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March 26, 2019
Horniness (AKA being sexually aroused) is a special state of body and mind. It’s a state during which we are much more likely to make risky decisions, not just about our sexual health, but about other things too. What else can make us forgo condoms, or lead us to believe our partners are not as risky as they may be? Our guest this week, Dr. Shayna Sparling, has been getting people sexually aroused in the lab (for research only!) and then tracking how this affects their thinking and decision-making. It’s a fascinating episode with some good take-home messages about sexual health. (Also, a glimpse into Dr. Zhana’s personal life and how she navigates using or not using condoms with new partners.) About our Guest Dr. Shayna Sparling is a postdoctoral research fellow based at Ryerson University in Toronto and the National Team Manager for the Engage Study – a multi-site national study on the sexual health of gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men. She has a PhD in Applied Social Psychology, with a focus in Community Psychology and in Health Psychology. Her research focuses on sexual health decision making and condom negotiation and the factors that can affect these two processes, including sexual arousal, relationship motivation, interpersonal power, and partner familiarity. To read Dr. Sparling’s papers yourself, go here, here, here, and here.  Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Dr. Zhana and Episode #56 guest, Kenneth Play, recently put together the world’s largest and most comprehensive survey on squirting – head on to squirtingsurvey.com and take it! Anyone regardless of gender or squirting experience can take it!! Are you in Boston? Come see Dr. Zhana talk about building safe and healthy open relationships at the Good Vibrations store in Brookline on Wed, 3/27. More info and tickets here. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter! Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 72Shares
March 26, 2019
Horniness (AKA being sexually aroused) is a special state of body and mind. It's a state during which we are much more likely to make risky decisions, not just about our sexual health, but about other things too. What else can make us forgo condoms, or lead us to believe our partners are not as risky as they may be? Our guest this week, Dr. Shayna Sparling, has been getting people sexually aroused in the lab (for research only!) and then tracking how this affects their thinking and decision-making. It's a fascinating episode with some good take-home messages about sexual health. (Also, a glimpse into Dr. Zhana's personal life and how she navigates using or not using condoms with new partners.) About our Guest Dr. Shayna Sparling is a postdoctoral research fellow based at Ryerson University in Toronto and the National Team Manager for the Engage Study - a multi-site national study on the sexual health of gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men. She has a PhD in Applied Social Psychology, with a focus in Community Psychology and in Health Psychology. Her research focuses on sexual health decision making and condom negotiation and the factors that can affect these two processes, including sexual arousal, relationship motivation, interpersonal power, and partner familiarity. To read Dr. Sparling's papers yourself, go here, here, here, and here.  Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Dr. Zhana and Episode #56 guest, Kenneth Play, recently put together the world's largest and most comprehensive survey on squirting - head on to squirtingsurvey.com and take it! Anyone regardless of gender or squirting experience can take it!! Are you in Boston? Come see Dr. Zhana talk about building safe and healthy open relationships at the Good Vibrations store in Brookline on Wed, 3/27. More info and tickets here. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter!
March 12, 2019
Sex work is one of the most stigmatized and misunderstood aspects of human sexuality. There are many different types of sex work, including phone sex, camming, stripping, “happy ending” massages, professional domination, and porn, to name a few. But the greatest stigma is probably reserved for the “full service” type of sex work (i.e., penetration and all), like that done by the workers at the Nevada brothels. (There are many other ways of doing “full service” type of sex work, from street walkers to illegal brothels to independent or agency-run escorts, but the Nevada brothels are the only fully legal and transparent avenue for this work). So what does it look like to live and work in these brothels? Who are the people doing these jobs, why are they there, what kinds of services do they provide, how much do they like the job, how often do they have orgasms with their clients…? Our guest on episode #58, Christina Parreira, answers these questions (and more) from both personal and professional experience – she actually worked at a couple of these brothels so she could collect data for her doctoral thesis research on sex work! Don’t miss this fascinating interview! About our Guest Christina Parreira is a PhD candidate in the department of sociology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She obtained her Masters degree in clinical psychology in 2010 from University of Hartford. Parreira is currently conducting an ethnography of Nevada legal brothels; her areas of interest are emotional labor and stigma in sex work. Parreira also works at Trac-B needle exchange & harm reduction center in Las Vegas, doing STI testing, counseling, and outreach. In addition to studying the topic of sex work, Parreira is a 10 year veteran in the sex industry, currently doing phone & webcam work as well as BDSM in Las Vegas. You can read about more of Christina’s work here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Dr. Zhana and Episode #56 guest, Kenneth Play, recently put together the world’s largest and most comprehensive survey on squirting – head on to squirtingsurvey.com and take it! Anyone regardless of gender or squirting experience can take it!! If you live in Boston, Dr. Zhana is coming to you on Wed, March 27, to do a workshop at the Good Vibrations store in Brookline on the topic of navigating sexual health and difficult emotions in nonmonogamous relationships. More info and tickets here. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter! Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 32Shares
March 12, 2019
Sex work is one of the most stigmatized and misunderstood aspects of human sexuality. There are many different types of sex work, including phone sex, camming, stripping, "happy ending" massages, professional domination, and porn, to name a few. But the greatest stigma is probably reserved for the "full service" type of sex work (i.e., penetration and all), like that done by the workers at the Nevada brothels. (There are many other ways of doing "full service" type of sex work, from street walkers to illegal brothels to independent or agency-run escorts, but the Nevada brothels are the only fully legal and transparent avenue for this work). So what does it look like to live and work in these brothels? Who are the people doing these jobs, why are they there, what kinds of services do they provide, how much do they like the job, how often do they have orgasms with their clients...? Our guest on episode #58, Christina Parreira, answers these questions (and more) from both personal and professional experience - she actually worked at a couple of these brothels so she could collect data for her doctoral thesis research on sex work! Don't miss this fascinating interview! About our Guest Christina Parreira is a PhD candidate in the department of sociology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. She obtained her Masters degree in clinical psychology in 2010 from University of Hartford. Parreira is currently conducting an ethnography of Nevada legal brothels; her areas of interest are emotional labor and stigma in sex work. Parreira also works at Trac-B needle exchange & harm reduction center in Las Vegas, doing STI testing, counseling, and outreach. In addition to studying the topic of sex work, Parreira is a 10 year veteran in the sex industry, currently doing phone & webcam work as well as BDSM in Las Vegas. You can read about more of Christina's work here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Dr. Zhana and Episode #56 guest, Kenneth Play, recently put together the world's largest and most comprehensive survey on squirting - head on to squirtingsurvey.com and take it! Anyone regardless of gender or squirting experience can take it!! If you live in Boston, Dr. Zhana is coming to you on Wed, March 27, to do a workshop at the Good Vibrations store in Brookline on the topic of navigating sexual health and difficult emotions in nonmonogamous relationships. More info and tickets here. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter!
February 26, 2019
I’m sure you’ve heard of straight women making out in public with other women in order to attract male attention? It’s a phenomenon called “performative making out” or making out for an audience, and in Episode #57, we invited one of the main researchers studying it, Dr. Kate Esterline, to tell us all about it. Are straight(ish) women the only ones who do it? How about gay women and men? How about straight(ish) guys? Why do you people do it? How is it different when people make out with someone of the gender that is congruent versus incongruent with their sexual orientation? Do people actually get what they were after with their makeouts? Listen on… About our Guest Dr. Kate Esterline earned her doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the University of Kansas in 2018. She is now working as a post-doctoral therapist at Purdue University’s Counseling and Psychological Services. Her research has focused on gendered experiences of performing sexual behavior, such as making out, in front of others and on understanding how people conceptualize and experience outness about sexual orientation. The majority of her time currently is spent doing clinical work, but she continues to collaborate with colleagues at the University of Kansas. You can read up on Kate’s studies here and here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Dr. Zhana and Episode #56 guest, Kenneth Play, recently put together the world’s largest and most comprehensive survey on squirting – head on to squirtingsurvey.com and take it! Anyone regardless of gender or squirting experience can take it!! Are you in Boston March 27? Come see Dr. Zhana talk at the Good Vibrations store in Brookline on Playing It Safer: Navigating Sexual Health and Difficult Emotions in Open Relationships! Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. And if you order before 2/14, you get 10 FREE gifts (including FREE shipping)! Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter! Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 32Shares
February 26, 2019
I'm sure you've heard of straight women making out in public with other women in order to attract male attention? It's a phenomenon called "performative making out" or making out for an audience, and in Episode #57, we invited one of the main researchers studying it, Dr. Kate Esterline, to tell us all about it. Are straight(ish) women the only ones who do it? How about gay women and men? How about straight(ish) guys? Why do you people do it? How is it different when people make out with someone of the gender that is congruent versus incongruent with their sexual orientation? Do people actually get what they were after with their makeouts? Listen on... About our Guest Dr. Kate Esterline earned her doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the University of Kansas in 2018. She is now working as a post-doctoral therapist at Purdue University's Counseling and Psychological Services. Her research has focused on gendered experiences of performing sexual behavior, such as making out, in front of others and on understanding how people conceptualize and experience outness about sexual orientation. The majority of her time currently is spent doing clinical work, but she continues to collaborate with colleagues at the University of Kansas. You can read up on Kate's studies here and here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Dr. Zhana and Episode #56 guest, Kenneth Play, recently put together the world's largest and most comprehensive survey on squirting - head on to squirtingsurvey.com and take it! Anyone regardless of gender or squirting experience can take it!! Are you in Boston March 27? Come see Dr. Zhana talk at the Good Vibrations store in Brookline on Playing It Safer: Navigating Sexual Health and Difficult Emotions in Open Relationships! Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. And if you order before 2/14, you get 10 FREE gifts (including FREE shipping)! Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter!
February 12, 2019
Every time Dr. Zhana teaches about almost any topic, someone asks a question about squirting, often referred to as female ejaculation. It seems like squirting is having a moment right now, with everyone and their mother wanting to know if all vagina-owners can squirt, what the ejaculate is made of, and how to make it happen. There is very limited science on this, which Dr. Zhana recently sifted through extensively while working on the online squirting course that her business partner, Kenneth Play, launched recently to teach people how to squirt. So in this episode, Dr. Zhana and Joe do something a little different. Instead of an academic researcher, we invite someone with an impressive amount of hands-on “research” when it comes to making vagina-owners squirt – Kenneth Play. Just how many vaginas has Kenneth had an opportunity to try and make them squirt? What’s his success rate? What’s the most reliable technique for making this happen? This and so much more in Episode 56 of the Science of Sex Podcast. Oh, and want to help us learn more about squirting? Dr. Zhana and Kenneth recently put together the world’s largest and most comprehensive survey on squirting – head on to squirtingsurvey.com and take it! Anyone regardless of gender or squirting experience can take it!! About our Guest Kenneth Play is an international sex hacking expert, sex educator and coach, and former celebrity fitness trainer. From a deeply sexually insecure Asian immigrant to becoming the most viewed sex hacking expert on PornHub and being named the World’s Greatest Sex Hacker by GQ, Kenneth develops and teaches sex hacks to help people learn new ways to play and overcome challenges in the bedroom. With his accelerated learning approach and playful style, he helps people gain sexual confidence, experience more pleasure, and cultivate deeper intimacy in record time. His teaching has been described as a mashup of Bruce Lee’s “knowing is not enough, we must apply” mantra, Martha Stewart’s step-by-step show-you-how, and Tim Ferriss’ personal experimenting-to-mastery. Meanwhile, he co-founded the globally-recognized sex-positive intentional community, Hacienda Villa; he teamed up with Dr. Zhana Vrangalova to work on The Casual Sex Project; and his projects have been featured in Vice, Thrillist, Elite Daily, Refinery 29, Time Out, The New York Times, Playboy, and Cosmopolitan. He has devoted his life to empowering people to experience incredible sex, and his mission is to make unapologetically explicit sex education mainstream.) Connect with Kenneth via Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and his website. You can order his Kenneth’s Sex Hacker Bundle Course here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. And if you order before 2/14, you get 10 FREE gifts (including FREE shipping)! Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr.
February 12, 2019
Every time Dr. Zhana teaches about almost any topic, someone asks a question about squirting, often referred to as female ejaculation. It seems like squirting is having a moment right now, with everyone and their mother wanting to know if all vagina-owners can squirt, what the ejaculate is made of, and how to make it happen. There is very limited science on this, which Dr. Zhana recently sifted through extensively while working on the online squirting course that her business partner, Kenneth Play, launched recently to teach people how to squirt. So in this episode, Dr. Zhana and Joe do something a little different. Instead of an academic researcher, we invite someone with an impressive amount of hands-on "research" when it comes to making vagina-owners squirt - Kenneth Play. Just how many vaginas has Kenneth had an opportunity to try and make them squirt? What's his success rate? What's the most reliable technique for making this happen? This and so much more in Episode 56 of the Science of Sex Podcast. Oh, and want to help us learn more about squirting? Dr. Zhana and Kenneth recently put together the world's largest and most comprehensive survey on squirting - head on to squirtingsurvey.com and take it! Anyone regardless of gender or squirting experience can take it!! About our Guest Kenneth Play is an international sex hacking expert, sex educator and coach, and former celebrity fitness trainer. From a deeply sexually insecure Asian immigrant to becoming the most viewed sex hacking expert on PornHub and being named the World’s Greatest Sex Hacker by GQ, Kenneth develops and teaches sex hacks to help people learn new ways to play and overcome challenges in the bedroom. With his accelerated learning approach and playful style, he helps people gain sexual confidence, experience more pleasure, and cultivate deeper intimacy in record time. His teaching has been described as a mashup of Bruce Lee’s “knowing is not enough, we must apply” mantra, Martha Stewart’s step-by-step show-you-how, and Tim Ferriss’ personal experimenting-to-mastery. Meanwhile, he co-founded the globally-recognized sex-positive intentional community, Hacienda Villa; he teamed up with Dr. Zhana Vrangalova to work on The Casual Sex Project; and his projects have been featured in Vice, Thrillist, Elite Daily, Refinery 29, Time Out, The New York Times, Playboy, and Cosmopolitan. He has devoted his life to empowering people to experience incredible sex, and his mission is to make unapologetically explicit sex education mainstream.) Connect with Kenneth via Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and his website. You can order his Kenneth's Sex Hacker Bundle Course here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. And if you order before 2/14, you get 10 FREE gifts (including FREE shipping)! Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page!
January 29, 2019
Testosterone is having a moment these days. T-boosting has grown into a $2.5 billion industry, with guys of all ages trying to up their T levels in hopes of increasing everything from libido to mood to energy. But what does testosterone do how about our cognitive processes? Could testosterone increase how quickly and automatically we make decisions about sexual situations, and could that lack of deliberation have a dark side that contributes to sexual assault and harassment? These are some of the questions that our guest, Dr. Gideon Nave from the U Penn Business School, attempted to answer for us in episode #55, based on several of his studies on how testosterone affects men’s reasoning and decision making processes in areas relevant to the last of the 5 Fs of basic, instinctive behaviors: fight, flight, freeze, feed, and, um, fornicate 😉 At the end of the episode we also briefly touch on yet another neurotransmitter that has received a lot of media attention over the past decade: oxytocin. Hailed as the “love hormone,” the “cuddle hormone,” or “liquid trust,” oxytocin is supposed to increase intimacy and trust, not just between romantic or sexual partners, but also among complete strangers. This story about oxytocin sounds awesome and we’d all love to believe in it, but does it stand up to scientific scrutiny? Dr. Nave’s recent review of the research suggests we should be a bit more skeptical. If you’d like to read the studies discussed in this episode, here they are: on T and cognitive reflection, on T and status goods, and on oxytocin & trust. About our Guest Gideon Nave is a marketing assistant professor at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. He got his PhD in Computation and Neural Systems at Caltech, how the mind works. His research uses a medley of quantitative and experimental methods from the fields of Computational Neuroscience, Cognitive Psychology, Game Theory and Machine Learning for reverse-engineering the decision-making process in humans. You can visit his website here. You’ve Had the Same Number of “Romantic Partners” as Your Mom A 2018 study out of Ohio State University looked at more than 7,000 mothers and their children, and they found an unexpected connection:  The number of, quote, “romantic partners” you’ve had is probably right around the same number your mom had.  And that’s true even if you never witnessed her in most of those relationships. The researchers say it’s probably because our mothers pass on relationship skills to us, which influences how we interact with everyone . . . including people in our dating life. It could be genes, too, but then you’d expect dad’s romantic history to matter as well. Yet, oddly enough, the researchers found no connection between a father’s number of romantic partners and his kids’ number. You can read more about the study here. Monogamy: Is It for Everyone? Are you in NYC on Tuesday, Feb 12? Interested in learning more about the pros and cons of monogamy vs nonmonogamy, and which one might be right for you? Come grab some drinks and see Dr. Zhana discuss this (and more) for her first live Think & Drink NYC event of the year, at Bar Subject on the Lower East Side. More info and tickets here. Before Next Time…
January 29, 2019
Testosterone is having a moment these days. T-boosting has grown into a $2.5 billion industry, with guys of all ages trying to up their T levels in hopes of increasing everything from libido to mood to energy. But what does testosterone do how about our cognitive processes? Could testosterone increase how quickly and automatically we make decisions about sexual situations, and could that lack of deliberation have a dark side that contributes to sexual assault and harassment? These are some of the questions that our guest, Dr. Gideon Nave from the U Penn Business School, attempted to answer for us in episode #55, based on several of his studies on how testosterone affects men's reasoning and decision making processes in areas relevant to the last of the 5 Fs of basic, instinctive behaviors: fight, flight, freeze, feed, and, um, fornicate ;) At the end of the episode we also briefly touch on yet another neurotransmitter that has received a lot of media attention over the past decade: oxytocin. Hailed as the "love hormone," the "cuddle hormone," or "liquid trust," oxytocin is supposed to increase intimacy and trust, not just between romantic or sexual partners, but also among complete strangers. This story about oxytocin sounds awesome and we'd all love to believe in it, but does it stand up to scientific scrutiny? Dr. Nave's recent review of the research suggests we should be a bit more skeptical. If you'd like to read the studies discussed in this episode, here they are: on T and cognitive reflection, on T and status goods, and on oxytocin & trust. About our Guest Gideon Nave is a marketing assistant professor at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. He got his PhD in Computation and Neural Systems at Caltech, how the mind works. His research uses a medley of quantitative and experimental methods from the fields of Computational Neuroscience, Cognitive Psychology, Game Theory and Machine Learning for reverse-engineering the decision-making process in humans. You can visit his website here. You've Had the Same Number of "Romantic Partners" as Your Mom A 2018 study out of Ohio State University looked at more than 7,000 mothers and their children, and they found an unexpected connection:  The number of, quote, "romantic partners" you've had is probably right around the same number your mom had.  And that's true even if you never witnessed her in most of those relationships. The researchers say it's probably because our mothers pass on relationship skills to us, which influences how we interact with everyone . . . including people in our dating life. It could be genes, too, but then you'd expect dad's romantic history to matter as well. Yet, oddly enough, the researchers found no connection between a father's number of romantic partners and his kids' number. You can read more about the study here. Monogamy: Is It for Everyone? Are you in NYC on Tuesday, Feb 12? Interested in learning more about the pros and cons of monogamy vs nonmonogamy, and which one might be right for you? Come grab some drinks and see Dr. Zhana discuss this (and more) for her first live Think & Drink NYC event of the year, at Bar Subject on the Lower East Side. More info and tickets here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on
January 15, 2019
Happy belated New Year! Given that the holiday season is a time when a lot of people consume significant amounts of alcohol AND get frisky while under its influence, we thought we’d kick off 2019 with an episode that ties drinking and sexual consent. Specifically, how does being intoxicated impact people’s perceptions of their own and their friends’ ability to consent to sex? In her unusual “naturalistic bar study” (more on that in the podcast), Dr. Michelle Drouin from Purdue University enlisted drunken bar goers and their friends to take a half-hour break from drinking so they can blow into breathalyzers and answer questions about sexual consent! Her findings and our conversation on just how much alcohol impedes people’s ability to consent, and how our society should deal with this issue is absolutely FASCINATING! Don’t miss it! About our Guest Dr. Michelle Drouin is a professor at Purdue University with a PhD in Developmental Psychology from the University of Oxford. She is an internationally-recognized speaker on sexuality, technology, and relationships, including online relationships, social media, and sexting. Dr. Drouin’s research on sexuality, social media, and mobile phone addiction has attracted international attention, and she regularly does interviews for television, radio, newspapers, and magazines. Her TEDx talk on “Online Love and Infidelity” has more than 150,000 views. Dr. Drouin also serves as an expert witness for sexuality, social media, and online relationship cases. You can follow Dr. Michelle Drouin on Twitter, here. You can read the full study discussed in the episode, here. Monogamy – Is It for Everyone? That’s the question Dr. Zhana will discuss in her first live event of 2019. Don’t miss it: February 12, 7:30pm, Bar Subject (188 Suffolk street). More info and tickets here. Before Next Time… Please consider supporting The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter! Like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 106Shares
January 15, 2019
Happy belated New Year! Given that the holiday season is a time when a lot of people consume significant amounts of alcohol AND get frisky while under its influence, we thought we'd kick off 2019 with an episode that ties drinking and sexual consent. Specifically, how does being intoxicated impact people's perceptions of their own and their friends' ability to consent to sex? In her unusual "naturalistic bar study" (more on that in the podcast), Dr. Michelle Drouin from Purdue University enlisted drunken bar goers and their friends to take a half-hour break from drinking so they can blow into breathalyzers and answer questions about sexual consent! Her findings and our conversation on just how much alcohol impedes people's ability to consent, and how our society should deal with this issue is absolutely FASCINATING! Don't miss it! About our Guest Dr. Michelle Drouin is a professor at Purdue University with a PhD in Developmental Psychology from the University of Oxford. She is an internationally-recognized speaker on sexuality, technology, and relationships, including online relationships, social media, and sexting. Dr. Drouin’s research on sexuality, social media, and mobile phone addiction has attracted international attention, and she regularly does interviews for television, radio, newspapers, and magazines. Her TEDx talk on “Online Love and Infidelity” has more than 150,000 views. Dr. Drouin also serves as an expert witness for sexuality, social media, and online relationship cases. You can follow Dr. Michelle Drouin on Twitter, here. You can read the full study discussed in the episode, here. Monogamy - Is It for Everyone? That's the question Dr. Zhana will discuss in her first live event of 2019. Don't miss it: February 12, 7:30pm, Bar Subject (188 Suffolk street). More info and tickets here. Before Next Time… Please consider supporting The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter! Like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page!
