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February 24, 2020
“Everybody had been so easily satisfied before and then it got harder to do what we did at ease… The feeling that the group had become what we’d rebelled against… that’s what a lot of the music after The Band was about.'' Robbie Robertson reflected in 1982 on the Rock of Ages period in The Band's history. It had felt like a while since The Band actually felt like a well oiled unit. Truth be told, The Band’s success was like a mousetrap, it had finally sprung and they were now stuck in more ways than one. Each member of the group were going through their own personal struggles in one way or another. Each member had their own lives with their wives, children and friends. It seems like they didn’t know how to communicate or to stop the ever moving freight train to take a second to slow down and come up with a plan on how to move forward in their new environment.  After “Cahoots” there a momentary sigh of relief. It was a desperate attempt at keeping it all together. Collectively, The Band’s two leaders, Levon and Robbie were realizing that it was finally time to put a stop to it. Their success founded them the ability to take more lead in directing their career. To help and maybe try and reclaim what they had felt what they had when they were making music alone in the mountains of Woodstock with the world not caring about them making music. But they wouldn’t be going out with a whimper, but with a bang.  Please Consider Following Us: Instagram: @TheBandPodcast Twitter: @TheBandPodcast Facebook: /TheBandPodcast The Band: A History is part of Pantheon Podcasts. Listen to The Band: A History and a variety of other great podcasts over on Pantheon. "Levons Barn" song provided by Adam Traum (https://www.adamtraumguitar.com/) Credits: Produced, Written & Hosted by Tyrell William Lisson Produced & Edited by Teagan Chevrier Additional Research by Fiona Chevrier
January 20, 2020
In 1993 Rick Danko told The News-Star: "I think we shipped a million copies of that second album and that changed a lot of people’s lives — in particular, the Band’s. After that, we were only getting together once a year, for a couple of months, to record. It was like we were too decadent to play.” 1970 was a hard year, but it wouldn't get any easier in 1971. Having struggled through "Stage Fright" and taking on the disastrous Festival Express music festival, The Band was burnt out and in a dark space. However, it was back into the studio to record a new album, even if they didn't want to. From the exterior The Band was the perfect group. They were pretty universally loved from their fans, their critics and their peers. The opposite was true for the five guys in the group, once a group of tight knit brothers was shattering. Creative droughts, drugs and alcohol continued to plague them deeply. "Cahoots" is a manifestation of the period the songs crafted for the album don't do anything to hide it. Now, with "Cahoots" their fourth studio album released to the world in 1971, The Band's shiny veneer was fading. The public started to sense The Band wasn't in a happy place and The Band didn't know how much longer they were going to be able to keep it up. Please Consider Following Us: Instagram: @TheBandPodcast Twitter: @TheBandPodcast Facebook: /TheBandPodcast The Band: A History is part of Pantheon Podcasts. Listen to The Band: A History and a variety of other great podcasts over on Pantheon. "Levons Barn" song provided by Adam Traum (https://www.adamtraumguitar.com/) Credits: Produced, Written & Hosted by Tyrell William Lisson Produced & Edited by Teagan Chevrier Additional Research by Fiona Chevrier
November 25, 2019
The Band: A History sits down with "Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band" filmmaker Daniel Roher to discuss the making of his documentary on Robbie Robertson. We discuss Roher's career in the Canadian documentary world, elevating his craft, the luck of landing "Once Were Brothers" and all that went into making the film, from star-studded interviews, Robbie and Levon's feud, Garth's exclusion and much, much more. You can find information about "Once Were Brothers" and were it is screening here. You can also find Daniel Roher on Instagram here. Please Consider Following Us: Instagram: @TheBandPodcast Twitter: @TheBandPodcast Facebook: /TheBandPodcast The Band: A History is part of Pantheon Podcasts. Listen to The Band: A History and a variety of other great podcasts over on Pantheon.
November 3, 2019
Rick Danko stated once: “Those first royalty checks we got almost killed some of us”. By 1970, The Band was starting to reap the rewards of their first two albums. Remember it has only been two years since the release of “Music From Big Pink”. It may feel like an elongated period of time, but The Band was a workhorse powering through producing an album yearly, while also staying busy on other projects. They were now receiving millions of dollars for the songs they wrote and performed. Frustrating from multiple avenues were starting to creep into what The Band had established. Drugs, alcohol, money, etc. were all working towards destroying what The Band had built. With little time and a label to keep happy, as well as an attempt to push all the issues aside, The Band went back into the studio to record their third album "Stage Fright". ⁣ ⁣However, it wouldn't be as easy this time. "Stage Fright" tested the group and pushed The Band to their limits. ⁣ Please Consider Following Us: Instagram: @TheBandPodcast Twitter: @TheBandPodcast Facebook: /TheBandPodcast The Band: A History is part of Pantheon Podcasts (http://www.pantheonpodcasts.com/). Listen to The Band: A History and a variety of other great podcasts over on Pantheon. "Levons Barn" song provided by Adam Traum (https://www.adamtraumguitar.com/) This show is part of Pantheon Podcasts.
