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September 15, 2019
Educators that teach teenagers have a unique challenge: their students want the same type of love and praise as before, but now they also want more autonomy. This means that the typical model of teachers setting the rules and students complying becomes more complicated as teenagers begin to question and challenge their teachers. What can new teachers do to ensure that they're respecting the needs of teenagers while still maintaining a positive learning environment? What should they do when their students begin to push back or become defiant? In today's episode, Andy Earle from Talking to Teens and I dive into the core motivations of teenage students so that teachers can frame their thinking and policies in a way that doesn't create more frustration and overwhelm for everyone. Where you can find Andy: Talking to Teens website Talking to Teens podcast Talking to Teens Instagram Love this show? Become an AWESOME SUPPORTER! Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast? Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter You can help make this podcast better! Please click the button below to complete this survey so that I can discuss the topics that matter to you most!
September 9, 2019
For many new teachers, lesson planning ALONE is a huge source of stress and anxiety. Not only is there a billion other things to do as a teacher, but there's the tiny detail of knowing how and what to plan. Yes, you definitely learned about it and even did some practice lesson plans. But now that you're faced with your own students (and possibly teaching a grade that you weren't prepared for), it's a whole new ballgame. In this episode, I don't tell you how to plan - I explain the mindset and big-picture view of planning an entire year, then down to quarters, units, and daily lessons. You can help make this podcast better! Please click the button below to complete this survey so that I can discuss the topics that matter to you most! Love this show? Become an AWESOME SUPPORTER! Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast? Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
September 2, 2019
Many teachers have students work in groups on assignments, but there are also quite a few that limit it. They don’t like the potential for chaos and bad behaviors, so for the most part, they avoid it. However, it’s impossible to keep students on-task and in silence for an entire class period. Those students may seem like they're paying attention but are in fact playing the role of a student who’s working. They’re tuning out from the lack of opportunity to talk to their peers. This is where group work also helps! In this episode, I’ll discuss the pros and cons of cooperative learning, as well as my tips for how to make it not only just WORK in your classroom but increases student achievement. You can help make this podcast better! Please CLICK HERE to complete this survey so that I can discuss the topics that matter to you most! Love this show? Become an AWESOME SUPPORTER! Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast? Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
August 26, 2019
One of your strongest and most helpful allies as a teacher are parents. They can rescue you when you need help creating materials for your class, volunteer to help chaperone events, and run fundraisers for your classroom. They can also question your teaching practices, make excuses when their child misbehaves, and go over your head and complain to your administrator. Either way, it's important that you build strong relationships with your students' parents right from the start. But how do you do that? What if you're uncomfortable with or intimidated by them? How should you handle conflicts with them? In this episode, I go over everything I’ve learned about creating positive parent relationships as well as how to deal with issues when parent-teacher conflicts arise. Sign up for Tailor-Ed and receive 3 months FREE! Just use the code TEACHERSNEEDTEACHERS Love this show? Become an AWESOME SUPPORTER! Want to ask a question and be featured on the podcast? Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by asking a question! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
August 19, 2019
Having a solid classroom management plan is ESSENTIAL for a successful year. No amount of curriculum planning will be effective if you have multiple students disrupting the learning. So now that you have a plan, how do you implement it? What are the possible things that could go wrong, and why do they happen? In Part 2 of this 2-part series, I dive into how to train your students to follow your plan, as well as how to deal with parents when their student misbehaves. Sign up for Tailor-Ed and receive 3 months FREE! Just use the code TEACHERSNEEDTEACHERS Love this show? Become an AWESOME SUPPORTER! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
August 12, 2019
Classroom management is BY FAR every new teacher's biggest struggle. They may have had success when they were borrowing someone else's class during student teaching, but when faced with their own, it can be daunting. Despite the tips and tricks taught in pre-service preparation programs, most new teachers still feel woefully unprepared for dealing with student behaviors. In Part 1 of this 2-part series, I discuss how to get in the right mindset for classroom management, as well as how to craft a solid classroom management plan. Sign up for Tailor-Ed and receive 3 months FREE! Just use the code TEACHERSNEEDTEACHERS Love this show? Become an AWESOME SUPPORTER! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
August 5, 2019
Many new and current teachers came to the profession as a second career. They take the plunge for many reasons and find themselves in a tough but completely fulfilling job. Some question whether or not it's a good idea or if they have anything to offer in education, and others are worried about the age gap between them and teachers coming straight from college. On today's episode, I discuss not only why many teachers make the switch, but I also showcase the advantages that second-career teachers have, as well as how they can be successful in education.  Sign up for Tailor-Ed and receive 3 months FREE! Just use the code TEACHERSNEEDTEACHERS Love this show? Become an AWESOME SUPPORTER! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
July 29, 2019
It's the back-to-school season as evidenced by all of the supplies laid out in Target! While this is a sad end to the summer, many new teachers are still interviewing for their first job or eagerly getting ready for their very first classroom. There's so much unknown in terms of what supplies you'll need, how to plan curriculum, learning about your school, etc. that it can be overwhelming, especially for elementary school teachers. So I called in an expert, Gretchen Bridgers from Always a Lesson, to offer some reassuring advice for incoming elementary school teachers so that they don't feel pressured to go into debt from buying supplies and feel confident that first day of school. You can find Gretchen at alwaysalesson.com Gretchen's interview with me on her podcast Her book (2nd edition coming out late this summer) Job interview questions, tips & guide 10 ways to prepare for the upcoming school year over the summer A list of "must-have" supplies for a first-year teacher Her new teacher facebook group Teach like a champion   Love this show? Become an AWESOME SUPPORTER! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
July 22, 2019
Every teacher understands the need for students to be engaged, but what if they constantly find themselves staring back at blank stares? How can a teacher deliver a lesson so that their students aren't falling asleep or spacing out? In addition to proper planning, lesson delivery is key to getting kids motivated to learn and do the hard work to improve. Here are actionable strategies that teachers can use today to keep their students excited throughout the class period. How to be an engaging teacher Have a developmentally appropriate teacher presence The teacher does less talking and the students do more Develop strong relationships with your students Learn how to respond to them without shutting them down Read the room Love this show? Become an AWESOME SUPPORTER! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
July 15, 2019
All teachers know that student engagement is essential for successfully teaching a lesson. Why? Because students don't necessarily want to learn and participate in school, and as a result, miss out on mastering important skills. When students are engaged, they switch on their natural curiosity and are self-motivated to learn, explore, and solve problems. But it's up to teachers to create optimal learning experiences to foster this passion for learning, which can at times be difficult to do. Here are five tried-and-true ways to create lessons that keep students engaged and hooked from the start to finish. 5 ways to create an engaging lesson or unit Give them an essential question/challenge Give student choice Connect the work to student interests Give them real-world scenarios - Make them demonstrate their learning rather than just completing a worksheet Showcase student work Love this show? Become an AWESOME SUPPORTER! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
July 8, 2019
If you scroll through social media, you'll see a lot of teachers posting the amazing things they're doing in their classrooms. This includes lessons, bulletin boards, materials, organization...if a teacher does, you'll see it there! But what if you have bigger dreams for your classroom, but neither you nor your school has the money? Do you just give up on it or use your small paycheck to fund it? Luckily, there are SO MANY people out there who want to help teachers out so that they can provide the best for students. Alex Fagundez from DonorsChoose.org and I discuss how teachers can get this funding so that cost doesn't have to hold teachers back from dreaming big. Get started with DonorsChoose.org If this is your first project Look for match offers Get in touch with the DonorsChoose.org team Sign up for Angela Watson's 40-Hour Teacher Work Week Club (mention that you heard about it from ME!) Love this show? Become an AWESOME SUPPORTER! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
