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July 9, 2020
Justin Tosi (https://www.justintosi.com/) and Brandon Warmke (http://brandonwarmke.com/) talk about their new book Grandstanding: The Use and Abuse of Moral Talk (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0851PR3DB/) on this episode. They explain how moral grandstanding differs from other vices like hypocrisy, and how it’s not the same as virtue signaling. They talk about psychological research that they have done with Joshua Green to create the grandstanding scale, which measures the motives for grandstanding, namely, prestige and dominance. Their findings suggest that the most partisan people are the most likely to engage in moral grandstanding. You can follow Justin Tosi and Brandon Warmke on Twitter @JustinTosi (https://twitter.com/JustinTosi) and @BrandonWarmke (https://twitter.com/BrandonWarmke).  If you have any comments you can contact Chris Martin at podcast@heterodoxacaemy.org or on twitter @Chrismartin76. Here is the transcript (https://heterodoxacademy.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/091_Brandon_Justin_transcript.pdf) of the episode. Related Links The psychology of moral grandstanding (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pNQqst5o3X4), The Big Think on YouTube Wrath, a talk by Justin Tosi on grandstanding (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yQ6UWQAzE5c&t=196s), from the Seven Deadly Sins series, Canadian Centre for Ethics in Public Affairs Rating the Show If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/half-hour-of-heterodoxy/id1279409241?mt=2)and click “View in iTunes” * Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details” * Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. Other Episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >> (https://heterodoxacademy.org/podcast-listing/)
July 2, 2020
This episode features cognitive psychologist and human memory expert, Dr. Elizabeth Loftus (https://faculty.sites.uci.edu/eloftus/). It’s a recording of a live webinar hosted by HxA on June 8, 2020 called Cocktails and Canceled Conversations with Elizabeth Loftus. Dr. Loftus is a Distinguished Professor at UC-Irvine in the Department of Psychological Science and the Department of Criminology, Law, and Society. She has published over 20 books and 600 scientific articles, and she has served as an expert witness or consultant in hundreds of cases, including the McMartin Preschool Molestation case, the Hillside Strangler, the Menendez brothers, and the Oklahoma Bombing. Earlier this year, Dr. Loftus was scheduled to speak at New York University, but her talk was canceled following her testimony at the Harvey Weinstein trial. You can follow Meghan on twitter @eloftus1 (https://twitter.com/eloftus1). If you have any comments you can contact Cory Clark at clark@heterodoxacademy.org or on twitter @ImHardcory (https://twitter.com/ImHardcory). Here is the transcript (https://heterodoxacademy.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/090_Elizabeth_Loftus_Transcript.pdf) of the episode. Rating the Show If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show's iTunes page (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/half-hour-of-heterodoxy/id1279409241?mt=2)and click “View in iTunes” * Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of "Details" * Next to "Click to Rate" select the stars.
June 26, 2020
Amy Edmondson (https://www.hbs.edu/faculty/Pages/profile.aspx?facId=6451) is my guest on this episode. She’s an organizational psychologist at Harvard Business School and she’s known for her highly influential studies of psychological safety, the sense that you can be honest and open and can take interpersonal risks at your workplace without fear of punishment. She has also published influential papers on team formation, and organizational learning. We’ll be talking about her book The Fearless Organization: Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace for Learning, Innovation and Growth (https://www.amazon.com/Fearless-Organization-Psychological-Workplace-Innovation/dp/1119477247), published last year and how college and university professors can leverage this research.   Related Links ·The Fearless Organization: Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace for Learning, Innovation and Growth (https://www.amazon.com/Fearless-Organization-Psychological-Workplace-Innovation/dp/1119477247) by Amy Edmondson ·Teaming: How Organizations Learn, Innovate, and Compete in the Knowledge Economy (https://www.amazon.com/Teaming-Organizations-Innovate-Compete-Knowledge/dp/078797093X/) by Amy Edmondson ·Amy Edmondson’s Faculty Page (https://www.hbs.edu/faculty/Pages/profile.aspx?facId=6451) ·Building a psychologically safe workplace (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LhoLuui9gX8), a TEDx Harvard Graduate School of Education talk ·How to turn a group of strangers into a team (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3boKz0Exros), a TEDx New York talk   Rating the Show If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: 1. Go to the show's iTunes page (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/half-hour-of-heterodoxy/id1279409241?mt=2)and click “View in iTunes” 2. Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of "Details" 3.Next to "Click to Rate" select the stars.
June 17, 2020
Meghan Daum (https://www.meghandaum.com/) is a columnist for Medium, an adjunct faculty in the MFA Writing Program at Columbia University's School of the Arts, and author of five books, one of which we will be discussing today, The Problem With Everything: A Journey Through the New Culture Wars. It was named one of the 100 notable books of 2019 by the New York Times. In a recent book club meeting, HxA read The Problem with Everything, a critique of contemporary feminism. On this episode, Cory Clark talks to Meghan about the book, and includes some questions from our book club participants.. You can follow Meghan on twitter @meghan_daum (https://twitter.com/meghan_daum). If you have any comments you can contact Cory Clark at clark@heterodoxacaemy.org or on twitter @ImHardcory (https://twitter.com/ImHardcory). Related Links The Problem With Everything: A Journey Through the New Culture Wars by Meghan Daum: https://www.meghandaum.com/the-problem-with-everything (https://www.meghandaum.com/the-problem-with-everything) Rating the Show If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show's iTunes page (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/half-hour-of-heterodoxy/id1279409241?mt=2)and click “View in iTunes” * Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of "Details" * Next to "Click to Rate" select the stars. Listen to other episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy > (https://heterodoxacademy.org/podcast-listing/)
May 28, 2020
Michael Kruse is a senior staff writer at POLITICO, where he writes about presidential candidates and campaigns. He has been a journalist since his undergraduate years at Davidson College, and worked for the Tampa Bay Times before joining POLITICO. He has won a number of awards including the National Press Foundation’s Dirksen Award for Distinguished Reporting of Congress. His work has been anthologized in The Best American Newspaper Narratives, Out There: The Wildest Stories from Outside Magazine, and Next Wave: America’s New Generation of Great Literary Journalists. We’ll be talking about the supposedly post-truth world that we live in and what college students should know about the nature of journalism.
