill to get more money into the hands of small businesses. We’ll dive into why convincing small businesses to put their names in the hat for this financial lifeline will still take some work. Meanwhile: this week’s new unemployment numbers are in. We’ll explain what “earnings season” is, and how the latest word from Wall Street could mean more bad news for workers. Also on today’s show: Georgia plans to take its first step towards normal life tomorrow. We’ll explain what that could mean for your state.  Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
April 22, 2020
Officials say the first known death from COVID-19 in the US happened weeks earlier than they realized. We’ll tell you what that might mean for the projection models everyone has been relying on. Meanwhile: a new study shows that a drug some were hopeful about might not actually help fight COVID-19. We’ll look at how the search for a COVID-19 treatment is going. Also on today’s show: a new software update you might not want to miss. Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
April 21, 2020
Last night, President Trump announced he’ll sign an executive order to suspend immigration into the US. But the administration has already made a number of changes to immigration procedures since the pandemic began. We’ll explain. Meanwhile: the Senate has reached a deal to refresh the Paycheck Protection Program. We’ll explain what that might mean for your favorite neighborhood bakery. Also on today’s show: an appeals court is allowing Texas to restrict abortion. We’ll dive into the debate over what medical procedures are considered ‘essential’ in the age of the pandemic. Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
April 20, 2020
Most public health experts agree: we need more testing to start lifting stay-at-home orders. But in the US, officials disagree on how to get more tests. We’ll explain how this impacts you. Meanwhile: people across the country defied social distancing measures this weekend to protest. We’ll explain what message protestors are trying to send. Also on today’s show: the price of oil dips into the negatives for the first time. We’ll look at why that happened and why it’s such a big deal.  Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
April 18, 2020
Across the world, economies have essentially been on pause due to COVID-19. The unintended consequence? A significant decrease in air pollution and carbon emissions. We talked to climate experts about how the pandemic is highlighting the human impact on the planet. And what that can teach us about the steps individuals and governments need to take to tackle climate change. You’ll hear from: Dr. Elizabeth Sawin, co-director of Climate Interactive, a think tank that builds computer simulations related to climate change solutions. Anthony Leiserowitz, director of the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication, which specializes in understanding Americans’ attitudes toward climate change.
April 17, 2020
The White House has new advice for states that might want to lift their stay-at-home orders. We’ll tell you what these new guidelines actually mean for you. Meanwhile: you might be hearing a lot about a new antiviral drug that could be used to fight COVID-19. We’ll explain why doctors say remdesivir has a lot of promise, but also a few shortcomings. Also on today’s show: millions of people are still waiting for their stimulus checks. We’ll look into the reasons your payment might not have come yet.  Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
April 16, 2020
For the fourth week in a row, US unemployment claims have risen by the millions. We’ll explain what Congress is doing to try to curb that trend. Meanwhile, there’s a new test that some say could help us get back to normal life. We’ll break down what these antibody tests are all about. Also on today’s show: we’ll explain why — despite orders to stay put — some people are venturing outside to protest. This morning, theSkimm hosted a live online presentation, Unemployment, Skimm’d. We explain what the latest unemployment numbers mean for your wallet, and how to navigate the unemployment benefits process.  Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
April 15, 2020
A new report from the US Commerce Department says shopping carts across America are way emptier than usual. We’ll tell you what a drop in retail sales means for the rest of the economy. Meanwhile: President Trump says he’s halting funding to the World Health Organization. We’ll dive into how this could impact the global fight against COVID-19. Also on today’s show: after a week of negotiations, ten airline companies will accept billions of dollars in federal aid. We’ll explain how that aid impacts us.  Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
April 14, 2020
States are teaming up to figure out how and when to lift their stay-at-home orders. We’ll explain why that’s causing tension with the White House. Meanwhile: over 80 million people are supposed to get their stimulus payouts by tomorrow. We'll tell you who that applies to and who’s left out. Also on today’s show: a US Navy sailor has died after COVID-19 spread onboard the USS Roosevelt. We’ll look at why the military’s handling of these outbreaks is becoming a big story.  Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
April 13, 2020
There’s been a lot of talk lately about when it’s OK to ‘reopen the economy.’ Public health experts say one thing that could get us to that point is contact tracing. We’ll explain why. Meanwhile: meat processing plants across the country have been shutting down over COVID-19 concerns. We’ll look at what this means for the food supply chain and those who work in it. Also on today’s show: there’s some big news about the global oil supply. We’ll tell you what it could mean for you at the gas pump. Plus: Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders officially endorses his old rival, former Vice President Joe Biden.  Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
April 9, 2020