December 19, 2018
Optimizing Sexual Satisfaction We all know having sex with our romantic partners is good for our relationship and sexual satisfaction. But why you’re doing it can make a difference; not all sexual motives were made equal. Some reasons to have sex lead to better and healthier outcomes than other reasons. Optimizing your intimate life is partly about making sure you’re doing “it” for the right reasons, and not doing “it” for the wrong reasons.   In Episode 53, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Jessica Wood about her research on the different types of reasons people have sex, how these different motives affect their relationship and sexual satisfaction differently, and whether this differs between folks in monogamous versus consensually nonmonogamous relationships. Curious about what the “good” and the “bad” reasons are? Tune in to learn more! You can read the full study discussed in the episode, here. About our Guest Dr. Jessica Wood is a Research Associate in the Department of Psychology at York University and the University of Guelph. Her research examines how sexual motivations are associated with relationship and sexual satisfaction, needs fulfillment, and sexual problems and challenges. Jessica also conducts research on the determinants of sexual health behaviors and barriers to healthcare access for people with developmental disabilities. She is currently a research specialist with the Sex Information & Education Council of Canada (SIECCAN). You can follow Dr. Jessica Wood on Twitter, here. Before Next Time… Please consider supporting The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter! Like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Visit Lelo to fulfill your high-quality vibrator needs with a wide selection of vibrators for all! Use discount code SCIENCE to get 20% off on your new vibrating toy. Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. Plus 3 FREE adult DVDs, FREE mystery gift and FREE shipping. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our Science of Sex Facebook group! Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 24Shares
December 18, 2018
Optimizing Sexual Satisfaction We all know having sex with our romantic partners is good for our relationship and sexual satisfaction. But why you're doing it can make a difference; not all sexual motives were made equal. Some reasons to have sex lead to better and healthier outcomes than other reasons. Optimizing your intimate life is partly about making sure you're doing "it" for the right reasons, and not doing "it" for the wrong reasons.   In Episode 53, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Jessica Wood about her research on the different types of reasons people have sex, how these different motives affect their relationship and sexual satisfaction differently, and whether this differs between folks in monogamous versus consensually nonmonogamous relationships. Curious about what the “good” and the “bad” reasons are? Tune in to learn more! You can read the full study discussed in the episode, here. About our Guest Dr. Jessica Wood is a Research Associate in the Department of Psychology at York University and the University of Guelph. Her research examines how sexual motivations are associated with relationship and sexual satisfaction, needs fulfillment, and sexual problems and challenges. Jessica also conducts research on the determinants of sexual health behaviors and barriers to healthcare access for people with developmental disabilities. She is currently a research specialist with the Sex Information & Education Council of Canada (SIECCAN). You can follow Dr. Jessica Wood on Twitter, here. Before Next Time… Please consider supporting The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter! Like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Visit Lelo to fulfill your high-quality vibrator needs with a wide selection of vibrators for all! Use discount code SCIENCE to get 20% off on your new vibrating toy. Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. Plus 3 FREE adult DVDs, FREE mystery gift and FREE shipping. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our Science of Sex Facebook group!
December 11, 2018
What is it about teachers that make them so hot? According to the popular college professor reviewing website, Rate My Professors, it’s more than just looks. But how does their rating system work? How are female professors rated versus their male peers? In Episode 52, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to New York University professor Pascal Wallisch about how students rate and tag their favorite (or not-so-favorite) professors on the divisive yet popular website, Rate My Professors. Does the site enable students to label their professors in a way that affirms gender stereotypes? And while Dr. Zhana and Pascal savor their hot pepper status, some professors would prefer that not to be a factor. Also— do you know the difference between a psychopath and a sociopath? Pascal provides us with some more info on the 1% of the population who is psychopathic and answers the first question on our minds— do they have sex? Tune in to learn more! About our Guest Pascal Wallisch serves as clinical assistant professor at New York University, heading the Fox lab. Pascal received a PhD in Psychology from the University of Chicago. Wallisch’s main research interests lie at the intersection of neuroscience, psychology, and data science. Pascal co-founded the “Neural Data Science” summer course at CSHL and wrote several books on the analysis of data in neuroscience. Pascal’s efforts were recognized with the “Golden dozen” teaching award by NYU. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Also check Dr. Zhana out on December 11th at The V Club where she teams up with one of our favorite researchers, Dr. Justin Lehmiller, to discuss one of our most popular topics: gender differences in sexuality. RSVP to The Mars/Venus Debate: Are Men and Women Really That Different When It Comes to Sex? here. Visit Lelo to fulfill your high-quality vibrator needs with a wide selection of vibrators for all! Use discount code SCIENCE to get 20% off on your new vibrating toy. Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. Plus 3 FREE adult DVDs, FREE mystery gift and FREE shipping. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our Science of Sex Facebook group! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter! Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 35Shares
December 11, 2018
What is it about teachers that make them so hot? According to the popular college professor reviewing website, Rate My Professors, it’s more than just looks. But how does their rating system work? How are female professors rated versus their male peers? In Episode 52, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to New York University professor Pascal Wallisch about how students rate and tag their favorite (or not-so-favorite) professors on the divisive yet popular website, Rate My Professors. Does the site enable students to label their professors in a way that affirms gender stereotypes? And while Dr. Zhana and Pascal savor their hot pepper status, some professors would prefer that not to be a factor. Also— do you know the difference between a psychopath and a sociopath? Pascal provides us with some more info on the 1% of the population who is psychopathic and answers the first question on our minds— do they have sex? Tune in to learn more! About our Guest Pascal Wallisch serves as clinical assistant professor at New York University, heading the Fox lab. Pascal received a PhD in Psychology from the University of Chicago. Wallisch’s main research interests lie at the intersection of neuroscience, psychology, and data science. Pascal co-founded the "Neural Data Science" summer course at CSHL and wrote several books on the analysis of data in neuroscience. Pascal's efforts were recognized with the "Golden dozen" teaching award by NYU. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Also check Dr. Zhana out on December 11th at The V Club where she teams up with one of our favorite researchers, Dr. Justin Lehmiller, to discuss one of our most popular topics: gender differences in sexuality. RSVP to The Mars/Venus Debate: Are Men and Women Really That Different When It Comes to Sex? here. Visit Lelo to fulfill your high-quality vibrator needs with a wide selection of vibrators for all! Use discount code SCIENCE to get 20% off on your new vibrating toy. Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. Plus 3 FREE adult DVDs, FREE mystery gift and FREE shipping. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our Science of Sex Facebook group! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter!
December 4, 2018
We have covered some kink, fetish and BDSM ground on the show, but this time we delve deep into the details of one specific kink: pup (or puppy) play. What is ‘pup play’? Who are ‘bio-pups’, and why are they so into this? Is this related to zoophilia / bestiality, or the world of furries? In Episode 51,  Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Liam Wignall about his research on pup play and the people who are into it.  He became the first to research this topic after it just kept “pupping” up for him in his research on kink for his PhD. Pup play is exactly what it sounds like; people who are into behaving as puppies socially and sexually. This kink has gotten more attention recently because of the internet, which is the primary way many people discover and start exploring it. Tune in to find out more about pup play from its foremost expert. You can read the full study discussed in this episode, here. About our Guest Dr Liam Wignall is a Lecturer in Psychology at Bournemouth University and a member of its Research Centre for Behaviour Change. He is a qualitative psychologist who studies kink subcultures, sexual identities and virtual media from interdisciplinary perspectives. He received his PhD from the University of Sunderland where he researched individuals who engage in kink activities but differ in levels of immersion into kink communities, examining the transformative effect of the internet on these sexual cultures. His research on pup play was the first to study the kink activity, published in Archives of Sexual Behavior and Sociological Research Online. He is interested in social change and sexualities more generally, and is currently working on a project on drag performers experiences of LGBT cultures. You can follow Dr. Liam Wignall on instagram @liamwignall and on twitter @liamwignall. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Check out Dr. Zhana on December 6th for her next event at The Assemblage, Doctor’s Orders: Real Doctor’s Debate Your Toughest Questions. Zhana will join a biologist, a physician and a neuroscientist to provide holistic answers to YOUR audience questions. Use guest password DOCTORSORDERS to RSVP. Also check Dr. Zhana out on December 11th at The V Club where she teams up with one of our favorite researchers, Dr. Justin Lehmiller, to discuss one of our most popular topics: gender differences in sexuality. RSVP to The Mars/Venus Debate: Are Men and Women Really That Different When It Comes to Sex? here. Visit Lelo to fulfill your high-quality vibrator needs with a wide selection of vibrators for all! Use discount code SCIENCE to get 20% off on your new vibrating toy. Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. Plus 3 FREE adult DVDs, FREE mystery gift and FREE shipping. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our Science of Sex Facebook group!
December 4, 2018
We have covered some kink, fetish and BDSM ground on the show, but this time we delve deep into the details of one specific kink: pup (or puppy) play. What is 'pup play'? Who are 'bio-pups', and why are they so into this? Is this related to zoophilia / bestiality, or the world of furries? In Episode 51,  Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Liam Wignall about his research on pup play and the people who are into it.  He became the first to research this topic after it just kept “pupping” up for him in his research on kink for his PhD. Pup play is exactly what it sounds like; people who are into behaving as puppies socially and sexually. This kink has gotten more attention recently because of the internet, which is the primary way many people discover and start exploring it. Tune in to find out more about pup play from its foremost expert. You can read the full study discussed in this episode, here. About our Guest Dr Liam Wignall is a Lecturer in Psychology at Bournemouth University and a member of its Research Centre for Behaviour Change. He is a qualitative psychologist who studies kink subcultures, sexual identities and virtual media from interdisciplinary perspectives. He received his PhD from the University of Sunderland where he researched individuals who engage in kink activities but differ in levels of immersion into kink communities, examining the transformative effect of the internet on these sexual cultures. His research on pup play was the first to study the kink activity, published in Archives of Sexual Behavior and Sociological Research Online. He is interested in social change and sexualities more generally, and is currently working on a project on drag performers experiences of LGBT cultures. You can follow Dr. Liam Wignall on instagram @liamwignall and on twitter @liamwignall. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Check out Dr. Zhana on December 6th for her next event at The Assemblage, Doctor's Orders: Real Doctor's Debate Your Toughest Questions. Zhana will join a biologist, a physician and a neuroscientist to provide holistic answers to YOUR audience questions. Use guest password DOCTORSORDERS to RSVP. Also check Dr. Zhana out on December 11th at The V Club where she teams up with one of our favorite researchers, Dr. Justin Lehmiller, to discuss one of our most popular topics: gender differences in sexuality. RSVP to The Mars/Venus Debate: Are Men and Women Really That Different When It Comes to Sex? here. Visit Lelo to fulfill your high-quality vibrator needs with a wide selection of vibrators for all! Use discount code SCIENCE to get 20% off on your new vibrating toy. Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. Plus 3 FREE adult DVDs, FREE mystery gift and FREE shipping. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our
November 27, 2018
Do you know the difference between sex and gender? Or what it means to be “gender nonconforming”? Trans or transgender? Genderqueer and gender non-binary? Our understanding and language around sex and gender has been rapidly expanding, and we don’t blame you if you’re not super familiar with it all. In Episode 50,  Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Seth Pardo about his research on the gender identity and gender presentation of 170 folks who were assigned female at birth but identify as gender nonconforming to some extent. From defining important gender terms to giving direction for the best way to ask about people’s pronouns, Dr. Pardo manages to inform and advise people like Joe, who are less familiar with the trans community. We had so much to talk about with Dr. Pardo, that we decided to skip the foreplay this week and get right into it. For more first-person narratives of trans lives, check out the memoirs Dr. Seth Pardo references in the episode: Becoming a Visible Man – Jamison Green The Woman I Was Not Born to Be – Aleshia Brevard Stone Butch Blues – Leslie Feinberg About our Guest Seth Pardo, Ph.D. is currently a Lead Evaluator and Researcher with the San Francisco Department of Public Health. He has worked for over a decade to raise awareness about the various factors that facilitate healthy development of gender identity, sexuality, intersectionality, and medical decision making for people with trans and gender diverse identities. Specializing in both academic and public health settings, Dr. Pardo has conducted federally-funded research as well as hosted, developed and presented workshops on sexual health, HIV prevention, substance use and recovery, diversity, cultural humility, medical necessity of gender affirming surgeries, and predictors of healthy identity development. He is considered a subject matter expert on transgender health and has a long history of developing innovative ways to move cultural competence from abstract ideas to implement best practices. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Check out Dr. Zhana on December 6th for her next event at The Assemblage, Doctor’s Orders: Real Doctor’s Debate Your Toughest Questions. Zhana will join a biologist, a physician and a neuroscientist to provide holistic answers to YOUR audience questions. Use guest password DOCTORSORDERS to RSVP. Also check Dr. Zhana out on December 11th where she’ll team up with one of our favorites Justin Lehmiller to discuss one of our most popular topics: gender differences! Visit The V Club to RSVP for the event. Visit Lelo to fulfill your high-quality vibrator needs with a wide selection of vibrators for all! Use discount code SCIENCE to get 20% off on your new vibrating toy. Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. Plus 3 FREE adult DVDs, FREE mystery gift and FREE shipping. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our
November 27, 2018
Do you know the difference between sex and gender? Or what it means to be "gender nonconforming"? Trans or transgender? Genderqueer and gender non-binary? Our understanding and language around sex and gender has been rapidly expanding, and we don't blame you if you're not super familiar with it all. In Episode 50,  Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Seth Pardo about his research on the gender identity and gender presentation of 170 folks who were assigned female at birth but identify as gender nonconforming to some extent. From defining important gender terms to giving direction for the best way to ask about people's pronouns, Dr. Pardo manages to inform and advise people like Joe, who are less familiar with the trans community. We had so much to talk about with Dr. Pardo, that we decided to skip the foreplay this week and get right into it. For more first-person narratives of trans lives, check out the memoirs Dr. Seth Pardo references in the episode: Becoming a Visible Man - Jamison Green The Woman I Was Not Born to Be - Aleshia Brevard Stone Butch Blues - Leslie Feinberg About our Guest Seth Pardo, Ph.D. is currently a Lead Evaluator and Researcher with the San Francisco Department of Public Health. He has worked for over a decade to raise awareness about the various factors that facilitate healthy development of gender identity, sexuality, intersectionality, and medical decision making for people with trans and gender diverse identities. Specializing in both academic and public health settings, Dr. Pardo has conducted federally-funded research as well as hosted, developed and presented workshops on sexual health, HIV prevention, substance use and recovery, diversity, cultural humility, medical necessity of gender affirming surgeries, and predictors of healthy identity development. He is considered a subject matter expert on transgender health and has a long history of developing innovative ways to move cultural competence from abstract ideas to implement best practices. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Check out Dr. Zhana on December 6th for her next event at The Assemblage, Doctor's Orders: Real Doctor's Debate Your Toughest Questions. Zhana will join a biologist, a physician and a neuroscientist to provide holistic answers to YOUR audience questions. Use guest password DOCTORSORDERS to RSVP. Also check Dr. Zhana out on December 11th where she'll team up with one of our favorites Justin Lehmiller to discuss one of our most popular topics: gender differences! Visit The V Club to RSVP for the event. Visit Lelo to fulfill your high-quality vibrator needs with a wide selection of vibrators for all! Use discount code SCIENCE to get 20% off on your new vibrating toy. Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. Plus 3 FREE adult DVDs, FREE mystery gift and FREE shipping. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page!
November 20, 2018
The dangers and risks for gay men in coming out of the closet is widely acknowledged, but what about bisexual men? More bi men, compared to gay men, keep their sexuality strictly on the down low. Why is this the case? How are these men’s experience different? In Episode 49,  Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Eric Schrimshaw from Columbia University about his research on bisexual men–especially those with long-term female partners–who remain in the closet and why they do so. Why would bisexual guys living in the 21st century in ultra-liberal New York City be so reticent about their sexual attractions/behaviors? Listen to the episode to find out! You can read the full study here. About our Guest Eric W. Schrimshaw, Ph.D., is a social/health psychologist and associate professor of sociomedical sciences at Columbia University Medical Center where he serves as co-Lead of the Sexuality, Sexual, and Reproductive Health certificate program. His research over the past 20 years has been in the area of LGB health, with a particular emphasis on HIV risk behaviors of MSM populations. In particular, he has an interest in the role of technology in changing how MSM meet and communicate with potential sexual partners and how this may contribute to sexual risk behaviors among MSM. His research has also addressed the unique psychological and sexual health needs of bisexual men, pornography viewers, male sex workers, and LGB adolescents. His research has been supported by multiple NIH grants and has resulted in the publication of over 60 journal articles addressing LGB health and well-being. You can visit his website here. Sex or Travel? Most Millennials Would Give Up the Former! A new study shows that some Millennials think travel is more important than sex. 57% of millennials said that they would give up sex for travel. This is consistent with other data we’ve been getting lately that millennials are having less sex and with fewer people than previous generations. Listen to find out if Dr. Zhana can pick between her two favorites, sex or travel? You can read the full article discussed here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Check out Dr. Zhana on November 20th at her Think & Drink NYC series event at the bar Subject where she will be debunking some common myths about the female orgasm, learn while enjoying a drink! Come to enter a raffle to win a LELO Sona Cruise vibrator! Buy tickets here. On that note: Visit Lelo to fulfill your high-quality vibrator needs with a wide selection of vibrators for all! Use discount code SCIENCE to get 20% off on your new vibrating toy. Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. Plus 3 FREE adult DVDs, FREE mystery gift and FREE shipping. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our Science of Sex Facebook group! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr.
November 20, 2018
The dangers and risks for gay men in coming out of the closet is widely acknowledged, but what about bisexual men? More bi men, compared to gay men, keep their sexuality strictly on the down low. Why is this the case? How are these men's experience different? In Episode 49,  Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Eric Schrimshaw from Columbia University about his research on bisexual men--especially those with long-term female partners--who remain in the closet and why they do so. Why would bisexual guys living in the 21st century in ultra-liberal New York City be so reticent about their sexual attractions/behaviors? Listen to the episode to find out! You can read the full study here. About our Guest Eric W. Schrimshaw, Ph.D., is a social/health psychologist and associate professor of sociomedical sciences at Columbia University Medical Center where he serves as co-Lead of the Sexuality, Sexual, and Reproductive Health certificate program. His research over the past 20 years has been in the area of LGB health, with a particular emphasis on HIV risk behaviors of MSM populations. In particular, he has an interest in the role of technology in changing how MSM meet and communicate with potential sexual partners and how this may contribute to sexual risk behaviors among MSM. His research has also addressed the unique psychological and sexual health needs of bisexual men, pornography viewers, male sex workers, and LGB adolescents. His research has been supported by multiple NIH grants and has resulted in the publication of over 60 journal articles addressing LGB health and well-being. You can visit his website here. Sex or Travel? Most Millennials Would Give Up the Former! A new study shows that some Millennials think travel is more important than sex. 57% of millennials said that they would give up sex for travel. This is consistent with other data we've been getting lately that millennials are having less sex and with fewer people than previous generations. Listen to find out if Dr. Zhana can pick between her two favorites, sex or travel? You can read the full article discussed here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Check out Dr. Zhana on November 20th at her Think & Drink NYC series event at the bar Subject where she will be debunking some common myths about the female orgasm, learn while enjoying a drink! Come to enter a raffle to win a LELO Sona Cruise vibrator! Buy tickets here. On that note: Visit Lelo to fulfill your high-quality vibrator needs with a wide selection of vibrators for all! Use discount code SCIENCE to get 20% off on your new vibrating toy. Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. Plus 3 FREE adult DVDs, FREE mystery gift and FREE shipping. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our Science of Sex Facebook group!