May 20, 2020
Adam Domby is my guest today. He’s a history professor at the College of Charleston and we’llbe talking about his research on the statue of Silent Sam at the University of North Carolina atChapel Hill. That statue commemorated a Confederate soldier and was erected at a main universityentrance in 1913. When Domby was a student at Chapel Hill in the early 2010s, he uncoveredthe dedication speech of the statue showing its connection to White supremacy. The statuewas pulled down by activists in 2018 and there has been an ongoing legal dispute over what todo with the statue. I’ll also be talking about Adam’s new book The False Cause: Fraud, Fabrication, and White Supremacy in Confederate Memory published in February this year, which is partially about thelies told by the people who sponsored this statue but mainly about lies told about NorthCarolina’s history after the Civil War and the function of those lies. You can follow Adam on twitter @AdamHDomby. (https://twitter.com/AdamHDomby)
May 12, 2020
This episode is hosted by Cory Clark, and Michael Roth is the guest. Michael is a historian, the president of Wesleyan University, and the author of the book ‘Safe Enough Spaces: A Pragmatist’s Approach to Inclusion, Free Speech, and Political Correctness on College Campuses’. HxA held its first ever book club a few weeks back, and we chose to read Safe Enough Spaces and had a lively discussion about it. Now we have Michael here to discuss the book, and we  include a couple of questions from our book club participants. You can follow Michael on twitter @mroth78 (https://twitter.com/mroth78). If you have any comments you can contact Cory Clark at clark@heterodoxacaemy.org or on twitter @ImHardcory (https://twitter.com/ImHardcory). Here is the transcript (https://heterodoxacademy.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/085_Michael_Roth_transcript.pdf) of the episode. Related Links You can find 'Safe Enough Spaces' here (https://www.amazon.com/Safe-Enough-Spaces-Pragmatists-Correctness-ebook/dp/B07VYSKP83/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1). Rating the Show If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show's iTunes page (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/half-hour-of-heterodoxy/id1279409241?mt=2)and click “View in iTunes” * Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of "Details" * Next to "Click to Rate" select the stars. Other Episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy https://heterodoxacademy.org/half-hour-of-heterodoxy/ (https://heterodoxacademy.org/half-hour-of-heterodoxy/)
April 27, 2020
This is a special one-hour episode featuring Christian Gonzalez and Ian Storey. Christian Gonzales is a research assistant at Heterodox Academy. He’s a senior at Columbia University and he has written for various conservative publications like National Review and City Journal. Ian Storey is a staff writer for Heterodox Academy. He’s a political scientist and a candidate for Masters of Divinity at Union Theological Seminary. Christian classifies himself as a conservative; Ian classifies himself as a liberal. In this episode we’ll explore whether it’s possible to define conservatism and liberalism. Here is a transcript (https://2cnzc91figkyqqeq8390pgd1-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/084_Ian_Christian_transcript.pdf)of this episode. Related Links Looking through an ideological lens at Columbia University by Christian Gonzalez https://heterodoxacademy.org/looking-through-an-ideological-lens-at-columbia-university/ (https://heterodoxacademy.org/looking-through-an-ideological-lens-at-columbia-university/) How Critics of Intersectionality (Often) Miss the Point by Ian Storey https://heterodoxacademy.org/how-critics-of-intersectionality-often-miss-the-point/ (https://heterodoxacademy.org/how-critics-of-intersectionality-often-miss-the-point/) Rating the Show If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page (https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/half-hour-of-heterodoxy/id1279409241?mt=2)and click “View in iTunes” * Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details” * Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. Other Episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy https://heterodoxacademy.org/half-hour-of-heterodoxy/ (https://heterodoxacademy.org/half-hour-of-heterodoxy/)
April 9, 2020
Cory Clark (http://www.coryjclark.com/) is my guest on this episode. She’s the Director of Academic Engagement at Heterodox Academy. She’s also a social psychologist and until recently was an assistant professor at Durham University in the UK. We’ll be talking about a paper by her and Bo Winegard that was published in Psychological Inquiry this year called “Tribalism in war and peace: The nature and evolution of ideological epistemology and its significance for modern social science (https://www.researchgate.net/publication/338754119_Tribalism_in_War_and_Peace_The_Nature_and_Evolution_of_Ideological_Epistemology_and_Its_Significance_for_Modern_Social_Science)”.
March 23, 2020
Katie Gordon is my guest today. Katie previously appeared on Episode 50: Can Offensive Political Speech Cause Trauma? On today’s episode, we’ll be talking about ways you can counsel and help students during the Coronavirus pandemic. We talk about what you can and cannot do, given legal and ethical guidelines around psychotherapy. We’ll also discuss resources that you and your students can use and explain what classroom practices might be most effective during the pandemic. Even though this episode is primarily for professors, it could be useful regardless of your current role. A transcript of this episode will be released shortly. Related Links * FACE COVID: How to respond effectively to the Corona crisis by Dr Russ Harris* ACT Companion: The Happiness Trap App – Apple version and Google version (free with code TOGETHER)* How to Cope When the World is Canceled: 6 Critical Skills from Dr. Ali Mattu's The Psych Show* Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy by David D. Burns (discussed in this episode)* How Can Professors help students with mental health concerns (March 2018) by Katie Gordon and Brandon Saxton (2018)* Jedi Counsel—Episode 86: College Mental Health (March 2018) with Katie Gordon and Brandon Saxton* Online Mental Health Resources (from Katie Gordon’s website) Rating the Show If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show's iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of "Details"* Next to "Click to Rate" select the stars. See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>
March 10, 2020
Amy Westervelt contributes to the Guardian, the Wall Street Journal, and the Washington Post. In 2015, she received a Rachel Carson award and, in 2016, an Edward R. Murrow award for her environmental journalism. She’s the creator and host of the podcast Drilled, the first true-crime style podcast about climate change
February 27, 2020
Eric Kaufmann, professor of politics at Birkbeck College, University of London, explains how white identity is threatened by immigration and how this trend drives polarization in English-speaking nations.
February 4, 2020
Jill DeTemple is my guest today. She’s an associate professor of religious studies at Southern Methodist University. She uses a technique called reflective structured dialogue to enable students to express their perspectives on contentious moral and religious issues. This technique was created by the non-profit organization Essential Partners in the 1980s after a series of abortion clinic shootings in Boston. It comes out of family therapy and we talk about the technique in the interview. Her work in this area has won her the American Academy of Religion 2018 Excellence in Teaching Award. Among the courses she teaches at SMU are “Social Scientific Approaches to the study of religion” “Problems in the philosophy of religion, and ‘Religious literacy." She also teaches a course on LatinX identities called “Identity and the Sacred in the Southwest” at the Taos, New Mexico campus of SMU. Jill and her colleagues are working on a book called The Listening Revolution: Teaching for Engagement and Curiosity. To learn more about her work, you can email her at detemple@smu.edu. Here is a transcript of this episode. Related Links: * Want Free Speech and Meaningful Classes on Campus? Encourage Listening by Jill DeTemple, Heterodox Academy* What Happens When You Reimagine The Difficult Conversation About Guns | YouTube/TIME – John Sarrouf * Reflective structured dialogue: A conversation with 2018 American Academy of Religion excellence in teaching award winner Jill DeTemple by Jill DeTemple Eugene V. Gallagher, Kwok Pui Lan, and Thomas Pearson, Teaching Theology and Religion* Disruption dialogue and swerve: Reflective structured dialogue in religious studies classrooms by Jill DeTemple and John Sarrouf, Teaching Theology and Religion If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>
January 21, 2020
Lawrence B. Glickman is my guest on this episode. He’s the Stephen and Evalyn Milman Professor in American Studies at Cornell University. We’ll be talking about his latest book, “Free Enterprise: An American History.” It covers what American politicians and the public mean when they talk about free enterprise, how that meaning has changed from the 19th century to the present, and whether the term “free enterprise” has a precise meaning. Nelson Lichtenstein, another historian of ideas, wrote this about Glickman’s new book, “In this sweeping intellectual and cultural history, Lawrence Glickman proves a sure guide to the economically vague yet politically talismanic meaning of the phrase ‘free enterprise.’ He demonstrates that the most enduring features of American business conservatism have long expressed themselves through this maddingly mythic construction.” Lawrence Glickman has also published historical books about the living wage and consumer activism. He teaches a popular course called “Sports and Politics and American History” at Cornell University. Here is a transcript of this episode. Related Links: * A Living Wage: American Workers and the Making of Consumer Society by Law* Buying Power: A History of Consumer Activism in America by Lawrence B. Glickman* Just a Lot of Woids: A book review of "Free Enterprise" by Eric Rauchway, Reviews in American History
January 2, 2020