This week’s new unemployment numbers are in, and things still aren’t good. We’ll look at what states are doing to keep up with the worsening jobs crisis. Meanwhile: as unemployment skyrockets, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is making moves to keep essential workers at work. Also on today’s show: grocery shopping during a pandemic already has its challenges, but food banks across the country are facing a lot more hurdles. We’ll explain why. Plus: how far can you take social distancing? Try outer space.  Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
April 8, 2020
We’re seeing clearer trends that black Americans may be at disproportionately higher risk of falling ill and dying from COVID-19. We’ll break down why public health experts say this is happening. Meanwhile: Wuhan — the Chinese city where the pandemic started — ended its 76-day lockdown. We’ll look at what’s next for its residents. Also on today’s show: Europe’s top finance officials left a never-ending meeting deadlocked. We’ll tell you why that’s a big deal. Also, big 2020 news today as Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders makes his way to the exit.  Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
April 7, 2020
Voters are heading to the polls to cast their ballots in the Wisconsin primary despite orders from the governor to stay home. We’ll dive into the drama and look at what voting during a pandemic could mean for November’s general election.  Meanwhile: President Trump has been promoting a drug that he says is a ‘game-changer’ for the fight against COVID-19. But America’s top medical officials are urging caution. We explain the big debate over hydroxychloroquine. Also on today’s show: Japan was one of the first countries to deal with COVID-19 cases, but only just enacted its strongest stay-at-home measure. We look at why the country waited until now to declare a state of emergency. Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
April 6, 2020
Health officials are warning that this will be an especially tough week. Are hospitals ready? A new federal report gives us an indication. Meanwhile: the United Nations says that reported incidents of domestic violence are on the rise during the pandemic. We’ll look into why that is. Also on today’s show: we share a few ways you can say thanks to healthcare workers near you.  If you or someone you know is experiencing domestic violence, contact the National Domestic Violence Hotline by calling 1-800-799-7233. If you're unable to speak safely, you can log onto thehotline.org or text LOVEIS to 22522.
April 3, 2020
When news broke that COVID-19 had hit the US, many of us were told not to wear masks unless we were sick. Now the US government is reportedly reconsidering that guidance. We’ll tell you why. Meanwhile, US unemployment data for the month of March just got released. We’ll break down what the numbers mean and why they’re getting so much attention today. Also on today’s show: we check up on New York’s new floating hospital, and explain why celebrities are reading children’s books on social media.  Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
April 2, 2020
We woke up this morning to some record-breaking unemployment numbers — as huge as they are, they may not even be showing the full picture. We’ll explain why. Meanwhile: the US’s secret stockpile of emergency medical equipment is running low. We’ll explain what the stockpile is and why this is happening at precisely the wrong moment in history. Also on today’s show: two cruise ships get the green light to dock in Florida after days of pleading. We tell you why more cruise ship drama is likely to come.  This morning, theSkimm hosted a live presentation: Recessions, Skimm’d. We explained what recessions are, why they’re a big deal, and how you can be prepared for when one comes up. Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
April 1, 2020
The US intelligence community is reportedly warning that China hid key info about the severity of its COVID-19 outbreak. We’ll walk you through what that could mean for other countries that relied on Chinese data as they crafted their own epidemic response plans. Meanwhile: it’s Census Day. We’ll explain what that means and how COVID-19 is complicating the count. Also on today’s show: more states are telling residents to stay at home after the White House revealed models showing dire statistics about the likely course of the COVID-19 pandemic.  Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
March 31, 2020
A US Navy Captain is pleading for help containing a COVID-19 outbreak onboard an American aircraft carrier in Guam. We’ll explain why the Navy is facing similar problems as cruise ships, and why having a nuclear power plant and fighter jets on board make this situation totally different. Meanwhile, a field hospital opened today on a grassy patch of Central Park, famous for its sunbathers and picnickers. We look at why these makeshift medical facilities are cropping up all over the country. Also on today’s show: a story so cute, we can’t even bear it. Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
March 30, 2020
Grocery delivery workers went on strike today. We’ll explain how the COVID-19 pandemic is impacting the delivery industry and how consumers can respond. Meanwhile: the White House extends social distancing guidelines until the end of April. But it remains up to states to decide how to actually enforce them. We look at a few approaches different states are taking. Also on today’s show: trivia night just got a reboot.  Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
March 28, 2020
It’s 2020 and women’s median earnings are about 80 cents for every dollar a man makes. Cool cool. That’s known as the gender pay gap. Ahead of Equal Pay Day on March 31st, we wanted to find out why this gap has persisted for so long, and what’s being done about it. That includes steps you can take. Yes, you. We talked to: Jennifer Klein, chief strategy and policy officer for Time’s Up Claire Wasserman, founder of Ladies Get Paid Maria Colacurcio, CEO of pay analysis software Syndio Skimm more: Wasserman recommends approaching your HR department about setting up a professional sponsorship program. Here’s what that can mean. Research has shown that salary transparency can help close the gender pay gap. Read up here and here.
