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October 10, 2019
Hackaday Editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys recap a week full of hacks from the solar sailing RC plane that has zero power storage to geeking out about lightning detectors and hacking Ikea LED controllers to unlock real dimming to building backyard wind turbines. We look up an IoT egg tray with appreciation not for the concept but certainly for the engineering, and scratch our heads on why one-hacker-smartwatch-to-rule-them-all seems like something that should happen but so far has only been a fleeting concept. Show Notes: https://hackaday.com/?p=380750
October 4, 2019
Hackaday Editors Tom Nardi and Mike Szczys comb through their favorite hacks from the past week. We loved Donald Papp's article on considerations before making the leap from FDM 3D Printers to a resin-based process, and we solidify our thoughts on curing cement in low-gravity. Tom's working on a Cyberdeck build, and he also found an ancient episode of an earlier and much different version of the Hackaday podcast. We're impressed with a mostly 3D-printed useless machine, a thermal-insert press that's also 3D-printed, and the Raspberry-Pi based Sidekick clone that popped up this week. A DIY wire-bending robot is an incredible build, as is the gorgeous wire-routing in a mechanical keyboard, and the filigree work on this playing card press. Plus you need to spend some time getting lost in this one hydrogen-line telescope project.  Show Notes: https://hackaday.com/?p=379616
September 27, 2019
Hackaday Editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams take a look at the latest hacks from the past week. We keep seeing awesome stuff and find ourselves wanting to buy cheap welders, thermal camera sensors, and CNC parts. There was a meeting of the dog-shaped robots at ICRA and at least one of them has super-fluid movements. We dish on 3D printed meat, locking up the smartphones, asynchronous C routines, and synchronized clocks.  Show Notes: https://hackaday.com/?p=378386
September 20, 2019
Hackaday Editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys work their way through a fantastic week of hacks. From a rideable tank tread to spoofing radio time servers and from tune-playing vacuum cleaners to an epic camera motion control system, there's a lot to get caught up on. Plus, Elliot describes frequency counting while Mike's head spins, and we geek out on satellite optics, transistor-based Pong, and Jonathan Bennett's weekly security articles. Show Notes: https://hackaday.com/?p=377268
September 12, 2019
Hackaday Editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams get caught up on the most interesting hacks of the past week. On this episode we take a deep dive into radiation monitoring projects, both Geiger tube and scintillator based, as well as LED cube projects. In the 3D printing world we want non-planar printing to be the next big thing. Padauk microcontrollers are small, cheap, and do things in really interesting ways if you don't mind embracing the ecosystem. And what's the best way to read a water meter with a microcontroller? Show Notes: https://hackaday.com/?p=376058
September 6, 2019
Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys wish Hackaday a happy fifteenth birthday! We also jump into a few vulns found (and fixed... ish) in the WiFi stack of ESP32/ESP8266 chips, try to get to the bottom of improved search for 3D printable CAD models, and drool over some really cool RC cars that add realism to head-to-head online racing. We look at the machining masterpiece that is a really huge SCARA arm drawbot, ask why Hydrogen cars haven't been seeing the kind of sunlight that fully electric vehicles do, and give a big nod of approval to a guide on building your own custom USB cables. Show Notes: https://hackaday.com/?p=375267
August 30, 2019
Hackaday Editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams recorded this week's podcast live from Chaos Communication Camp, discussing the most interesting hacks on offer over the past week. I novel locomotion news, there's a quadcopter built around the coanda effect and an autonomous boat built into a plastic storage bin. The radiation spikes in Russia point to a nuclear-powered ramjet but the idea is far from new. Stardust (well... space rock dust) is falling from the sky and it's surprisingly easy to collect. And 3D-printed gear boxes and hobby brushless DC motors have reached the critical threshold necessary to mangle 20/20 aluminum extrusion. Show Notes: https://hackaday.com/?p=374187
August 23, 2019
Hackaday Editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams recorded this week's podcast live from Chaos Communication Camp, discussing the most interesting hacks on offer over the past week. I novel locomotion news, there's a quadcopter built around the coanda effect and an autonomous boat built into a plastic storage bin. The radiation spikes in Russia point to a nuclear-powered ramjet but the idea is far from new. Stardust (well... space rock dust) is falling from the sky and it's surprisingly easy to collect. And 3D-printed gear boxes and hobby brushless DC motors have reached the critical threshold necessary to mangle 20/20 aluminum extrusion. https://wp.me/paBn4l-1z3a