James Poniewozik is my guest today. He’s the chief television critic for the New York Times. We’ll be talking about his new book “Audience of One: Donald Trump, Television, and the Fracturing of America,” which was listed as one of the 10 best books of the year by Publishers Weekly, one of the 50 notable works of nonfiction in 2019 by The Washington Post, and a notable book of the year by the New York Times Book Review. One critic called it “two books in one” because half the book examines the history of television from the Reagan era to today, and the other half illustrates how Donald Trump assiduously used television to create his persona. As Poniewozik puts it, Trump is “a character that wrote itself, a brand mascot that jumped of the cereal box and entered the world, a simulacrum that replaced the thing it represented.” Audience of One combines both humor and serious analysis to explain how new forms of television programming–reality TV in particular–have changed the world we live in.   A transcript will be released soon. Related Links: * James Poniewozik's Columns at The New York Times* James Poniewozik on Twitter* Carlos Lozada's Review of "Audience of One," Washington Post* The Bulwark podcast: Episode with James Poniewozik, hosted by Charlie Sykes* An Evening with James Poniewozik, Sacramento Press Club and California State Library* An Evening with James Poniewozik, Midtown Scholar Bookstore, Harrisburg, PA. * Baby Yoda is Your God Now by James Poniewozik* Review: 'Watchmen' is an audacious Rorschach test by James Poniewozik If you enjoyed listening to the show, please leave us a review on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>
December 18, 2019
Deb Mashek, my guest on this episode, is the executive director of Heterodox Academy. We talk about what Heterodox Academy does and Deb gives a preview of some 2020 events. Here is a transcript of this episode. Related Links: * The Staff of Heterodox Academy* The Advisory Council of Heterodox Academy* HxCommunities* Donate to HxA* Glenn Loury on Half Hour of Heterodoxy* Alice Dreger on Half Hour of Heterodoxy* Rick Shweder on Half Hour of Heterodoxy If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>
December 12, 2019
Carol Quillen is my guest on this episode. She’s the president of Davidson College, my alma mater, and she is also a historian by training. She received her PhD in history from Princeton University. In 2018, Princeton awarded her the James Madison Medal, given in recognition of a distinguished career. She has published essays and talked about the usefulness of debate and free expression in academia, and has also commented on the limits of free expression. Related Links: * Carol Quillen on Twitter* Carol Quillen Biography * Fostering Democratic Values on Campus, a panel discussion with Carol Quillen, Ron Daniels, Wayne Frederick, and John Donvan* Reframing the Free Speech versus Inclusivity Debate by Carol Quillen, The Davidsonian* Time for a Detox: How the Sugar High of Certainty Impairs Speaking about Speech by Carol Quillen, Forbes* Buckle Up, It’s College by Carol Quillen, Forbes* Talk by Carol Quillen at the Community Building Initiative in Charlotte* Is Ethical Public Service Still Possible?, talk by William Kristol followed by panel discussion andd Q&A with Carol Quillen, sociology professor Natalie Delia Deckard, philosophy professor Daniel Layman, Davidson College event* 2020 - It Only Gets Worse From Here: Mike Allen & Vann Professor of Ethics and Society Bill Kristol, Davidson College event Here is a transcript of this episode. If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>
December 5, 2019
Phoebe Maltz Bovy (@tweetertation) is my guest today. She’s the author of The Perils of "Privilege": Why Injustice Can’t be Solved by Accusing Others of Advantage, published in 2017. Her essays on privilege and politics have appeared in The New Republic, The Atlantic, The Washington Post, and other publications. She also co-hosts the heterodox show Feminine Chaos with Kat Rosenfeld, available in streaming video on bloggingheads tv and as a podcast. We’ll be talking about her book and some of her more recent articles on privilege. Here is a transcript of this episode. Related Links: * Phoebe Maltz Bovy on Twitter* Perils of Privilege excerpt in The New Republic* Feminine Chaos, a bloggingheads.tv show on heterodox feminism with Phoebe Maltz Bovy and Kat Rosenfeld. (You can also donate to the show on Patreon.)* The last thing on ‘privilege’ you’ll ever need to read by Carlos Lozada, book review in The Washington Post* Sympathy for the White Devil: Phoebe Maltz Bovy’s ‘The Perils of Privilege’ by Jacqui Shine, LA Review of Books* Liberals need to stop to stop obsessing over privilege or they’ll never accomplish anything by Phoebe Maltz Bovy, Quartz * White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack by Peggy McIntosh If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>
November 26, 2019
Ilana Redstone (@irakresh) is my guest. She is an associate professor of sociology at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she teaches core sociology courses and a special course called Bigots and Snowflakes: Living in a World Where Everyone Else is Wrong. She is the founder of Diverse Perspectives Consulting, whose mission to improve communication to create a truly inclusive workplace culture. Her research has focused on legal permanent residents in the U.S. She also has written about problems within the discipline of sociology. She has been a faculty fellow at Heterodox Academy since 2017. She currently manages the HXSociology forum, part of the Heterodox Communities (HxCommunities) initiative. It aims to support and promote a sense of community among heterodox scholars within particular fields of study, particular geographic regions, and other specific academic communities. Here is a transcript of this episode. Related Links: * The silent crisis in the classroom by Ilana Redstone, Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) Conference 2019* New sociology course allows for viewpoint diversity by Sarah O'Beiren, The Daily Illini* The dangers of defining deviancy up by Ilana Redstone, Quillette* Articles by Ilana Redstone on Heterodox Academy's blog If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>
November 12, 2019
Tony McAleer is my guest on this episode. He’s the author of the new book “The Cure for Hate: A Former White Supremacist’s Journey from Violent Extremism to Radical Compassion. He is the co-founder of Life After Hate, a non-profit organization whose mission to help people leave hate groups and to counter hate on social media without censorship. A former organizer for the White Aryan Resistance (WAR), he served as a recruiter for WAR and proprietor of a white-supremacist voice messaging center. In addition to co-directing Life After Hate, Tony works with governments and academic researchers to combat recruitment into hate groups. Earlier this year, he testified before the U.S. Congress’s Civil Rights and Civil Liberties subcommittee on confronting white supremacy and the adequacy of the Federal response. He currently lives in Vancouver, British Columbia. Life After Hate is based in Chicago. Here is a transcript of this episode. If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>
November 1, 2019
Robert Talisse (@roberttalisse) is my guest on this episode. He's the W. Alton Jones Professor of Philosophy at Vanderbilt University. His central research area is democratic theory. In his latest book Overdoing Democracy: Why We Must Put Politics in Its Place (@OverdoingD), Robert argues that we spoil certain social goods if we spend too much time and effort in the arena of politics and elevate political allegiances above other commitments. If you're in the D.C. area, you can catch a book signing by Robert Talisse at Politics and Prose on Connecticut Ave on November 2nd at 3:30 in the afternoon. If you're in the New York area, you can catch him at Shakespeare and Company on November 7 at 6:30 p.m. Here is a transcript of this episode. If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>
October 23, 2019
Sheila Heen is my guest today. This is the second part of a two-part interview with her. The first part is available here. Sheila is the coauthor of Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most (1999), a New York Times Business Bestseller that has continuously been in print. An updated 10th anniversary edition was published in 2010. She’s also the coauthor of Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Arts of Receiving Feedback Well (Even When It’s Off-Base, Unfair, Poorly Delivered and Frankly, You’re Not in the Mood), a New York Times bestseller. She is a lecturer at Harvard Law School and a founder of Triad Consulting Group. Here is a transcript of this episode. If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>
October 18, 2019
Sheila Heen is my guest today. She’s the coauthor of Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most (1999), a New York Times Business Bestseller that has continuously been in print. An updated 10th anniversary edition was published in 2010. She’s also the coauthor of Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well (Even When It’s Off-Base, Unfair, Poorly Delivered and Frankly, You’re Not in the Mood), a New York Times bestseller. She is a lecturer at Harvard Law School and a founder of Triad Consulting Group. We discuss difficult conversations between faculty and students in this episode, the first of two episodes with Sheila Heen. We recorded this using Skype because of technical problems with the application that we normally use. You may notice lower audio quality. Here is a transcript of this episode. Rating the Show If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>
October 1, 2019
Matthew H. Goldberg (@MattGoldberg100) is my guest on this episode. He's a Postdoctoral Associate at the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication. He's an expert in social psychological topics related to communication, such as attitudes and persuasion, motivated reasoning, and ideology. We discuss Matt's recent paper A Social Identity Approach to Engaging Christians in the Issue of Climate Change, published this month in Science Communication. We also talk about related work at the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication, where Matt works.  Matt talked about Katherine Hayhoe, an Evangelical Christian and climate activist, during the episode. Here is a short biographical video on Katherine Hayhoe from NOVA's Secret Life of Scientists and Engineers series. Her YouTube channel is Global Weirding with Katherine Hayhoe. Here is a transcript of this episode. Related Links: * Open Science Framework: Persuasive Climate Change Messages to Christian (data from the studies we discussed) * Yale Climate Opinion: Visualizations and Data * Matthew Goldberg on Google Scholar * A Social Identity Approach to Engaging Christians in the Issue of Climate Change by Matthew H. Goldberg, Abel Gustafson, et al. * Discussing Global Warming Leads to Greater Acceptance of Climate Science by Matthew H. Goldberg, Sander van der Linden, et al. * Perceived Social Consensus Can Reduce Ideological Biases on Climate Change by Matthew H. Goldberg, Sander van der Linden, et al. Rating the Show If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>