July 1, 2019
New teachers around the world are gearing up to find their first new job OR find a better one. Part of that job hunt is the dreadful but necessary part of writing a resume. But what if you don't have much experience to list on your resume? Should it be one page or more? What if you took a year off to travel? There's so much conflicting information on the Internet, so I brought professional resume writer Lauren Hamer to answer these questions. From cover letters to thank-you emails, Lauren and I go into all of the details that will make you stand out and get an interview. Click here for the Weeknight Resume Builder   Where you can find Lauren: LaunchPoint Resume website Facebook Etsy Twitter LinkedIn Click here for Lauren's article on follow-up emails after an interview   Love this show? Become an AWESOME SUPPORTER! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
June 24, 2019
Many newer teachers feel unprepared for integrating technology into their teaching. Their credentialing program or student teaching experience may have exposed them to some basic tech, but figuring out WHEN and WHY to use it is a different story. How can we meaningfully use tech in a way that isn't overwhelming to both us and the students? How do we know if it's actually improving outcomes? Jennifer Gonzalez from The Cult of Pedagogy and I discuss the thought processes teachers should go through when choosing tech, as well as tips before actually implementing it.   Jennifer also has an online technology course for educators, Jumpstart Plus, that will not only teach you about the 10 most impactful technology processes but also helps you implement them in your teaching. She only offers this five times a year, and the next cohort isn't until October. So click below to learn more and join hundreds of educators in their edtech journey.   JOIN JUMPSTART PLUS!   Where to find Jennifer: Cult of Pedagogy website Cult of Pedagogy podcast Twitter Instagram Love this show? Become an AWESOME SUPPORTER! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter Click here for a transcript of this episode
June 17, 2019
Love this show? Become an AWESOME SUPPORTER! Pretty much everybody has good intentions to implement healthy habits after January 1, but for teachers, the BEST time to do this is when school is out for the summer! We have more time to think about it, more time to plan, and more time to gently adopt a new lifestyle without the pressures of planning, teaching, and grading. But how do we do this so that it sticks and we don't throw it away with the stress of the new year? In this episode, Sheri Traxler and I discuss how to develop healthy habits in a slow and sustainable way that isn't judgemental or strict. If you've ever wanted to be a healthy eater and someone who exercises regularly, then this episode is for you! Click here to get Sheri's FREE guide, How to Overcome the Guilt and Shame of Diets, and Get Fit the Sane Way Where you can find Sheri: The ViREO Life website Facebook: The ViREO Life Instagram: The ViREO Life Youtube: The ViREO Life Her exercise playlist Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter A transcript of this episode can be found at https://teachersneedteachers.com/65
June 10, 2019
Love this show? Become an AWESOME SUPPORTER! Finding time to exercise when you've got a 9-5 job can be tough. The thing is, teachers don't just work 9-5, they often take work home, which means that there's even less time to exercise. How can we fit this in when we're exhausted at the end of the day, don't really like to exercise in the first place, or are burnt out from trying? In this episode, Sheri Traxler and I discuss how to find movement that you enjoy sneaking in some exercise, as well as how to craft your own program if you can't stand those pre-made ones. Click here to get Sheri's FREE guide, How to Overcome the Guilt and Shame of Diets, and Get Fit the Sane Way Things to look for in a new gym: Is it an all-inclusive gym? Or is it boutique like martial arts studios, group/personal training Are there kids around? Is there childcare or classes for kids Staff - ask for credentials - American Council on Exercise - best overall health/wellness focus, with an emphasis on client progression and overcoming some health issues - American College of Sports Medicine - perfect for clients needing help overcoming complicated health issues - National Strength and Conditioning Association - ideal for clients wanting to compete at a high level athletically Cleanliness - restrooms Don’t worry about repair sign, only if it hasn’t been fixed in a while 5 Principles of strength training Adaptation: your body will adapt to the same exercise after time Overload: to keep building muscle, overload beyond what you've been doing Safety - if you increase more than 10-15% more, you can get injured Specificity - don’t do crunches to reduce abs, think of overall calorie burning Rebuilding - microscopic tears in the fibers, 48-72 hours to rebuild. Don’t do the same muscle every day Where you can find Sheri: The ViREO Life website Facebook: The ViREO Life Instagram: The ViREO Life Youtube: The ViREO Life Her exercise playlist Fitness on Vacation - https://youtu.be/HxmxnOLoSe0 How to Overcome Challenges to Exercise - https://youtu.be/Sdynd_Op-Z4 Elite Fitness Study - My Perspective - https://youtu.be/2ff_0WRGa-k Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
June 3, 2019
Love this show? Become an AWESOME SUPPORTER! Teachers often develop poor eating habits from the limited time to eat and the constant barrage of work. Think about how you work while eating, have barely any time to really enjoy your food, eating while supervising, etc. How can we possibly enjoy our food? And for those of us trying to lose weight, how can we do that if we're mindlessly stuffing our faces at school? In this episode, Sheri Traxler and I discuss how to regain control in a practical way that works for teachers. I also dive into my own bad eating habits and Sheri helps me work through those. Click here to get Sheri's FREE guide, How to Overcome the Guilt and Shame of Diets, and Get Fit the Sane Way Where you can find Sheri: Facebook: The ViREO Life Instagram: The ViREO Life Youtube: The ViREO Life The ViREO Life website Click here to get your FREE preview lesson of the End-of-the-year Sanity Saver! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
May 27, 2019
It’s hard to get past someone who annoys you - whether it’s a child or adult. And we tend to place blame on circumstances beyond our control, such as parent involvement or accountability, lack of consequences from the administration, the apathy of the student. But what did WE do to mitigate those circumstances? How have WE tried to repair the relationship in order to get a different outcome? In this episode, I discuss how to deal with that ONE student you’ve been battling with all year as well as how to be more proactive in the future so that you can deal with those types of students head-on. Love this show? Become an AWESOME SUPPORTER! Click here to get your FREE preview lesson of the End-of-the-year Sanity Saver! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
May 20, 2019
Click here to get your FREE preview lesson of the End-of-the-year Sanity Saver! How do you know if teaching is really for you? This question is on the minds of new teachers year round, but especially at the end of the year. Sometimes student teaching or that first year will be that crucial time when you start feeling like something isn’t right, or maybe it’s just a little further down like 6 or 7 years. In any case, let’s be introspective and be honest about the answers to these questions.  Another podcast episode to listen to (with admittedly similar information) is Episode 20 where I ask questions so you can determine if you have the right mindset to survive as a teacher. In Episode 30 I discuss what you can do when your lessons aren’t working. I’d definitely take time to listen and reflect on how you can catch yourself in the midst of a dying lesson before it gets away. Episode 49, which is about how to take feedback so that you don’t shut down when you receive it. I discuss how to process it so that you don’t go into defense mode, but actually take action and improve. I go into depth in Episode 47 about how to get better feedback and help. Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
May 13, 2019
Click here to sign up for the End-of-the-year Sanity Saver! You may already be feeling burnout at this early point in your career. Luckily, there is no shortage of articles, podcasts, books, or Youtube videos on the topic. And the reason is obvious - teaching is hard, requires long hours with little pay, so burnout is inevitable. With all of the content on teacher burnout comes recommendations on getting past it.  So I wanted to share with you five things that I did this year to still be an effective and seemingly happy teacher while dealing with burnout. Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
May 6, 2019
Click here to sign up for the End-of-the-year Sanity Saver! Foreign language teachers have a wonderful and life-changing subject area, but it definitely comes with its challenges. Reluctant speakers, struggling readers, and a subject area that is relegated as "just an elective" can make it difficult to feel like one is making an impact. Elena Spathis offers strategies on how to overcome this and turn those students into lifelong language learners. Where you can find Elena: @SrtaSpathis Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
April 29, 2019