March 27, 2020
President Trump just signed the most expensive relief bill in US history, but it wasn’t exactly a cakewalk. We explain the drama that had lawmakers scrambling to fly back to the Capitol. Meanwhile, officials at the World Health Organization have been warning for weeks that developing nations could have a tougher time coping with COVID-19. We break down why that is and why more developed nations should care. Also on today’s show: what it means now that UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has tested positive for COVID-19, and the new fashion trend that Walmart says WFH life is driving. Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
March 26, 2020
The latest US unemployment numbers are in. They’re historic, and not in a good way. We’ll break down the data and look at how Congress is trying to patch up the unemployment insurance system in the middle of a health crisis. Meanwhile: how do world leaders hold an emergency summit when they’re supposed to be social distancing? We’ll explain the plan G20 leaders put together to fight COVID-19 while governing-from-home. (Here’s what their WFH confab looked like.) Also on today’s show: how dating sites are helping people connect remotely. Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
March 25, 2020
Senate leaders say they’ve reached a historic deal to help Americans and American businesses deal with the economic fallout of COVID-19. The $2 trillion relief package will also steer billions of dollars to hospitals and local governments to respond to the ongoing health crisis. We’ll tell you what’s (probably) in the bill and why each part of it matters. Meanwhile, New York is being called an ‘epicenter’ of COVID-19. We’ll explain why New York has been hit so hard and what the rest of the country might be able learn from its experience. Also on today’s show: states are asking Amazon and other online retailers to do more to crack down on COVID-19 price gouging, and our recs for the best zoo webcams (links below). Here’s a penguin frolicking through a field at the Santa Barbara Zoo Here are live streams of snow leopard cubs at the Melbourne Zoo Here’s a live feed of a coral reef in Australia  Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370 to shout-out a loved one or share how you’re helping your community during the pandemic. You might hear your message on the show.
March 24, 2020
The 2020 Summer Olympics won’t be happening in summer 2020 anymore. We’ll explain how the decision to postpone the Olympics could impact more than your TV habits. Then: officials around the US are ordering the release of some inmates as a way to slow down COVID-19. Plus: we look at how the pandemic could complicate November’s general election.
March 23, 2020
The Senate is divided over a bill that’s supposed to help Americans deal with the economic fallout of COVID-19. We’ll tell you the latest. Meanwhile, President Trump appears anxious to send Americans back to the office. We’ll tell you why, and what other officials have to say about it. Also on today’s show: why some private companies might help the government produce hospital equipment, and a distance runner’s solution for working out at home.
March 20, 2020
The US is sealing itself off from its neighbors, with big restrictions on the Mexico and Canada borders. We’ll explain why, and take a look at the other big COVID-19 news of the day. Meanwhile, if you’ve been to a supermarket lately, you may have noticed shelves looked a bit...grim. But experts say: don’t panic. Also on today’s show: we spoke with Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus response coordinator. If you want to send a message to a loved one reminding them why it’s important to keep social distancing, let us be your megaphone. Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370. You might hear your message on the show.
March 19, 2020
China just reported no new locally-transmitted COVID-19 cases for the first time since the outbreak began. We’ll explain why that’s great news, but why China isn’t quite out of the woods just yet. Meanwhile, the federal government is giving Americans three extra months to pay their taxes. But taxpayer beware! That April 15th tax filing deadline is still very much a thing. Also on today’s show: we’ll look at why ‘panic-buying’ groceries isn’t the most urgent food issue we should be worried about. We’d love to hear your tips for helping your community during the COVID-19 outbreak. Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370.
March 18, 2020
Healthcare workers are on the frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic. We’ll dive into the risks they’re facing as they work around the clock to save lives. Meanwhile, the US government is coming up with ways to help Americans cope with the economic crisis. We’ll explain why one option being discussed is checks in the mail. Also on today’s show: one listener tells us how she’s ‘Zoom’-ing in to keep her community together.  We’d love to hear your tips for helping your community during the COVID-19 outbreak. Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370.
March 18, 2020
Healthcare workers are on the frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic. We’ll dive into the risks they’re facing as they work around the clock to save lives. Meanwhile, the US government is coming up with ways to help Americans cope with the economic crisis. We’ll explain why one option being discussed is checks in the mail. Also on today’s show: one listener tells us how she’s ‘Zoom’-ing in to keep her community together.  We’d love to hear your tips for helping your community during the COVID-19 outbreak. Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370. ** Dr. Lewis Nelson is the Chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School and also a practicing physician treating patients at University Hospital.