September 15, 2019
Today's episode features Charlie Sykes (@SykesCharlie), a conservative political commentator who hosted a popular talk radio show from 1993 to 2016. He later joined The Weekly Standard magazine and hosted The Daily Standard podcast. In December 2018, after the shuttering of The Weekly Standard, he and William Kristol founded The Bulwark website, hiring many former staff members of the Standard. Charlie currently hosts the daily Bulwark podcast, which features interviews with politicians, professors, and commentators. Books by Charlie Sykes: * How the Right Lost Its Mind (2017; updated preface in paperback edition)* Fail U: The False Promise of Higher Education (2016)* Profscam: Professors and the Demise of Higher Education (1988) Here is a transcript of the episode. Rating the Show If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>
September 7, 2019
This episode was recorded before a live audience at the Decatur Book Festival in Decatur, GA, on September 1, 2019. It features historians Kevin Kruse (@KevinMKruse) and Julian Zelizer (@JulianZelizer) talking about Fault Lines: A History of the United States Since 1974. The end of the episode features audience questions and answers. Here is a transcript of the episode. Rating the Show If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>
September 1, 2019
Lara Schwartz is the director of the Project for Civil Discourse at American University where she’s also a professor in law and government. She’s also the coauthor of How to College: What to Know Before You Go (And When You're There). We talk about the problem of false equivalence (also termed false balance, both-sidesism, and both-siderism) in the classroom, and how college professors can address this problem. Related Links: * Project for Civil Discourse on Youtube* Can journalistic “false balance” distort public perception of consensus in expert opinion? by Derek J. Koehler, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied* Balance as Bias: Global Warming and the U.S. Prestige Press by M. T. Boykoff and J. M. Boykoff, Global Environmental Change* Journalistic Balance as Global Warming Bias by Jules Boykoff, Fairness and Accuracy in Resporting* Lara Schwartz on the 2019 Heterodox Academy conference panel, "Successes, Strains and Stories to Inspire." Here is a transcript of the episode. Rating the Show If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>
August 23, 2019
Harvard University professor and best-selling author Steven Pinker considers why open inquiry, viewpoint diversity, and constructive disagreement matter beyond the academy. He makes the case that healthy colleges and universities equip citizens, scientists, policymakers, parents, and others with the habits of heart and mind necessary to advance the human condition. The talkback and Q&A host is Nick Gillespie, Editor-at-Large of Reason magazine. A transcript is available on Youtube. Editor's note: This episode is Steven Pinker's keynote talk at the 2019 Heterodox Academy Conference. Rating the Show If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>
August 15, 2019
Joanna Schug (@joannaschug) is a social and cross-cultural psychologist at the College of William and Mary. We discuss how the concept of relational mobility helps us understand why cultures differ from one another, and why people can have difficulty adapting to a new culture. For a long time, we’ve described cultures in terms of individualism or collectivism, but there are limitations to those terms. Joanna explains how we can interpret cultural behavior better if we think about high and low relational-mobility cultures. Related Links: * Cowboys vs. Rice Farmers: Mapping the Ecology of Cultural Difference, William & Mary News* How to win (and lose) friendships across cultures: Why relational mobility matters by Robert Thomson and Masaku Yuki, In Mind* Relational Mobility Depends on Where You Live, Asian Scientist* Relational Mobility Explains Between- and Within-Culture Differences in Self-Disclosure to Close Friends by Joanna Schug, Masaki Yuki, & William Maddux, Psychological Science* Relational mobility predicts social behaviors in 39 countries and is tied to historical farming and threat by Robert Thomson, Masaku Yuki, Thomas Talhelm, Joanna Schug, and others, PNAS Here is a transcript of this episode. Rating the Show If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>
August 1, 2019
Cailin O’Connor (@cailinmeister) is a philosopher of science at the University of California-Irvine. We discuss her book The Misinformation Age: How False Beliefs Spread co-authored with James Owen Weatherall. Related Links: * Do as I Say, Not as I Do, or, Conformity in Scientific Networks by James Owen Weatherall and Cailin O'Connor* How Science Spreads: Smallpox, Stomach Ulcers, and ‘The Vegetable Lamb of Tartary’: Episode of The Hidden Brain* Ukraine: The Haze of Propaganda by Tim Snyder, New York Review of Books* Endogenous Epistemic Factionalization: A Network Epistemology Approach by James Owen Weatherall & Cailin O’Connor* The Natural Selection of Conservative Science by Cailin O’Connor * How to Beat Science and Influence People: Policy Makers and Propaganda in Epistemic Networks by James Owen Weatherall, Cailin O’Connor, & Justin P. Bruner Here is a transcript of this episode. Rating the Show If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>
July 23, 2019
This episode features short interviews with people who attended the 2019 Heterodox Academy conference and one excerpt from a conference symposium. Guests In Order of Appearance: * Jon Haidt, social psychologist and business ethics professor * Amna Khalid, historian* Jesse Singal, journalist at New York Magazine* Anya Pechko, entrepreneur and founder of Project Be* Fabio Rojas, sociologist and editor of Contexts* Nicholas Phillips, Heterodox Academy research associate Here is a transcript of the episode. Rating the Show If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>
July 15, 2019
Oliver Burkeman is a British journalist and author based in Brooklyn. We discuss his recent Guardian essay where he argues that excessive engagement with political news is unhealthy for individual wellbeing and for democracy. Related Links * How the news took over reality by Oliver Burkeman* The Antidote: Happiness for People Who Can't Stand Positive Thinking (Burkeman)* Video: The Negative Path to Happiness and Success (Burkeman)* Help! How To Be Slightly Happier and Get a Bit More Done (Burkeman)* Why time management is ruining our lives (Burkeman)* Overdoing Democracy: Why We Must Put Politics in Its Place by Robert Talisse Here is atranscript of the episode. Rating the Show If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: * Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”* Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”* Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>
July 1, 2019
Nicholas Christakis is a physician and sociologist at Yale University. His previous books included Connected and Death Foretold.
June 15, 2019
My guest today is Angie Maxwell (@AngieMaxwell1). She received her PhD. In American Studies from the University of Texas at Austin, and is currently associate professor of Southern Studies at the University of Arkansas. She also chairs the Diane D. Blair Center of Southern Politics, which administers national polls of political attitudes that oversample residents of the Southern U.S. Her new book The Long Southern Strategy: How Chasing White Voters in the South Changed American Politics, which is grounded in data from these polls, comes out on June 28, 2019. The book is coauthored by Todd Shields. Here is a transcript of this episode. Rating the Show If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>
June 1, 2019
Listen to an interview with political theorist Teresa Bejan whose book Mere Civility critiques early modern debates about toleration
May 20, 2019
Listen to Deb Mashek and Karen Gillo preview the Heterodox Academy 2019 Conference.
May 15, 2019
Maria Dixon Hall manages the Campus Cultural Intelligence program at Southern Methodist University. She has a background in multiple disciplines, having earned a masters of divinity, a masters of theology, and a PhD in Organizational Communication and Religion. Her work in cultural intelligence differs from the typical diversity training that’s done on college campuses, and as you’ll hear, it has received both positive and negative media coverage. Maria will be a panelist at the 2019 Heterodox Academy conference in New York City on June 20 and 21. Registration for the conference is open now -- register here! Related Links A New Model to Move Beyond Diversity by Maria Dixon Hall, Tulsa World Hard Questions, Honest Answers by Maria Dixon Hall, Chronicle of Higher Education Cultural Intelligence, a talk by Maria Dixon Hall at The United Methodist Church Texas Annual Conference Follow Maria her on Twitter Transcript Here is a transcript of this episode. Rating the Show If you enjoyed this show, please rate it on iTunes: Go to the show’s iTunes page and click “View in iTunes”Click “Ratings and Reviews” which is to the right of “Details”Next to “Click to Rate” select the stars. See the full list of episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy >>
May 8, 2019
This is a re-release of a podcast episode from The Annex, a sociology podcast created by Joseph Cohen (CUNY Queens College), Leslie Hinkson (Georgetown), and Gabriel Rossman (UCLA).
May 1, 2019
Listen to an interview with Christopher Federico, a political psychologist with joint appointments in psychology and political science at the University of Minnesota. We talk about a new paper in which he and Ari Malka argue that people do not simply become liberal or conservative based on the strength of their psychological needs for security and certainty.
April 15, 2019
Listen to an interview with Ashley Jardina, political scientist and author of White Identity Politics
April 15, 2019
How political scientists have wrongly conflated racial identity and prejudice
April 1, 2019
Listen to an interview with Arthur Brooks, author of Love Your Enemies. This episode features him in conversation with Deb Mashek, executive director of Heterodox Academy, and the two co-hosts of How Do We Fix it?, Richard Davies and Jim Meigs.