Click here to sign up for the End-of-the-year Sanity Saver! Many new teachers are just trying to make it to the end of the year in one piece so that they can finally welcome summer break. But before we can hit happy hour and celebrate, we need to plan it out. Here are the four areas you need to start taking action on now so that you can have a stellar end of the school year. Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter  
April 25, 2019
During an interview, it's important to find a way to showcase our strengths. But how can we do it without necessarily bragging, and how can we do it in the context of the questions? Similarly, if you're asked about a negative experience in your teaching, how can you frame your answer to put you in a positive light? Ross Cooper gives fabulous tips on how to answer interview questions from the lens of a principal. Click HERE for a copy of all of the interview questions from this series! Tell us about yourself and what brings you here today. Why are you a good fit for our organization? How do you grow professionally? Talk to us about a time in which you learned from an experience via a mistake. What do you do in your free time? Where you can find Ross Cooper: His school’s website: T. Baldwin Demarest Elementary School His school’s Twitter and hashtag: T. Baldwin Demarest Elementary School #oldtappanproud Ross’ Twitter: @RossCoops31 If you have a moment this week, please complete this Google Form. This will help me know if it’s worth the time to create it, as well as what you think I should include. If you complete the form and leave your email, then if I create it, you’ll be invited to beta test it and make it better! Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter  
April 22, 2019
New teachers looking for that first teaching job are often worried about their lack of experience when doing their first round of interviews. How can they talk about their experiences when they've only finished student teaching? Should they be upfront or pad their experiences? Rick Mohrien explains how newer teachers can still be authentic while still making a good impression on the interview panel. Click HERE for a copy of all of the interview questions from this series! Tell me your story, how did you end up here today wanting to be a teacher here at Winget Park? What’s the best lesson you ever taught, and tell me why it was the best lesson? It’s the first week of school, tell me what you’re doing to build relationships with your students. It’s the first week of school, tell me what you’re doing with your students’ families. How do you help yourself grow as a learner? What are some things you like to do to support your own professional growth outside the required professional development? Where you can find Rick Mohrien: His school’s website: Winget Park Elementary His school’s Twitter: @CMS_WingetPark Rick’s Twitter: @Mohrien Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter    
April 18, 2019
So you've sent in your resume, and finally got a call for an interview. AWESOME! You put on your most professional-looking outfit, walk in tall, shake hands firmly, and finally sit down for those questions. But what if you don't know the answer to a question? What should you say? Should you lie? What if you said, "I don't know?" Would you look like an idiot? Rob Fulk asks me some compelling interview questions that I wasn't necessarily ready for (but did my best to think on the fly), and he gives advice to new teachers on how to answer difficult questions. Click HERE for a copy of all of the interview questions from this series! What do you know about our school? What’s more important to education in the success of our students - tradition or innovation? Defend your answer. What perspectives outside of a Euro-centric curriculum can you bring to our classrooms? Can you give me specific examples in an ELA classroom of literature you would bring in from a non-Euro perspective? What specific supports are you going to need to be successful in our building? What are your expectations of a team/PLC, and how do you uphold your expectations of your team/PLC? Where you can find Rob Fulk: His school’s website: Marion C. Moore School His school’s Twitter and hashtag: @Mooremustangs #knowmoore Rob’s Twitter: @RobFulk Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter    
April 15, 2019
Teachers often spend quite a bit of time polishing and perfecting their resumes, but is that what really gets them a job? What if a teacher has limited experience - do they still have a shot when they're up against more seasoned veterans? Resumes are only one small factor in the hiring process (but PLEASE spellcheck!), and personality and fit are the biggest ones. Scott Schwartz discusses which personality traits tend to predict success in any job, as well as how his district eliminates the "gut feeling" factor and relies on data. Click HERE for a copy of all of the interview questions from this series! Tell me about a difficult circumstance that you handled, what action did you take, and what were the results? What is the difference between a good teacher and a great teacher? A student in your class consistently causes disruptions. Explain the steps you take to help the child and maintain your positive classroom environment. Do you believe that placing a zero in the grade book teaches responsibility? Describe your understanding of what a standards-based learning environment looks like. Where you can find Scott Schwartz: Deerfield Public School District: https://www.dps109.org/Domain/4 Deerfield Public School District’s Twitter: @DPS109 Scott Schwartz’s Twitter: @scaschwa Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter    
April 11, 2019
When teachers prepare to apply for jobs, they polish their resume, many create a portfolio of curriculum and experiences, and most scour the internet for interview questions (which you no longer have to do because of this series!). But do you research the schools for which you're interviewing? Do you know the ethos and culture of that school? In today's interview, Asia Cunnigham discusses why you MUST do your due diligence and research a school in the same way that any administrator will research YOU. Click HERE for a copy of all of the interview questions from this series! Tell me about you and your teaching experience with your cooperating teacher. Tell me about how you empower students to become involved in their learning process in the classroom. As a teacher, how do you build relationships equitably with all the students in your environment so that they’re able to demonstrate mastery and reach their maximum potential? What is a typical day in your literacy classroom look like? Tell me what you do in terms of your students that are unmotivated. What does that look like? How do you ensure parental involvement in their learning process in your classroom? What ways are you a collaborative working colleague? Where you can find Asia Cunningham: Glenn Elementary School: https://www.dpsnc.net/Glenn Glenn Elementary’s Twitter: Gleen Elementary Asia Cunningham’s Twitter: @APMsC_GES Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter    
April 8, 2019
While you're in an interview, a principal is trying to get a sense or whether or not you'd be a good fit for their school. They'll want to know if your personality and teaching style would complement the culture of the school. This involves your ability to handle conflict - with students, parents, and colleagues. Click HERE for a copy of all of the interview questions from this series! 20 years from now, how would you like your current students to remember you as a teacher? I want you to reflect on a situation where you were given criticism for an instructional or behavioral approach in your classroom. How did you handle that criticism and how did you use that criticism to improve your practice? If students had to pay admission to come to your classroom, what lesson have you found to be very engaging that makes them want to be there? Teaching can be stressful and it’s important to have a good sense of humor. Tell us a joke or a personal story that highlights your sense of humor Teachers are very passionate, so there’s going to be conflict at times especially when you’re collaborating with a grade level. If you and your grade-level team had some conflict, what steps would you take to overcome it? Where you can find James Moffett: Derby Hills Elementary School: http://dhes.derbyschools.com/ The school’s Facebook Page: Derby Hills Elementary James Moffett’s Twitter: @DHEPrincipal Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter    
April 1, 2019