March 17, 2020
The COVID-19 caseload in the US topped 5,000 today, but Florida, Illinois and Arizona kept calm and carried on with primary voting. Meanwhile: are we on the cusp of a lockdown? We’ll explain how federal and local governments are differing in their responses. Also: COVID-19 could create a new kind of medical problem. Listen to what’s keeping the CEO of the American Red Cross up at night.  We’d love to hear your tips for helping your community during the COVID-19 outbreak. Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370. If you or someone you know would like to donate blood, you can learn more at: redcross.org
March 16, 2020
The Federal Reserve dusted off its Great Recession playbook on Sunday to find ways to boost the US economy. It cut interest rates to close to zero percent and will buy up $700 billion in financial assets to help get the economy through the COVID-19 pandemic. We’ll break down what these new steps could mean for you and how markets reacted. Meanwhile, social distancing is the new going out. We’ll explain why you should get on board. Also on today’s show: a big commitment at last night’s CNN debate, and a forgery of biblical proportions.  We’d love to hear your tips for helping your community during the COVID-19 outbreak. Call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370.
March 13, 2020
President Trump declared a national emergency today over the COVID-19 outbreak, and said more Americans should be able to get tested soon. We’ll explain why the US has been facing a testing shortage and how the plans announced today could address that. Then, 30 million US students rely on school meal programs. But what happens when school’s closed? We’ll dive into the latest plans to feed students being told to hunker down at home. Also on today’s show: we’ll preview what could be an unusually quiet Democratic debate on Sunday, and introduce you to the fiercest bug around.
March 12, 2020
Last night President Trump addressed the nation to explain how the US is responding to COVID-19. He talked up the importance of keeping the disease out of the country. But remember: it’s already here. We dive into the complications with testing and treating, and why there’s a lot more work that the US needs to do to be prepared. Meanwhile: if you’re still considering traveling, we’ll tell you what you might need to know when it comes to booking it. Also on the show: it’s Census season, and the government is rolling out a new online option to help you out.
March 11, 2020
COVID-19 is now officially a pandemic. But as more and more companies are telling their employees to work from home, many people don’t have that luxury. We’ll explain why the lack of unemployment insurance and universal paid sick leave is a pain for the gig economy and for some hourly workers. Meanwhile, a New York judge just handed down a prison sentence for movie producer Harvey Weinstein. We’ll break it down. Also on today’s show: how Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is faring in the Democratic presidential primary, and a career pro-tip from supermodel Karlie Kloss.
March 10, 2020
Italians woke up this morning under a nationwide quarantine as the country attempts to stop the spread of COVID-19, the disease caused by coronavirus. Italy is the latest country to follow China’s playbook by using “social distancing” policies to contain the disease, and it might not be the last. We’ll explain why putting a little space between you and others might buy public health systems some time to figure out how to respond to this unfolding outbreak. Also on today’s show: Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders duke it out in Michigan’s Democratic primary, and India’s Prime Minister skips out on celebrating Holi.
March 9, 2020
The markets took a nosedive today. And in response, Wall Street found the brakes and stepped on them. We’ll explain what happened and what it means moving forward. Meanwhile, the beginning of the week might have you dreaming about taking a vacation. But heads up: the US government is warning people against booking their dream cruise. Also on the show: Mexico City finds out what a day without women looks like.
March 6, 2020
The Supreme Court heard its first major case on abortion access with a strong new conservative majority on the bench. We’ll dive into what the outcome of this case could mean for the future of abortion access in the US. Meanwhile, this Sunday is International Women’s Day. We talked to some women – and their partners – about how they share the workload at home. Also on the show: how people around the world are getting creative when it comes to telling people to wash their hands.
March 5, 2020
Elizabeth Warren dropped out of the race for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. Her next big plan is TBD. Meanwhile, countries around the world are planning stimulus packages to help people and businesses recover from the economic hit of COVID-19. But economists aren’t convinced of their value. Also on the show: the US-Taliban peace deal is getting tested. And now the International Criminal Court is launching a formal investigation into possible war crimes committed during the war in Afghanistan.
March 4, 2020
With Super Tuesday behind us and nearly all the results in, the 2020 Democratic presidential field is narrowing even more. We’ll explain who won and lost big last night, and what happens next. Meanwhile: health officials are schooling the media on how to talk about COVID-19, the disease caused by coronavirus. It’s part of an effort to combat misinformation that’s been causing an ‘infodemic’. Also on the show: a potential women’s history museum in DC, and a pro-tip for commanding any room.  Click here for info on COVID-19 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
March 3, 2020
It’s Super Tuesday. The biggest primary day so far where voters in 14 states plus American Samoa cast their ballots to pick their preferred nominee. This time around, California has a starring role with the most delegates up for grabs. Meanwhile: COVID-19 is impacting major events around the world, which has some worried about what this could mean for the 2020 Summer Olympics. Also on the show: Apple admits to causing your iPhone to lag on purpose, and the Democratic Republic of Congo discharges its last Ebola patient.  Click here for more on what you need to know about COVID-19.
March 2, 2020
At least six people in the state of Washington have died from COVID-19. As the US government ramps up testing efforts, experts warn to expect a big jump in confirmed cases as results start coming in. Meanwhile: over the weekend, former VP Joe Biden scored a major win in the South Carolina primary -- thanks in part to a big endorsement. Also on the show: Israel heads to polls for the third time in less than a year, and this time around there are a lot more complications.