November 13, 2018
Some people are into sexually aggressive and humiliating acts, from biting &  spanking, to spitting and verbal humiliation. This is usually referred to as paraphilias, or uncommon sexual desires, but how uncommon are these sexual desires, actually? And, perhaps more controversially, could there be some evolutionary bases for some of our BDSM desires? In Episode 48,  Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Menelaos Apostolou from the University of Nicosia in Cyprus about his evolutionary theories on why people are into BDSM and the research he’s conducted trying to test them. In a large (though non-representative) sample of Greek Cypriots, he found that over 70% of people reported interest in at least one (and ~50% in at least three) different sexually aggressive and humiliating acts, both on the giving and the receiving end. Not so uncommon after all! Could people’s interest in these acts come from humanity’s long history of sexual violence and aggression, from war conquest to forced marriages? Listen to find out more about these fascinating, controversial evolutionary theories. You can read the full study discussed in the episode here. This week, we decided to skip the Foreplay and answer one of your questions instead! Dr. Zhana and Joe answer a listener question about our The Truth About Female Infidelity episode. About our Guest Dr. Menelaos Apostolou is currently an Associate Professor at the University of Nicosia, Cyprus. He was born in Athens, Greece and he completed his post-graduate and graduate studies in the United Kingdom. He has published several peer-reviewed papers, books, and chapters in books in the area of evolutionary psychology. His research focus is human mating behavior. You can visit his website here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our Science of Sex Facebook group! Check out Dr. Zhana on November 20th at her Think & Drink NYC series event at the bar Subject where she will be debunking some common myths about the female orgasm, learn while enjoying a drink! Buy tickets here. We have a new sponsor! Visit Lelo to fulfill your high-quality vibrator needs with a wide selection of vibrators for all! Use discount code SCIENCE to get 20% off on your new vibrating toy. Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. Plus 3 FREE adult DVDs, FREE mystery gift and FREE shipping. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter! Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 10Shares
November 13, 2018
Some people are into sexually aggressive and humiliating acts, from biting &  spanking, to spitting and verbal humiliation. This is usually referred to as paraphilias, or uncommon sexual desires, but how uncommon are these sexual desires, actually? And, perhaps more controversially, could there be some evolutionary bases for some of our BDSM desires? In Episode 48,  Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Menelaos Apostolou from the University of Nicosia in Cyprus about his evolutionary theories on why people are into BDSM and the research he's conducted trying to test them. In a large (though non-representative) sample of Greek Cypriots, he found that over 70% of people reported interest in at least one (and ~50% in at least three) different sexually aggressive and humiliating acts, both on the giving and the receiving end. Not so uncommon after all! Could people's interest in these acts come from humanity's long history of sexual violence and aggression, from war conquest to forced marriages? Listen to find out more about these fascinating, controversial evolutionary theories. You can read the full study discussed in the episode here. This week, we decided to skip the Foreplay and answer one of your questions instead! Dr. Zhana and Joe answer a listener question about our The Truth About Female Infidelity episode. About our Guest Dr. Menelaos Apostolou is currently an Associate Professor at the University of Nicosia, Cyprus. He was born in Athens, Greece and he completed his post-graduate and graduate studies in the United Kingdom. He has published several peer-reviewed papers, books, and chapters in books in the area of evolutionary psychology. His research focus is human mating behavior. You can visit his website here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our Science of Sex Facebook group! Check out Dr. Zhana on November 20th at her Think & Drink NYC series event at the bar Subject where she will be debunking some common myths about the female orgasm, learn while enjoying a drink! Buy tickets here. We have a new sponsor! Visit Lelo to fulfill your high-quality vibrator needs with a wide selection of vibrators for all! Use discount code SCIENCE to get 20% off on your new vibrating toy. Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. Plus 3 FREE adult DVDs, FREE mystery gift and FREE shipping. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter!
November 6, 2018
Some people are far more interested in and comfortable with casual sex, a trait called unrestricted sociosexuality. In Episode 47,  Dr. Zhana and Joe ask a question that’s on a lot of people’s minds: Are these “sluttier” folks (and we use this term lovingly and without judgment) less satisfied in and committed to their partners in long-term romantic relationships compared to their more “restricted” peers? Our guest, Dr. Gregory Webster, is the first–and thus far only–person to have examined how sociosexual orientation is associated with satisfaction and commitment in long-term relationships using data from both members of a couple! That way, you can measure not only one’s own sociosexuality but also how one’s partner’s sociosexuality is linked to their relationship satisfaction and commitment. And would this differ for couples who were dating, engaged, or recently married? Tune in to find out more! You can read the full study discussed in the episode here. About our Guest Gregory D. Webster is an associate professor of psychology at the University of Florida, with graduate degrees in psychology from the College of William & Mary (MA, 2001) and the University of Colorado Boulder (PhD, 2006). Greg researches personality and individual differences, romantic and sexual relationships, and judgments and decisions about rare and extreme events. When not doing research, he enjoys reading, running, cycling, DJ-ing, dancing, laughing at his own bad puns, and travel. He also spends his time re-reading and nerding-out over A Song of Ice and Fire, the science fiction book series that inspired the television show A Game of Thrones. You can visit his website here. HPV Vaccines Don’t Increase Sexual Activity in Teens! Following up on the news we shared in a recent episode on CDC’s decision to extend the age range for the HPV vaccine recommendation to 45, in this week’s foreplay we discuss a new study that addresses people’s concerns about vaccination’s effect on sexual activity in teens. A regionally representative study of teenage girls in British Columbia found that introducing vaccines to schools did not increase sexual activity. In fact, sexual activity has decreased from 20% to 18% since vaccines were implemented in schools. Science busts another myth! Read full the article here. Also, in this week’s foreplay, recent studies have found that about 40% of people have experienced post-coital depression (the post-sex blues) sometime in their life. This is defined as a dysphoric feeling some people have after sex, not necessarily due to regret or trauma. Why does this occur? This might be linked to having positive chemicals and neuroreceptors during sex, that go away post-sex. Comparable to a drug withdrawal crash, you no longer feel as amazing as you did before. Read the full article here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our
November 6, 2018
Some people are far more interested in and comfortable with casual sex, a trait called unrestricted sociosexuality. In Episode 47,  Dr. Zhana and Joe ask a question that's on a lot of people's minds: Are these "sluttier" folks (and we use this term lovingly and without judgment) less satisfied in and committed to their partners in long-term romantic relationships compared to their more "restricted" peers? Our guest, Dr. Gregory Webster, is the first--and thus far only--person to have examined how sociosexual orientation is associated with satisfaction and commitment in long-term relationships using data from both members of a couple! That way, you can measure not only one's own sociosexuality but also how one's partner's sociosexuality is linked to their relationship satisfaction and commitment. And would this differ for couples who were dating, engaged, or recently married? Tune in to find out more! You can read the full study discussed in the episode here. About our Guest Gregory D. Webster is an associate professor of psychology at the University of Florida, with graduate degrees in psychology from the College of William & Mary (MA, 2001) and the University of Colorado Boulder (PhD, 2006). Greg researches personality and individual differences, romantic and sexual relationships, and judgments and decisions about rare and extreme events. When not doing research, he enjoys reading, running, cycling, DJ-ing, dancing, laughing at his own bad puns, and travel. He also spends his time re-reading and nerding-out over A Song of Ice and Fire, the science fiction book series that inspired the television show A Game of Thrones. You can visit his website here. HPV Vaccines Don't Increase Sexual Activity in Teens! Following up on the news we shared in a recent episode on CDC's decision to extend the age range for the HPV vaccine recommendation to 45, in this week's foreplay we discuss a new study that addresses people's concerns about vaccination's effect on sexual activity in teens. A regionally representative study of teenage girls in British Columbia found that introducing vaccines to schools did not increase sexual activity. In fact, sexual activity has decreased from 20% to 18% since vaccines were implemented in schools. Science busts another myth! Read full the article here. Also, in this week's foreplay, recent studies have found that about 40% of people have experienced post-coital depression (the post-sex blues) sometime in their life. This is defined as a dysphoric feeling some people have after sex, not necessarily due to regret or trauma. Why does this occur? This might be linked to having positive chemicals and neuroreceptors during sex, that go away post-sex. Comparable to a drug withdrawal crash, you no longer feel as amazing as you did before. Read the full article here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our Science of Sex Facebook group!
October 30, 2018
Research has shown that sexual orientation is greatly determined by genetics. We also know that identical twins share 100% of their genetic material. Then how is it possible that only about 30% of all identical twins have the same sexual orientation as their co-twin? In Episode 46, Dr. Zhana and Joe speak with Dr. Gerulf Rieger about his research on identical twins with discordant sexual orientation. Dr. Rieger tests whether childhood gender non-conformity, genital arousal patterns, and finger length ratio–all known indicators of adult homo- or heterosexuality–also differ among identical twins who differ in self-reported sexual orientation. And sure enough, they do! (I.e., they’re not lying.) So if it’s not genetics, where is this difference in sexual orientation coming from? Tune in to find out more! You can read the full studies discussed in the episode: Gender Non-Conformity Finger Length Ratio Sexual Arousal Patterns About our Guest Gerulf Rieger obtained a MSc in Biological Anthropology from the University of Zurich in Switzerland and a PhD in Personality Psychology from Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. Gerulf had a teaching position at Northwestern University and was a research fellow in the Department of Human Development at Cornell University before joining the Psychology Department at the University of Essex. You can visit his website here. Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… Everyone is talking about this New York Times article. The Trump administration is trying their hardest to define gender strictly based on genitals. Consequently, erasing trans folks by defining them out of existence. This attempted claim in not only terrifying and dangerous for the trans community but is also scientifically inaccurate. This is not the definition of gender, or sex. Sex is defined by a number of things only one of which is genitals at birth. Even if sex is the only thing the administration were trying to define it is far too complicated to reduce to external genitalia. Tune in to find out more and read the full article here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram!      For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our Science of Sex Facebook group! We have a new sponsor! Visit Lelo to fulfill your vibrator needs with a wide selection of vibrators for all! Use discount code SCIENCE when you purchase your new toy. Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. Plus 3 FREE adult DVDs, FREE mystery gift and FREE shipping. Check out Dr. Zhana on November 20th at her Think & Drink event where she will be debunking some common myths about the female orgasm, learn while enjoying a drink! Buy tickets here. Remember to submit comments,
October 30, 2018
Research has shown that sexual orientation is greatly determined by genetics. We also know that identical twins share 100% of their genetic material. Then how is it possible that only about 30% of all identical twins have the same sexual orientation as their co-twin? In Episode 46, Dr. Zhana and Joe speak with Dr. Gerulf Rieger about his research on identical twins with discordant sexual orientation. Dr. Rieger tests whether childhood gender non-conformity, genital arousal patterns, and finger length ratio--all known indicators of adult homo- or heterosexuality--also differ among identical twins who differ in self-reported sexual orientation. And sure enough, they do! (I.e., they're not lying.) So if it's not genetics, where is this difference in sexual orientation coming from? Tune in to find out more! You can read the full studies discussed in the episode: Gender Non-Conformity Finger Length Ratio Sexual Arousal Patterns About our Guest Gerulf Rieger obtained a MSc in Biological Anthropology from the University of Zurich in Switzerland and a PhD in Personality Psychology from Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois. Gerulf had a teaching position at Northwestern University and was a research fellow in the Department of Human Development at Cornell University before joining the Psychology Department at the University of Essex. You can visit his website here. Don't Miss This Week's Foreplay... Everyone is talking about this New York Times article. The Trump administration is trying their hardest to define gender strictly based on genitals. Consequently, erasing trans folks by defining them out of existence. This attempted claim in not only terrifying and dangerous for the trans community but is also scientifically inaccurate. This is not the definition of gender, or sex. Sex is defined by a number of things only one of which is genitals at birth. Even if sex is the only thing the administration were trying to define it is far too complicated to reduce to external genitalia. Tune in to find out more and read the full article here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram!      For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our Science of Sex Facebook group! We have a new sponsor! Visit Lelo to fulfill your vibrator needs with a wide selection of vibrators for all! Use discount code SCIENCE when you purchase your new toy. Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. Plus 3 FREE adult DVDs, FREE mystery gift and FREE shipping. Check out Dr. Zhana on November 20th at her Think & Drink event where she will be debunking some common myths about the female orgasm, learn while enjoying a drink! Buy tickets
October 23, 2018
Are women’s sex drives really weaker than men’s? Are women really less likely to cheat–or want to cheat? Are they really better suited for monogamy? And how much are these gender differences due to nature vs. nurture? In Episode 45, we bring best-selling author Dr. Wednesday Martin on the show to talk about her new book UNTRUE: Why Nearly Everything We Believe About Women, Lust, and Adultery is Wrong and How the New Science Can Set Us Free, which reviewers say totally upends our common beliefs about these issues. Tune in to hear some of the surprising insights Dr. Martin gleaned from her interviews with numerous (mostly female!) researchers across a range of academic disciplines, discussions with women living various adulterous or openly nonmonogamous lifestyles, and immersive visits to sex parties and sex workshops.  We had such a fascinating–and at times heated–conversation with Dr. Martin, that we decided to devote the whole episode to it and skip the foreplay this time. Please enjoy, share, and get Dr. Martin’s book for even more info on the subject. About our Guest Dr. Wednesday Martin is a feminist cultural critic and #1 New York Times bestselling author. She earned her PhD in comparative literature and cultural studies, with a focus on anthropology, from Yale University. Her other notable books include Stepmonster: A New Look at Why Real Stepmothers Think, Feel, and Act the Way We Do and her memoir Primates of Park Avenue.” The Atlantic calls UNTRUE “revolutionary” and predicts “it may well set off nuclear bombs in bedrooms and boardrooms.” Visit her website or follow her on Instagram @wednesdaymartinphd or Twitter @wednesdaymartin. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram!      For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our Science of Sex Facebook group! Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. Plus 3 FREE adult DVDs, FREE mystery gift and FREE shipping. Check out Dr. Zhana on November 20th at her Think & Drink event where she will be debunking some common myths about the female orgasm, learn while enjoying a drink! Buy tickets here. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter! Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 9Shares
October 23, 2018
Are women's sex drives really weaker than men's? Are women really less likely to cheat--or want to cheat? Are they really better suited for monogamy? And how much are these gender differences due to nature vs. nurture? In Episode 45, we bring best-selling author Dr. Wednesday Martin on the show to talk about her new book UNTRUE: Why Nearly Everything We Believe About Women, Lust, and Adultery is Wrong and How the New Science Can Set Us Free, which reviewers say totally upends our common beliefs about these issues. Tune in to hear some of the surprising insights Dr. Martin gleaned from her interviews with numerous (mostly female!) researchers across a range of academic disciplines, discussions with women living various adulterous or openly nonmonogamous lifestyles, and immersive visits to sex parties and sex workshops.  We had such a fascinating--and at times heated--conversation with Dr. Martin, that we decided to devote the whole episode to it and skip the foreplay this time. Please enjoy, share, and get Dr. Martin's book for even more info on the subject. About our Guest Dr. Wednesday Martin is a feminist cultural critic and #1 New York Times bestselling author. She earned her PhD in comparative literature and cultural studies, with a focus on anthropology, from Yale University. Her other notable books include Stepmonster: A New Look at Why Real Stepmothers Think, Feel, and Act the Way We Do and her memoir Primates of Park Avenue.” The Atlantic calls UNTRUE “revolutionary” and predicts “it may well set off nuclear bombs in bedrooms and boardrooms.” Visit her website or follow her on Instagram @wednesdaymartinphd or Twitter @wednesdaymartin. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram!      For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our Science of Sex Facebook group! Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product. Plus 3 FREE adult DVDs, FREE mystery gift and FREE shipping. Check out Dr. Zhana on November 20th at her Think & Drink event where she will be debunking some common myths about the female orgasm, learn while enjoying a drink! Buy tickets here. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter!
October 16, 2018
In Episode 44, Dr. Kirstin Mitchell returns to talk to Dr. Zhana and Joe about the differences between sexual partners reported by men and women. It’s been an age-old question: Do men really have more sexual partners than women? Or are there other reasons for men reporting twice as many partners as women on average? Joe thinks it’s as simple as “they’re all lying,” but the answers are slightly more complicated. Tune in to find out how sampling, counting as well as some degree of misreporting play into the vast perceived difference between men and women’s “number.” Read Dr. Mitchell’s study here!  About our Guest Kirstin Mitchell, PhD, is a Senior Research Fellow at the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow, where she leads a theme of research on Families and Intimate & Sexual Relationships. Additionally, she led the sexual function component of the third British National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3), designing the first measure of sexual function specifically tailored to population surveys. She is co-editor of the textbook ‘Sexual Health: A public health perspective’ which offers a multi-disciplinary and broad-based perspective on sexual health. A social scientist by background, her work focuses on social, cultural and behavioural influences on sexual health, and on identifying public health focused solutions to preventing and addressing sexual health problems. You can check out Kirstin’s website, or follow her on twitter to find out more. To read the study discussed in the episode click here. Don’t miss this week’s foreplay… This just in: FDA approves HPV vaccine for adults 27-45! Why did it take this long for older adults to get the vaccine? The HPV vaccine, Gardasil 9, was previously approved for children and adults 9-26, however it is only now being offered for the older age group. The assumption that adults over 27 don’t have enough new sexual partners to warrant the vaccine is one possible reason for this delay. Even though older adults are more likely to be married or in long term relationships, it does not mean that they are forever done having new sexual partners! HPV is easily transmitted, since it is a skin to skin transmission and condoms are only partially effective in prevention. This development in vaccine offering is important and necessary! Read more about the study here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram!      Check out Dr. Zhana’s next Sex Science Social: Debunking Sex Myths That Ruin Lives, on October 18th. She will be discussing some common myths that get pushed around that can be detrimental to relationships! Click here to reserve your tickets for the event! For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our Science of Sex Facebook group! Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any...
October 16, 2018
In Episode 44, Dr. Kirstin Mitchell returns to talk to Dr. Zhana and Joe about the differences between sexual partners reported by men and women. It's been an age-old question: Do men really have more sexual partners than women? Or are there other reasons for men reporting twice as many partners as women on average? Joe thinks it's as simple as "they're all lying," but the answers are slightly more complicated. Tune in to find out how sampling, counting as well as some degree of misreporting play into the vast perceived difference between men and women's "number." Read Dr. Mitchell's study here!  About our Guest Kirstin Mitchell, PhD, is a Senior Research Fellow at the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow, where she leads a theme of research on Families and Intimate & Sexual Relationships. Additionally, she led the sexual function component of the third British National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal-3), designing the first measure of sexual function specifically tailored to population surveys. She is co-editor of the textbook ‘Sexual Health: A public health perspective’ which offers a multi-disciplinary and broad-based perspective on sexual health. A social scientist by background, her work focuses on social, cultural and behavioural influences on sexual health, and on identifying public health focused solutions to preventing and addressing sexual health problems. You can check out Kirstin's website, or follow her on twitter to find out more. To read the study discussed in the episode click here. Don’t miss this week’s foreplay… This just in: FDA approves HPV vaccine for adults 27-45! Why did it take this long for older adults to get the vaccine? The HPV vaccine, Gardasil 9, was previously approved for children and adults 9-26, however it is only now being offered for the older age group. The assumption that adults over 27 don't have enough new sexual partners to warrant the vaccine is one possible reason for this delay. Even though older adults are more likely to be married or in long term relationships, it does not mean that they are forever done having new sexual partners! HPV is easily transmitted, since it is a skin to skin transmission and condoms are only partially effective in prevention. This development in vaccine offering is important and necessary! Read more about the study here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram!      Check out Dr. Zhana’s next Sex Science Social: Debunking Sex Myths That Ruin Lives, on October 18th. She will be discussing some common myths that get pushed around that can be detrimental to relationships! Click here to reserve your tickets for the event! For more sex science articles, events and discussions please join our Science of Sex Facebook group! Visit Adam & Eve and use promo code SCIENCE for 50% off just about any product...