When we’re starting out with our teaching careers, we’re overwhelmed with all of the details that go into being a teacher that we often neglect to take care of ourselves. I’m sure you’ve seen so many posts, websites, programs, and even CONFERENCES dedicated to teacher self-care. But part of taking care of yourself is making sure that you and your family are safe and secure. It goes without saying that if you didn’t have to worry so much about your finances, your home, your health, and the well-being of your family, you’d have more mental energy and space to tackle teaching. If there was a way to feel even a little bit better about some aspect of your personal life, then teaching just seems less overwhelming. I know it sounds cliche to say that, but so many people think that homeownership is so impossible that it’s not the American dream anymore. However, after talking to my good friend and real estate agent Tonya Spivey and her friend and loan officer Wes Shaw, I realized that there are AMAZING programs out there to help people - particularly teachers - get into a home of their own. So even if you’re super skeptical and think it’s out of the question, give this episode a listen so that you at least know your options. Have an open mind and envision yourself moving into your own first home. And when the time is right, you’ll be educated and prepared to dive head first into the process. How to contact Wes: (858)888-5270, wes.shaw@movement.com Wes Shaw NMLS # 272036 / CA-DBO272036 | Movement Mortgage, LLC supports Equal Housing Opportunity. NMLS ID# 39179 (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org) | Movement Mortgage, LLC is licensed by "CA Department of Business Oversight under the California Residential Mortgage Lending Act"# 4131054. Interest rates and products are subject to change without notice and may or may not be available at the time of loan commitment or lock-in. Borrowers must qualify at closing for all benefits. “Movement Mortgage” is a registered trademark of the Movement Mortgage, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company. 8024 Calvin Hall Rd, Indian Land, SC 29707. How to contact Tonya: (619)302-9891, tonyaspivey@gmail.com Keller Williams SD Metro CALBRE#02059804 Broker CalBRE #01295699 The four programs we discuss: School program My Home Zero Interest Program (ZIP) Golden State Funding Authority for Veterans Be sure to visit downpaymentresource.com to find out what programs are available for your address Some vocabulary in our discussion: conventional financing - A conventional loan is a mortgage that is not guaranteed or insured by any government agency, including the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), the Farmers Home Administration (FmHA) and the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). It is typically fixed in its terms and rate. FICO score - A FICO Score is one of many types of credit scores, which are three-digit numbers that summarize your credit history, management and behavior. Your FICO Score is the credit score generated by Fair Isaac Corp. (FICO), a leading financial analytics company. FICO Scores range from 300 to 850. simple interest - interest that is paid on the principal amount borrowed. It is considered the best type of interest for a borrower because it is not compounded. lien on title - A lien is a legal claim or a right against property. Liens provide security, allowing a person or organization to take property or take other legal action to satisfy debts and obligations. Liens are often part of the public record, informing potential creditors and others about existing debts. lien in secondary position - Second lien debt refers to loans that are reimbursed only after loan balances on senior debts (lien on title) are repaid in full following a default. Due to the subordinated claim on assets, if a borrower defaults on a secured loan, the senior lien holder may receive 100% on the loan balance from the sale of the underlying collateral, while the second lien holder receives only a fraction of the loan amount on the subordinated debt. deferred payments - A deferred payment option is an option that operationally defers payment on the loan until a later date. closing costs - Expenses required for a real estate purchase or refinance. Closing costs are also called settlement costs and can include lender charges, title insurance, escrow fees, real estate commissions, recording fees, transfer taxes and others. escrow fees - Escrow is when an impartial third party holds on to funds and distributes them accordingly to process a transaction. The funds, also known as earnest money, is typically held in an escrow account by an escrow officer or attorney. Escrow costs cover the final closing paperwork and handle the exchange of funds and recording of deeds. Escrow may also refer to an account held by a mortgage lender into which the homebuyer pays money each month for property tax and insurance payments. The lender then pays these items on the borrower’s behalf as they come due.  title fees - Title service fees are part of the closing costs you pay when getting a mortgage. When you purchase a home, you receive a document most often called a deed, which shows the seller transferred their legal ownership, or “title,” to the home to you. Title service fees are costs associated with issuing a title insurance policy for the lender. default - Failing to repay a debt as agreed.  home appreciation - Appreciation is the increase in a home's value over time.  loan officer - A loan officer is a representative of a bank, credit union, or other financial institution who finds and assists borrowers in acquiring loans. Loan officers can work with a wide variety of lending products for both consumers and businesses.  Sources: Lending Tree: https://www.lendingtree.com/glossary/#a The Balance: https://www.thebalance.com/liens-what-they-are-and-how-they-work-315611 Investopedia: https://www.investopedia.com/terms/d/deferredpaymentoption.asp American Financing: https://www.americanfinancing.net/mortgage-basics/escrow-closing-costs-guide Consumer Financial Protection Bureau: https://www.consumerfinance.gov/ask-cfpb/what-are-title-service-fees-en-157/ Redfin: https://www.redfin.com/definition/appreciation Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter    
March 25, 2019
Effective feedback is KEY to moving students forward, but how what does it actually mean to give good feedback? What does it look like? How can you tell if it's working? Simply correcting students won't lead to improved student outcomes, so here are five steps to up your feedback game. In Part 4 of this 4-part series on feedback, I discuss how to best give feedback so that your students act on it and improve. If you missed the first three parts of this series: TnT 47: How to get truly helpful feedback to inform your teaching TnT 48: Student feedback can completely change your teaching TnT 49 Why you might be wasting that valuable feedback If you have a moment this week, please complete this Google Form. This will help me know if it’s worth the time to create it, as well as what you think I should include. If you complete the form and leave your email, then if I create it, you’ll be invited to beta test it and make it better! Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter  
March 18, 2019
Teachers receive a LOT of feedback, and as a new teacher, how you deal with it will determine how successful you’ll be. But what is it about receiving constructive feedback that makes us shut down or ignore it? How do we take something that, from the giver, was well-intentioned, and transform it into an attack? The teachers that are the most receptive to feedback and TAKE ACTION are the ones that grow and improve the fastest. In Part 3 of this 4-part series on feedback, I discuss how to best receive feedback so that you don't shut down when you hear it. If you missed the other parts of the series: TnT 47: How to get truly helpful feedback to inform your teaching TnT 48: Student feedback can completely change your teaching TnT 50: Five steps for giving impactful feedback Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter  
March 11, 2019
You can almost consider students as your “customers” in that they’re the ones that have to sit through your lesson, participate in your activities, and prove whether or not they learned anything. While you don't have to entertain them, I’ve mentioned several times that having engaging and relevant content is crucial and that every activity, handout, lecture, etc. you do has to result in learning. So in addition to having colleagues observe us and give us feedback, it’s important to know the temperature and climate of your classroom. And the only way to truly know is to survey your students. This is Part 2 of my 4-part series on feedback. If you missed the first part on getting better feedback from your colleagues and administrators, be sure to listen to it here. If you missed the other parts of the series: TnT 47: How to get truly helpful feedback to inform your teaching TnT 49: Why you might be wasting that valuable feedback TnT 50: Five steps for giving impactful feedback If you have a moment this week, please complete this Google Form. This will help me know if it’s worth the time to create it, as well as what you think I should include. If you complete the form and leave your email, then if I create it, you’ll be invited to beta test it and make it better! Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter  
March 4, 2019
As teachers, we constantly give feedback to our students. We usually do it verbally or written, and the intent is to help students improve and grow. However, when it comes to receiving feedback, it’s a different monster.  How did we progress to a state where we feel we’re too good for feedback? How can we become better at asking and receiving it? In this 4-part series, I’m going to discuss the different aspects of feedback, from asking for it, to how to optimally receive it, and how to craft it in a better way for our students. Today I’m going to be discussing asking for it. If you missed the other parts of the series: TnT 48: Student feedback can completely change your teaching TnT 49: Why you might be wasting that valuable feedback TnT 50: Five steps for giving impactful feedback Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter  
February 25, 2019
Every teacher has had that one student that refuses to do their work. No matter what you do, you just can't get them to do anything. This problem only gets worse when you decide to write them off. The thing is, these students typically have a very logical reason for not working, and it's up to us to figure it out and help them move past that. Here are seven reasons why your students aren't doing their work in your class. Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
February 18, 2019
Facing a room of blank stares and unwilling participants is a teacher's nightmare. For some teachers, it happens every year, while for others it might be just one year or one period of students. Either way, it can be really deflating as a teacher when you’re trying to do everything to connect with your students. Here's how I intentionally structure my class to facilitate discussion and participation. Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
February 11, 2019