August 16, 2019
Mike Szczys and Kerry Scharfglass recorded this week's podcast live from DEF CON. Among the many topics of discussion, we explore some of the more interesting ways to move a robot. From BB-8 to Holonomic Drives, Kerry's hoping to have a proof of concept in time for Supercon. Are you using On-Chip Debugging with your projects? Neither are we, but maybe we should. The same goes for dynamic memory allocation; but when you have overpowered micros like the chip on the Teensy 4.0, why do you need to? We close this week's show with a few interviews with badge makers who rolled out a few hundred of their design and encountered manufacturing problems along the way. It wouldn't be engineering without problems to solve. Show Notes: https://hackaday.com/?p=372073
August 9, 2019
Hackaday Editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams curate the awesome hacks from the past week. On this episode, we marvel about the legacy RTL-SDR has had on the software-defined radio scene, turn a critical ear to 16-bit console audio hardware, watch generative algorithms make 3D prints beautiful, and discover why printer paper is so very, very bright white. Show Notes: https://hackaday.com/?p=370890
August 2, 2019
Hackaday Editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys geek out over the latest hacks. This week we saw a couple of clever CNC builds that leverage a great ESP32 port of GRBL. The lemonade-pitcher-based submarine project is everything you thought couldn't work in an underwater ROV. Amazon's newest Dot has its warranty voided to show off what 22 pounds gets you these days. And there's a great tutorial on debugging circuits that grew out of a Fail of the Week. Plus, we get the wind knocked out of us with an ambitious launch schedule for airless automotive tires, and commiserate over the confusing world of USB-C. Show Notes: https://hackaday.com/?p=370038
July 26, 2019
Hackaday Editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams cover the most interesting hacks over the past week. So much talk of putting computers in touch with our brains has us skeptical on both tech and timeline. We celebrated the 40th Anniversary of the Walkman, but the headphones are the real star. Plus, Verilog isn't just for FPGAs, you can synthesize 7400 circuits too! Elliot is enamored by a subtractive printing process that uses particle board, and we discuss a couple of takes on hybrid-powered drones. Show Notes: https://hackaday.com/?p=368984
July 19, 2019
Hackaday Editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys dive into the most interesting hacks of the week. Confused by USB-C? So are we, and so is the Raspberry Pi 4. Learning VGA is a lot easier when abstract concepts are unpacked onto a huge breadboard using logic chips and an EEPROM. Adding vision to a prosthetic hand makes a lot of sense when you start to dig into possibilities of this Hackaday Prize entry. And Elliot gets nostalgic about Counter-Strike, the game that is a hack of Half-Life, grew to eclipse a lot of other shooters, and is now 20 years old. Show Notes: https://hackaday.com/?p=366837
July 12, 2019
Hackaday Editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams are back after last week's holiday break to track down all of the hacks you missed. There are some doozies; a selfie-drone controlled by your body position, a Theremin that sings better than you can, how about a BGA hand-soldering project whose creator can't even believe he pulled it off. Kristina wrote a spectacular article on the life and career of Mary Sherman Morgan, and Tom tears down a payment terminal he picked up in an abandoned Toys R Us, plus much more! Show Notes: https://hackaday.com/?p=366837
June 28, 2019
Hackaday Editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams dish their favorite hacks from the past week. Seems like everyone is trying to mill their own Mac Pro grille and we love seeing how they go about it. Elliot is gaga over a quintet of power latching circuits, Mike goes crazy for a dough sheeter project, and we dig through the news behind methane on Mars, the Raspberry Pi 4 release, and spoofing Presidential text alerts with SDR. If you like mini-keyboards you need to see the Fauxberry, Artificial Intelligence became an art critic this week, and poorly-lit rooms have been solved with a massive mirror system. Show Notes: https://hackaday.com/?p=364870
June 21, 2019
Hackaday Editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys wade through the fun hacks of the week. Looks like Google got caught ripping off song lyrics (how they got caught is the hack) and electric cars are getting artificially noisier. We look at 3D Printing directly from used plastic, and building a loom with many hundreds of 3D printed parts. The Sound Blaster 1.0 lives again thanks to some (well-explained) reverse engineered circuitry. Your smartphone is about to get a lot more buttons that work without any extra electronics, and we'll finish things up with brass etching and downloadable nuclear reactor plans. Show Notes: https://hackaday.com/?p=363817