October 9, 2018
In Episode 43, Kaci Mial joins Dr. Zhana and Joe to talk about the female condom. Some people (including Joe) don’t even know what a female condom is! But this stops with this episode where we learn a lot more about the female, or internal, condom. Kaci discusses the benefits and differences of the internal condom, compared with the more familiar external condom as well as the limited availability of the condom and the reasons and implications behind that. Tune in to find out! Read the full study here! About our Guest Kaci Mial has always been passionate about helping others and making a difference. Kaci recently graduated from the Masters of Human Sexuality Education track at Widener University where she pursued her passion for research, academia, as well as community outreach. As a sexuality educator, Kaci successfully applies a trauma informed, sex-positive, and medically accurate approach to a variety of sexuality presentations at international conferences, agencies, schools, universities, and residential programs. Kaci is currently offering infant massage workshops for parents and caregivers within her community to help facilitate bonding, consent practices, and loving touch. To contact Kaci and to learn more about infant massage, you can visit her website at kacimial.com or follow her on Instagram @kacimial. To read the study discussed in the episode click here. Don’t miss this week’s foreplay… Are millennials better at staying in marriages than their parents were? A new study has found that divorce rates have dropped by 18% over the last 10 years. One possible reason could be that millennials might be getting married later, choosing to focus more on their careers and reaching economic stability before getting married which often leads to more marital stability. Furthermore, fewer millennials are getting married in the first place, therefore not contributing to the divorce rate at all. There are many possible answers to this new, unprecedented finding. Click here to find out more. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and check out our website at scienceofsexpodcast.com! For more in-person sex science, check out Dr. Zhana at the Touchpoint Town Hall on October 15th for her seminar on How to Be In An Open Relationship . See the event live at the Assemblage, or listen in on the Touchpoint Podcast. RSVP here to reserve your ticket for this free event! Check out Dr. Zhana’s next Sex Science Social: Debunking Sex Myths That Ruin Lives, on October 18th. She will be discussing some common myths that get pushed around that can be detrimental to relationships! Click here to reserve your tickets for the event! Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter! Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 13Shares
October 9, 2018
In Episode 43, Kaci Mial joins Dr. Zhana and Joe to talk about the female condom. Some people (including Joe) don't even know what a female condom is! But this stops with this episode where we learn a lot more about the female, or internal, condom. Kaci discusses the benefits and differences of the internal condom, compared with the more familiar external condom as well as the limited availability of the condom and the reasons and implications behind that. Tune in to find out! Read the full study here! About our Guest Kaci Mial has always been passionate about helping others and making a difference. Kaci recently graduated from the Masters of Human Sexuality Education track at Widener University where she pursued her passion for research, academia, as well as community outreach. As a sexuality educator, Kaci successfully applies a trauma informed, sex-positive, and medically accurate approach to a variety of sexuality presentations at international conferences, agencies, schools, universities, and residential programs. Kaci is currently offering infant massage workshops for parents and caregivers within her community to help facilitate bonding, consent practices, and loving touch. To contact Kaci and to learn more about infant massage, you can visit her website at kacimial.com or follow her on Instagram @kacimial. To read the study discussed in the episode click here. Don’t miss this week’s foreplay… Are millennials better at staying in marriages than their parents were? A new study has found that divorce rates have dropped by 18% over the last 10 years. One possible reason could be that millennials might be getting married later, choosing to focus more on their careers and reaching economic stability before getting married which often leads to more marital stability. Furthermore, fewer millennials are getting married in the first place, therefore not contributing to the divorce rate at all. There are many possible answers to this new, unprecedented finding. Click here to find out more. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and check out our website at scienceofsexpodcast.com! For more in-person sex science, check out Dr. Zhana at the Touchpoint Town Hall on October 15th for her seminar on How to Be In An Open Relationship . See the event live at the Assemblage, or listen in on the Touchpoint Podcast. RSVP here to reserve your ticket for this free event! Check out Dr. Zhana’s next Sex Science Social: Debunking Sex Myths That Ruin Lives, on October 18th. She will be discussing some common myths that get pushed around that can be detrimental to relationships! Click here to reserve your tickets for the event! Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter!
October 2, 2018
In Episode 42, Dr. Justin Lehmiller returns to talk with Dr. Zhana and Joe about sexual fantasies and what they say about us! Most people have sexual fantasies, and some fantasies are not as rare as you might think. What do our fantasies mean? Should we act on them and if so how? Dr. Justin Lehmiller talks about his new book Tell Me What You Want: The Science of Sexual Desire and How It Can Help You Improve Your Sex Life. Listen to find out which are the most common sexual fantasies, how our fantasies differ according to our age, gender and political beliefs, as well as the ways we can normalize sexual fantasies and potentially make them realities.  About our Guest Dr. Justin Lehmiller is a social psychologist, Research Fellow at The Kinsey Institute, and author of the new book Tell Me What You Want. Dr. Lehmiller is an award-winning educator and a prolific scholar who has published more than 40 pieces of academic writing to date. Dr. Lehmiller’s research focuses on topics including casual sex, sexual fantasy, sexual health, and friends with benefits. Dr. Lehmiller has run the popular blog Sex and Psychology since 2011 and he is a popular freelance writer, penning columns and op-eds for major publications, including Playboy, USA Today, VICE, Psychology Today, and New York Magazine. He has been named one of 5 “Sexperts” You Need to Follow on Twitter by Men’s Health, and is a go-to expert on sex for several major media outlets. Visit his website. Or follow him on Instagram @justinjlehmiller or on twitter @JustinLehmiller. Don’t miss this week’s foreplay… A new study shows that it takes just a third of a second to realize you are attracted to someone and only a quarter of a second to recognize a person’s gender. Spotting attractiveness and gender so quickly could better increase our chances of finding a mate. We associate attractiveness with intelligence and better health which helps us make snap judgments about potential mates. Click here to find out more. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and check out our website at scienceofsexpodcast.com! Check out Dr. Zhana at a comedy variety show Wednesday October 3rd at 8 pm! Click here for more details. For more in-person sex science, check out Dr. Zhana at the Touchpoint Town Hall on October 15th, for her seminar on How to Be In An Open Relationship. See the event live at the Assemblage, or listen in on the Touchpoint Podcast. RSVP here to reserve your ticket for this free event! Check out Dr. Zhana’s next Sex Science Social: Debunking Sex Myths That Ruin Lives, on October 18th. She will be discussing some common myths that get pushed around that can be detrimental to relationships! Click here to reserve your tickets for the event! Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does?
October 2, 2018
In Episode 42, Dr. Justin Lehmiller returns to talk with Dr. Zhana and Joe about sexual fantasies and what they say about us! Most people have sexual fantasies, and some fantasies are not as rare as you might think. What do our fantasies mean? Should we act on them and if so how? Dr. Justin Lehmiller talks about his new book Tell Me What You Want: The Science of Sexual Desire and How It Can Help You Improve Your Sex Life. Listen to find out which are the most common sexual fantasies, how our fantasies differ according to our age, gender and political beliefs, as well as the ways we can normalize sexual fantasies and potentially make them realities.  About our Guest Dr. Justin Lehmiller is a social psychologist, Research Fellow at The Kinsey Institute, and author of the new book Tell Me What You Want. Dr. Lehmiller is an award-winning educator and a prolific scholar who has published more than 40 pieces of academic writing to date. Dr. Lehmiller's research focuses on topics including casual sex, sexual fantasy, sexual health, and friends with benefits. Dr. Lehmiller has run the popular blog Sex and Psychology since 2011 and he is a popular freelance writer, penning columns and op-eds for major publications, including Playboy, USA Today, VICE, Psychology Today, and New York Magazine. He has been named one of 5 "Sexperts" You Need to Follow on Twitter by Men's Health, and is a go-to expert on sex for several major media outlets. Visit his website. Or follow him on Instagram @justinjlehmiller or on twitter @JustinLehmiller. Don’t miss this week’s foreplay… A new study shows that it takes just a third of a second to realize you are attracted to someone and only a quarter of a second to recognize a person's gender. Spotting attractiveness and gender so quickly could better increase our chances of finding a mate. We associate attractiveness with intelligence and better health which helps us make snap judgments about potential mates. Click here to find out more. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and check out our website at scienceofsexpodcast.com! Check out Dr. Zhana at a comedy variety show Wednesday October 3rd at 8 pm! Click here for more details. For more in-person sex science, check out Dr. Zhana at the Touchpoint Town Hall on October 15th, for her seminar on How to Be In An Open Relationship. See the event live at the Assemblage, or listen in on the Touchpoint Podcast. RSVP here to reserve your ticket for this free event! Check out Dr. Zhana’s next Sex Science Social: Debunking Sex Myths That Ruin Lives, on October 18th. She will be discussing some common myths that get pushed around that can be detrimental to relationships! Click here to reserve your tickets for the event! Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr....
September 25, 2018
This week, Joe and Dr. Zhana switched things up and decided to dedicate an entire episode to answering some of your questions! Dr. Zhana gives science based answers to listener’s most pressing questions while Joe chimes in with some witty banter and some of his own questions. This week’s episode covered a range of topics including, vaginismus, open relationships, gooning, non surgical penis enhancement, and more! Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and check out our website at scienceofsexpodcast.com! Check out Dr. Zhana’s next event: Debunking Sex Myths That Ruin Lives, on October 18th. She will be discussing some common myths that get pushed around that can be detrimental to relationships! Click here to reserve your tickets for the event! Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter! Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 2Shares
September 25, 2018
This week, Joe and Dr. Zhana switched things up and decided to dedicate an entire episode to answering some of your questions! Dr. Zhana gives science based answers to listener's most pressing questions while Joe chimes in with some witty banter and some of his own questions. This week's episode covered a range of topics including, vaginismus, open relationships, gooning, non surgical penis enhancement, and more! Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and check out our website at scienceofsexpodcast.com! Check out Dr. Zhana’s next event: Debunking Sex Myths That Ruin Lives, on October 18th. She will be discussing some common myths that get pushed around that can be detrimental to relationships! Click here to reserve your tickets for the event! Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter!
September 18, 2018
In Episode 40, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk with Tierney Lorenz on sex and the immune system! It’s been known that sexual activity can have an effect on the immune system. What do those effects look like? A healthy sex life can be great for the immune system which can in turn increase things like sex drive or pleasure. On this week’s episode we were able to talk to Dr. Tierney Lorenz on her research on sex and the immune system! About our Guest Dr. Lorenz received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Texas at Austin after completing an internship at the University of Washington School of Medicine. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Kinsey Institute and the Center for the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior at Indiana University. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Nebraska, and a member of the Center for Brain, Biology and Behavior. Dr. Lorenz’s research examines the interaction between women’s mental, physical and sexual health. The Women, Immunity and Sexual Health (WISH) lab investigates the ways that sexual behavior impact women’s immune and endocrine function, as well as ways to help women with mental and/or physical health conditions have happy, healthy sexual lives. Don’t miss this week’s foreplay… New Supreme Court Justice, Brett Kavanaugh, recently said that certain forms of birth control were “abortion inducing.” Let’s get the facts straight: this is entirely untrue. The pill prevents the body from ovulating (the process of releasing eggs) so that sperm cannot meet with an egg. Even Plan B (otherwise known as the morning after pill) acts as a large dose of birth control to do the exact same thing. The package even specifies that Plan B will not work if sperm has already found its way to an egg. Bottom line is science does NOT say that birth control induces abortion, so try again, Kavanaugh! Read more here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and check out our website at scienceofsexpodcast.com! Check out Dr. Zhana’s next event: Debunking Sex Myths That Ruin Lives, on October 18th. She will be discussing some common myths that get pushed around that can be detrimental to relationships! Click here to reserve your tickets for the event! Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter! Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 16Shares
September 18, 2018
In Episode 40, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk with Tierney Lorenz on sex and the immune system! It's been known that sexual activity can have an effect on the immune system. What do those effects look like? A healthy sex life can be great for the immune system which can in turn increase things like sex drive or pleasure. On this week's episode we were able to talk to Dr. Tierney Lorenz on her research on sex and the immune system! About our Guest Dr. Lorenz received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Texas at Austin after completing an internship at the University of Washington School of Medicine. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Kinsey Institute and the Center for the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior at Indiana University. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Nebraska, and a member of the Center for Brain, Biology and Behavior. Dr. Lorenz's research examines the interaction between women's mental, physical and sexual health. The Women, Immunity and Sexual Health (WISH) lab investigates the ways that sexual behavior impact women's immune and endocrine function, as well as ways to help women with mental and/or physical health conditions have happy, healthy sexual lives. Don’t miss this week’s foreplay… New Supreme Court Justice, Brett Kavanaugh, recently said that certain forms of birth control were "abortion inducing." Let's get the facts straight: this is entirely untrue. The pill prevents the body from ovulating (the process of releasing eggs) so that sperm cannot meet with an egg. Even Plan B (otherwise known as the morning after pill) acts as a large dose of birth control to do the exact same thing. The package even specifies that Plan B will not work if sperm has already found its way to an egg. Bottom line is science does NOT say that birth control induces abortion, so try again, Kavanaugh! Read more here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and check out our website at scienceofsexpodcast.com! Check out Dr. Zhana’s next event: Debunking Sex Myths That Ruin Lives, on October 18th. She will be discussing some common myths that get pushed around that can be detrimental to relationships! Click here to reserve your tickets for the event! Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter!
September 11, 2018
In Episode 39, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk with Jimmy Moran on Snapchat use and sex! Snapchat is a popular social media platform, founded in 2011, that allows users to send images and videos with the option of having the content automatically deleted after being viewed. Furthermore, most of the app’s users are under 24 and most non-users assume the app is used sexually. Do people really use snapchat for sexual purposes? How common is this? Finally, what’s the difference between men and women’s use of the app? Tune in to find out more about Jimmy Moran’s research on Snaphchat’s sexual use. About our Guest Jimmy Moran is a first-year doctoral student in the Evolutionary Social Cognition lab directed by Dr. Damian Murray. He received his B.S. in Psychology and Evolution and Behavior from the University of Scranton in 2015, where he worked with Dr. Barry X. Kuhle. After graduating he attended Bucknell University where he received his M.S. in Experimental Psychology and worked with Dr. T. Joel Wade. He is interested in the human sexual psychology, such as mate poaching, of couple’s attractiveness discrepancy. He is currently working on understanding men’s overestimation of women’s sexual intent, and how human’s major histocompatibility complex affect their relationships, attractiveness, as well as health. To read the study discussed in the episode, click here. Don’t miss this week’s foreplay… Rates of three STIs, syphilis, gonorrhea and chlamydia, have reached a record-breaking high in the United States. “Last year, nearly 2.3 million US cases of these sexually transmitted diseases were diagnosed, according to preliminary data.” Tune in to hear what Dr. Zhana and Joe have to say about this new public health crisis. Read the study discussed here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and check out our website at scienceofsexpodcast.com! Check out Dr. Zhana’s next Sex Science Social live show, on September 13th. She will be discussing the gender spectrum from a cross-cultural perspective, featuring Dr. Matthew Stief. Click here to reserve your tickets for the event! We’re gearing up to do another Q&A episode so send us your questions here or email us at info@scienceofsexpodcast.com Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter! Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 1Shares
September 11, 2018
In Episode 39, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk with Jimmy Moran on Snapchat use and sex! Snapchat is a popular social media platform, founded in 2011, that allows users to send images and videos with the option of having the content automatically deleted after being viewed. Furthermore, most of the app's users are under 24 and most non-users assume the app is used sexually. Do people really use snapchat for sexual purposes? How common is this? Finally, what's the difference between men and women's use of the app? Tune in to find out more about Jimmy Moran's research on Snaphchat's sexual use. About our Guest Jimmy Moran is a first-year doctoral student in the Evolutionary Social Cognition lab directed by Dr. Damian Murray. He received his B.S. in Psychology and Evolution and Behavior from the University of Scranton in 2015, where he worked with Dr. Barry X. Kuhle. After graduating he attended Bucknell University where he received his M.S. in Experimental Psychology and worked with Dr. T. Joel Wade. He is interested in the human sexual psychology, such as mate poaching, of couple's attractiveness discrepancy. He is currently working on understanding men's overestimation of women's sexual intent, and how human’s major histocompatibility complex affect their relationships, attractiveness, as well as health. To read the study discussed in the episode, click here. Don’t miss this week’s foreplay… Rates of three STIs, syphilis, gonorrhea and chlamydia, have reached a record-breaking high in the United States. "Last year, nearly 2.3 million US cases of these sexually transmitted diseases were diagnosed, according to preliminary data." Tune in to hear what Dr. Zhana and Joe have to say about this new public health crisis. Read the study discussed here. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and check out our website at scienceofsexpodcast.com! Check out Dr. Zhana’s next Sex Science Social live show, on September 13th. She will be discussing the gender spectrum from a cross-cultural perspective, featuring Dr. Matthew Stief. Click here to reserve your tickets for the event! We're gearing up to do another Q&A episode so send us your questions here or email us at info@scienceofsexpodcast.com Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter!
September 4, 2018
Welcome back to the Science of Sex Podcast! In the Season 2 premiere, your favorite hosts, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk with Dr. Amy Muise on Communal Sexual Motivation, or CSM. CSM, or being Good, Giving, and Game (GGG), in a relationship is all about being motivated to be responsive to a partner’s sexual needs or interests. According to Dr. Muise, CSM works as a spectrum, with individuals ranking from high to low. In this episode, find out how CSM can be beneficial to a relationship, the implications of being in a non-monogamous relationship, and how CSM can be related to understanding other needs of one’s partner. About our Guest Dr. Amy Muise is an Assistant Professor and Director of the Sexual Health and Relationships (SHaRe) lab at York University. Dr. Muise’s research focuses on how can couples keep the spark alive over time. There are challenges to maintaining a satisfying sex life and relationship—desire and passion often decline as a relationship progresses and partners often have different sexual needs and interests. Dr. Muise investigates the psychological and interpersonal factors that help couples maintain desire and passion over time, have more fulfilling sex lives and relationships, and successfully navigate conflicts of interest or transitional periods in a relationship. Dr. Muise’s research informs how couples can thrive in their relationships, and in turn increase their overall health and well-being. For more information, please visit www.amymuise.com and follow her and her lab on Facebook and Twitter. Don’t miss this week’s foreplay… Dr. Zhana and Joe both discuss their personal lives. Dr. Zhana reveals a surprising new development about her thoughts on love, relationships and children. And, Joe spent his summer trying to “heat it up” in the bedroom. Before Next Time… Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and check out our website at scienceofsexpodcast.com! For more in-person sex science, check out Dr. Zhana as the Resident Sex Education at the Touchpoint Town Hall on September 11th. See the event live at the Assemblage, or listen in on the Touchpoint Podcast. Visit the Touchpoint website to get tickets! Check out Dr. Zhana’s next Sex Science Social live show, on September 13th. She will be discussing the gender spectrum from a cross-cultural perspective, featuring Dr. Matthew Stief. Click here to reserve your tickets for the event! For more information on both events go to drzhana.com/events. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter! Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 8Shares
September 4, 2018
Welcome back to the Science of Sex Podcast! In the Season 2 premiere, your favorite hosts, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk with Dr. Amy Muise on Communal Sexual Motivation, or CSM. CSM, or being Good, Giving, and Game (GGG), in a relationship is all about being motivated to be responsive to a partner’s sexual needs or interests. According to Dr. Muise, CSM works as a spectrum, with individuals ranking from high to low. In this episode, find out how CSM can be beneficial to a relationship, the implications of being in a non-monogamous relationship, and how CSM can be related to understanding other needs of one’s partner. About our Guest Dr. Amy Muise is an Assistant Professor and Director of the Sexual Health and Relationships (SHaRe) lab at York University. Dr. Muise’s research focuses on how can couples keep the spark alive over time. There are challenges to maintaining a satisfying sex life and relationship—desire and passion often decline as a relationship progresses and partners often have different sexual needs and interests. Dr. Muise investigates the psychological and interpersonal factors that help couples maintain desire and passion over time, have more fulfilling sex lives and relationships, and successfully navigate conflicts of interest or transitional periods in a relationship. Dr. Muise’s research informs how couples can thrive in their relationships, and in turn increase their overall health and well-being. For more information, please visit www.amymuise.com and follow her and her lab on Facebook and Twitter. Don't miss this week's foreplay... Dr. Zhana and Joe both discuss their personal lives. Dr. Zhana reveals a surprising new development about her thoughts on love, relationships and children. And, Joe spent his summer trying to "heat it up" in the bedroom. Before Next Time... Remember to like The Science of Sex Podcast on Facebook, Twitter, and check out our website at scienceofsexpodcast.com! For more in-person sex science, check out Dr. Zhana as the Resident Sex Education at the Touchpoint Town Hall on September 11th. See the event live at the Assemblage, or listen in on the Touchpoint Podcast. Visit the Touchpoint website to get tickets! Check out Dr. Zhana’s next Sex Science Social live show, on September 13th. She will be discussing the gender spectrum from a cross-cultural perspective, featuring Dr. Matthew Stief. Click here to reserve your tickets for the event! For more information on both events go to drzhana.com/events. Remember to submit comments, questions, and everything in between on our Get in Touch Page! Do you love The Science of Sex Podcast and all the work Dr. Zhana does? Support her by becoming a monthly Patreon Supporter!