It's an understatement to say that there just isn't enough time in the day for teachers to get everything done. There are emails to answer, assignments to grade, lessons to plan, and so much more. Naturally, many teachers use their breaks or lunchtime to get work done or check social media, but often to the detriment of their professional growth. Getting out of the classroom is essential to make the necessary connections that all teachers need. Here are ten reasons why new teachers should hang out with colleagues during lunch. Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
February 4, 2019
New teachers are repeatedly told to seek out help from their colleagues, but what if it's really uncomfortable for them? What if they suffer from social anxiety and have a hard time talking to anyone at their school? How can they get the support they need if they'd prefer to hide in their classroom? If this describes you, then here are strategies for overcoming those obstacles and becoming a true part of the family at your school. Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
January 28, 2019
We often find ourselves slaving over creating lessons, only to feel deflated when it seems like our students didn't understand the lesson at all. What's going on? Is it the lesson? Is it us? Is it the students? How can you tell? Here are three aspects of your teaching to evaluate when trying to figure out whether or not your students are actually learning, and how to improve your teaching if most of them are missing the mark.    Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
January 21, 2019
Here are some questions I frequently see in teacher Facebook groups and on Twitter: I feel bad for using Teachers Pay Teachers. Is this a disservice to my students? How do others deal with unannounced observations? What are your go-to sub plans? Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
January 14, 2019
When teachers are just starting out, they often feel like they can't do anything right. Many well-laid plans go awry, they struggle with classroom management, and there's always more to do than there are hours in the day. To make things worse, they feel so inadequate and are convinced that they're the only ones with these problems. Here's the thing: they're NOT, and in fact, everyone survives these obstacles in some way. Here are some of the common "screw-ups" that newer teachers face and how they're eventually resolved. Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
January 7, 2019
New teachers often feel stressed out and depressed their first few years. Aside from struggling with so many aspects of the job and worrying about job security and pay, they often feel like they're doing a horrible job. Teaching is definitely tough and it can be difficult to know how to improve, but the best way to do it without going insane is to work on one aspect of teaching at a time. Here are six areas that will make the most impact, but you should only work on ONE per semester. Don't overwhelm yourselves with trying to do too much! Once you've chosen which aspect you want to work on, go back to Episode 38 to learn how to break it down into manageable steps. Six areas of improvement Classroom management Lesson planning Lesson delivery Assessment Grading Parents and colleagues Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
December 31, 2018
Second semester or the time after Winter Break is a great time to make adjustments in your teaching. You know your students and have some systems in place, so why not pick something small but significant to change and improve? These small changes add up over time and will lead to longer lasting results. So here’s the process I’ve found to be successful time and again, as well as what I plan to adjust this semester.  Are you ready to ditch the teacher tired? Join the 40-hour Teacher Workweek Club! Click HERE to learn more, and when you sign up, please mention Kim Lepre or kim@teachersneedteachers.com. Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter   Identify ONE thing that you want to work on, and be specific. Don’t just say “classroom management.” Determine which students are the instigators and decide how you’re going to fix those relationships. Now set realistic goals to fix that one thing. Don’t try to fix everything because then it won’t stick. You have all of your teaching career to try to fix everything, so pick one thing at a time Next, picture your classroom, your students, and you. Picture what it would be like if that one change was successful. Be a fly on the wall and imagine the activities you would do, how the students would behave and work, how you would deliver the lesson and assess students, etc. Now, write it down somewhere - on paper, in a Note on your phone, in a Google Doc. Just write it down and set your intention. Next, write down what it will take to achieve that, and be really, really honest with yourself. You might have to rebuild relationships with some students. You might have to change some aspect of your teaching or planning. You might have to ask for someone to observe you and give you feedback. You might have to go on Teachers Pay Teachers and find a lesson or activity that will help you. Your next step is to figure out when you’re going to start this. When is your deadline for starting this? How will you track and assess your progress? Will your create some sort of graph, chart, or graphic organizer? Will your journal your progress? Make it concrete so that when you take a few steps back (which will inevitably happen in the process), you can look at the situation objectively and know what to fix. How will you reward yourself along the way for hitting certain benchmarks? This part is REALLY important to keeping you motivated! Don’t just think that success is its own reward, you need something tangible so that you can push through when things get tough. It could be an extra night of Netflix, a piece of chocolate, a glass of wine...whatever makes you happy. But have a planned reward system so that you don’t give up and revert to bad habits. Information about hyperdocs: https://hyperdocs.co/
December 24, 2018
You've finally made it to the point where you're ready to student teach! You're filled with excitement, anticipation, and ANXIETY about how to prepare. Yes, your teacher preparation program has prepared you for this moment, but you still can't help but feel like you don't know what to do the weeks leading up to it. Here's practical advice on how to frame your thinking to get the most out of your student teaching experience.    Preparing for student teaching GETTING TO KNOW THE STUDENTS Have a clearly thought-out Day One. That first day is REALLY important. You truly only get one chance to make a good first impression. Learn every student’s name by the end of week one, and use their name every time you see them. You aren’t teaching a class, you’re teaching individuals. Work on creating a good rapport with your students as fast as possible without trying to be their friend. Focus on building relationships Be prepared for all of the questions students will ask you - appropriate or not. They’re genuinely curious, and if you’re young, they see you less as a teacher and more as a family member. That’s ok, just draw the line on what you share. Let them get to know you without revealing too much. Be real. GETTING TO KNOW THE STAFF Talk to the teachers you will be around. They have been there. Lean on their expertise. Be involved in the school - meetings, clubs, school events. This will create a deeper connection with the students. Be observant of all teachers, not just your master teacher. Introduce yourself to the office and custodial staff, and befriend them IMMEDIATELY. This is actually a good practice every time you start at a new school, but they will save and support you in more ways you can imagine. CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT Simplify your classroom expectations, like having only a few rules. Pick some all-encompassing rules that relate to being good human beings rather than “don’t do this” and “don’t do that.” It also makes it easier to enforce. Be willing to use the authority you're given to create a positive learning environment. Learn and use your master teacher’s classroom routines and procedures. Figure out how to incorporate your own way of teaching into them. In terms of classroom management, follow what the master teacher has already established. You don’t want to create a situation where they say, “Well Mr. White lets us do that.” You also want to take their recommendations on discipline to heart, especially if they have a well-run classroom. Classroom management will be the bane of your existence in your first few years of teaching, so try to glean whatever you can. This means record how they handle discipline issues. Ask them for copies of all of their forms. Ask them why they did “that” when they choose a particular consequence. Communicate that you’re not challenging their authority, you just want to know the rationale behind their decisions. PLANNING When it comes to planning definitely ask for help or input Try to plan far in advance if possible, but be ready to pivot as necessary. Being flexible will save you a lot of headache and anxiety. If you're a 1:1 school, ALWAYS have paper copies and a plan B if the wifi goes down!! If students are just staring at you with blank looks, have them do a quick think-pair-share and ask them to teach what you just discussed, but in their own words Accept that not all lessons will be successful. Admit when you make a mistake and laugh about it together with the students. Being human goes a long, long way. YOUR MASTER TEACHER: Go in with an open mind when working with your master teacher. Even if you don’t agree with what they’re doing, absorb everything because later on in your career you may find that you want to adopt some of their policies and procedures! If you don’t like/get along with your guide teacher try to find some common ground and avoid any confrontation just because they are doing us a huge service by helping us and they can also serve as a reference later on Keep a journal and take notes. Ask for feedback a lot, and when you get the feedback you don’t like, take it as an opportunity to improve Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