March 15, 2019
Listen to episode 50 of Half Hour of Heterodoxy featuring clinical psychologist Katie Gordon.
March 4, 2019
Listen to an interview with Jeffrey A. Sachs, lecturer in politics at Acadia University. Sachs presents his critique of the idea that campuses are facing a free speech crisis, and also discusses differences between the U.S. and Canada.
February 20, 2019
Podcast episode featuring Julian Zelizer, historian at Princeton university, and coauthor of Fault Lines: A History of the United States Since 1974, published this January. Zelizer is author and editor of 18 books on U.S. history and has a weekly column on CNN.
February 13, 2019
Listen to the latest episode featuring Noah Silverman and Katie Baxter of Interfaith Youth Core (IFYC).
January 28, 2019
Listen to Deb Mashek and Musa al-Gharbi reflect on Heterodox Academy's activities on 2018 and present new initiatives for 2019.
January 22, 2019
Listen to a discussion with Xander Snyder and Erik Fogg, hosts of the Reconsider Podcast, on bias and accuracy in political news and research.
January 14, 2019
Listen to an interview with Chad Wellmon about whether universities have historically had a clear purpose.
January 2, 2019
Listen to a discussion of a new book by Kruse and Julian Zelizer about post-Watergate America, covering the Carter years, the Cold War, and more.
December 21, 2018
Listen to an interview with Ellen Hendriksen, host of The Savvy Psychologist podcast. She's a clinical psychologist at Boston University's Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders (CARD). Her work is regularly featured in Psychology Today, Scientific American, and The Huffington Post. Her book, How to be Yourself: Quiet Your Inner Critic and Rise Above Social Anxiety was published in 2018.
December 10, 2018
Listen to Craig Frisby and Joshua Phillips discuss problems with cultural competence and cultural sensitivity training.
November 30, 2018
Listen to Tania Reynolds discuss why men are consistently stereotyped as perpetrators of immoral harm, and why this matters for public policy.
November 15, 2018
Listen to a special Thanksgiving episode about gratitude featuring journalist, author, and lecturer A. J. Jacobs
November 14, 2018
Listen to an interview with Lucía Martínez Valdivia, assistant professor at Reed College.
October 30, 2018
When sociologists explain why men and women have different careers, different interests, and different priorities, they rely on socialization as an explanation. But is that explanation complete? I talk to sociologist Charlotta Stern about this question.
October 15, 2018
Listen to an interview with Julie Wronski, professor of political science at the University of Mississippi. In a new paper, she and her coauthors show a difference between the average authoritarianism of Bernie Sanders voters and Hillary Clinton voters.
October 1, 2018
Listen to a new podcast episode featuring David Askenazi of the Knight Foundation, and Jeff Jones of Gallup. They discuss survey findings about attitudes toward free expression on American campuses.
September 17, 2018
Listen to a discussion of The Coddling of the American Mind, just published this month, with the authors Greg Lukianoff and Jon Haidt. They discuss the history behind the Atlantic article on coddling, Greg's battle with depression, Nietzchean and Stoic views of pain, and other topics.
September 6, 2018
Jason Stanley is Jacob Urowsky Professor of Philosophy at Yale University. He formerly specialized in the philosophy of language, but has recently changes his focus to populism and politics, with his 2015 book How Propaganda Works and his new book How Fascism Works, which goes on sale this month.
August 29, 2018
A new podcast episode in which Chris Martin talks to Robert Quinn, the executive director of Scholars at Risk Network, which helps protect and relocate members of higher education communities whose freedom and security are threatened in their home countries. Since the founding of Scholars at Risk in 2000, SAR has assisted over 1000 scholars through temporary research and teaching visits. You can join the network here. You can find out more about Scholars at Risk at www.scholarsatrisk.com and on Twitter at @ScholarsAtRisk. You can also find many other interviews with Rob on the Youtube channel for the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs.
August 15, 2018
A new podcast episode in which Chris Martin talks to Jessica Good, a social psychologist at Davidson College. Her research focuses on stereotyping and discrimination. Chris invited her to the show to talk about her new paper on multiculturalism because it's a contentious topic in the political world and academia. Her new paper is called Valuing Differences and Reinforcing Them: Multiculturalism Increases Race Essentialism.
July 30, 2018
Rick Mehta (@RickRMehta) is a professor of psychology at Acadia University in Nova Scotia, Canada. His research focuses on the mechanisms involved in decision making. He has recently begun to study viewpoint diversity in universities and Canadian psychology departments specifically. His talk Free Speech in Universities: Threats and Opportunities covers the philosophy and psychology of free expression.
July 17, 2018
Fabio Rojas is a professor of sociology at Indiana University at Bloomington. He’s the author of From Black Power to Black Studies: How a Radical Social Movement and Theory for the Working Sociologist published by Columbia University Press. He blogs at Orgtheory.wordpress.com. 06:30 Understanding the rules of activism 08:13 Doing activist work that’s unsatisfying but important 11:18 Visiting Wellesley University’s Freedom Project 22:15 Is understanding necessary for effective activism? 26:34 Two new articles: a new survey of student activism; Defining scholarly roles
June 29, 2018
Robert Wright is a former senior editor at The New Republic, and he currently hosts The Wright Show. He’s also the author of several bestselling books on evolution and society. His latest book Is Why Buddhism Is True. Behind Bob’s Mindful Resistance Newsletter [0:00] Tribal tweets and popularity [5:28] Evaluating Heterodox Academy [16:00] The Google Memo [21:40] The intellectual dark web/Evolutionary psychology [25:25] Bob’s near-term plans [31:45] Mindfulness and De-Biasing Oneself [37:46]
June 19, 2018
0:00 The uniqueness of Evergreen State 5:42 Activities since leaving Evergreen 10:10 Economic privilege in academia 15:00 Safe space, identity politics, etc. 20:10 Why Evergreen needs a better president
June 5, 2018
John Inazu is professor of law and religion at Washington University in St. Louis. His scholarship focuses on the First Amendment freedoms—specifically speech, assembly, and religion. His first book is about freedom of assembly. His second book, which we discuss, is Confident Pluralism: Surviving and Thriving Through Deep Difference. It was published in 2016 and a paperback edition with a new introduction comes out this year.
May 15, 2018
Arthur Sakamoto (@sakamoto_arthur), sociologist at Texas A&M, discusses three myths about Asian Americans. 0:00 The questionable claim of a high Hmong dropout rate 08:00 The poverty rate and wealth of Asians and non-Asians 14:01 Are Asians disadvantaged by living in costly neighborhoods? 20:10 Assimilation and the mobile labor market 23:40 Why do sociologists selectively talk about cost of living? 25:31 White privilege and the alleged bamboo ceiling
April 24, 2018
Caroline Mehl and Raffi Grinberg direct the OpenMind Platform, an interactive tool to help individuals learn perspective taking and intellectual humility using principles from psychology. There are beta versions of Open Mind for use in corporations, organizations, and religious communities. You can check out Open Mind at openmindplatform.org and follow Open Mind on Twitter at openmindusa.
April 9, 2018
My guest today is Richard Reeves. He’s a social and political commentator and he has written for several newspapers and magazines in both the US and the UK, including The Guardian and The Atlantic. He has also written a biography of John Stuart Mill and between 2010 and 2012, Richard was Director of Strategy to the UK’s Deputy Prime Minister.
March 26, 2018
David Frum (@davidfrum) is a senior editor at the Atlantic Magazine and a frequent contributor at MSNBC. He is a former speechwriter for George W. Bush and is known for coining the phrase “axis of evil.” He has been a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and a contributor at the National Review. He is the author of nine books including most recently Trumpocracy: The Corruption of the American Republic, which we discuss today.