June 25, 2018
In episode 35, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Amy C. Moors about her research on non-monogamy! Non-monogamy often gets a bad rep in our society, but also in academia. A lot of research conducted on polyamory has been biased, showing stigma even among researchers. Hence, this makes it difficult to have clear and accurate statistics about non-monogamy and open relationships. Thankfully, there are some studies out there that attempt to analyze this bias and why it occurs. About Our Guest Amy C. Moors, is the Director of the Social Science Research and Evaluation Program at Purdue University’s College of Engineering and a Research Fellow at Indiana University’s Kinsey Institute. This fall she’s honored to join Chapman University’s Department of Psychology as an assistant professor. She earned a Ph.D. in Psychology and Women’s Studies from the University of Michigan. Dr. Moors’s research addresses the impact of bias on people’s well-being and satisfaction in intimate and professional contexts. In one line of research, she studies diverse expressions of sexuality. In her other line of research, she examines strategies for promoting equity in higher education. Dr. Moors has published more than 40 articles and chapters related to gender, sexuality, close relationships, and social inequalities. Recently, she was recognized by the Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality as a “Rising Scholar.” Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… SKYN Condoms unveiled a new survey of 4000 people designed to analyze the behaviors, attitudes and preferences of sexually active millennials. Despite what people may claim, there is still heavy stigma against women who have multiple sexual partners. Also, fewer millennials are using dating apps, and women are (still) more likely to fake an orgasm versus men. Finally, it showed that older millennials are getting kinky – using toys like anal beads, handcuffs, and whips in bed. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
June 25, 2018
In episode 35, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Amy C. Moors about her research on non-monogamy! Non-monogamy often gets a bad rep in our society, but also in academia. A lot of research conducted on polyamory has been biased, showing stigma even among researchers. Hence, this makes it difficult to have clear and accurate statistics about non-monogamy and open relationships. Thankfully, there are some studies out there that attempt to analyze this bias and why it occurs. About Our Guest Amy C. Moors, is the Director of the Social Science Research and Evaluation Program at Purdue University’s College of Engineering and a Research Fellow at Indiana University’s Kinsey Institute. This fall she’s honored to join Chapman University’s Department of Psychology as an assistant professor. She earned a Ph.D. in Psychology and Women’s Studies from the University of Michigan. Dr. Moors’s research addresses the impact of bias on people’s well-being and satisfaction in intimate and professional contexts. In one line of research, she studies diverse expressions of sexuality. In her other line of research, she examines strategies for promoting equity in higher education. Dr. Moors has published more than 40 articles and chapters related to gender, sexuality, close relationships, and social inequalities. Recently, she was recognized by the Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality as a “Rising Scholar.” Don't Miss This Week's Foreplay... SKYN Condoms unveiled a new survey of 4000 people designed to analyze the behaviors, attitudes and preferences of sexually active millennials. Despite what people may claim, there is still heavy stigma against women who have multiple sexual partners. Also, fewer millennials are using dating apps, and women are (still) more likely to fake an orgasm versus men. Finally, it showed that older millennials are getting kinky – using toys like anal beads, handcuffs, and whips in bed.
June 18, 2018
In episode 36, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Patrick Jern about the romantic side effects of hormonal birth control! We often talk about the physical side effects of hormonal birth control methods (i.e. the pill, the IUD, the patch, the shot, the ring…) like weight gain, acne, cramping, spotting, headaches, and so on. But we rarely talk about how the emotional side effects of these hormones can affect relationships. Turns out, hormonal birth control may have an influence on mate preference and relationship outcomes, so we spoke to Dr Patrick Jern who has studied these effects extensively! Read the full study here! About Our Guest Dr. Patrick Jern is currently an associate professor of applied clinical psychology at Åbo Akademi University in Turku, Finland, and leads the sexuality research group at Turku Brain and Mind Centre. He has previously worked as a researcher at universities in Sweden and Australia. He is also a licensed clinical psychologist, and holds a degree in sex therapy. Dr. Jern’s research has focused on human sexuality and sex-related problems, including studies on the etiology and treatment of sexual dysfunctions; how hormonal contraceptives affect relationships; and testing evolutionary hypotheses relating to mate choice and retention. He has authored more than 80 scientific publications, and is currently investigating whether network models – basically the idea that symptoms cause and maintain other symptoms – can be used to improve treatment interventions for sexual problems. Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… A new survey asked people how many people they’ve KISSED in their lives, and the results are really interesting…5% of people have NEVER kissed anyone. That includes 19% of people between 18 and 24 years old. It also includes 2% of people over 55. It’s also an even gender split, 5% of men and 5% of women have never been kissed. 4% of people have only kissed one person. On the other end of things, 15% have kissed more than 50 people. Finally, men are more likely than women to say they’ve kissed more than 50 people. Read the study here. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
June 18, 2018
In episode 36, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Patrick Jern about the romantic side effects of hormonal birth control! We often talk about the physical side effects of hormonal birth control methods (i.e. the pill, the IUD, the patch, the shot, the ring…) like weight gain, acne, cramping, spotting, headaches, and so on. But we rarely talk about how the emotional side effects of these hormones can affect relationships. Turns out, hormonal birth control may have an influence on mate preference and relationship outcomes, so we spoke to Dr Patrick Jern who has studied these effects extensively! Read the full study here! About Our Guest Dr. Patrick Jern is currently an associate professor of applied clinical psychology at Åbo Akademi University in Turku, Finland, and leads the sexuality research group at Turku Brain and Mind Centre. He has previously worked as a researcher at universities in Sweden and Australia. He is also a licensed clinical psychologist, and holds a degree in sex therapy. Dr. Jern’s research has focused on human sexuality and sex-related problems, including studies on the etiology and treatment of sexual dysfunctions; how hormonal contraceptives affect relationships; and testing evolutionary hypotheses relating to mate choice and retention. He has authored more than 80 scientific publications, and is currently investigating whether network models – basically the idea that symptoms cause and maintain other symptoms – can be used to improve treatment interventions for sexual problems. Don't Miss This Week's Foreplay... A new survey asked people how many people they’ve KISSED in their lives, and the results are really interesting…5% of people have NEVER kissed anyone. That includes 19% of people between 18 and 24 years old. It also includes 2% of people over 55. It’s also an even gender split, 5% of men and 5% of women have never been kissed. 4% of people have only kissed one person. On the other end of things, 15% have kissed more than 50 people. Finally, men are more likely than women to say they’ve kissed more than 50 people. Read the study here.
June 11, 2018
In episode 36, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Christian Grov about his research on coming out in America and how it might have changed. Coming out as gay and bisexual has changed over the years, but there is also another layer to coming out and that is coming out as HIV-positive. Due to modern advancements in medicine, an HIV-positive status no longer implies a death sentence, so coming out becomes more complex. This week, we spoke to Dr. Christian Grov on the studies he has conducted about coming out in America. Click here to read the study discussed on the show! About Our Guest Dr. Christian Grov is a Professor in the Department of Community Health and Social Science. His research centers on the sexual health of sexual minority individuals, particularly gay and bisexual men. Exploring substance use, sexual compulsivity, venues where individuals meet sex partners, and Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP). He has (co)authored over 100 publications including the book, In the Company of Men: Inside the Lives of Male Prostitutes. He has served as a member of the NYC Department of Health’s HIV Prevention Planning Group as well as the Board of Directors of HOOK, a non-profit dedicated to improving the health and well-being of men who are involved in sex work. Dr. Grov is an affiliated faculty member with the CUNY Institute for Implementation Science in Population Health (ISPH). Collectively, his body of work seeks to inform HIV and STI prevention, education and health policy. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
June 11, 2018
In episode 36, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Christian Grov about his research on coming out in America and how it might have changed. Coming out as gay and bisexual has changed over the years, but there is also another layer to coming out and that is coming out as HIV-positive. Due to modern advancements in medicine, an HIV-positive status no longer implies a death sentence, so coming out becomes more complex. This week, we spoke to Dr. Christian Grov on the studies he has conducted about coming out in America. Click here to read the study discussed on the show! About Our Guest Dr. Christian Grov is a Professor in the Department of Community Health and Social Science. His research centers on the sexual health of sexual minority individuals, particularly gay and bisexual men. Exploring substance use, sexual compulsivity, venues where individuals meet sex partners, and Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP). He has (co)authored over 100 publications including the book, In the Company of Men: Inside the Lives of Male Prostitutes. He has served as a member of the NYC Department of Health’s HIV Prevention Planning Group as well as the Board of Directors of HOOK, a non-profit dedicated to improving the health and well-being of men who are involved in sex work. Dr. Grov is an affiliated faculty member with the CUNY Institute for Implementation Science in Population Health (ISPH). Collectively, his body of work seeks to inform HIV and STI prevention, education and health policy.
June 4, 2018
In episode 34, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Kirstin Mark about how couples can keep desire alive in long-term relationships! Earlier this year, the Journal of Sex Research published a paper that reviewed research from 64 empirical articles all of which tried to answer the question of how to maintain sexual desire in long term relationships. To discuss the results of this research, we spoke with one of the lead authors of the paper, Dr. Kristen Mark. About Our Guest Dr. Kristen Mark is an Associate Professor in Health Promotion at the University of Kentucky. She is also the Director of the Sexual Health Promotion Lab and the Faculty Fellow for the Office of LGBTQ* Resources. Dr. Mark’s research centers around sexual well-being with an emphasis on the importance of sexual pleasure and satisfaction to the study of sexual health. Her work has been published in over 50 peer reviewed academic journals and she has presented her work at more than 100 national and international conferences. She also regularly contributes to popular media outlets to digest scientific findings for the public. To learn more about Dr. Mark, visit her website: www.kristenmark.com or follow her on twitter @Kristen_Mark. Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… The U.S. fertility rate is the lowest it’s been in 40 years and the decline is sharpest for minority women. This could be due to the fact that having children is extremely expensive in the U.S. with new families receiving little to no government aid when a child is born, unlike some European countries. Read the article discussed here. Apparently, Netflix might not be the best thing to do with your significant other. A new study proclaims that couples getting into bed and watching their own shows on different devices could be cutting down on romantic time. A previous study reported that couples were less interested in being intimate due to watching TV in bed. Read full study here. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
June 4, 2018
In episode 34, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Kirstin Mark about how couples can keep desire alive in long-term relationships! Earlier this year, the Journal of Sex Research published a paper that reviewed research from 64 empirical articles all of which tried to answer the question of how to maintain sexual desire in long term relationships. To discuss the results of this research, we spoke with one of the lead authors of the paper, Dr. Kristen Mark. About Our Guest Dr. Kristen Mark is an Associate Professor in Health Promotion at the University of Kentucky. She is also the Director of the Sexual Health Promotion Lab and the Faculty Fellow for the Office of LGBTQ* Resources. Dr. Mark’s research centers around sexual well-being with an emphasis on the importance of sexual pleasure and satisfaction to the study of sexual health. Her work has been published in over 50 peer reviewed academic journals and she has presented her work at more than 100 national and international conferences. She also regularly contributes to popular media outlets to digest scientific findings for the public. To learn more about Dr. Mark, visit her website: www.kristenmark.com or follow her on twitter @Kristen_Mark. Don't Miss This Week's Foreplay... The U.S. fertility rate is the lowest it’s been in 40 years and the decline is sharpest for minority women. This could be due to the fact that having children is extremely expensive in the U.S. with new families receiving little to no government aid when a child is born, unlike some European countries. Read the article discussed here. Apparently, Netflix might not be the best thing to do with your significant other. A new study proclaims that couples getting into bed and watching their own shows on different devices could be cutting down on romantic time. A previous study reported that couples were less interested in being intimate due to watching TV in bed. Read full study here.
May 28, 2018
In episode 33, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dulcinea Pitagora about what marks the difference between abuse versus consensual kink in a relationship. Many believe that because BDSM is founded upon consent, communication, and negotiation that abuse cannot make its way into a kinky relationship. However, just like vanilla relationships, BDSM dynamics are not immune to the possibility of abuse. It can sometimes be even harder to identify abuse in kink-oriented relationships. It is extremely important to be able to identify this (sometimes very fine) line between consensual BDSM and abuse. To talk about this distinction, we sat down with Dulcinea Pitagora, aka The Kink Doctor. About Our Guest Dulcinea Pitagora holds a Master of Arts in Psychology from the New School for Social Research, a Master of Social Work from New York University, a Master of Education from Widener University, and is an AASECT Certified Sex Therapist and doctoral candidate at Widener University’s PhD program in clinical sexology. Pitagora has a psychotherapy/sex therapy practice in NYC working with individuals, couples, and multiple partners that is trans-, poly-, kink-, and sex work-affirmative. Pitagora is an adjunct professor of sexual health at New York University; has published articles in peer-reviewed journals; and presented at conferences on the topics of alternative sexuality and gender diversity. Pitagora conducts research, lectures, and seminars pertaining to these communities; is the founder of ManhattanAlternative.com, an alternative lifestyle affirmative provider listing; and is a co-organizer of the AltSex NYC Conference. Pitagora is Kink Doctor in the Web series by the same name. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
May 28, 2018
In episode 33, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dulcinea Pitagora about what marks the difference between abuse versus consensual kink in a relationship. Many believe that because BDSM is founded upon consent, communication, and negotiation that abuse cannot make its way into a kinky relationship. However, just like vanilla relationships, BDSM dynamics are not immune to the possibility of abuse. It can sometimes be even harder to identify abuse in kink-oriented relationships. It is extremely important to be able to identify this (sometimes very fine) line between consensual BDSM and abuse. To talk about this distinction, we sat down with Dulcinea Pitagora, aka The Kink Doctor. About Our Guest Dulcinea Pitagora holds a Master of Arts in Psychology from the New School for Social Research, a Master of Social Work from New York University, a Master of Education from Widener University, and is an AASECT Certified Sex Therapist and doctoral candidate at Widener University’s PhD program in clinical sexology. Pitagora has a psychotherapy/sex therapy practice in NYC working with individuals, couples, and multiple partners that is trans-, poly-, kink-, and sex work-affirmative. Pitagora is an adjunct professor of sexual health at New York University; has published articles in peer-reviewed journals; and presented at conferences on the topics of alternative sexuality and gender diversity. Pitagora conducts research, lectures, and seminars pertaining to these communities; is the founder of ManhattanAlternative.com, an alternative lifestyle affirmative provider listing; and is a co-organizer of the AltSex NYC Conference. Pitagora is Kink Doctor in the Web series by the same name.
May 21, 2018
In episode 32, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Emily Rothman about the benefits of educating kids about porn. A new study reported on joint efforts by folks at Boston University and the Boston Public Health Commission to educate young people about pornography, in hopes that they would develop a more realistic understanding of what porn is, how it’s made, and how it relates to real-life sex and bodies. These programs have been proven to work and be extremely beneficial for young people. On this week’s episode we spoke to the lead author on this study, Dr. Emily Rothman. Read study discussed here! About Our Guest Emily F. Rothman, ScD, is a Professor at the Boston University School of Public Health with secondary appointments at the Boston University School of Medicine in Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine. She is also a visiting scientist at the Harvard Injury Control Research Center. Dr. Rothman has authored more than 80 publications that span the areas of intimate partner violence, sexual assault, human trafficking, firearm violence, and pornography. She has been a PI or co-investigator on numerous federal research grants from entities including the NIH and NIJ , and worked closely with multiple state sexual assault and domestic violence coalitions, state health departments, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on issues related to sexual assault prevention. Dr. Rothman received her master’s and doctoral degrees in public health from Harvard University. Interested in incorporating porn literacy for teens in your school or youth group? Sign up for this June 30th training in Boston! This training is for teachers, counselors and youth workers who want to learn how to deliver this curriculum to youth in their locale. You can register on the website for this event here! Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… A new study suggests that millennials are waiting longer to have sex with one in eight still virgins at the age of 26. This could be due to a “fear of intimacy” that is thought to be caused by social media. Many young people feel intense pressure due to the exposure of hyper-sexualized images in the mass media plus their own social media presence. Previous generations reported that one in 20 were virgins at this age. Read full article here! Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
May 21, 2018
In episode 32, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Emily Rothman about the benefits of educating kids about porn. A new study reported on joint efforts by folks at Boston University and the Boston Public Health Commission to educate young people about pornography, in hopes that they would develop a more realistic understanding of what porn is, how it’s made, and how it relates to real-life sex and bodies. These programs have been proven to work and be extremely beneficial for young people. On this week’s episode we spoke to the lead author on this study, Dr. Emily Rothman. Read study discussed here! About Our Guest Emily F. Rothman, ScD, is a Professor at the Boston University School of Public Health with secondary appointments at the Boston University School of Medicine in Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine. She is also a visiting scientist at the Harvard Injury Control Research Center. Dr. Rothman has authored more than 80 publications that span the areas of intimate partner violence, sexual assault, human trafficking, firearm violence, and pornography. She has been a PI or co-investigator on numerous federal research grants from entities including the NIH and NIJ , and worked closely with multiple state sexual assault and domestic violence coalitions, state health departments, and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on issues related to sexual assault prevention. Dr. Rothman received her master’s and doctoral degrees in public health from Harvard University. Interested in incorporating porn literacy for teens in your school or youth group? Sign up for this June 30th training in Boston! This training is for teachers, counselors and youth workers who want to learn how to deliver this curriculum to youth in their locale. You can register on the website for this event here! Don't Miss This Week's Foreplay... A new study suggests that millennials are waiting longer to have sex with one in eight still virgins at the age of 26. This could be due to a “fear of intimacy” that is thought to be caused by social media. Many young people feel intense pressure due to the exposure of hyper-sexualized images in the mass media plus their own social media presence. Previous generations reported that one in 20 were virgins at this age. Read full article here!
May 15, 2018
In episode 31, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Lori Brott about some ways that people can manage low sexual desire. Low sexual desire is something that is more common than most people think. It can appear in many different forms, and it is not synonymous with asexuality. Low sexual desire among women is thought to be common around menopause. There are many different treatment options both medicinal and not for women. On this week’s episode, we have Dr. Lori Brotto discussing her extensive research on treatment for low sexual desire, specifically in women. About Our Guest Dr. Lori Brotto is a Professor in the UBC Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, a Registered Psychologist in Vancouver, Canada, and the Executive Director of the Women’s Health Research Institute of BC located at BC Women’s Hospital. Dr. Brotto is the director of the UBC Sexual Health Laboratory where research primarily focuses on developing and testing psychological and mindfulness-based interventions for women with sexual desire and arousal difficulties and women with chronic genital pain. Dr. Brotto is an Associate Editor for the Archives of Sexual Behavior, has 150 peer-reviewed publications, is the Sexual Health expert writer for the Globe and Mail, and is frequently featured in the media on topics related to sexuality. Her book, Better Sex Through Mindfulness: How Women Can Cultivate Desire is a trade book of her research demonstrating the benefits of mindfulness for women’s sexual concerns. Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… BDSM practitioners are outraged about former New York Attorney General, Eric Schniederman’s, depiction of role-playing. After being accused of sexual assault and sexual violence by several women, Schniederman insists that the activities that occurred between him and his accusers was consensual role-playing. However, the women who have come forward have made clear that their interactions with him were not consensual. Consent, communication, and negotiation are the three most important values upheld in the BDSM community, so when he tried to play sexual assault off as kinky sex, the kink community was not having it at all. This defense of “rough” or “kinky” sex has been used before by people accused of sexual assault, but let it be clear that all activities that fall within BDSM are consensual, and if they are not, it is abuse. Period. Read article here. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
May 15, 2018
In episode 31, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Lori Brott about some ways that people can manage low sexual desire. Low sexual desire is something that is more common than most people think. It can appear in many different forms, and it is not synonymous with asexuality. Low sexual desire among women is thought to be common around menopause. There are many different treatment options both medicinal and not for women. On this week’s episode, we have Dr. Lori Brotto discussing her extensive research on treatment for low sexual desire, specifically in women. About Our Guest Dr. Lori Brotto is a Professor in the UBC Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, a Registered Psychologist in Vancouver, Canada, and the Executive Director of the Women’s Health Research Institute of BC located at BC Women’s Hospital. Dr. Brotto is the director of the UBC Sexual Health Laboratory where research primarily focuses on developing and testing psychological and mindfulness-based interventions for women with sexual desire and arousal difficulties and women with chronic genital pain. Dr. Brotto is an Associate Editor for the Archives of Sexual Behavior, has 150 peer-reviewed publications, is the Sexual Health expert writer for the Globe and Mail, and is frequently featured in the media on topics related to sexuality. Her book, Better Sex Through Mindfulness: How Women Can Cultivate Desire is a trade book of her research demonstrating the benefits of mindfulness for women’s sexual concerns. Don't Miss This Week's Foreplay... BDSM practitioners are outraged about former New York Attorney General, Eric Schniederman’s, depiction of role-playing. After being accused of sexual assault and sexual violence by several women, Schniederman insists that the activities that occurred between him and his accusers was consensual role-playing. However, the women who have come forward have made clear that their interactions with him were not consensual. Consent, communication, and negotiation are the three most important values upheld in the BDSM community, so when he tried to play sexual assault off as kinky sex, the kink community was not having it at all. This defense of “rough” or “kinky” sex has been used before by people accused of sexual assault, but let it be clear that all activities that fall within BDSM are consensual, and if they are not, it is abuse. Period. Read article here.