February 28, 2020
This week, the stock market has been feeling the pain of COVID-19. We’ll look at what the current economic impact is and what a ‘market correction’ has to do with it. Meanwhile, the US and the Taliban are on the verge of a major peace deal. We’ll break down how the agreement could lead to the end of the US’s longest war. Also on today’s show: a look at pedestrian safety, the annual convention of conservative activists, and a leap-year tradition that could be skipped over.  PS: Click here for more pedestrian safety tips.
February 27, 2020
Scotland is about to make your ‘time of the month’ a lot easier on your wallet. It will soon become the first country to make tampons and pads free and available for everyone. We’ll explain how that policy aims to tackle the ‘period poverty’ affecting girls and women around the world. Meanwhile, a patient in California has been diagnosed with coronavirus – aka COVID-19. And this case is raising questions about the way the US government is testing for the disease. We’ll tell you why. Also on the show: measuring how companies ‘go green,’ and why seagulls can’t get enough of your lunch.
February 26, 2020
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is warning Americans to prepare for COVID-19 to spread within the US. (That’s the new disease caused by coronavirus.) When the CDC says ‘this could be bad,’ they mean major disruptions to your everyday life. But health experts want to make it clear that preparing doesn’t mean panicking. Meanwhile, the Syrian civil war made a surprise appearance in last night’s Democratic primary debate. We’ll explain why the current situation in Syria is so dire, and why millions of people there still need help. Also on the show: Gretchen Carlson shares her advice for what to do if you’re dealing with harassment at work, and talks about her new organization, Lift Our Voices.  Click here to learn more about the situation in Syria and how you can help children and families fleeing conflict.
February 25, 2020
Must feel good to be first. Bernie Sanders has achieved front-runner status in the 2020 Democratic primary. How is that possible after just three states have voted? We’ll explain the money (and delegate) math involved. Then: President Trump wrapped up a quick trip to India to talk trade with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. But the huge welcome party Trump got doesn’t necessarily mean that the US and India are locking down a trade deal anytime soon. Also on the show: a Zamboni driver hits the ice MVP-style.
February 24, 2020
A jury in New York has found Harvey Weinstein guilty of third-degree rape and first-degree criminal sexual assault. He could face more than two decades in prison. We’ll dive into what today’s verdict means, what the jury didn’t convict him on, and what to expect next in the trial that was propelled by the #MeToo movement. Meanwhile: as coronavirus continues to spread, fears are growing that the outbreak is reaching the level of a pandemic. Also on today’s show: we remember NASA mathematician legend Katherine Johnson.
February 21, 2020
The US and the Taliban have agreed to a reduction of violence for the next seven days. It’s kinda like a test run to see if they can put down their weapons for good, and possibly end America’s longest war. But there’s still a lot that could get in the way and a long way to go. Meanwhile, Russian election interference is back in the news ahead of this year’s big vote. Also on the show: Nevada is crossing its fingers for a smooth caucus this weekend, and we remember the tech legend who gave us ‘copy and paste.’
February 20, 2020
Nondisclosure agreements were a big talker at last night’s democratic presidential debate. We’ll dive into what former New York City mayor Mike Bloomberg had to say, and talk to former Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson about ongoing efforts to curtail the practice of mandatory NDAs at the office. Meanwhile: President Trump’s longtime advisor Roger Stone was sentenced to over three years in prison today. But Trump’s recent ‘big pardon energy’  could mean that this prison sentence doesn’t mean prison time. Also on the show: the Trump Administration wants Americans step up their stock investment game, and why snapping shrimp are signaling a big problem in the ocean.
February 19, 2020
Medicare for All is likely to come up in tonight’s big Democratic primary debate in Las Vegas. But Nevada’s powerful Culinary Union fought hard for its members to enjoy a top-notch private health care plan, and they’re resisting change. We’ll dive into the drama between the union and candidates pushing Medicare for All. Meanwhile, the coronavirus outbreak has led to travel restrictions for nearly half of China’s population, which means that a lot of people aren’t making it to the many manufacturing companies that support the global supply chain. Also on the show: a pro-tip from Love Wellness founder and CEO Lo Bosworth.
February 18, 2020
The Boy Scouts of America has officially filed for bankruptcy as it deals with an onslaught of sexual abuse lawsuits. We’ll dive into what this move means for the future of the organization and for thousands of victims seeking justice. Meanwhile: former New York City mayor Mike Bloomberg has qualified for tomorrow night’s democratic presidential debate. Recent polls show him in second place behind Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders. Also on today’s show: why grasshoppers have proven to be a surprising ally for homeland security officials.    Here’s a link to our December show on “look-back laws.”