March 15, 2018
Show Notes Musa al-Gharbi is a research associate at Heterodox Academy and a PhD student in sociology at Columbia University. He is a writer whose work has been featured in The New York Times, the Washington Post, The Atlantic, and several other venues. The topics of his research include terrorism, extremism, war, antiracism, and, more recently, U.S. political elections. Selected Quote So there’s this real problem where in order to move the needle on a lot of the social issues that progressives want to address, they just need to be able to engage with a far larger band of people than we’re training them to engage with. I mean even from the religious standpoint, most Americans are religious and most people, especially outside of the United States – again, if you’re talking about in developing nations, even more religious and in a different way than Western Europeans and Americans often are – and we’re just fundamentally not training social researchers to be able to speak in a religious language or even feel comfortable engaging with religious people or their narratives or frames of reference. Transcript This is a professional transcript but it may contain errors. Please do not quote it without verification. Chris Martin: My guest today is Musa al-Gharbi. He’s a researcher at Heterodox Academy. He’s a PhD student in Sociology at Columbia and he’s a writer whose work has not only been featured on our blog, but also in the New York Times, the Washington Post, The Atlantic and several other venues. The topics of his research range from terrorism to war to anti-racism and more recently, he has been writing about US political elections. You can find out more about him at his website musaalgharbi.com. So here is Musa al-Gharbi. Welcome to the show. Musa al-Gharbi: Yeah, thank you for having me. Chris Martin: We’re glad to have you on. On previous episodes, I’ve interviewed professors pretty much uniformly and you’re the first student to be in the interviewee’s chair on this show. I’m curious. Tell me a bit about how you as a graduate student decided to join Heterodox Academy. Musa al-Gharbi: I had kind of an unusual journey. I mean in academia in general but maybe the Heterodox Academy as well. So I started in community college and a lot of the concerns that we deal with at Heterodox Academy weren’t such a big deal there. I mean a lot of times at community colleges, you have much more diverse student bodies, even racially and ethnically, but definitely in terms of like socio-economic status and political orientation. But then when I went to University of Arizona, which is where I got my bachelor’s and my master’s degree, I noticed a big shift pretty immediately and it was mainly just that you would see almost all the professors were clearly aligned with the left -- and to the extent that they talked about sort of non-leftist views at all,  a lot of the talk was very uncharitable. But usually they just excluded frameworks that were not affiliated with the left to begin with. I found that disturbing and irksome often because I myself come from a conservative community and family.  I’m very familiar with conservative thought and I know that conservatives have a lot to add to many of these conversations and I felt like more diverse input would have enriched and enlivened a lot of these conversations. But still, I mean when I would hear things on the news about like safe spaces and trigger warnings and microaggressions and the like, I always thought that that was – like I didn’t think that any of that stuff was real or particularly salient to anyone’s university experience. I thought it was just people on the right blowing stuff out of proportion or whatever. But then when I got to Columbia, I saw that –
February 27, 2018
Show Notes Deb Mashek (@DebMashekHXA) is the new executive director of Heterodox Academy. She is currently professor of psychology at Harvey Mudd College, but will be leaving that position to serve full time as executive director. We talk about her career and her three priorities for 2018. Selected Quote "I regularly have students and colleagues swinging by for closed-door conversations where they say things like, 'There is this question I wanted to ask in class, or there’s an idea I wanted to raise in a meeting, but I didn’t feel comfortable with doing so because other people might tell me that I’m being ridiculous, or that it's an offensive question.' And that has a very chilling effect on inquiry and on the pursuit of knowledge."   Transcript This is a professional transcript but it may contain errors. Please do not quote it without verification. Chris Martin: My guest today is Deb Mashek. She’s the new Executive Director of Heterodox Academy and this is her first appearance on our podcast. Deb also goes by Debra. I mentioned that if you want to search for her scholarly publications. She’s currently a tenured Professor of Psychology at Harvey Mudd College and despite being very happy with her job there, she has decided to leave and join us here at Heterodox Academy. You can follow her on Twitter, @DebMashekHxA. So here is Deb Mashek. Welcome to the show and welcome to Heterodox Academy. Debra Mashek: Thank you. It’s a pleasure to be here. Chris Martin: Well, thanks for joining us for this episode and congratulations on your appointment. So you’re currently a Professor of Psychology at Harvey Mudd. But you started out studying psychology, biology and women studies. So tell me a bit about how you got from there to where you are right now. Debra Mashek: Yeah. So I was an undergrad at Nebraska Wesleyan University where as you mentioned, I was studying bio-psychology and women studies and then from there, I moved on to Stony Brook University where I received my MA and my PhD in Social Psychology with an emphasis in quantitative methods and my expertise developed there in close relationships and I studied the self-expansion model. The idea there is that through relationships, we take on the resources, the identities and the perspectives of other people and then ultimately increase our own agency in the world through interpersonal connection. Since then I’ve applied that theoretical frame to the study of romantic relationships and incarcerated people, college students and also inter-institutional collaborations. So after Stony Brook, I went on for a three-year research fellowship at George Mason and then as you mentioned in 2005, made the move to Harvey Mudd College, which is a small liberal arts school in Claremont, California. We’re very STEM-focused and we’re one of the Claremont Colleges, which includes Pomona, Scripps, Pitzer, Claremont McKenna, Harvey Mudd, Claremont Graduate University and Keck Graduate Institute. Chris Martin: So last year you applied to our director position at Heterodox Academy. What made you decide to do that? Debra Mashek: It’s a great question. So I’m at this job I absolutely love working with students and colleagues who just wow me every single day and I’m getting ready to leave it and so the question is, “Why in the world would I do such a thing?” and the answer has to do with I am worried about what I’m seeing in the broader landscape of higher ed. You know, given my relationships work, I think a lot about relationships among people, among institutions, among ideas and I am personally very fascinated by – kind of these emergent properties of togetherness, the ways that when we come together, we can think, we can create, we can discover when there’s really room at the table for diver...
February 8, 2018
Show Notes Frank Lechner is a professor of sociology at Emory University. He did his undergraduate work in sociology at Tilburg University in the Netherlands, and then moved to the U.S. for his PhD. He’s the author of four books and two edited volumes—his most recent book is The American Exception, a book about American exceptionalism that covers several aspects of American life including religion, law, sports, and media. I invited him to the show in part to have a dialogue about a piece I published about asymmetric polarization. We also discussed a first-year seminar on conservatism that Frank taught in 2016. To my knowledge, that’s the first seminar of its kind at Emory. Selected Quote I appreciate your comment about my “nonpartisan” teaching because in my day to day life, I try to depoliticize the work that I do. I don’t put my own views forward in a very strong manner. I prefer to create a space in which students can analyze arguments and evidence as honestly and as seriously as possible and to provide them with the tools and if necessary play the Devil’s advocate for whatever side needs my support and my articulation. And I think in my actual teaching I don’t take a strong political posture. More generally, I occasionally I speak up on political issues, issues on campus so people are aware I have perhaps a slightly deviant point of view, a point of view that deviates from the orthodoxy that reigns on most college campuses. But at the same time, I don’t fight any Quixotic battles against the dominant culture. Transcript This is a professional transcript but it contains some errors. Please do not quote it without verification. Chris Martin: I’m Chris Martin and this is Half Hour of Heterodoxy. This show is produced by Heterodox Academy. You can find out more about us at heterodoxacademy.org. You can also find us on Facebook under Heterodox Academy and on Twitter @hdxacademy.   My guest today is Frank Lechner. Frank is a professor of sociology at Emory University, which is where I recently finished my PhD. I took a theory course with Frank during my second year and I was very impressed with his mastery of classical, sociological theories. And Frank is known more broadly within the sociology community for his work on globalization. He’s the author of four books and two edited volumes. His most recent book is The American Exception. It’s a book about American exceptionalism that covers several aspects of American life including politics, religion, law, sports and the media.   I invited Frank to the show in part to have a dialogue about a piece I published about asymmetric polarization in America. We also discussed the first year seminar on conservatism that Frank taught in 2016. To my knowledge that’s the first seminar of its kind at Emory.   The essay about asymmetric polarization that we discuss is one that I published in late 2016. Frank disagreed with many points in the essay, which is why I invited him to the show. The essay is entitled To My Undergraduate Class on the 2016 Election. I was teaching a class on the sociology of happiness at the time and I wrote this essay to expand on what I said to my class. I published this essay on Medium and Lee Jussim published a copy of it on his blog so you may have read it on one of those places. If you haven’t read it, you can find it online by searching for “To My Undergraduate Class on the 2016 Election.”   Now, the essay doesn’t exactly represent what I said to my class. What I actually said to my class was quite brief. I wrote this essay afterwards and then sent it to my class to read if they wanted to. And the essay primarily makes two points that I made in class. The first is about ideology quite broadly. The first point is that Liberals,
January 21, 2018