June 14, 2019
Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams talk news and great hacks from the past seven days. Sad word this week as Maker Media, the company behind Make Magazine and Maker Faire, have closed their doors. There seems to be a lot of news about broken hardware to discuss with ADS-B problems grounding hundreds of flights in the US, Hackaday itself had a site outage, Raspberry Pi 3 B+ can be bricked with a really easy mistake, and Lewin wrote a great overview of the Takata airbag debacle. Don't worry there are still plenty of hacks as we look at old computers that sing, microcontrollers that chiptune, beat boxes that are actually boxes, and some very neat cartridge hacks for NES and Arduboy. Show Notes: https://hackaday.com/?p=362871
June 7, 2019
Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys dig through the most interesting hacks from the past week. On this episode we take a look at a portable power bank build that defies belief. We discuss an all-in-one SDR portable, messing with restaurant pagers, and the software that's common to both of these pursuits. There's a hopping robot that is one heck of a PID challenge, and another robot that does nothing but stare you down. We bring it on home with great articles on pianos with floppy disks, and that satellite cluster you should be watching for in the night sky. Show Notes: https://hackaday.com/?p=361762
May 31, 2019
Mike Szcycz is on a well-deserved vacation this week, so staff writer Dan Maloney joins managing editor Elliot Williams for a look at all the great hacks of the week. On this episode we're talking about licensing fees for MIDI 2.0, a two-way fail while snooping on employees, and the potential for diagnosing Alzheimer's with virtual reality. We also dive into the well-engineered innards of a robotic cheetah, a personal assistant safe enough for kids to use, and how listening to your monitor reveals more about you than you'd think. You don't want to miss a space nerd's quest for fire or a hacker's guide to solder and soldering. And you've got to catch the story of a hapless hacker's contact high from a vintage synthesizer. It's quite a trip. Show Notes: https://hackaday.com/?p=360003
May 24, 2019
Join editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys as they unpack all the great hacks we've seen this week. On this episode we're talking about laser Internet delivered from space, unwrapping the complexity of Charlieplexed circuits, and decapping ICs both to learn more about them and to do it safely at home. We have some fun with backyard siege weapons (for learning about physics, we swear!), gambling on FPGAs, and a line-scanning camera that's making selfies fun again. And nobody thought manufacturing electroluminescent displays was easy, but who knew it was this hard? Show notes: https://hackaday.com/?p=360002
May 17, 2019
Join Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams as they riff on the coolest hacks from the past week. Clocks and 3D printing seem to keep coming up this week as we look at using an FPGA plus GPS receiver for better accuracy than we're used to, and we haggle over what to call the robot arms that nudge the hands on a shelf-clock. There's a wicked 3D-printed planetary gear design, and brackets that turn flat cardboard into boxes (more useful than you might think). We close out with great reads on the Supermicro fallout of the last 7 months, and a pretty big oops moment as a hacker knocks out keyfobs for an entire neighborhood. Show Notes: https://hackaday.com/?p=358729
May 10, 2019
Hackaday editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys gather round the microphone to spin tales from a week of hacks. All the rage are fax-machine-based malware, a hydrogen fuel cell drone, and bringing color to the monochrome world of the original Super Mario Land. There are at least three really cool LED hacks this week, plus Tom's been exploring space advertising, Maya's debunking solder myths, and Elliot goes ga-ga for a deep Ikea electronics hack. Closing out the show is an interview with Bart Dring about his exquisitely-engineered string art robot. Show Notes: hackaday.com/?p=358043
May 3, 2019
Join editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams as they recount a week of fascinating hacks. We take a good look at the PMS150C, a microcontroller that literally costs pennies but can only be flashed once. SNES emulators have a new trick up their sleeves to make low-def a lot less low, and you retro enthusiasts will either hate or love the NES zapper chandelier. Elliot's enamored by a bike computer running Android core, and both Mike and Elliot delve into the food hacking scene, be it meat, chocolate, coffee, or of course frosting!