February 14, 2020
As the coronavirus continues to spread, one of the affected groups has been healthcare workers on the frontlines in China. We’ll dive into how a vaccine could be on the horizon, but still has a long way to go. Then: the Senate votes to rein in President Trump’s power to conduct military strikes in Iran. As tensions increase between the US and Iran, an unlikely middleman is helping the two countries work out their issues and bring much needed humanitarian aid to the Iranian people. Also on the show: why the US government wants to remind you on Valentine’s Day … to take things slow.
February 13, 2020
Attorney General William Barr has RSVP’d to a hearing with the House Judiciary Committee. And Dems have a lot of things they want to ask him about. Think: Roger Stone, Jessie Liu, and Rudy Giuliani. Meanwhile: all eyes were on Federal Reserve nominee Judy Shelton today at her confirmation hearing. Her controversial ideas – like bringing back the gold standard – have some senators scratching their heads. Also on the show: why a surge in home sales might not be great for your wallet, and why today is Galentine’s Day. Cheers to you and your beautiful tropical fish.
February 12, 2020
Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó is back home after a whirlwind trip throughout Europe and the US to drum up support for his cause. It’s been over a year since he defied current president Nicolás Maduro and declared himself the rightful president. And even though Guaidó has the US and over 50 other countries on his side, Guaidó’s campaign may be losing steam. As that political battle rages, the people of Venezuela continue to suffer through a refugee crisis of massive proportions. Also on today’s show: author and entrepreneur Erica Williams Simon talks about big life changes and the power of storytelling.
February 11, 2020
Today, after years of lawsuits and red tape, a federal judge approved the merger of wireless network giants T-Mobile and Sprint. We dive into why states are making calls to stop this from happening and what it could mean for your next phone bill. Meanwhile, the Philippines is scrapping a decades-old military agreement with the US called the Visiting Forces Agreement. We’ll tell you why that could have major implications for global security. Also on today’s show: the New Hampshire primary is underway, but the midnight vote in Dixville Notch got off to a surprising start.
February 10, 2020
Today, the Trump administration unveiled its budget proposal for 2021. But since Congress holds the purse strings and Democrats have the majority in the House, it’s likely that this plan might not work out. We’ll dive into the plan’s winners and losers, and why the border wall between the U.S. and Mexico is back in the spotlight. Also on today’s show: China sees its deadliest day of the coronavirus outbreak, and why some of last night’s Oscar winners gave a nod to a new anti-discrimination law.
February 7, 2020
It’s Friday night, and some 2020 democratic candidates will be spending theirs in...New Hampshire for the eighth democratic debate. We’ll tell you why some of the candidates are hoping to put this ‘No Good, Very Bad’ week behind them. Meanwhile, football season is already making a comeback with a brand new league called the XFL. And this one’s taking your bets (legally). Also on today’s show: Harvey Weinstein’s defense team calls its first witnesses, and a historic first to keep an ear out for at the Oscars on Sunday. To receive gambling addiction help 24/7/365, call or text the National Problem Gambling Helpline at 1-800-522-4700.
February 6, 2020
President Trump’s Senate impeachment trial is over, but that’s not the end of political investigations in 2020. We’ll explain what info Democrats and Republicans in Congress want to track down now. Then, the coronavirus outbreak is causing a global shortage on protective face masks. We hear from one expert on what this could mean for the healthcare workers who need those masks the most. Also on today’s show: Tensions ease in the U.S.-China trade war, and a performance artist fakes a traffic jam.
February 5, 2020
President Trump’s Senate impeachment trial has come to an end. So, what happens now? Meanwhile, if you spotted members of Congress last night wearing pins with the letters E-R-A and asked W-H-Y, there was a reason for it. We’ll dive into the Equal Rights Amendment and the latest push to ratify it into the U.S. Constitution. Also on today’s show: tips for tax freshmen, and a preview of our chat with Coach Monica Aldama from ‘Cheer’ on Netflix.
February 4, 2020
A day after the Iowa Democratic Caucus, we’re told results are still just around the corner. But the damage from a historic vote-counting fail is already being felt, and Iowa could be the biggest loser. Meanwhile, we’ll look at the big issues that might come up in tonight’s State of the Union Address by checking out the guest list. Also on today’s show: Democrats float an alternative to impeachment, and why one lonely creature might not have been the last of his kind.
February 3, 2020
The 2020 primary season kicks off tonight with the Iowa caucuses. But how does a caucus actually work – and why does Iowa get so much clout? Meanwhile, the Senate impeachment trial continues but the end is in sight. We’ll break down what to look for in the coming days. Also on today’s show: why the World Health Organization has a problem with countries imposing travel bans in the midst of the coronavirus outbreak, and why there might be more to Shakira’s viral Super Bowl moment than just another meme.