December 17, 2018
There's never a shortage of teachers who feel overwhelmed and stressed by all of the demands of teaching. It honestly feels like there's no time to get everything done AND have time for family, friends, and self-care. That's about to change. Angela Watson shares her candid insight on how new teachers can finally learn how to prioritize and do what will have the most impact on their teaching. We also discuss how she helped me become the efficient and effective teacher that I am today. Are you ready to ditch the teacher tired? Join the 40-hour Teacher Workweek Club! Click HERE to learn more, and when you sign up, please mention Kim Lepre or kim@teachersneedteachers.com. Here's how to connect with Angela: Her website: https://thecornerstoneforteachers.com/ Twitter: Angela_Watson Instagram: Angela.Watson Facebook: Cornerstone for Teachers Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
December 10, 2018
It’s not unusual for a teacher to suffer from a case of the “shoulds” – a ubiquitous and harmful affliction that affects ALL teachers (ok…everyone). When images of Pinterest-perfect classrooms and abundant sharing on social media are paired with less-than-ideal student work or a miserable teaching environment, teachers start thinking about the things they should be doing. Here’s my personal experience as well as how I plan to deal with it. I love hearing your stories and positive messages about teaching! So I’m asking my listeners to answer the following questions by leaving me a message on my Google voicemail. I’ll air these in upcoming episodes so that my community of listeners can celebrate each other wins! Questions: Your name, where you live/teach, and the grades and subjects you teach. One thing that you love about teaching What you’re grateful for when it comes to school and teaching Your most memorable holiday teacher present Something you look forward to in the new year and/or a goal for the next semester. Your #1 tip for surviving school in December. Please keep your response to a maximum of 3 minutes. Also, let’s keep it positive! For the best sound, use your phone to call the Google Voice number. You don’t need earbuds or anything, just hold up the phone just like you would to make a phone call. My Google Voice number is (949) 829-1396. Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
December 3, 2018
This idea of students needing to fail, it seems counterintuitive, right? But what if it's actually in the best interest of the student? Why should a teacher "allow" a student to fail a class? While teachers are charged with ensuring that all students learn and grow academically, there are times when it's just not possible for a student. In this case, letting a student fail gives an accurate picture of their abilities and deficiencies, and allows them to get the proper support they deserve. Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
November 26, 2018
Every teacher is faced with one or several students each year who just refuse to do any work. No matter what they try, these students slouch in their seats and avoid all attempts to produce any evidence of learning. Many teachers give up on these students eventually and just let them fail. But what if they didn't? Here are some reasons why YOU as their teacher deserve much more from these students and why you should keep persisting until they do. Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
November 19, 2018
Do you have piles of assignments that need grading? Are you feeling overwhelmed by it? You're not alone! All teachers find themselves buried in grading at some point, and it can seem like there's no way out of it. While there's probably no way around having to sit down and do the dirty work, here are some tips to do it efficiently as well as avoid getting into this situation again.  Steps for getting your grading under control Commit to being organized Stop adding assignments (seriously!) Reconsider how you grade Set aside blocks of time Streamline your feedback Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
November 12, 2018
Math teachers are tasked with teaching students concepts that they'll use for life while also getting past students' fixed mindset of, "I hate math, and I suck at it." How can teachers keep students motivated and engaged in a Common Core world? Ray Steinmetz explains how personalizing learning, setting up strong systems for formative assessment, and using targeted interventions will produce huge math gains. We also discuss advice for new teachers on what to focus those first years of teaching. How to get in touch with Ray: His website, BlendedLearningMath On Twitter: @Blended_Math His podcast, Instant Relevance Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
November 5, 2018
Regardless of how long you've been teaching, there will be many moments when your lessons just don't seem to be working. This is especially frustrating when you've taken time to plan the "perfect" lesson or unit, and the students still can't grasp the concept! When this happens, it can be a valuable learning experience if you take the right steps to correct your course. 5 steps (in order) to making it better next time: Don't blame the students Take responsibility Reevaluate Use something that has worked before Ask for help Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
October 29, 2018
Every teacher will receive at least one (if not more) emailed from disgruntled parents. Regardless of who's at fault, it can be a nerve-wracking experience and have lasting negative effects if not handled properly. How can we address the email in a diplomatic way without having to compromise our class policies and dignity? I provide 10 steps on how to handle the email so that the situation doesn't escalate to the point where the parent becomes angrier and you set off red flags with your administration. Steps for handling an angry parent email: 1) Investigate the issue the parent is upset about. 2) Take a moment to understand the parent’s perspective. 3) Have another colleague take a look at it. 4) If you feel compelled to, draft your angry reply in a different medium 5) Give your principal a heads up. 6) No matter what, you'll need to respond, but stay cool. 7) After crafting that email, save it as a draft and come back to it when you’re not upset. 8) Don’t blame or lecture the student the next day. 9) Find a way to prevent this issue from popping up again. 10) If you’re delivering unhappy news, have another colleague take a look at it. Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
October 22, 2018
Many teachers come into the profession with one of two extremes - they have no idea what they're supposed to teach and have to plan everything themselves, or they're given a completely scripted and planned curriculum and have no autonomy. Both of these scenarios can be frustrating especially when these teachers are given little to no direction. Here are three areas to consider when determining what your students are expected to learn and demonstrate. They'll help you get a better picture of your curriculum and make the most of your lesson planning. What's your why? Go back to your why for the lesson: what do you want students to learn vs. what you want students to be able to show you. How do you get to that why? What are the logical steps to get there? What are the gaps in knowledge that you need to fill? How will you know that your students “got it"? How can you connect what they're learning to real life? Students are more engaged and willing to participate when they can relate to or recognize something from pop culture. How can something happening in the news apply to what they’re learning? How can something that they’ve experienced apply to your material? Try to use analogies as much as possible so that they can make connections and get more than a surface level understanding. What are meaningful products that they can produce? How does this affect grading and feedback? Is it really necessary for you to grade EVERY part of the process, or can circulating around the classroom, stopping with each student at some point, giving feedback, and documenting be enough? If students get real-time feedback, then you don’t have to give as much when you grade the final product. You’ve already told them what they need to know to be successful. If you wait until the end to give feedback, you’re too late. Unless you have them revise, they won’t take anything way from your feedback, and they probably won’t apply it to future assignments. Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
October 15, 2018
All teachers know that they need to differentiate, but what does that look like in a classroom? During the planning stages? In real time? How can a teacher be expected to plan for students performing two grades below and those performing two grades above in the same class? Laura Kebart describes how this doesn't have to be a daunting task, and gives tips on how to streamline and even make grading simpler! Click HERE to grab Laura's resource with 10 Questions and Answers for how to respond to parents or administrators who want to know what you're doing to differentiate, which includes a link to her hands-on workshop! How to get in touch with Laura: Middle School ELA Teachers Community for Grades 6-7-8 Her Language Arts Teachers Membership Site Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
October 8, 2018