April 26, 2019
This episode looks at microfluidics using Shrinky Dinks, expanding foam to build airplane wings, the insidious effect of time on component solder points, and Airsoft BBs used in 3D printing. Finishing out the episode we have an interview with two brothers who started up a successful business in the Shenzhen electronics markets.
April 19, 2019
Hackaday Editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams discuss the highlights of the great hacks from the past week. On this episode we discuss wireless charging from scratch, Etch-A-Sketch selfies, the robot arm you really should build yourself, bicycle tires and steel nuts for anti-slip footwear, and bending the piezo-electric effect to act as a VLF antenna. Plus we delve into articles you can't miss about 5G and robot firefighting. https://hackaday.com/?p=355057
April 12, 2019
Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys take a look at advances in photogrammetry (building 3D models out of many photographs from a regular camera), a delay pedal that's both aesthetically and aurally pleasing, and the power of AI to identify garden slugs. Mike interviews Scotty Allen while walking the streets and stores of the Shenzhen Electronics markets. We delve into SD card problems with Raspberry Pi, putting industrial controls on your desk, building a Geiger counter for WiFi, and the sad truth about metal 3D printing.Take a look at the links below if you want to follow along, and as always, tell us what you think about this episode in the comments! https://wp.me/paBn4l-1u53
April 5, 2019
Editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams geek out about all things hackerdom. Did you catch all of our April Fools nods this week? Get the inside scoop on those, and also the inside scoop on parts that have been cut in half for our viewing pleasure. And don't miss Mike's interview with a chip broker in the Shenzhen Electronics markets.
March 29, 2019
Editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys catch up on the past week in hackerdom. It seems as if we're in a golden age of machine building as an incredible rocker-bogie rover is built to transport a child and mechanical simplicity automates the wet cat food dispensing process. We marvel at the ability to use G-code to decorate eggs (them being curvy in more than one direction and all). The we contemplate the ability to build and start a motor which will continue to run long after your own life ends. And perhaps it's time to add more layers to your PCB design playbook. Show notes: http://hackaday.com/?p=351780
March 22, 2019
With our intrepid Editor in Chief Mike Szczys off being kind of a big deal in China, Managing Editor Elliot Williams is joined by Staff Writer Tom Nardi to talk about all the hacks that were fit to print over the past week. Join us as we talk about the wide world of custom mechanical keyboards, reviving a woefully antiquated display technology, building your own RC transmitter out of stuff you have laying around the lab, and the unexpected parallels between Pepto Bismol and rocket fuel. Show notes at hackaday.com/?p=349631
March 15, 2019
Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys walk through the past week in hackerdom. There's a new jargon quiz! Do you know what astrictive robotic prehension means? We look at the $50 Ham series, omni-wheeled pen plotting robots, a spectrum of LED hacks, LEGO CNC for chocolate rework, and grinding lenses with a CNC mill. In the "can't miss" category are fingerprinting 3D Printers, and how NASA designs far beyond the stated life of an engineering project. Show notes at hackaday.com/?p=349624
March 8, 2019
Catch up on the past week of hacks with Hackaday Editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys. "AI on the Edge" is the buzzword of choice lately, with hardware offerings from BeagleBone and Google to satiate your thirst. We take on spotty data from Tesla, driving around on four bouncy-houses, reverse engineering a keytar, unearthing a gem of a dinosaur computer, and MIPI DSI display hacking. There are tips for getting better at commenting code, and making your computer do your algebra homework. Show notes at https://hackaday.com/?p=348778
March 1, 2019