Show Notes  Jennifer Earl is professor of sociology and a professor of government and public policy at the university of Arizona. Her research focuses on Internet and social movements, social movement repression, and the sociology of law. She is the 2017 winner of the William F. Ogburn Career Achievement Award, awarded by the communication, information technologies, and media sociology section of the American Sociological Association. I invited her to the podcast to talk about the use of the internet by political activists. When I say Internet, I don’t just mean social media. Social media gets a lot of attention, especially when people talk about polarization, but the internet is more than just Twitter and Facebook, and I think people sometime misunderstand how the internet is being used by political activists. I also wanted to talk to her about how the internet can be used to deceive people, and how people can become discerning consumers of web content. Selected Quotes One should treat information on the Web with more criticism than we often treat it. So I think a practice that I try to use is that if I read something that I’m surprised about, many people will then try to Google a confirmation of that. So they’ll read “X happened,” and then they’ll google “Did X Happen?” Or they’ll just google “X” and see what comes up. But I would recommend that you try you consider falsification too, just like in social science so that you also try to search for negative evidence like this didn’t happen. So you might Google “X isn’t true” or “X is a myth.” Now certainly sometimes that’s going to get you to places where… Well, probably X was true. So, one of the things about holocaust denial is that holocaust denial plays on that kind of format of question (”X is a myth”) to bring people into holocaust denial websites. So I’m not saying that you should trust falsification on the web 100 percent of the time either, but I think you should have a healthy skepticism about what you read even if it’s sent to you by someone you trust because you don’t know their vetting procedure. Transcript This transcription was done by a professional but it may contain a few errors. Please listen to the podcast episode before quoting this transcript. Transcript Chris Martin: My guess today is Jennifer Earl and she’s a professor of sociology and a professor of government and public policy at the University of Arizona. Her research focuses on internet and social movements, social movement repression and the sociology of law. And she’s the 2017 winner of the William F. Ogburn Career Achievement Award, which is awarded by Communication, Information Technologies and Media Sociology section of the American Sociological Association. I invited her to the podcast to talk about the use of the internet by political activists. And when I say internet, I don’t just mean social media. Social media gets a lot of attention especially when people are talking about polarization, but the internet is much broader than that. And I think sometimes people misunderstand based on the writings of some popular authors how the internet is actually being used. I also wanted to talk to her about how the internet can be used to deceive people and how people can become more discerning users of web content. So here is Jennifer Earl. Welcome to the show. Jennifer Earl: Thanks so much for having me. I really appreciate it. Chris Martin: I wanted to start by talking about your 2011 book, Digitally Enabled Social Change: Activism in the Internet Age. You co-authored that with Katrina Kimport. Can you tell us a little bit about that book? Jennifer Earl: Certainly. So Katrina and I were very interested in how the use of digital technologies were affecting protest and social movements.
December 15, 2017
John McWhorter: Transcript of an interview
November 13, 2017
Show Notes  Cristine Legare is an associate professor of psychology at the University of Texas-Austin and she’s on the executive board of Heterodox Academy. She is the winner of the APS Spence Award for Transformative Early Career Contributions. In this episode, I talk to her about two teaching issues: how to teach a politically and religiously diverse student body, and how to approach controversial issues. You can learn more about Cristine Legare at www.cristinelegare.com. Selected Quotes “There are a lot of different things I would recommend. One is to set the stage within a class to accommodate lots of different perspectives. A student should have exposure to a great variety of different perspectives. And often students aren’t aware that there are many, many different ways to view or reason about a particular topic. So I think the first step is educating students that there are, in fact, lots of different ways of approaching a topic—that there are a lot of different opinions about topics and different values concerning topics. I think setting that stage is very important.”   Previous Episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy Music: "Ave Marimba" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
October 30, 2017
Half Hour of Heterodoxy is now an audio-only podcast. We suggest that you subscribe through iTunes, Stitcher, TuneIn, or any other app of your choice, or listen using the audio player in the blog post.  Show Notes  Alice Dreger is an historian of medicine and science, a sex researcher, and an advocate of academic freedom. She is the author of Galileo’s Middle Finger: Heretics, Activists, and One Scholar’s Search for Justice. In this episode, I talk to her about why she blames university brand management, and the corporatization of academia more broadly, for the policing of research, which has now become common in academic life. We talk about how the increasing reliance on external research funding has spurred attention to university brand management, and Alice also presents her recommendations for what to do if you are caught up in an academic controversy. Alice Dreger's Webpage Alice Dreger on Twitter Alice Dreger's keynote address on academic freedom at FIRE's 2017 faculty conference Selected Quotes 1 "I went to my [Northwestern] university provost and said, 'Admit that this was censorship and say that you won’t do it again.' He would not do that. And It seemed that he was legitimately afraid at that point of the [university] hospital corporation, which I found deeply concerning. And that’s why I finally did just resign. You can’t have any integrity if you have a major book out on academic freedom telling people to stand up for their academic rights and you’re allowing your university dean to tell you what you can and can’t publish." 2 "One thing I recommend to people, the minute they start to get into trouble with academic freedom, is that they contact FIRE because it’s one of the few organizations out there that will defend you for free and will do so vigorously. And universities do care about their FIRE rating. They really do care about It. So it matters."   Previous Episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy Music: "Ave Marimba" Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
October 10, 2017
Half Hour of Heterodoxy is now an audio-only podcast. We'll still upload episodes to Youtube if you'd prefer to get them there, but we suggest that you subscribe through iTunes, Stitcher, TuneIn, or any other app of your choice, or listen using the audio player in the blog post.  Show Notes In today's episode, I interview Arthur Sakamoto. Arthur is a professor of sociology at Texas A&M. Prior to working there, he worked at the University of Texas, Austin, from 1989 to 2013. He specializes in economic sociology and class inequality. He has published a number of papers on Asian Americans and their socioeconomic attainments, and papers about whether Asian-Americans are victims of discrimination in the labor market. His work suggests that Asian American men and White men have parity in the labor market. As you’ll hear in this interview, this work is controversial because it breaks the paradigm that most sociologists use. Arthur also talks about the consequences for your career if you try to publish work that challenges the conventional paradigm. Arthur Sakamoto’s Home Page at Texas A&M Arthur Sakamoto’s Google Scholar page Selected Quotes 1 "I’ve heard of debates about why sociology is so liberal and there’s some say it’s selectivity—liberals are the people interested in going into sociology…. My perception has been that within the field of sociology, the rewards for people who don’t conform to the conventional wisdom are slim, and I’ve known good sociologists doing good research who did not get tenure because their work didn’t fit into the paradigm very well." 2 "I’ll be frank with you—I’ve been submitting to the American Sociological Review on Asian Americans for the past 25 years and apparently there’s no data good enough for the ASR to convince the reviewers that Asian Americans have reached parity with respect to Whites. Every single one gets rejected. What happens is when the paper doesn’t conform to the conventional wisdom, the methodological standards are raised. But when you argue that there’s discrimination against Asians, the methodological standards are relaxed." 3 "I’ve always been interested in studying Asian Americans and I’ve found that American sociology has not shared my enthusiasm. It’s kind of ironic to me that Japanese Americans have had lower poverty rates than Whites for the past half century; have had higher education for the past century; have had greater probability of obtaining white collar professional jobs for decades, and yet I challenge you to find a single text on race and ethnicity that describe any of that. We get endless detail about internment about Japanese-Americans in WWII but it’s as if everything else that Japanese Americans have done has been obliterated from the field of sociology because of this focus on the majority-minority paradigm. So that’s another reason why I’ve been critical of this—because it’s prevented me from studying Asian Americans in terms of their class characteristics." 4 "A lot of courses don’t seriously talk about Asian Americans systematically so you’re not provided with evidence or consistent data to test this paradigm for Asians. For example, Erik Olin Wright, former president of the American Sociological Association, has an intro textbook “How America Really Works.” And in the whole chapter on race there’s not a single datum on Asian Americans. And that’s “How America Works,” there's no Asians. It’s not uncommon for these data to be deleted, and they’ll talk about this or that particular instance of racism…. They’ll talk about instances of discrimination but they won’t go over systematic statistics which suggest that Asians are actually less likely to be murdered than other groups." 5 "I have no ideological aversion to studying racial discrimination, I mean,
September 27, 2017
Glenn Loury (@GlennLoury) is the Merton P. Stoltz Professor of the Social Sciences and Professor of Economics at Brown University. He has taught previously at Boston, Harvard and Northwestern Universities, and the University of Michigan. He hosts the Glenn Show at Bloggingheads.tv, where he has talked to John McWhorter, Rob Montz, Amy Wax, and others about campus politics and the censorship of unorthodox views. 0:00 Intro; NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly at Brown, and the aftermath 9:36 Faculty appreciate the gravity of the problem 14:00 “Prof. Loury, don’t you know the word is out on you?” 20:06 Brown’s allocation of $100 mil for diversity/inclusion 25:20 Are initiatives evidence-based? 33:20 Must people of color be mentored by other people of color? Related Links The Glenn Show Self-Censorship in Public Discourse: A Theory of “Political Correctness” and Related Phenomena, a 1994 article by Glenn Loury An Ivy League professor on what the campus conversation on race gets wrong Selected Quote "There is an awareness of the concerns that Heterodox Academy devotees would think foremost about, which is that we allow differences of opinion to be expressed. It’s vitally important that we do so. There is an appreciation of that point of view here in the administration. I think of my friend, the long time provost of the university.… I’ve gotten to know him very well, and I’ve had extended conversations with him about these matters because we’re friends, and I’ve expressed my concerns. He’s got a difficult problem in balancing the various equities that are concerned. I’m not talking splitting the difference on free speech issues. I’m talking about managing a large organization with a lot of different moving parts and varied interests. He has instituted very self-consciously a lecture series bringing controversial speakers to campus…. It’s not a one-dimensional thing like free speech is dying at Brown."   Other Episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy
September 21, 2017
Half Hour of Heterodoxy #12: Jonathan Haidt (@JonHaidt) is a co-founder and executive director of Heterodox Academy. He is a professor of business ethics at New York University’s Stern School of Business, and has written The Happiness Hypothesis: Finding Modern Truth in Ancient Wisdom (2006) and The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion (2012), which became a New York Times bestseller.