May 8, 2018
In episode 30, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Dylan Selterman about the motivations for infidelity! There are many factors that play into the cause of infidelity including anger, stress, neglect, a general lack of love or passion, and more. Infidelity and cheating is interesting to study on the quantitative side. We can look at how many people cheat, the demographics of cheaters, etc., but what about the psychological motivations for cheating? What exactly drives a person to cheat? This week we spoke to Dr. Dylan Selterman who has conducted some great research on what motivates people to cheat. Read the full study here. About Our Guest Dylan Selterman received his B.A. in Psychological and Brain Sciences from Johns Hopkins University in 2006 and his Ph.D. in Social/Health Psychology from Stony Brook University in 2011. He currently teaches at the U of Maryland, where he also runs the DREAM Lab, where they research romantic attraction/dating, emotions (e.g., jealousy), attachment in interpersonal relationships, patterns of dreaming, sexual behavior, and morality/ethics. Outside of the classroom, Dr. Selterman leads a mindfulness meditation group for students, and writes for popular media. Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… A new survey found 56% of first-time sex with a partner are AWKWARD, or downright terrible. However, only 30% said they would end things because of a bad first encounter. 70% said that the first time doesn’t define the relationship. “A study conducted by OnePoll in conjunction with Pure Romance examined the first-time sex habits and experiences of 2,000 Americans. The #1 thing that can ruin a first encounter for men is not finishing. And 29% said trouble performing because they DRANK too much has ruined a first-time hook-up. The #1 complaint from women is not enough FOREPLAY. And 37% said a guy’s dirty SHEETS can ruin the mood.” Read full article here. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
May 8, 2018
In episode 30, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Dylan Selterman about the motivations for infidelity! There are many factors that play into the cause of infidelity including anger, stress, neglect, a general lack of love or passion, and more. Infidelity and cheating is interesting to study on the quantitative side. We can look at how many people cheat, the demographics of cheaters, etc., but what about the psychological motivations for cheating? What exactly drives a person to cheat? This week we spoke to Dr. Dylan Selterman who has conducted some great research on what motivates people to cheat. Read the full study here. About Our Guest Dylan Selterman received his B.A. in Psychological and Brain Sciences from Johns Hopkins University in 2006 and his Ph.D. in Social/Health Psychology from Stony Brook University in 2011. He currently teaches at the U of Maryland, where he also runs the DREAM Lab, where they research romantic attraction/dating, emotions (e.g., jealousy), attachment in interpersonal relationships, patterns of dreaming, sexual behavior, and morality/ethics. Outside of the classroom, Dr. Selterman leads a mindfulness meditation group for students, and writes for popular media. Don't Miss This Week's Foreplay... A new survey found 56% of first-time sex with a partner are AWKWARD, or downright terrible. However, only 30% said they would end things because of a bad first encounter. 70% said that the first time doesn’t define the relationship. “A study conducted by OnePoll in conjunction with Pure Romance examined the first-time sex habits and experiences of 2,000 Americans. The #1 thing that can ruin a first encounter for men is not finishing. And 29% said trouble performing because they DRANK too much has ruined a first-time hook-up. The #1 complaint from women is not enough FOREPLAY. And 37% said a guy’s dirty SHEETS can ruin the mood.” Read full article here.
May 1, 2018
In episode 29, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Christian Joyal about some of the more common (and uncommon) kinks and fetishes. Paraphilia is defined as a condition characterized by abnormal sexual desires, typically involving extreme or dangerous activities. While this definition might draw some immediate conclusions, various paraphilias are very common, such as BDSM/kink, while others are more rare. On this week’s episode we spoke with Dr. Christian Joyal on his research on paraphilia and uncommon sexual interests. Links to studies discussed in the episode: What exactly is an unusual sexual fantasy? The Prevalence of Paraphilic Interests How anomalous are paraphilic interests? About Our Guest Christian Joyal, Ph.D., is doctor in neuropsychology, full professor at the University of Quebec, co-director of the International Center of Comparative Criminology and associate researcher at the Philippe-Pinel Institute of Montreal. His main research interests concern the neuroimaging of sexual arousal and sexual deviance, the definition of “normal” sexuality and paraphilias, as well as motives and origins of BDSM proclivities. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
May 1, 2018
In episode 29, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Christian Joyal about some of the more common (and uncommon) kinks and fetishes. Paraphilia is defined as a condition characterized by abnormal sexual desires, typically involving extreme or dangerous activities. While this definition might draw some immediate conclusions, various paraphilias are very common, such as BDSM/kink, while others are more rare. On this week’s episode we spoke with Dr. Christian Joyal on his research on paraphilia and uncommon sexual interests. Links to studies discussed in the episode: What exactly is an unusual sexual fantasy? The Prevalence of Paraphilic Interests How anomalous are paraphilic interests? About Our Guest Christian Joyal, Ph.D., is doctor in neuropsychology, full professor at the University of Quebec, co-director of the International Center of Comparative Criminology and associate researcher at the Philippe-Pinel Institute of Montreal. His main research interests concern the neuroimaging of sexual arousal and sexual deviance, the definition of “normal” sexuality and paraphilias, as well as motives and origins of BDSM proclivities.
April 25, 2018
The episode is all about YOU! This week Dr. Zhana takes your sex questions! You hit us up online and on social media and now Zhana gives you her science based answers in the most Dr. Zhana kind of way. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
April 24, 2018
The episode is all about YOU! This week Dr. Zhana takes your sex questions! You hit us up online and on social media and now Zhana gives you her science based answers in the most Dr. Zhana kind of way.
April 17, 2018
This week, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to “The Vagina Scientist.” Dr. Jim Pfaus and his team published an article attempting to resolve the controversy surrounding clitoral versus vaginal orgasms and we break it down in this episode of “The Science of Sex.” Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
April 17, 2018
This week, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to "The Vagina Scientist." Dr. Jim Pfaus and his team published an article attempting to resolve the controversy surrounding clitoral versus vaginal orgasms and we break it down in this episode of "The Science of Sex."
April 11, 2018
In episode 26, Things got a little heavy in this episode where we talked to James Cantor about his research on pedophilia. We often think of pedophilia as a sexual attraction towards minors, but that’s actually not true. Western culture has become accustomed to viewing anyone under the age of 18 as a child, however biologically “children” become “adults” at a much earlier age. On average, puberty occurs between the ages of 10 and 14 for girls and 12 and 16 for boys. While boys and girls can reach sexual maturity before the age of 18, we, as a culture, have decided that, on average, children reach a certain emotional maturity around 18. However, different states have agreed upon various ages for when a minor can consent to sexual activity. We often make the mistake of viewing adults who have sex with people under the age of 18 as pedophiles, but it’s actually a lot more complicated. So we spoke to Dr. James Cantor about his extensive research regarding pedophilia. About Our Guest Dr. James Cantor is a clinical psychologist and sexual behavior scientist, studying the nature and causes of sexual interests—from heterosexuality and homosexuality to rare and exotic desires from sexual fantasies of being swallowed to people who have sex while dressed or cross-dressed as animals. He and his team have used a wide range of neuroscientific techniques to examine pedophilia and its potential causes. Their results have shown that having a sexual interest in children is not a result of suffering sexual abuse in one’s own childhood, as generally believed, but an innate characteristic of neurological origin, like a sexual orientation. The implications of his team’s work have gained international interest, including his appearances on CNN, the BBC, and Dan Savage’s column Savage Love to discuss how society can better improve child safety and provide ethical treatment for atypical sexual interests. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
April 11, 2018
In episode 26, Things got a little heavy in this episode where we talked to James Cantor about his research on pedophilia. We often think of pedophilia as a sexual attraction towards minors, but that’s actually not true. Western culture has become accustomed to viewing anyone under the age of 18 as a child, however biologically “children” become “adults” at a much earlier age. On average, puberty occurs between the ages of 10 and 14 for girls and 12 and 16 for boys. While boys and girls can reach sexual maturity before the age of 18, we, as a culture, have decided that, on average, children reach a certain emotional maturity around 18. However, different states have agreed upon various ages for when a minor can consent to sexual activity. We often make the mistake of viewing adults who have sex with people under the age of 18 as pedophiles, but it’s actually a lot more complicated. So we spoke to Dr. James Cantor about his extensive research regarding pedophilia. About Our Guest Dr. James Cantor is a clinical psychologist and sexual behavior scientist, studying the nature and causes of sexual interests—from heterosexuality and homosexuality to rare and exotic desires from sexual fantasies of being swallowed to people who have sex while dressed or cross-dressed as animals. He and his team have used a wide range of neuroscientific techniques to examine pedophilia and its potential causes. Their results have shown that having a sexual interest in children is not a result of suffering sexual abuse in one’s own childhood, as generally believed, but an innate characteristic of neurological origin, like a sexual orientation. The implications of his team’s work have gained international interest, including his appearances on CNN, the BBC, and Dan Savage’s column Savage Love to discuss how society can better improve child safety and provide ethical treatment for atypical sexual interests.
April 3, 2018
In episode 25, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to J. Michael Baily about sexual orientation: What is it and do women have one? Sexual orientation, although widely agreed upon to exist, is still disputed by some in the scientific community. Specifically, women’s sexual orientation has been questioned based on the assumption that women are more likely to be able to “change” their sexual orientation. Speaking with us about his work on sexual orientation on this episode is J. Micahel Bailey. About Our Guest J. Michael Bailey has been involved in research in a wide variety of fields and has one of the most diverse research programs of anyone in Canada. Currently he has over 8200 citations in Google Scholar, over 500 from the last calendar year. These are in fields as diverse and divergent as herpetology, space biology, and human sexuality. Most of Bailey’s research now is in psychology and health. An important part of his life has been as a science communicator. For ten years, he was a columnist on the TV science news show “Daily Planet” as well as “Scientist-in-Residence” for an additional five years for the Canadian Discovery Channel. While at Dalhousie University, he received the two major science communicator awards available in eastern Canada. Don’t Miss this Week’s Foreplay… You’ve heard of “ghosting,” but you probably haven’t heard of “mosting.” The term was first coined by MEL Magazine back in January and has been trending on social media in recent days. Journalist Tracy Moore wrote, “Mosting is when someone goes overboard on the fluff job and then vanishes. It’s not just someone being complementary and flattering; it’s someone faking being totally smitten when they aren’t.” She later clarified to the Huffington Post, “Mosting is ghosting, but where before you ghost, you completely love bomb the person with praise, compliments and faux perfect soulmate-type stuff.” Male birth control might be a reality sooner than we thought. A new, small study presented in Chicago at the annual Endocrine Society meeting found an experimental drug called dimethandrolone (or DMAU), is both safe and effective. In a month-long trial involving 83 men, the drug was found to lower hormone levels without signs of testosterone deficiency or excess. Study authors said there was “marked suppression” of testosterone and of two hormones necessary for a man to produce sperm for those who took 400mg of DMAU, the highest dose. More research is needed before DMAU becomes a viable option for male birth control, but this drug is considered “a major step forward in the development of a once-daily “male pill.” Afterglow Porn Hub announced that it’s offering a $25,000 grant to fund a “human sexuality research project” to support university professors and researchers who supervise student fieldwork. The creation of the Pornhub Grant for Sexual Wellness coincides with the relaunch of the site’s Sexual Wellness Center (which I am featured on!), where users can read hundreds of articles on all aspects of sexual health. The grant aims to advance sexual research, whether it be “technological, medical or sociologically rooted,” according to a press release that boasts 85 million-plus visitors per day. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
April 3, 2018
In episode 25, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to J. Michael Baily about sexual orientation: What is it and do women have one? Sexual orientation, although widely agreed upon to exist, is still disputed by some in the scientific community. Specifically, women's sexual orientation has been questioned based on the assumption that women are more likely to be able to “change” their sexual orientation. Speaking with us about his work on sexual orientation on this episode is J. Micahel Bailey. About Our Guest J. Michael Bailey has been involved in research in a wide variety of fields and has one of the most diverse research programs of anyone in Canada. Currently he has over 8200 citations in Google Scholar, over 500 from the last calendar year. These are in fields as diverse and divergent as herpetology, space biology, and human sexuality. Most of Bailey’s research now is in psychology and health. An important part of his life has been as a science communicator. For ten years, he was a columnist on the TV science news show “Daily Planet” as well as “Scientist-in-Residence” for an additional five years for the Canadian Discovery Channel. While at Dalhousie University, he received the two major science communicator awards available in eastern Canada. Don't Miss this Week's Foreplay... You’ve heard of “ghosting,” but you probably haven’t heard of “mosting.” The term was first coined by MEL Magazine back in January and has been trending on social media in recent days. Journalist Tracy Moore wrote, “Mosting is when someone goes overboard on the fluff job and then vanishes. It’s not just someone being complementary and flattering; it’s someone faking being totally smitten when they aren’t.” She later clarified to the Huffington Post, “Mosting is ghosting, but where before you ghost, you completely love bomb the person with praise, compliments and faux perfect soulmate-type stuff.” Male birth control might be a reality sooner than we thought. A new, small study presented in Chicago at the annual Endocrine Society meeting found an experimental drug called dimethandrolone (or DMAU), is both safe and effective. In a month-long trial involving 83 men, the drug was found to lower hormone levels without signs of testosterone deficiency or excess. Study authors said there was “marked suppression” of testosterone and of two hormones necessary for a man to produce sperm for those who took 400mg of DMAU, the highest dose. More research is needed before DMAU becomes a viable option for male birth control, but this drug is considered “a major step forward in the development of a once-daily “male pill.” Afterglow Porn Hub announced that it’s offering a $25,000 grant to fund a “human sexuality research project” to support university professors and researchers who supervise student fieldwork. The creation of the Pornhub Grant for Sexual Wellness coincides with the relaunch of the site’s Sexual Wellness Center (which I am featured on!), where users can read hundreds of articles on all aspects of sexual health. The grant aims to advance sexual research, whether it be “technological, medical or sociologically rooted,” according to a press release that boasts 85 million-plus visitors per day.
March 27, 2018
In episode 24, we explore some of the ways that people can treat erectile dysfunction without medication. There has been significant research conducted on those diagnosed with erectile dysfunction (ED). Many of those treatments include prescription medication, however there are also alternative options available. To discuss the variety of treatments for ED, we spoke with Dr. Richard Wassersug. About Our Guest Dr. Richard Wassersug is an Honorary Professor at the University of British Columbia and also an Adjunct Professor at the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, LaTrobe University. He’s worked in a wide variety of fields from the biology of frogs, to space biology, and human sexuality. Most of his research now is in psychology and health. For ten years, he was a columnist on the TV science news show “Daily Planet” as well as “Scientist-in-Residence” for an additional five years for the Canadian Discovery Channel. Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… A new survey of 2,000 US women by Cosmopolitan magazine found that 70 percent of millennials who have used the pill have stopped taking it or thought about stopping in for the past three years. Instead of the pill, many women have turned to smartphone apps to help track their fertility. Some of the more popular apps include, Natural Cycles ($79.99/year), MyFLO ($1.99), Clue (free with in-app purchases), and AskTia (free). While these apps can be a great alternative for people who do not wish to alter their body’s hormone levels, they still do not offer the effectiveness that medical birth control or condoms offer. Afterglow While some people identify as asexual or demisexual (requiring an emotional attraction before feeling sexual attraction), a term for the opposite phenomenon has been coined. Megasexuals are people who require a strong sexual attraction or connection before they find themselves able to experience emotional attraction to someone. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
March 27, 2018
In episode 24, we explore some of the ways that people can treat erectile dysfunction without medication. There has been significant research conducted on those diagnosed with erectile dysfunction (ED). Many of those treatments include prescription medication, however there are also alternative options available. To discuss the variety of treatments for ED, we spoke with Dr. Richard Wassersug. About Our Guest Dr. Richard Wassersug is an Honorary Professor at the University of British Columbia and also an Adjunct Professor at the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society, LaTrobe University. He’s worked in a wide variety of fields from the biology of frogs, to space biology, and human sexuality. Most of his research now is in psychology and health. For ten years, he was a columnist on the TV science news show “Daily Planet” as well as “Scientist-in-Residence” for an additional five years for the Canadian Discovery Channel. Don't Miss This Week's Foreplay... A new survey of 2,000 US women by Cosmopolitan magazine found that 70 percent of millennials who have used the pill have stopped taking it or thought about stopping in for the past three years. Instead of the pill, many women have turned to smartphone apps to help track their fertility. Some of the more popular apps include, Natural Cycles ($79.99/year), MyFLO ($1.99), Clue (free with in-app purchases), and AskTia (free). While these apps can be a great alternative for people who do not wish to alter their body’s hormone levels, they still do not offer the effectiveness that medical birth control or condoms offer. Afterglow While some people identify as asexual or demisexual (requiring an emotional attraction before feeling sexual attraction), a term for the opposite phenomenon has been coined. Megasexuals are people who require a strong sexual attraction or connection before they find themselves able to experience emotional attraction to someone.
March 20, 2018
What does it mean when someone identifies as “mostly-straight?” In episode 23, we talk to Dr. Ritch Savin-Williams about sexual fluidity and the Kinsey scale. Ever since the development of the Kinsey scale for sexual orientation, there has been significant research on sexual fluidity. While some easily self-identify as gay, straight, bisexual, or pansexual, there are others who’s sexual orientation isn’t as clearly defined by society. Some folks feel as though they are “mostly” gay or straight, but many confuse this concept with bisexuality. On this week’s episode Dr. Zhana and Joe spoke with Dr. Ritch Savin-Williams  on his extensive research on sexual fluidity, specifically those who are considered “mostly-straight.” About Our Guest Dr. Ritch C. Savin-Williams, Professor Emeritus at Cornell University, has written Bisexual Young Men [draft], Mostly Straight: Sexual Fluidity among Men (2017), Becoming Who I Am: Young Men on Being Gay (2016), and The New Gay Teenager (2005). He is a licensed clinical psychologist and has served as an expert witness on same-sex marriage, gay adoption, and Boy Scout court cases. Dr. Savin-Williams has consulted for media outlets such as MTV, 20/20, Oprah Winfrey, The Today Show, National Geographic, National Public Radio, Rolling Stone, Time, New York Times, and Washington Post. Dr. Savin-Williams blogs on Sex/Romance for Psychology Today. Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay According to Dr. Helen Fischer from the Kinsey Institute, men who own dogs get more dates. Owning a dog shows that you are responsible and are able to care for someone other than yourself. Various studies have backed up this claim, including one done in 1992 that found subjects in photographs were rated as happier and more likable when they posed with a dog. Also, a 2013 study found men who were described to volunteers as only interested in short-term flings were more likely to be seen as potential long-term lovers if they owned a dog. Afterglow According to the people at YouPorn, 24% of straight guys say they’ve watched GAY porn. And 39% of women have seen lesbian porn. They also found that 65% of men and 59% of women have watched videos on their site with their significant other. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
March 20, 2018
What does it mean when someone identifies as “mostly-straight?” In episode 23, we talk to Dr. Ritch Savin-Williams about sexual fluidity and the Kinsey scale. Ever since the development of the Kinsey scale for sexual orientation, there has been significant research on sexual fluidity. While some easily self-identify as gay, straight, bisexual, or pansexual, there are others who’s sexual orientation isn’t as clearly defined by society. Some folks feel as though they are “mostly” gay or straight, but many confuse this concept with bisexuality. On this week’s episode Dr. Zhana and Joe spoke with Dr. Ritch Savin-Williams  on his extensive research on sexual fluidity, specifically those who are considered “mostly-straight.” About Our Guest Dr. Ritch C. Savin-Williams, Professor Emeritus at Cornell University, has written Bisexual Young Men [draft], Mostly Straight: Sexual Fluidity among Men (2017), Becoming Who I Am: Young Men on Being Gay (2016), and The New Gay Teenager (2005). He is a licensed clinical psychologist and has served as an expert witness on same-sex marriage, gay adoption, and Boy Scout court cases. Dr. Savin-Williams has consulted for media outlets such as MTV, 20/20, Oprah Winfrey, The Today Show, National Geographic, National Public Radio, Rolling Stone, Time, New York Times, and Washington Post. Dr. Savin-Williams blogs on Sex/Romance for Psychology Today. Don't Miss This Week's Foreplay According to Dr. Helen Fischer from the Kinsey Institute, men who own dogs get more dates. Owning a dog shows that you are responsible and are able to care for someone other than yourself. Various studies have backed up this claim, including one done in 1992 that found subjects in photographs were rated as happier and more likable when they posed with a dog. Also, a 2013 study found men who were described to volunteers as only interested in short-term flings were more likely to be seen as potential long-term lovers if they owned a dog. Afterglow According to the people at YouPorn, 24% of straight guys say they’ve watched GAY porn. And 39% of women have seen lesbian porn. They also found that 65% of men and 59% of women have watched videos on their site with their significant other.