November 3, 2019
Rick Danko stated once: “Those first royalty checks we got almost killed some of us”. By 1970, The Band was starting to reap the rewards of their first two albums. Remember it has only been two years since the release of “Music From Big Pink”. It may feel like an elongated period of time, but The Band was a workhorse powering through producing an album yearly, while also staying busy on other projects. They were now receiving millions of dollars for the songs they wrote and performed. Frustrating from multiple avenues were starting to creep into what The Band had established. Drugs, alcohol, money, etc. were all working towards destroying what The Band had built. With little time and a label to keep happy, as well as an attempt to push all the issues aside, The Band went back into the studio to record their third album "Stage Fright". ⁣ ⁣However, it wouldn't be as easy this time. "Stage Fright" tested the group and pushed The Band to their limits. ⁣ Please Consider Following Us: Instagram: @TheBandPodcast Twitter: @TheBandPodcast Facebook: /TheBandPodcast The Band: A History is part of Pantheon Podcasts. Listen to The Band: A History and a variety of other great podcasts over on Pantheon. "Levons Barn" song provided by Adam Traum (https://www.adamtraumguitar.com/)
September 8, 2019
The Band's follow-up self-titled album "The Band" was a success and bigger than their first effort. You'd think they'd slow down and smell the roses, but they didn't. The Band never followed the same path as everyone else and continued to dive deep into recording. Often times as individuals rather than a group, each member spent serious time in 1969 and 1970 working on their friends projects including work for John Martyn, Todd Rundgren, Jesse Winchester and John Simon. However, with the success came the demands of a fanbase and a label. The Band spent time on the road in 1969 for the first time in an extended capacity. The success opened the door to a new life style, a place where everyone wanted to be your friend and every had a party. With touring also came press in a meaningful way. The Band broke ground being the first American band on TIME magazine. The Band also were re-introduced to the press with a very spicy interview given by Ronnie Hawkins and much, much more. The Band embraced this life style, but it would just be a matter of time before it all began to start breaking down. With a label expecting more albums, The Band would be back in the studio in 1970 creating their third album. Time will tell if it would all pay off for The Band. Please Consider Following Us: Instagram: @TheBandPodcastTwitter: @TheBandPodcastFacebook: /TheBandPodcastThe Band: A History is part of Pantheon Podcasts (http://www.pantheonpodcasts.com/). Listen to The Band: A History and a variety of other great podcasts over on Pantheon.
September 7, 2019
We review the new Robbie Robertson documentary "Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band" that just premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival directed by Daniel Roher and executive produced by Martin Scorsese, Ron Howard and Brian Glazer.
August 4, 2019
While The Band had critical success on their first studio effort 1968's "Music From Big Pink" they didn't waste anytime before getting back into the studio to make their follow up. The Band was now respected in their own right apart from Ronnie Hawkins and Bob Dylan. They had the support of a growing fanbase, critics and most importantly musicians like George Harrison and Eric Clapton. However, while The Band were enjoying the frills of a now more luxurious lifestyle that didn't impede on their music making. Their self-titled second album, later referred to as "The Brown Album" pushed them even further in the music cultural zeitgeist. The approach similar to what they had done with their first album. This time holing themselves up into a homemade studio in the Hollywood Hills as opposed to the mountain wilderness of the Catskills in upstate New York. The Brown album went on to produce some of The Band's most well known songs like "The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down", "Rag Mamma Rag", "Whispering Pines" and "King Harvest (Has Surely Come" and further cemented their influence in the creation of the Americana genre of back to basics. Their sophomore album was also their own unique commentary on America from the perspective of the now increasingly forgotten peoples: the farmers, the truck drivers and even the drunkards! Moreover, The Band began to play live again for the first time in years, taking part in some of the most important festivals in music history like: the Toronto Pop Festival, Woodstock and Isle of Wight all in 1969. While also playing historic stints at Bill Graham's Winterland in San Fransisco and Fillmore East in New York. The Band was nearing the peak, their reach was growing, their influence looming large and they were able to make the music they had yearned to create for over a decade. Please Consider Following Us: Instagram: @TheBandPodcastTwitter: @TheBandPodcastFacebook: /TheBandPodcast
June 11, 2019
The mythical proportion that has graced "Music From Big Pink" has been there since the beginning. By the late sixties, everyone was buzzing about what Dylan and The Band were doing in upstate New York. "Music From Pink" quaked the music world, it’s profound impact changed the perspective  of the largest artists of the day. George Harrison was obsessed, Eric Clapton famously quit Cream and wanted to join The Band. . In an era saturated by fuzzy blues, acid rock and psychedelia, the authentic, raw and roots music of The Band was fresh air. This episode we will go through The Band’s collective process for creating arguably their best album, the album that skyrocketed them to fame. Please consider following on social media: Instagram: @TheBandPodcastTwitter: @TheBandPodcastFacebook: /TheBandPodcastCheck out Adam Traum who provided the track "Levon's Barn" for this episode. http://www.adamtraumguitar.com