We know you love the original art on Hackaday. Those fantastic illustrations are the work of Joe Kim, and he joins us as a guest on this week’s episode to talk about his background, what inspires him, and how he pulls it all off. This episode is still packed with hacks. Editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams somehow stumble into two projects that end up generating hydrogen (despite that not being their purpose). But that art angle this week goes beyond Joe’s guest appearance as we look at a hack to add green curve tracing goodness on a black and white CRT, and an incredible take on a string art building machine. We get a look at interesting hardware that landed on the clearance rack, ultralight robots that move with flex PCB actuators, a throwback to mechanical computing, and giving up control of your home heating and cooling to a Raspberry Pi. https://hackaday.com/?p=347900
February 22, 2019
Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys look at all that's happening in hackerdom. This week we dive deep into super-accurate clock chips, SPI and microcontroller trickery, a new (and cheap) part on the microcontroller block, touch-sensitive cloth, and taking a home X-ray to the third dimension. We're saying our goodbyes to the magnificent A380, looking with skepticism on the V2V tech known as DSRC, and also trying to predict weather with automotive data. And finally, what's the deal with that growing problem of electronic waste? Show notes at: https://hackaday.com?p=346585
February 15, 2019
What's the buzz in the hackersphere this week? Hackaday Editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys recap their favorite hacks and articles from the past seven days. Check out the show notes at https://hackaday.com/?p=345656
February 8, 2019
Catch up on interesting hacks from the past week with Hackaday Editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams. This week we discuss the story behind falling lifetime ratings for LED bulbs, look at finite element analysis to strengthen 3D printed parts, ogle the beauty of blacksmithing, and marvel at open source Lidar development. We delve into great reader suggestions for Blue Pill projects sparked by last week’s podcast, discuss some history of the V2 rocket, and cover Chromecast control hardware, glowing home chemistry, K40 laser cutter add-ons, and more. Show notes at https://hackaday.com/?p=344796
February 1, 2019
Catch up on your Hackaday with this week’s podcast. Mike and Elliot riff on the "blue pill" (ST32F103 boards), blackest of black paints, hand-crafted sorting machines, a 3D printer bed leveling system that abuses some 2512 resistors, how cyborgs are going mainstream, and the need for more evidence around airport drone sightings. Show notes: http://hackaday.com/2019/02/01/hackaday-podcast-ep004-taking-the-blue-pill-abusing-resistors-and-not-finding-drones/
January 24, 2019
Highlights include a dip into audio processing with sox and FFMPEG, scripting for Gmail, weaving your own carbon fiber tubes, staring into the void of the sharpest color CRT ever, and unlocking the secrets of cheap 433 MHz devices. Plus Elliot talks about his follies in building an igloo while Mike marvels at what's coming out of passive RFID sensor research. Show notes: http://hackaday.com/?p=342443
January 15, 2019
Hackaday Editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams talk about the Circuit Sculpture Contest and their favorite hacks of the week. Elliot interviews the OpenFPGA crew at 35C3 See the show notes for this episode: https://hackaday.com/?p=341528
January 11, 2019
Editors Elliot Williams and Mike Szczys look back on the most interesting hacks and can't-miss articles from the past week (or so). Highlights include abusing IPv6 addresses, underclocking WiFi, taking Wii out of the livingroom, scratch built microphones, computer prophecy coming true, and the end of an Automotive Era. This week, Hackaday Contributor Bob Baddeley came on the show to discuss developments in facial recognition technology and its use in the wild. See the show notes for this episode: http://hackaday.com/?p=340484
December 18, 2018
Hackaday Editors Mike Szczys and Elliot Williams discuss trends seen in 2018, and try to narrow down their favorite hacks and favorite articles from the year. See the show notes for this episode: https://hackaday.com/2018/12/18/hackaday-podcast-2018-year-in-review/
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