March 13, 2018
What are some of the most popular condom errors and how common are they? In episode 22, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Cynthia Graham about the different ways people misuse condoms and make condom errors. We’ve been actively talking and educating about condoms for decades now, and if people would only listen to scientists and public health professionals, everyone would be wrapping it up all the time! But that doesn’t seem to be the case, and too often, condoms don’t get used, and sometimes they get used but fail, and people end up with unwanted pregnancies and STIs. So Dr. Zhana and Joe sat down with Dr. Cynthia Graham and discussed her research on these errors. About Our Guest Cynthia Graham is a Professor of Sexual and Reproductive Health at the University of Southampton. She is also a Research Fellow at The Kinsey Institute. Cynthia obtained her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from McGill University and her Masters in clinical psychology from the University of Glasgow. She is a Fellow of the British Psychological Society and of the Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality. Cynthia is is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Sex Research. She has published over 140 articles in peer-reviewed journals and 40 book chapters. Her research interests focus on women’s sexual and reproductive health, in particular the behavioural effects of hormonal contraceptives, sexual excitation and sexual inhibition, sexual problems in women, and condom use errors and problems. Don’t Miss this Week’s Foreplay… According to a survey, only 12% of females have asked a male to send a dick pic. Researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology found that women LIKE one-night stands as long as these two conditions are met: they’re the one who initiated it and the other person was good at getting-it-on. And that second condition is definitely important. The researchers found that both women AND men are more likely to regret a one-night stand if the other person was mediocre in bed. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
March 13, 2018
What are some of the most popular condom errors and how common are they? In episode 22, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Cynthia Graham about the different ways people misuse condoms and make condom errors. We’ve been actively talking and educating about condoms for decades now, and if people would only listen to scientists and public health professionals, everyone would be wrapping it up all the time! But that doesn’t seem to be the case, and too often, condoms don’t get used, and sometimes they get used but fail, and people end up with unwanted pregnancies and STIs. So Dr. Zhana and Joe sat down with Dr. Cynthia Graham and discussed her research on these errors. About Our Guest Cynthia Graham is a Professor of Sexual and Reproductive Health at the University of Southampton. She is also a Research Fellow at The Kinsey Institute. Cynthia obtained her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from McGill University and her Masters in clinical psychology from the University of Glasgow. She is a Fellow of the British Psychological Society and of the Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality. Cynthia is is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Sex Research. She has published over 140 articles in peer-reviewed journals and 40 book chapters. Her research interests focus on women’s sexual and reproductive health, in particular the behavioural effects of hormonal contraceptives, sexual excitation and sexual inhibition, sexual problems in women, and condom use errors and problems. Don't Miss this Week's Foreplay... According to a survey, only 12% of females have asked a male to send a dick pic. Researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology found that women LIKE one-night stands as long as these two conditions are met: they’re the one who initiated it and the other person was good at getting-it-on. And that second condition is definitely important. The researchers found that both women AND men are more likely to regret a one-night stand if the other person was mediocre in bed.
March 6, 2018
Is there a relationship between pubic hair and STD’s? Pubic hair isn’t as popular as it once was. The majority of both men and women have engaged in some sort of grooming ‘down there,’ whether it’s some basic ‘manscaping’ or waxing everything off. But have you ever wondered if having (or not having) pubic hair made a difference in your susceptibility to STI’s? Turns out, not having any pubic hair may actually increase the chances of contracting an STI. To talk about the study that focuses on pubic hair, we interviewed Dr. Benjamin Breyer. About Our Guest Dr Benjamin Breyer is an Associate Professor of Urology and Epidemiology & Biostatistics at UCSF, but he’s also a practitioner, a surgeon, Chief of Urology, San Francisco General Hospital. Dr. Breyer’s primary research interests involve studying the epidemiology of sexual dysfunction, lower urinary tract symptoms, and genitourinary trauma and reconstruction. His work has been funded by the NIH supported and he has authored or coauthored over 130 articles and book chapters. Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… According to a new study, the G-spot is a myth! After conducting tests on a group of 13 women, researchers found no unique anatomical structure that is known as “the G spot.” However, this doesn’t necessarily mean that the spot doesn’t exist, it just means that biologically there is no physical G-spot structure inside the vagina. According to a survey, most people don’t wait too long before feeling comfortable enough to travel with someone. Women said they would go on a trip with someone after five dates, and the men said THREE! What are the most common noises people make during sex? According to a new survey, 91% of men and 77% of women enjoy moaning, which came in first place. Following that, dirty talk, heavy breathing, and screaming were all popular. Even 8% of men and 13% of women said that silence was preferred. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
March 6, 2018
Is there a relationship between pubic hair and STD’s? Pubic hair isn’t as popular as it once was. The majority of both men and women have engaged in some sort of grooming ‘down there,’ whether it’s some basic ‘manscaping’ or waxing everything off. But have you ever wondered if having (or not having) pubic hair made a difference in your susceptibility to STI’s? Turns out, not having any pubic hair may actually increase the chances of contracting an STI. To talk about the study that focuses on pubic hair, we interviewed Dr. Benjamin Breyer. About Our Guest Dr Benjamin Breyer is an Associate Professor of Urology and Epidemiology & Biostatistics at UCSF, but he’s also a practitioner, a surgeon, Chief of Urology, San Francisco General Hospital. Dr. Breyer’s primary research interests involve studying the epidemiology of sexual dysfunction, lower urinary tract symptoms, and genitourinary trauma and reconstruction. His work has been funded by the NIH supported and he has authored or coauthored over 130 articles and book chapters. Don't Miss This Week's Foreplay... According to a new study, the G-spot is a myth! After conducting tests on a group of 13 women, researchers found no unique anatomical structure that is known as “the G spot.” However, this doesn’t necessarily mean that the spot doesn’t exist, it just means that biologically there is no physical G-spot structure inside the vagina. According to a survey, most people don’t wait too long before feeling comfortable enough to travel with someone. Women said they would go on a trip with someone after five dates, and the men said THREE! What are the most common noises people make during sex? According to a new survey, 91% of men and 77% of women enjoy moaning, which came in first place. Following that, dirty talk, heavy breathing, and screaming were all popular. Even 8% of men and 13% of women said that silence was preferred.
February 27, 2018
Are there biological factors that contribute to sexual orientation? The question of whether biology plays a role in determining sexual orientation is heavily debated in the scientific community. While some people believe that sexual orientation is a choice, others disagree and believe that there is significant evidence to suggest that sexual orientation is decided before we’re even born. Studies have concluded that the brains of heterosexual vs homosexual individuals are organized differently. To talk about his research on this subject, Dr. Qazi Rahman joined us to help get to the bottom of this question. About Our Guest Dr Qazi Rahman is one of the leading scientists in the psychobiology of sexual orientation. His work explores the evolutionary, genetic, neurodevelopmental, and neurocognitive underpinnings of human sexual orientation and the philosophical implications of this science for broader issues. He is currently a senior lecturer at the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, and his book, Born Gay: The Psychobiology of Sex Orientation, lays out his findings. Unsolicited Dick Pics According to a survey, only 12% of females have asked a male to send a dick pic. However, unsurprisingly, 46% of women say they have received one nonetheless. The survey also concluded that 44% of men think women find it sexy when they receive a photo of a guy’s junk, but 58% of women think receiving a dick pic is gross. Clearly we have some work to do on communication. Mico-Cheating Have you heard of “micro-cheating?” It encompasses a range of behaviors like fantasizing about or feeling attracted to someone other than your partner. According to Dr. Lisa Brateman, an NYC-based Psychotherapist and Relationship Specialist, the vast majority of people in relationships engage in “micro-cheating” and it is completely normal. The definition of micro-cheating varies from couple to couple, and most professionals suggest communicating with your partner about these thoughts and feelings. Who know? Maybe your partner is also attracted to that cute bartender. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
February 27, 2018
Are there biological factors that contribute to sexual orientation? The question of whether biology plays a role in determining sexual orientation is heavily debated in the scientific community. While some people believe that sexual orientation is a choice, others disagree and believe that there is significant evidence to suggest that sexual orientation is decided before we’re even born. Studies have concluded that the brains of heterosexual vs homosexual individuals are organized differently. To talk about his research on this subject, Dr. Qazi Rahman joined us to help get to the bottom of this question. About Our Guest Dr Qazi Rahman is one of the leading scientists in the psychobiology of sexual orientation. His work explores the evolutionary, genetic, neurodevelopmental, and neurocognitive underpinnings of human sexual orientation and the philosophical implications of this science for broader issues. He is currently a senior lecturer at the Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, and his book, Born Gay: The Psychobiology of Sex Orientation, lays out his findings. Unsolicited Dick Pics According to a survey, only 12% of females have asked a male to send a dick pic. However, unsurprisingly, 46% of women say they have received one nonetheless. The survey also concluded that 44% of men think women find it sexy when they receive a photo of a guy’s junk, but 58% of women think receiving a dick pic is gross. Clearly we have some work to do on communication. Mico-Cheating Have you heard of “micro-cheating?” It encompasses a range of behaviors like fantasizing about or feeling attracted to someone other than your partner. According to Dr. Lisa Brateman, an NYC-based Psychotherapist and Relationship Specialist, the vast majority of people in relationships engage in “micro-cheating” and it is completely normal. The definition of micro-cheating varies from couple to couple, and most professionals suggest communicating with your partner about these thoughts and feelings. Who know? Maybe your partner is also attracted to that cute bartender.
February 17, 2018
Do consent-oriented communities (like BDSM) experience lower levels of rape culture? A study published in 2016 in the Journal of Sex Research, aimed to explore whether communities that emphasize consent see less rape culture than our mainstream society. It compared various communities (college campuses, BDSM, and workplaces) to find out how the levels of sexism, victim blaming, sexual aggression and more stood. Turns out that the BDSM community saw the lowest level of these rape-culture associated ideas. In episode 19, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Kathryn Klement about her research on this topic. About Our Guest Dr. Kathryn Klement is a feminist social psychologist who specializes in research examining attitudes about women’s sexuality, sexual violence, and reproductive justice. She currently works at Bemidji State University where she teaches courses on human sexuality, women and gender, and research methods. Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… According to a survey, couples who argue are 10 times more likely to be happier and stay together versus couples who avoid talking about their problems. This doesn’t necessarily mean that couples who fight constantly are matches made in heaven, but it does suggest that talking through issues (i.e. strong communication) can contribute to a positive relationship. Read full article here. Ever wonder if you’re really in love? Then you’re in luck because a medical test may soon be available to differentiate love or lust. Dr. Fred Nour, a neuroscientist based in Los Angeles, says that we could have this scientific technology by 2028. Using an MRI-type scanner, the test would be able to detect the presence of specific chemicals associated with feelings of love in the brain. Read article discussed here. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
February 17, 2018
Do consent-oriented communities (like BDSM) experience lower levels of rape culture? A study published in 2016 in the Journal of Sex Research, aimed to explore whether communities that emphasize consent see less rape culture than our mainstream society. It compared various communities (college campuses, BDSM, and workplaces) to find out how the levels of sexism, victim blaming, sexual aggression and more stood. Turns out that the BDSM community saw the lowest level of these rape-culture associated ideas. In episode 19, Dr. Zhana and Joe talk to Dr. Kathryn Klement about her research on this topic. About Our Guest Dr. Kathryn Klement is a feminist social psychologist who specializes in research examining attitudes about women’s sexuality, sexual violence, and reproductive justice. She currently works at Bemidji State University where she teaches courses on human sexuality, women and gender, and research methods. Don't Miss This Week's Foreplay... According to a survey, couples who argue are 10 times more likely to be happier and stay together versus couples who avoid talking about their problems. This doesn’t necessarily mean that couples who fight constantly are matches made in heaven, but it does suggest that talking through issues (i.e. strong communication) can contribute to a positive relationship. Read full article here. Ever wonder if you’re really in love? Then you’re in luck because a medical test may soon be available to differentiate love or lust. Dr. Fred Nour, a neuroscientist based in Los Angeles, says that we could have this scientific technology by 2028. Using an MRI-type scanner, the test would be able to detect the presence of specific chemicals associated with feelings of love in the brain. Read article discussed here.
February 9, 2018
This week, Joe and Dr. Zhana switched things up and decided to answer some questions we’ve been asked by listeners! We got some really interesting questions over the past few months, so we dedicated an episode to answering them (well, Dr. Zhana answered them and Joe chimed in with some witty banter). They talked about a range of topics including, cuckolding, open relationships, blowjobs, pubic hair, consent, and more! Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… According to a report from the National Center for Health Statistics, Herpes (HSV-1 and HSV-2) is decreasing among all demographics in the United States. Since 1999, HSV-1 (oral Herpes) has decreased by 11.3% and HSV-2 (genital Herpes) has gone down 5.9%. Read full article here. Apparently, there are some new dating terms being used by young people. Flexting is bragging A LOT when you’re messaging with someone before you meet them (and men are more likely to do this). Cricketing is when someone goes days without responding. Ghostbusting is when someone tries to ghost you…but you won’t let them. Serendipidating is when you put off a date just to give yourself a little extra time to meet someone better. Fauxbae’ing is when someone pretends to have a significant other on social media when they’re single. Check out the rates of these trends on the podcast! Read article discussed here. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
February 9, 2018
This week, Joe and Dr. Zhana switched things up and decided to answer some questions we’ve been asked by listeners! We got some really interesting questions over the past few months, so we dedicated an episode to answering them (well, Dr. Zhana answered them and Joe chimed in with some witty banter). They talked about a range of topics including, cuckolding, open relationships, blowjobs, pubic hair, consent, and more! Don't Miss This Week's Foreplay... According to a report from the National Center for Health Statistics, Herpes (HSV-1 and HSV-2) is decreasing among all demographics in the United States. Since 1999, HSV-1 (oral Herpes) has decreased by 11.3% and HSV-2 (genital Herpes) has gone down 5.9%. Read full article here. Apparently, there are some new dating terms being used by young people. Flexting is bragging A LOT when you’re messaging with someone before you meet them (and men are more likely to do this). Cricketing is when someone goes days without responding. Ghostbusting is when someone tries to ghost you…but you won’t let them. Serendipidating is when you put off a date just to give yourself a little extra time to meet someone better. Fauxbae’ing is when someone pretends to have a significant other on social media when they’re single. Check out the rates of these trends on the podcast! Read article discussed here.
February 2, 2018
Could cuckolding be a positive thing for some couples? A new study investigates fantasies about and experiences with cuckolding in a large and diverse sample of gay-identified men. The study received media attention, with CNN reporting “Cuckolding could be positive for some couples.” One of the study’s authors is not a scientist but is probably a familiar name to most listeners: Dan Savage. We spoke with the lead author of the study, Dr, Justin Lehmiller. About Our Guest Dr. Justin J. Lehmiller received his Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Purdue University. He is currently the Director of the Social Psychology Graduate Program at Ball State University. Dr. Lehmiller is also a Research Fellow at The Kinsey Institute. Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… A new survey of more than 20,000 U.K. employees uncovered nearly 90 percent of them admitting to some form of sexual interaction in the office. Although office relationships are often discouraged in most corporate environments, the dating app survey found that sexual activity inside office workplaces is quite common. Among the 20,238 British people surveyed by Saucy Dates, 87 percent said they “have engaged in sexual activity” in the office at some point throughout the span of their career. Read full article here. Afterglow New research from Confi, a digital health startup founded at Harvard Business School, shows that men and women have different expectations when it comes to sex. The survey looked at 1,200 young people between 18 and 25, the majority of whom identified as straight. 45% of men surveyed said they expect vaginal sex from someone who goes home with them after a party. But when you consider the fact that just 31% of women said the same, you can really see the problem: there’s a 14 percent disparity of expectations. That means that 14 percent of the time there may be men expecting sex that women aren’t planning on having. Read article discussed here. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
February 2, 2018
Could cuckolding be a positive thing for some couples? A new study investigates fantasies about and experiences with cuckolding in a large and diverse sample of gay-identified men. The study received media attention, with CNN reporting “Cuckolding could be positive for some couples." One of the study's authors is not a scientist but is probably a familiar name to most listeners: Dan Savage. We spoke with the lead author of the study, Dr, Justin Lehmiller. About Our Guest Dr. Justin J. Lehmiller received his Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Purdue University. He is currently the Director of the Social Psychology Graduate Program at Ball State University. Dr. Lehmiller is also a Research Fellow at The Kinsey Institute. Don't Miss This Week's Foreplay... A new survey of more than 20,000 U.K. employees uncovered nearly 90 percent of them admitting to some form of sexual interaction in the office. Although office relationships are often discouraged in most corporate environments, the dating app survey found that sexual activity inside office workplaces is quite common. Among the 20,238 British people surveyed by Saucy Dates, 87 percent said they “have engaged in sexual activity” in the office at some point throughout the span of their career. Read full article here. Afterglow New research from Confi, a digital health startup founded at Harvard Business School, shows that men and women have different expectations when it comes to sex. The survey looked at 1,200 young people between 18 and 25, the majority of whom identified as straight. 45% of men surveyed said they expect vaginal sex from someone who goes home with them after a party. But when you consider the fact that just 31% of women said the same, you can really see the problem: there’s a 14 percent disparity of expectations. That means that 14 percent of the time there may be men expecting sex that women aren’t planning on having. Read article discussed here.