May 5, 2019
This week we dive deeper into the legendary roots-rock group, The Band as they move up to join Bob Dylan after he recovers from his motorcycle accident. Excited to send some time off the road they took the opportunity to write and record some music. They started to rent the famous clubhouse they called "Big Pink". The Basement Tapes became the legacy of over a year of creating and making music in the basement of Big Pink.   Please consider following on social media:  Instagram: @TheBandPodcast Twitter: @TheBandPodcast Facebook: /TheBandPodcast Check out Adam Traum who provided the track "Levon's Barn" for this episode.  http://www.adamtraumguitar.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thebandpodcast/support
May 5, 2019
This week we dive deeper into the legendary roots-rock group, The Band as they move up to join Bob Dylan after he recovers from his motorcycle accident. Excited to send some time off the road they took the opportunity to write and record some music. They started to rent the famous clubhouse they called "Big Pink". The Basement Tapes became the legacy of over a year of creating and making music in the basement of Big Pink.  Please consider following on social media: Instagram: @TheBandPodcastTwitter: @TheBandPodcastFacebook: /TheBandPodcastCheck out Adam Traum who provided the track "Levon's Barn" for this episode. http://www.adamtraumguitar.com
April 8, 2019
This week we dive deeper into the legendary roots-rock group, The Band as they join Dylan. Detailing the years between 1964 through 1966 we take a look at the group as they get to see the world. Private jets, A-list celebrities, turmoil and more. The Hawks got to experience the very best of music and the very worst. From seeing how a master like Bob Dylan writes and performs to having crowds of thousands hate your guts. This episode of The Band: A History packs a punch. Please consider following on social media:  Instagram: @TheBandPodcast Twitter: @TheBandPodcast Facebook: /TheBandPodcast Check out Adam Traum who provided the track "Levon's Barn" for this episode.  http://www.adamtraumguitar.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thebandpodcast/support
April 8, 2019
This week we dive deeper into the legendary roots-rock group, The Band as they join Dylan. Detailing the years between 1964 through 1966 we take a look at the group as they get to see the world. Private jets, A-list celebrities, turmoil and more. The Hawks got to experience the very best of music and the very worst. From seeing how a master like Bob Dylan writes and performs to having crowds of thousands hate your guts. This episode of The Band: A History packs a punch. Please consider following on social media: Instagram: @TheBandPodcastTwitter: @TheBandPodcastFacebook: /TheBandPodcast Check out Adam Traum who provided the track "Levon's Barn" for this episode. http://www.adamtraumguitar.com
March 10, 2019
This week we dive deeper into the legendary roots-rock group, The Band after they left Ronnie Hawkins. Detailing the years between 1964 into 1965 we take a look at a group of young musicians who were experimenting with their sound. From their relentless touring across Eastern Canada in through the Southern states of the United States of America we are exposed to a very interesting period of time in The Band's history. Session work with John Hammond Jr. to jamming with Sonny Boy Williamson to drugs and arrests, this episode of The Band: A History packs a punch. Please consider following on social media:  Instagram: @TheBandPodcast Twitter: @TheBandPodcast Facebook: /TheBandPodcast --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thebandpodcast/support
March 10, 2019
This week we dive deeper into the legendary roots-rock group, The Band after they left Ronnie Hawkins. Detailing the years between 1964 into 1965 we take a look at a group of young musicians who were experimenting with their sound. From their relentless touring across Eastern Canada in through the Southern states of the United States of America we are exposed to a very interesting period of time in The Band's history. Session work with John Hammond Jr. to jamming with Sonny Boy Williamson to drugs and arrests, this episode of The Band: A History packs a punch. Please consider following on social media: Instagram: @TheBandPodcastTwitter: @TheBandPodcastFacebook: /TheBandPodcast
February 9, 2019
Welcome to The Band: A History. Episode #001 - Ronnie "The Hawk" Hawkins recounts the legendary singer from Arkansas role on music history, specifically rockabilly and his role in developing the sound in Canada through Canadian musicians. Moreover, the episode looks at how Hawkins put together a group of musicians that later went on to become the legendary roots-rock group, The Band.  Please consider following on social media:  Instagram: @TheBandPodcast Twitter: @TheBandPodcast Facebook: /TheBandPodcast --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thebandpodcast/support
February 9, 2019
Welcome to The Band: A History. Ronnie "The Hawk" Hawkins recounts the legendary singer from Arkansas role on music history, specifically rockabilly and his role in developing the sound in Canada through Canadian musicians. Moreover, the episode looks at how Hawkins put together a group of musicians that later went on to become the legendary roots-rock group, The Band. Please consider following on social media: Instagram: @TheBandPodcastTwitter: @TheBandPodcastFacebook: /TheBandPodcast
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