The Next Generation Science Standards, or NGSS, have been rolled out the past few years with much confusion and anxiety. Veteran science teachers have been grappling with how to shift their way of teaching while new teachers are still attempting to fit all of the pieces together. Erin Sadler and I discuss the continuing struggles with implementation, as well as how to reframe our idea of how science instruction should be delivered. Resources mentioned in this episode: National Science Teachers Association: https://www.nsta.org/ iExplore Science: https://iexplorescience.com/ San Diego Unified School District's Science Resources: https://sites.google.com/a/sandi.net/ngss-draft-lessons/ Oakland Unified School District's Science Resources: https://sites.google.com/ousd.k12.ca.us/science HHMI: https://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive PHET at the University of Colorado in Boulder: https://phet.colorado.edu/ How to reach Erin: Instagram: sadlerscience Twitter: @sadlersci Blog: Sadler Science Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
October 1, 2018
In this final installment of my series on examining student data, we look at how preassessment data and Lexile scores can really illuminate gaps in learning for students in any subject area. Getting baseline data in the form a preassessment can help teachers know what skills students come prepared with, and what they may need to reteach. Tie this together with Lexile scores, and teachers can fully understand their students' ability to access grade-level material. Click HERE to grab my Data Collection Contact Sheet to help you remember the key people in your school who manage the different types of student data!  Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
September 24, 2018
Students with disabilities that are mainstreamed have unique educational struggles that all teachers must address. New teachers often wonder what they're required to do with students with IEPs, and how to balance that with the million other things they need to take care of. Latisha Chisholm, LICSW dispels myths and misconceptions about teaching students with IEPs, as well as breaking down just how easy it can be to teach this wonderful population of students. Click HERE to grab my Data Collection Contact Sheet to help you remember the key people in your school who manage the different types of student data! Want to connect with Latisha? Anacostia High’s website: Anacostiahs.org Anacostia High’s social media accounts: @AnacostiaHigh Find Latisha on Twitter and Instagram Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
September 17, 2018
On the first day of school, neither you nor your students know much about each other. However, looking at their demographic data prior to that initial meeting can help you get a clearer picture of their particular circumstances. From their socioeconomic status to their English language proficiency, you can use this data before the school year starts to start planning culturally responsive lessons. Here are the particular data points I look at and how I use that information to guide my teaching. Click HERE to grab my Data Collection Contact Sheet to help you remember the key people in your school who manage the different types of student data!  Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
September 10, 2018
At the beginning of the school year, many teachers prioritize tasks such as setting up their classroom, going over the curriculum, working on their syllabus, and ironing out classroom procedures and policies. But do they spend the same amount of energy examining student data? Teachers can't effectively differentiate and measure student growth without first collecting and analyzing data. Here are the five types of data that are essential for back-to-school. Click HERE to grab my Data Collection Contact Sheet to help you remember the key people in your school who manage the different types of student data!  Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
September 4, 2018
Preservice teachers have a unique task of cramming as much information and experience on pedagogy, classroom management, educational technology, and much more. How can they leverage what they learn in their credentialing programs so that they have a higher chance of success? Dr. Sam Fecich dives into the core essentials and even has even created a resource to inspire and guide hopeful educators. Where to find Sam: Her website: sfecich.com Twitter: @Sfecich  Instagram: @Sfecich Her Edumagic Podcast Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
August 27, 2018
It's no secret that teaching is a rewarding but difficult job. Many teachers go into the career only to become overwhelmed, disillusioned, disheartened, and lost. Could have this been prevented? Possibly, but only if they had examined their own mindset and determined if they were truly ready for the challenges of teaching. Questions to ask yourself: Are you a blamer? Do you have thick skin? Do you like the sounds of kids' voices more than your own? When was the last time someone changed your mind? Are your educational policies, procedures, and philosophies truly serving students and learning? Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
August 18, 2018
Most new teachers have experience using social media, but are they taking advantage of the on-demand professional development and support? Mari Venturino dives into how Twitter can be the PD you're looking for to grow and become confident as an educator.    The giveaway is over, but you can still get your copy of Mari's second book, Fueled by Coffee and Love: The Refill. Ready to dive into Twitter chats? Click here to get my Twitter Chat and Facebook Group list! Still not sure how to participate in a Twitter chat? Click here for a thorough guide from Gretchen at Always a Lesson! Sentence frames for tweeting about teaching: One new thing I tried in my class today was ____ and it went _____. One thing I’m excited for next week is _____. One thing I am working on or trying to grow in is _____. One of my goals is ______. Has anyone done ______ with their students? Where to find Mari: Her blog: https://mariventurino.com/ Twitter: @MsVenturinon Instagram: MsVenturino Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
August 13, 2018
It's back-to-school...elementary style! Elementary school teachers know too well the stresses of preparing for multiple subjects, classroom decor, routines, and systems. Carolyn Gardner tells us what to focus on so that we can truly be prepared for that first day of school. She also has a FABULOUS freebie just for my listeners to help you prepare and organize for back-to-school. Click on this link to grab her FREE back-to-school planning guide! We discuss: The common struggles new elementary teachers face How to prepare when you haven't seen your classroom How to ensure success and less overwhelm those first few months Where you can find Carolyn: Her website: The Proactive Teacher Twitter: @ProactiveTchr Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TheProactiveTeacher/ Instagram:  https://www.instagram.com/theproactiveteacher/ Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
August 6, 2018
It's back-to-school time! There's always so much to prepare for your first teaching position, one thing that you definitely want to plan ahead is your syllabus. Use this document as a communication tool with your students' parents so that you can all be on the same page. Here's a link to my Syllabus. Click HERE for an editable copy of this syllabus, as well as other free resources. Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
July 30, 2018
New teachers have a seemingly endless amount of things to prepare for their first day, but often they worry about back-to-school the most. Tenisha Tate explains how to handle it while keeping control of your class, how to spot a student in need, and why your preconceived notions of teaching in an urban vs. suburban school could be wrong! You can find Tenisha at: Her school’s website: Hall Middle School Her school’s social media accounts: @HallMiddle Her Twitter: @ttate1 Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
July 23, 2018
Now that I've interviewed seven administrators and answered their top job interview questions, it's time to take all of that valuable information and put it to good use. Here are my key takeaways that you can use to nail your next teaching interview and land that job! Click here to get a copy of all of the interview questions from Episodes 9-14! Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
July 19, 2018
Even though they will vary, most interview panels ask similar questions. Ross Cooper gives us one of the best ways to stand out in an interview and discusses the importance of always growing and learning as an educator.  Tell us about yourself and what brings you here today. Why are you a good fit for our organization? How do you grow professionally? Talk to us about a time in which you learned from an experience via a mistake. What do you do in your free time? Where you can find Ross Cooper: His school’s website: T. Baldwin Demarest Elementary School His school’s Twitter and hashtag: T. Baldwin Demarest Elementary School #oldtappanproud Ross’ Twitter: @RossCoops31 Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
July 16, 2018
One of the biggest fears that many brand new teachers have is that they won’t be hired due to their lack of experience. Rick Mohrien tells us what’s REALLY important to most principals and what beginning teachers should focus on for the interview. Tell me your story, how did you end up here today wanting to be a teacher here at Winget Park? What’s the best lesson you ever taught, and tell me why it was the best lesson? It’s the first week of school, tell me what you’re doing to build relationships with your students. It’s the first week of school, tell me what you’re doing with your students’ families. How do you help yourself grow as a learner? What are some things you like to do to support your own professional growth outside the required professional development? Where you can find Rick Mohrien: His school’s website: Winget Park Elementary His school’s Twitter: @CMS_WingetPark Rick’s Twitter: @Mohrien Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
July 12, 2018