January 26, 2018
It might not be a surprise that, on average, straight women orgasm less frequently than straight men, but why is this? A 2014 nationally representative study of Americans ages 18-59 found that 91% of men but only 64% of women reported orgasm during their most recent partnered sex. However, lesbians orgasm much more frequently and reliably than heterosexual and bisexual women, but for the men, there are fewer, if any, sexual orientation differences when it comes to orgasm frequency. A new study surveyed over 50,000 Americans that more or less confirmed these gender and sexual orientation differences in orgasm rates. The survey extended the research into understanding some of the demographic factors and sexual practices that are linked to higher or lower rates of orgasm. Speaking with us on this episode is the lead author on this study, Dr. David Frederick. About Our Guest Dr. Frederick got his PhD from UCLA and is now an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Chapman University in California. His work uses perspectives from social psychology, health psychology, and evolutionary psychology to better understand human sexual motivations, attractions, body image, sexual satisfaction and orgasm, and sexual orientation differences in some of these constructs. Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… A controversial new app, LegalFling, is hoping to take any element of question out of sexual encounters. It creates legally binding contracts pertaining to sexual consent during hookups. The contracts could include options like having a list of sexual do’s and don’ts, photo and video approval, whether a condom should be used, whether explicit language can be used, and a guarantee that prospective partners are STD-free. Although a good concept in theory, some legal activists are saying the concept is a bad one, citing the fact that consent for sexual activity can be withdrawn at any time including after sex has started. Read full article here. It has been proven that rural women start having sex younger than city girls, and also end up having more children. The CDC released its findings of a study of 10,000 American women. By looking at differences in their sexual activity, it was revealed that countryside girls started having sex at 16.6 years old, compared to urban ones who waited until 17.4 years old. At the age of 18, three quarters of the rural women are having sex, and only 68.6 percent from the cities. Perhaps the teenagers growing up in larger towns have other forms of entertainment? Countryside ladies also end up having more children. However, they also used more fool-proof contraception than the city teens, who admitted that they rely more on the (risky!) “pull-out” method. Read article discussed here. According to a new study, the biggest sexual turn-off for men (BY FAR) is trying to have a baby. When men were trying to conceive, they were 22% less interested in having sex, making it more of a mood killer than depression, being tired, or even having erectile dysfunction issues. The researchers say there are two main reasons: One, men feel like trying to conceive takes some of the passion away, and two, it can lead to serious frustration if a couple is having problems. Read full article here. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
January 26, 2018
It might not be a surprise that, on average, straight women orgasm less frequently than straight men, but why is this? A 2014 nationally representative study of Americans ages 18-59 found that 91% of men but only 64% of women reported orgasm during their most recent partnered sex. However, lesbians orgasm much more frequently and reliably than heterosexual and bisexual women, but for the men, there are fewer, if any, sexual orientation differences when it comes to orgasm frequency. A new study surveyed over 50,000 Americans that more or less confirmed these gender and sexual orientation differences in orgasm rates. The survey extended the research into understanding some of the demographic factors and sexual practices that are linked to higher or lower rates of orgasm. Speaking with us on this episode is the lead author on this study, Dr. David Frederick. About Our Guest Dr. Frederick got his PhD from UCLA and is now an Assistant Professor of Psychology at Chapman University in California. His work uses perspectives from social psychology, health psychology, and evolutionary psychology to better understand human sexual motivations, attractions, body image, sexual satisfaction and orgasm, and sexual orientation differences in some of these constructs. Don't Miss This Week's Foreplay... A controversial new app, LegalFling, is hoping to take any element of question out of sexual encounters. It creates legally binding contracts pertaining to sexual consent during hookups. The contracts could include options like having a list of sexual do’s and don’ts, photo and video approval, whether a condom should be used, whether explicit language can be used, and a guarantee that prospective partners are STD-free. Although a good concept in theory, some legal activists are saying the concept is a bad one, citing the fact that consent for sexual activity can be withdrawn at any time including after sex has started. Read full article here. It has been proven that rural women start having sex younger than city girls, and also end up having more children. The CDC released its findings of a study of 10,000 American women. By looking at differences in their sexual activity, it was revealed that countryside girls started having sex at 16.6 years old, compared to urban ones who waited until 17.4 years old. At the age of 18, three quarters of the rural women are having sex, and only 68.6 percent from the cities. Perhaps the teenagers growing up in larger towns have other forms of entertainment? Countryside ladies also end up having more children. However, they also used more fool-proof contraception than the city teens, who admitted that they rely more on the (risky!) “pull-out” method. Read article discussed here. According to a new study, the biggest sexual turn-off for men (BY FAR) is trying to have a baby. When men were trying to conceive, they were 22% less interested in having sex, making it more of a mood killer than depression, being tired, or even having erectile dysfunction issues. The researchers say there are two main reasons: One, men feel like trying to conceive takes some of the passion away, and two, it can lead to serious frustration if a couple is having problems. Read full article here.
January 18, 2018
Once a cheater, always a cheater…right? In our 15th episode, Joe and Dr. Zhana spoke with Kayla Knopp, the lead author on a study that focuses on the likelihood of “serial cheating” in individuals. Based on a nationwide sample of almost 500 people in unmarried romantic relationships followed every 4-6 months over a period of 5 years as they ended their initial relationship and entered a second one found that there may be some truth to that saying. Specifically, those who had cheated on their partner in the first relationship were three times more likely to have cheated on their next partner than people who had not cheated on their first partner (45% vs 18%). About Our Guest Knopp is currently a PhD candidate in Clinical Psychology at the University of Denver, working under Dr. Galena Rhoades, Dr. Howard Markman, and Dr. Scott Stanley in the Center for Marital and Family Studies in the Department of Psychology at DU. Her research focuses on couples and romantic relationships, with particular focus on commitment processes, diversity, and statistical modeling. Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… The number of millennials having anal sex has doubled in the past 12 years, but maybe not for the best reasons. In a review of three UK studies of more than 45,000 aged between 16 to 24-years-old, researchers found teenage girls and young women are now under increasing pressure to have anal sex even though they find it painful. The study, published in the Journal Adolescent Health, found some of the largest increases in the prevalence of oral and anal sex over the past decade were observed among those aged 16-18. Read full article here. On the other end of the age spectrum, a new study found that men are three times more likely to experience an increase in sexual frequency after getting a vasectomy. Four out of ten of those surveyed said their sex lives had ‘significantly improved’. Men who had vasectomies also said they had higher sex drives, better erections and orgasms and were more satisfied. And the benefits were not just for the men. Women reported an increase in their sexual arousal after their partner had the operation. Read more here. Afterglow Have you ever had trouble keeping your mind at ease during sex? You’re not alone, and your case is far from hopeless! More and more people are practicing mindfulness when it comes to sex, and research is showing that it leads to better sex and can help treat female sexual dysfunction. Mindfulness, simply put, is focusing on what’s happening in the present moment, and while it might sound easy, that’s not always the case. It takes practice and patience, so if you’re curious read more about it here. Read articles discussed here: Stress and Sex Female Sexual Dysfunction Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
January 17, 2018
Once a cheater, always a cheater…right? In our 15th episode, Joe and Dr. Zhana spoke with Kayla Knopp, the lead author on a study that focuses on the likelihood of “serial cheating” in individuals. Based on a nationwide sample of almost 500 people in unmarried romantic relationships followed every 4-6 months over a period of 5 years as they ended their initial relationship and entered a second one found that there may be some truth to that saying. Specifically, those who had cheated on their partner in the first relationship were three times more likely to have cheated on their next partner than people who had not cheated on their first partner (45% vs 18%). About Our Guest Knopp is currently a PhD candidate in Clinical Psychology at the University of Denver, working under Dr. Galena Rhoades, Dr. Howard Markman, and Dr. Scott Stanley in the Center for Marital and Family Studies in the Department of Psychology at DU. Her research focuses on couples and romantic relationships, with particular focus on commitment processes, diversity, and statistical modeling. Don't Miss This Week's Foreplay... The number of millennials having anal sex has doubled in the past 12 years, but maybe not for the best reasons. In a review of three UK studies of more than 45,000 aged between 16 to 24-years-old, researchers found teenage girls and young women are now under increasing pressure to have anal sex even though they find it painful. The study, published in the Journal Adolescent Health, found some of the largest increases in the prevalence of oral and anal sex over the past decade were observed among those aged 16-18. Read full article here. On the other end of the age spectrum, a new study found that men are three times more likely to experience an increase in sexual frequency after getting a vasectomy. Four out of ten of those surveyed said their sex lives had ‘significantly improved’. Men who had vasectomies also said they had higher sex drives, better erections and orgasms and were more satisfied. And the benefits were not just for the men. Women reported an increase in their sexual arousal after their partner had the operation. Read more here. Afterglow Have you ever had trouble keeping your mind at ease during sex? You’re not alone, and your case is far from hopeless! More and more people are practicing mindfulness when it comes to sex, and research is showing that it leads to better sex and can help treat female sexual dysfunction. Mindfulness, simply put, is focusing on what’s happening in the present moment, and while it might sound easy, that’s not always the case. It takes practice and patience, so if you’re curious read more about it here. Read articles discussed here: Stress and Sex Female Sexual Dysfunction
January 11, 2018
What do the sexting habits of adults 21 and over look like? In a recent paper, researchers surveyed a nationally representative sample of almost 6,000 single US adults ages 21+ about their sexting experiences, sending and receiving sexually explicit text messages or photos. Dr. Justin Garcia, from the Kinsey Institute at Indiana University joined us to talk about the study. About Our Guest Dr. Justin Garcia is Ruth Halls Associate Professor of Gender Studies and Associate Director for Research and Education at The Kinsey Institute, Indiana University, Bloomington. His research interests focus on the evolutionary and biocultural foundations of variation in monogamy, intimacy, dating, and sex. He has also been a scientific advisor to several industry partners, including K-Y Brand, Teva Women’s Health, WomanCare Global, and the online dating company Match.com. Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… The dating site, Plenty of Fish, released a survey of over 2,000 adults about who their holiday hookups tend to be. Surprisingly, a common response was…the ex. Another popular response was hooking up with a coworker. Read full article here. Afterglow A new study out of a University in the Netherlands found that there’s really no such thing as love at first sight. The researchers found that if someone said they’d fallen in love with someone at first sight, it was actually just because they thought the person was SUPER attractive. So maybe we should start calling it infatuation at first sight? Read article discussed here. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
January 11, 2018
What do the sexting habits of adults 21 and over look like? In a recent paper, researchers surveyed a nationally representative sample of almost 6,000 single US adults ages 21+ about their sexting experiences, sending and receiving sexually explicit text messages or photos. Dr. Justin Garcia, from the Kinsey Institute at Indiana University joined us to talk about the study. About Our Guest Dr. Justin Garcia is Ruth Halls Associate Professor of Gender Studies and Associate Director for Research and Education at The Kinsey Institute, Indiana University, Bloomington. His research interests focus on the evolutionary and biocultural foundations of variation in monogamy, intimacy, dating, and sex. He has also been a scientific advisor to several industry partners, including K-Y Brand, Teva Women’s Health, WomanCare Global, and the online dating company Match.com. Don't Miss This Week's Foreplay... The dating site, Plenty of Fish, released a survey of over 2,000 adults about who their holiday hookups tend to be. Surprisingly, a common response was…the ex. Another popular response was hooking up with a coworker. Read full article here. Afterglow A new study out of a University in the Netherlands found that there’s really no such thing as love at first sight. The researchers found that if someone said they’d fallen in love with someone at first sight, it was actually just because they thought the person was SUPER attractive. So maybe we should start calling it infatuation at first sight? Read article discussed here.
January 4, 2018
This week is the first holiday special of The Science of Sex, live from The Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality (SSSS). SSSS is an international organization dedicated to the advancement of knowledge about sexuality, and in November, Dr. Zhana attended their annual meeting in Atlanta. She was able to speak with professors, researchers, and students about several new studies, and even some that have not been published yet! In her first interview Dr. Zhana spoke with Dr. Dayna Henry from James Madison University about her study on how college students define and perceive sexual assault. Next, Dr. Megan Maas, an assistant professor at Michigan State University, and her discussed her research on the backlash on Twitter after Donald Trump’s infamous Access Hollywood tape in which he brags about sexual assault. She was also was able to interview Dr. Ron Rogge from the University of Rochester on his study on dating apps such as Tinder and Grindr. Margaret Bennett, a PhD student at the University of Connecticut, also spoke with her about her review on deception in casual and committed relationships. Finally, she had Lauryn Vander Molen a great discussion about her work studying paraphilia. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
January 4, 2018
This week is the first holiday special of The Science of Sex, live from The Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality (SSSS). SSSS is an international organization dedicated to the advancement of knowledge about sexuality, and in November, Dr. Zhana attended their annual meeting in Atlanta. She was able to speak with professors, researchers, and students about several new studies, and even some that have not been published yet! In her first interview Dr. Zhana spoke with Dr. Dayna Henry from James Madison University about her study on how college students define and perceive sexual assault. Next, Dr. Megan Maas, an assistant professor at Michigan State University, and her discussed her research on the backlash on Twitter after Donald Trump’s infamous Access Hollywood tape in which he brags about sexual assault. She was also was able to interview Dr. Ron Rogge from the University of Rochester on his study on dating apps such as Tinder and Grindr. Margaret Bennett, a PhD student at the University of Connecticut, also spoke with her about her review on deception in casual and committed relationships. Finally, she had Lauryn Vander Molen a great discussion about her work studying paraphilia.
December 29, 2017
This week is the first holiday special of The Science of Sex, live from The Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality (SSSS). SSSS is an international organization dedicated to the advancement of knowledge about sexuality, and in November, Dr. Zhana attended their annual meeting in Atlanta. She was able to speak with professors, researchers, and students about several new studies, and even some that have not been published yet! In her first interview Dr. Zhana spoke with Dr. Dayna Henry from James Madison University about her study on how college students define and perceive sexual assault. Next, Dr. Megan Maas, an assistant professor at Michigan State University, and her discussed her research on the backlash on Twitter after Donald Trump’s infamous Access Hollywood tape in which he brags about sexual assault. She also was able to interview Dr. Ron Rogge from the University of Rochester on his study on dating apps such as Tinder and Grindr. Margaret Bennett, a PhD student at the University of Connecticut, also spoke with Dr. Zhana about her review on deception in casual and committed relationships. Finally, she had a great discussions with Lauryn Vander Molen about her work studying paraphilia. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
December 29, 2017
This week is the first holiday special of The Science of Sex, live from The Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality (SSSS). SSSS is an international organization dedicated to the advancement of knowledge about sexuality, and in November, Dr. Zhana attended their annual meeting in Atlanta. She was able to speak with professors, researchers, and students about several new studies, and even some that have not been published yet! In her first interview Dr. Zhana spoke with Dr. Dayna Henry from James Madison University about her study on how college students define and perceive sexual assault. Next, Dr. Megan Maas, an assistant professor at Michigan State University, and her discussed her research on the backlash on Twitter after Donald Trump’s infamous Access Hollywood tape in which he brags about sexual assault. She also was able to interview Dr. Ron Rogge from the University of Rochester on his study on dating apps such as Tinder and Grindr. Margaret Bennett, a PhD student at the University of Connecticut, also spoke with Dr. Zhana about her review on deception in casual and committed relationships. Finally, she had a great discussions with Lauryn Vander Molen about her work studying paraphilia.
December 21, 2017
Contrary to many popular stereotypes, there are many women who are as equally into casual sex as some men, but what do these women prefer when it comes to their partners? A new study found that women who are more interested in casual sex differ from women who are not into hookups in the kinds of men they’re interested in, especially when it comes to hookup partners as opposed to relationship partners. This week, Naomi Muggleton, the lead author on this study, is talking to us about her research on this topic. About Our Guest Naomi Muggleton is a PhD student in Behavioral Science in the Psychology department at the University of Warwick, UK. Her work develops evolutionary theoretical models to understand what motivates societies to harshly suppress female sexuality. Her work also investigates how and why cultural factors can influence the type of men that heterosexual women are attracted to. She is particularly interested in the environmental triggers (e.g. socioeconomic, disease, income inequality) which promote sexual conservatism. Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… News broke earlier this week that the Center for Disease Control released a list of seven words that would be “banned” from any rhetoric coming from the CDC. However, the director of the CDC has released clarification on the so-called “ban” stating that these words should not be used in budget proposals for Congress. The seven words are: fetus, diversity, vulnerable, transgender, entitlement, science-based, and evidence-based. A researcher in the psychology of sex has been found to have been fabricating studies. Dr. Nicolas Guéguen published several studies on such vital topics including whether women with larger breasts get more invitations to dance in nightclubs, whether women are more likely to give their phone number to a man if asked while walking near a flower shop, and whether a male busdriver is more likely to let a woman (but not a man) ride the bus for free if she touches him. It is not clear what will happen to this researcher. Read full article here. Afterglow A survey of 2,000 people on Plenty of Fish found that half of people polled admit they’ve previously kissed a co-worker at an office holiday party. This statistic is very interesting considering the ongoing conversation in the news about the fine line between flirtation and sexual harassment especially in the workplace. So how do we reckon with this type of romance? Read article discussed here. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 0Shares
December 20, 2017
Contrary to many popular stereotypes, there are many women who are as equally into casual sex as some men, but what do these women prefer when it comes to their partners? A new study found that women who are more interested in casual sex differ from women who are not into hookups in the kinds of men they’re interested in, especially when it comes to hookup partners as opposed to relationship partners. This week, Naomi Muggleton, the lead author on this study, is talking to us about her research on this topic. About Our Guest Naomi Muggleton is a PhD student in Behavioral Science in the Psychology department at the University of Warwick, UK. Her work develops evolutionary theoretical models to understand what motivates societies to harshly suppress female sexuality. Her work also investigates how and why cultural factors can influence the type of men that heterosexual women are attracted to. She is particularly interested in the environmental triggers (e.g. socioeconomic, disease, income inequality) which promote sexual conservatism. Don't Miss This Week's Foreplay... News broke earlier this week that the Center for Disease Control released a list of seven words that would be “banned” from any rhetoric coming from the CDC. However, the director of the CDC has released clarification on the so-called “ban” stating that these words should not be used in budget proposals for Congress. The seven words are: fetus, diversity, vulnerable, transgender, entitlement, science-based, and evidence-based. A researcher in the psychology of sex has been found to have been fabricating studies. Dr. Nicolas Guéguen published several studies on such vital topics including whether women with larger breasts get more invitations to dance in nightclubs, whether women are more likely to give their phone number to a man if asked while walking near a flower shop, and whether a male busdriver is more likely to let a woman (but not a man) ride the bus for free if she touches him. It is not clear what will happen to this researcher. Read full article here. Afterglow A survey of 2,000 people on Plenty of Fish found that half of people polled admit they’ve previously kissed a co-worker at an office holiday party. This statistic is very interesting considering the ongoing conversation in the news about the fine line between flirtation and sexual harassment especially in the workplace. So how do we reckon with this type of romance? Read article discussed here.
December 14, 2017
Our news cycle has been filled with countless examples of male sexual misconduct, from sexual assault, to harassment, to just general creepiness across virtually every profession and social sphere. With the exception of our groper-in-chief, this has professionally hurt pretty much all of these men, and while we seem to be doing better at holding the perpetrators of these crimes accountable, we are still having trouble identifying why these acts of sexual misconduct are so widespread. To help us explore this question, we interviewed someone who’s been studying male sexual aggression for almost four decades: Dr. Neil Malamuth at UCLA. About Our Guest Dr. Malamuth is an interdisciplinary social scientist who’s most famous in psychology circles for developing the so-called Confluence Model of male sexual aggression, which takes a more comprehensive approach toward identifying the various factors (including personality traits, attitudes and values, past experiences, opportunity) and the synergistic way in which they come together to form the “perfect storm” for sexual violence. It’s an absolutely fascinating conversation that was SO good, that we decided to keep it going for longer than usual and skip our usual Afterglow segment. Don’t Miss This Week’s Foreplay… In a victory for expecting parents, the New York State Paid Family Leave Law (PFL) will go into effect on January 1st, requiring virtually all private employers in New York to provide paid family leave benefits to eligible employees. The US is the only developed country in the world that doesn’t have federally mandated paid parental leave, with devastating consequences for maternal and infant mortality, health, and development. This NY state law is the most comprehensive in the country thus far. Read full article here. The Metropolitan Museum of Art has decided to not remove a painting that has caused some controversy, lately. The painting, called “Thérèse Dreaming” (1938), depicts a young girl in a suggestive pose in which her underwear is visible. An online petition calling to remove the painting received 8,000 signatures, citing the current climate around sexual misconduct as grounds for removal. Read article discussed here. Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest LinkedIn 4Shares
December 14, 2017
Our news cycle has been filled with countless examples of male sexual misconduct, from sexual assault, to harassment, to just general creepiness across virtually every profession and social sphere. With the exception of our groper-in-chief, this has professionally hurt pretty much all of these men, and while we seem to be doing better at holding the perpetrators of these crimes accountable, we are still having trouble identifying why these acts of sexual misconduct are so widespread. To help us explore this question, we interviewed someone who’s been studying male sexual aggression for almost four decades: Dr. Neil Malamuth at UCLA. About Our Guest Dr. Malamuth is an interdisciplinary social scientist who’s most famous in psychology circles for developing the so-called Confluence Model of male sexual aggression, which takes a more comprehensive approach toward identifying the various factors (including personality traits, attitudes and values, past experiences, opportunity) and the synergistic way in which they come together to form the “perfect storm” for sexual violence. It’s an absolutely fascinating conversation that was SO good, that we decided to keep it going for longer than usual and skip our usual Afterglow segment. Don't Miss This Week's Foreplay... In a victory for expecting parents, the New York State Paid Family Leave Law (PFL) will go into effect on January 1st, requiring virtually all private employers in New York to provide paid family leave benefits to eligible employees. The US is the only developed country in the world that doesn’t have federally mandated paid parental leave, with devastating consequences for maternal and infant mortality, health, and development. This NY state law is the most comprehensive in the country thus far. Read full article here. The Metropolitan Museum of Art has decided to not remove a painting that has caused some controversy, lately. The painting, called “Thérèse Dreaming” (1938), depicts a young girl in a suggestive pose in which her underwear is visible. An online petition calling to remove the painting received 8,000 signatures, citing the current climate around sexual misconduct as grounds for removal. Read article discussed here.
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