January 31, 2020
After more than three years, Brexit is actually happening. We’ll break down what’s next for the UK. Spoiler: there’s still a long road ahead. Meanwhile, the debate over witnesses in the Senate impeachment trial is headed toward a vote. Which means the end is in sight. Also on today’s show: a lot of firsts will be happening on and off the field on Super Bowl Sunday.
January 30, 2020
The World Health Organization says that the coronavirus outbreak is a global public health emergency. We’ll break down what this means as countries respond and how the economic impact of this disease is being felt around the world. Meanwhile, a locust invasion is wreaking havoc in East Africa and parts of the Middle East and South Asia. Also on today’s show: question time for senators at the impeachment trial ends today, and a mummy finds his voice.
January 29, 2020
Now that opening arguments have wrapped up in the Senate impeachment trial, it’s time for lawmakers to ask the questions. We’ll break down how this process works and what to expect next. Meanwhile, the American Lung Association put out its big annual report on tobacco use. The conclusion? The US government still has a lot of work to do. Also on today’s show: what to know about doing your taxes as a freelancer, and a pro-tip on negotiation from Food52 CEO Amanda Hesser.
January 28, 2020
President Trump’s defense lawyers have wrapped up opening arguments. We’ll break down the case they made, and what’s next for the Senate impeachment trial. Meanwhile, the White House has finally unveiled its plan for peace in the Middle East. But a key player to the deal wasn’t part of it, so TBD on whether the plan will work out. Also on today’s show: a new mobile app to track votes at the Iowa caucuses has security experts concerned.
January 28, 2020
President Trump’s defense lawyers have wrapped up opening arguments. We’ll break down the case they made, and what’s next for the Senate impeachment trial. Meanwhile, the White House has finally unveiled its plan for peace in the Middle East. But a key player to the deal wasn’t part of it, so TBD on whether the plan will work out. Also on today’s show: a new mobile app to track votes at the Iowa caucuses has security experts concerned.
January 27, 2020
President Trump’s defense team is launching into day two of their opening arguments at the Senate impeachment trial. But leaked excerpts from former National Security Advisor John Bolton’s upcoming book are adding more pressure on senators to consider calling new witnesses. Meanwhile, Trump hosted two back-to-back meetings with Israel’s top two political rivals today. We’ll explain what this has to do with peace in the Middle East. Also on today’s show: the latest updates on coronavirus, and a thing to know when doing your taxes and growing your family.
January 24, 2020
House Democrats are wrapping up three days of opening arguments in the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump. Before Trump’s defense lawyers take the mic on Saturday, we’ll take a look at how Democrats laid out the case, and whether it changed anyone’s minds. Then, President Trump became the first sitting president to speak at the March for Life rally today in DC. We’ll explain why his timing is everything. Also on today’s show: how drama over the head of the Recording Academy is overshadowing the biggest night in music.
January 23, 2020
China is turning to massive quarantines to stop the spread of coronavirus. Now, millions are impacted as transportation comes to a halt ahead of the Lunar New Year. We’ll explain why some experts say quarantines don’t always work as intended. Then, a UN court has ordered Myanmar to take steps to protect its persecuted Rohingya Muslim population. That demand couldn’t have come on a more timely day. Also on today’s show: Delta Airlines shares its profits with employees, and how to get ‘Tinder Verified.’ Here’s a link to our December show on the Myanmar case at the International Court of Justice.
January 22, 2020
Hundreds of people have been infected by a virus that originated in China. Now, a case has been diagnosed in the US, too. We’ll explain what the coronavirus is and how officials are handling it. Meanwhile, the impeachment trial is back in session, so expect some long nights ahead. We’ll look into how the first day of oral arguments by the House Managers kicked off. Also on today’s show: how life updates can impact your taxes, and a pro-tip on career negotiations.
January 21, 2020
The world’s biggest movers and shakers are packing up their skis and heading to a place called Davos in the Swiss Alps. That’s right: it’s time for the annual World Economic Forum. We’ll explain what that is and why it’s a big deal. Meanwhile, the Senate spent the day laying out the rules of President Trump’s impeachment trial. We’ll look into what a trial looks like on Capitol Hill. Also on today’s show: why the New York Times’ 2020 endorsement is making headlines. If you have a few extra minutes, we'd love to hear your thoughts. Please take our survey.
January 17, 2020
All eyes are on the Senate in the run up to next week’s impeachment trial. But new rules could make it difficult, or even impossible, to keep up with what’s going on. We’ll tell you why. Then, we’ll dive into your inbox to help explain all those privacy policy emails you’ve probably been receiving. Also on today’s show: the story behind China’s falling birth rate, and Michigan’s place in the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.  If you have a few extra minutes, we'd love to hear your thoughts. Please take our survey.