When preparing for an interview, we’re often faced with the fear of the unknown. What if we don’t have an answer or know what the interviewer is talking about? Rob Fulk gives new teachers valuable and honest tips about how to handle these common interview situations. What do you know about our school? What’s more important to education in the success of our students - tradition or innovation? Defend your answer. What perspectives outside of a Euro-centric curriculum can you bring to our classrooms? Can you give me specific examples in an ELA classroom of literature you would bring in from a non-Euro perspective? What specific supports are you going to need to be successful in our building? What are your expectations of a team/PLC, and how do you uphold your expectations of your team/PLC?  Where you can find Rob Fulk: His school’s website: Marion C. Moore School His school’s Twitter and hashtag: @Mooremustangs #knowmoore Rob’s Twitter: @RobFulk Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
July 9, 2018
Hiring new teachers based on a resume and a gut feeling during an interview can sometimes result in someone who is a wrong fit for the school. Scott Schwartz describes the meticulous process his district uses to hire a great teacher every time, as well as the implications for teachers interested in working there. He also conducts a mock interview with me and asks me questions that he uses after the initial prescreening process.  Where you can find Scott Schwartz: Deerfield Public School District: https://www.dps109.org/Domain/4 Deerfield Public School District’s Twitter: @DPS109 Scott Schwartz’s Twitter: @scaschwa Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
July 5, 2018
As a new teacher, your advisors in your credentialing program probably gave you some interviewing advice and practice questions. While these are helpful, it’s definitely even more valuable to hear from someone on a hiring committee and know exactly what types of answers they’re looking for. Asia Cunningham not only shares with us some of the more common interview questions but also gives advice on what types of answers you should prepare. She also conducts a mock interview with me and asks me questions that allow her to put the puzzle pieces together about a potential candidate.   Where you can find Asia Cunningham: Brier Creek Elementary School: https://www.wcpss.net/Page/21494 Brier Creek’s Twitter: Brier Creek Elementary Asia Cunningham’s Twitter: @APMsC_BCES Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
July 2, 2018
A topic that many job-seeking teachers are asked about is classroom management. Every school has its own philosophy and mission in terms of behavior, but some take it a step further. James Moffett dives deep into how being a trauma-informed school is the best form of classroom management and how it influences his hiring decisions. He also conducts a mock interview with me and asks me questions that help him decide if a candidate would be a good fit for his school.   Where you can find James Moffett: Derby Hills Elementary School: http://dhes.derbyschools.com/ The school’s Facebook Page: Derby Hills Elementary James Moffett’s Twitter: @DHEPrincipal   Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
June 28, 2018
As a new teacher, you’ve probably been on many, many interviews without any luck. While it’s awful to be rejected, the best thing you can do is use it as a learning experience. Here are some reasons why you may not have been hired for that position. Many factors are out of your control They may have had someone else in mind There were candidates that were a better fit You set off red flags Too many people applied There were questions about your resume This episode kicks off a series where I interview several principals who tell me what they’re looking for when hiring brand new teachers. They also interview ME, and we’ll see whether or not they’d hire me! Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
June 25, 2018
Teaching literacy is a responsibility for all teachers of all subjects, but what if you don’t know how to teach reading? Brooklyn Khan dives into a simple but powerful strategy that every new teacher should have readily available. To access the show notes, go to https://teachersneedteachers.com/7. What is close reading?   Why is it beneficial, especially for new teachers? Common Core Aligned Inherent Differentiation Encourage Critical Thinking Support Cross-Curricular Instruction Close reading freebies for my listeners: https://litinfocus.com/4-major-benefits-close-reading/ Student Bookmarks Teacher’s Planning Matrix (Snapshot Guide) Close Reading Graphic Organizer Brooklyn’s TpT store: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Literacy-In-Focus   Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
June 21, 2018
Thinking about and dealing with classroom management is often a beginning teachers’ nightmare. Taking the time to have a crystal clear picture of your rules and consequences will help to improve student behaviors with each coming year.  To access the resource, go to https://teachersneedteachers.com/6. What are your 5-7 rules? Are they phrased in the positive rather than negative? What is the logical progression of consequences when students don’t follow those rules? Have you clearly and concisely communicated your rules and consequences to both the students and their parents? How do your classroom rules and consequences align with school and district policies? What are you doing to build relationships with students so that you can minimize behavior problems?    Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
June 18, 2018
Properly communicated classroom policies and procedures ensure that you can maximize the learning time in a safe and productive environment. When we start out teaching, it’s a time of experimentation to see what works. Here are four important points to consider when deciding on what and how to implement your policies and procedures.  To access the resource, go to https://teachersneedteachers.com/5. How students come into the classroom, where they keep their belongings, expectations for the beginning and end of class Policies for students leaving their seats: bathroom use, getting supplies, sharpening pencils, etc. How you transition between activities Electronic device usage (cell phones, tablets, etc.) Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
June 14, 2018
As a newer teacher, you probably used the grading system from student teaching or a haphazard combination of what you “heard” you should do. By taking the time to closely examine your grading policies, you can ensure that your gradebook clearly communicates your students’ academic progress. To access the resource, go to https://teachersneedteachers.com/4. Using weighted grades: How much is each of these categories worth in your gradebook? Homework Tests Classwork Projects How about late work and effort? What are your grading policies for: Late work Partial completion Test retakes and assignment redos Extra credit Absences Cheating  Still not sure what you want for your grading? Here’s an article that might help you: https://www.mrslepre.com/grading-your-gradebook/  Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
June 11, 2018
When was the last time you examined your classroom setup? Your classroom needs to be set up to maximize student learning while also reducing traffic and chaos. Here’s what to consider when considering a new setup. To access the resource, go to https://teachersneedteachers.com/3. Classroom Layout Reflect on: Student desks/tables Student chairs Teacher desk Cabinets and shelves Bin and containers for supplies Organization Reflect on: Books Pens, pencils, and markers Scissors and glue sticks Student work Classroom technology Seating arrangement Reflect on Heterogeneous vs homogeneous groups Students in individual seats vs. groups Frequency of seat changes  Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
June 4, 2018
Today's questions: How to keep it together during unannounced observations. Which grade is the easiest to teach Whether or not you should go straight into teaching after getting your credential Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
June 1, 2018
Do you collect student feedback? If not, you should! It's a great way to know how students perceive your effectiveness, and whether or not you're creating relationships and connecting with them. It's also a quick and easy way for students to feel that they have a voice in their education. Here's a link so you can see the types of questions I ask: https://goo.gl/forms/R8ejdjhPF4gSPEAH2 Love this show? Buy me a coffee! Don't forget to leave a voicemail! Let your voice be heard! Click here how to find out how you can be a part of the podcast by telling us your favorite parts of teaching! Listeners who leave a voicemail will be eligible to receive a FREE Teachers Need Teachers sticker! Click HERE to find out more! Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, or Stitcher Join my Facebook Group where I occasionally podcast live Message me through Instagram or Twitter
June 1, 2018
Being a new teacher is tough as it is, especially if you don't have a mentor and have to go at it alone. There are so many questions you want to ask but feel stupid doing so. There are situations in which you SHOULD ask questions, but you're so confused and overwhelmed. Who am I and why did I create this podcast? What makes me think that I'm qualified to talk about this stuff? Why should you subscribe and come back for more? Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts or Google Podcast Join my Facebook Group and let's chat about this episode Message me through Instagram or Twitter
June 1, 2018
What is the Teachers Need Teachers podcast about and who is it for? Why should you subscribe? What makes this different from other teaching podcasts? How will this change your teaching? Listen in and get all of the details in 106 second flat. Got questions, feedback, or want to be on the show? You can email me at kim@teachersneedteachers.com Connect with me Subscribe to Apple Podcasts or Google Podcast Join my Facebook Group and let's chat about this episode Message me through Instagram or Twitter
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