January 16, 2020
Something new started today: the impeachment trial of the President of the United States. We’ll explain how a one-man media circus gave the start of the trial a run for its money. Meanwhile, Russian President Vladimir Putin just watered down the powers of his own office. Or, did he? We'll break down why Putin might be up to one of his oldest tricks. Also on today’s show: we look at women who work, and rewind a century to relive a ‘Dry January’ that ended up lasting 13 years.
January 15, 2020
The “i” word is back in the headlines after the House of Representatives sent articles of impeachment to the Senate today. Did Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s decision to hit ‘pause’ on impeachment for almost a month pay off? We’ll dive in. Meanwhile, the US and China signed  a “phase one” trade deal today. Whether it’s enough to settle the trade drama is a whole nother story. Also on today’s show: an unmissable debate moment, and career advice from Kate Upton.
January 14, 2020
One month after a deadly shooting in Florida, the Justice Department is still trying to figure out what happened. But there’s one thing standing in the way of investigators: Apple. We’ll explain why the government and big tech are fighting over data privacy. Meanwhile, tonight is the last democratic debate before the first voters head to the polls. We’ll break down what will and won’t be on stage. Also on today’s show: the WNBA makes money moves, and a record-breaking rapper.
January 13, 2020
Iran is suddenly on the defensive, facing critics inside and outside the country after it admitted to shooting down a passenger plane last week. We’ll explain how Iran is dealing with widespread protests and how the plane accident could impact the country’s diplomatic standing. Meanwhile, the Australian government is also on the defensive over its climate policies as wildfires continue to rage down under. Also on today’s show: a royal summit, and the big (corporate) winner from today’s Oscar nominations. PS: if you want to help the Aussie fire relief efforts, here’s the link we mentioned in the show.
January 10, 2020
Days after a deadly plane crash in Iran, questions remain over what exactly happened. We’ll explain why major media outlets and western leaders are pointing to Iran. Meanwhile, Puerto Rico is still recovering from two huge earthquakes this week. We’ll look into how the devastation following Hurricane Maria two years ago is affecting the island’s recovery efforts. Also on today’s show: the buzziest new gadgets, and the (maybe) first humans on Mars. PS: if you want to help the earthquake relief efforts, here’s the link we mentioned in the show.
January 10, 2020
First there was Brexit, now there’s Megxit. If you checked Instagram (or just the internet) this week, you probably saw the news that Prince Harry and Meghan Markle are stepping back from their roles as senior royals. So, what does this actually mean? Can they do that? In this Skimm Special, we explain the decision that shocked the world.
January 9, 2020
Members of Congress had a heated debate today over limiting President Trump’s ability to start a war with Iran. We’ll explain who holds the war-fighting cards in Washington and why Congress rarely raises its voice. Meanwhile, the White House is rolling back rules concerning environmental impact assessments for key infrastructure projects. We’ll dig into why President Richard Nixon thought they were important in the first place. Also on today’s show: tips on how to ask for a pay raise, and a check-up with RBG.
January 8, 2020
At times this week, it looked like the US and Iran were heading toward an all-out war. And those concerns only intensified last night after Iran attacked a pair of Iraqi military bases where US troops are stationed. We’ll explain the likelihood of war at this moment, or whether it’s possible the two foes will stand down. Meanwhile, we’ll explain why a a CEO-turned-fugitive in Lebanon is making headlines for his unlikely escape from Japan. Also on today’s show: a big royal announcement, and a former ambassador’s advice about negotiating with your boss...even if your boss is the President of the United States.
January 7, 2020
The latest drama between the US and Iran is catching Iraq in the crossfire. After a deadly US drone strike in Iraq, Iraq’s parliament wants US troops out of the country. We’ll explain how America’s relations with key ally are suddenly at risk. Meanwhile, lawmakers are back at work in the US and the UK. We’ll break down how they plan to tackle two big agenda items – impeachment and Brexit. Also on today’s show: how Facebook is fighting deepfakes, and how your Christmas tree could enjoy a second life.
January 6, 2020
The year is off to a rocky start for the US and Iran. Last week, the US killed a top Iranian general linked to attacks on hundreds of Americans. Now, Iran is threatening to retaliate. We’ll dive in. Meanwhile, it’s day one for the Harvey Weinstein trial in New York, more than two years after an explosive report detailed allegations of decades of sexual assault. We’ll explain why bringing him to justice has taken so long. Also on today’s show: we’ll survey the damage from Australia’s deadly bushfires, and how celebrities spoke up about it at the Golden Globes. PS: if you want to help the fire relief efforts, here’s the link we mentioned in the show.
January 3, 2020
Last year brought with it some big stories about change - stories that we’ll probably see more of in 2020. So before we ring in the new year, here are some of the major ‘sea change’ stories that were on our radar: the impeachment of the President of the United States, huge protests against climate change, and a wave of anti-government fervor around the globe. Editor's Note: this is a pre-recorded episode. We'll be back with our regular programming on Monday at 5pm ET.
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