September 21, 2017
Jonathan Haidt (@JonHaidt) is a co-founder and executive director of Heterodox Academy. He is a professor of business ethics at New York University’s Stern School of Business, and has written The Happiness Hypothesis: Findi...
September 15, 2017
Norm Ornstein (@NormOrnstein), is a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. He has written and co-written a number of books about gridlock and partisanship in the American political system including The Permanent Campaign and Its Future (1995), The Broken Branch (2006), and It’s Even Worse Than It Looks (2012). 0:00 What students should know about US politics 4:34 How the parties have realigned 13:00 And how they’re continuing to realign 15:05 We’ve moved from partisanship to tribalism…Newt Ginrich 18:44 Evaluating Democrat leadership in the 60s and 70s 20:55 Norm’s new book, “One Nation After Trump” 24:00 The Dunkirk analogy 28:10 Critiques of Norm from conservatives About Norm Ornstein Norm Ornstein’s American Enterprise Institute page: https://www.aei.org/scholar/norman-j-ornstein/ Articles by Norm Ornstein at The Atlantic It’s Even Worse Than It Looks: How the American Constitutional System Collided with the New Politics of Extremism, with Thomas Mann One Nation After Trump: A Guide for the Perplexed, the Disillusioned, the Desperate, and the Not-Yet Deported, with Thomas Mann and E. J. Dionne Selected Quotes “What I really wanted to emphasize, especially with It’s Even Worse Than It Looks was that we’ve moved from partisanship to tribalism. And there’s a real difference. You can be a strong partisan—view people on the other side of the aisle as worthy adversaries. And that’s partisanship. If you view people on the other side as evil and trying to destroy your way of life, and the enemy, that’s tribalism.”   Other Episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy
September 5, 2017
Scott Lilienfeld is professor of psychology at Emory University. Here, he talks about his 2016 article evaluating the psychological literature on microaggressions and his 2017 article about revoking the Goldwater rule. Scott is an Association for Psychological Science fellow, and he has published numerous studies in personality psychology, social psychology, political psychology, and clinical psychology. He also has an interest in debunking popular myths. His popular books include Brainwashed: The Seductive Appeal of Mindless Neuroscience and 50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology. Timeline: 1:06 The history behind Scott’s micro-aggressions critique 7:01 Two big weaknesses in research studies 15:23 Real-world implications 20:05 Reactions to the article 26:05 The Goldwater Rule, and revoking it in 2017   You can learn more Scott Lilienfeld at his website.  A gated copy of his paper on micro-aggressions, entitled “Microaggressions: Strong claims, inadequate evidence” is here. And it is summarized in this blog post by Musa Al-Gharbi.  His paper on the Goldwater is here. Selected Quote: “One big criticism concerns the nature of the construct of micro-aggressions itself. Do we understand what it is? And one of the points I raise is that even though there’s something there, it’s so vague and so nebulous, it could, in principle, include almost anything that could offend almost anyone. And I think that’s part of the problem. It lends itself to too much abuse, too much misunderstanding.“   Other episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy.
August 22, 2017
Apologies for the audio and video problems in this episode. In this episode, Chris Martin interviews Rick (Richard) Shweder, cultural anthropologist at University of Chicago’s Department of Comparative Human Development. He is author and editor of numerous books including Thinking Through Cultures: Expeditions in Cultural Psychology and Why Do Men Barbecue? Recipes for Cultural Psychology. His recent research examines the scopes and limits of pluralism, the tension between diversity and equality, and the multicultural challenge in Western liberal democracies. You can learn more Rick Shweder at his website. A new paper by Rick, entitled “The End of the Modern Academy: At The University of Chicago, For Example” will be published in Social Research this fall. 0:00 Introduction 2:15 The undergraduate curriculum and multiculturalism: inclusion vs. sovereignty 6:50 Intersectionality is not consistent with solidarity 9:30 The fracture within cultural anthropology 17:30 America allows a lot of cultural diversity 22:00 Confusionism 24:45 Do international students help viewpoint diversity? 29:00 Opposing perspectives on academic subculture Selected Quote: "Once you start all of a sudden emphasizing status or seeing yourself as a tribal institution with different groups and different tribes, each of whom is really an interest group promoting their picture of the world and really is not interested in challenges to it; or challenges get perceived as offensive attacks or as harms, then you’ve changed the nature of the [academic] subculture. Too what extent that subculture has already changed is one of the things I know that people at Heterodox Academy are concerned with. I certainly am concerned about it. And whether or not the picture of the modern academy that I just gave is sustainable, how many people are prepared to defend it, these are all issues of the day."   Other episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy.  
August 17, 2017
In this episode, Chris Martin (@Chrismartin76) interviews Jacques Berlinerblau (@berlinerblau), Professor of Jewish Civilization and director of the Center for Jewish Civilization at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. Jacques talks about his new book, Campus Confidential: How College Works or Doesn’t, for Professors, Parents, and Students 0:00 Three factions in humanities departments 04:40 Advice for grads and undergrads in the humanities 11:20 How to repair the academy 13:30 Active learning and elite high school students 16:30 What should professors be like? 19:45 The secret weapon or creating intellectual diversity 24:00 The big fissure in the intellectual world 28:35 Does left-wing ideology resemble a religion?   See also: "When your next college free speech controversy erupts, don’t blame liberals" (Washington Post). Quote on the Three Factions in the Humanities: "People like Bill Maher strangely enough or Fox News often think of American academic culture as they would think of American political culture—in American academic culture, we have red/blue, conservative/liberal, Republican/Democrat—a binary. Everything is stuffed into that binary. On a typical American college campus, in particular an elite liberal arts college campus, you actually have three factions. A tiny, deplorably small cohort of conservative scholars. Something like 2 percent of professors of English are registered Republicans. To me that’s mind boggling. You have a much larger cohort of liberals—a graying cohort of liberals. But the energy and enthusiasm and the excitement among what I would call the far Left. These might be readers of Michel Foucault. These might be readers of Jacques Derrida….My argument is they’re basically half to 60 to 70% of every major humanities department at every major college in the United States so we have to be very cautious when we blame liberals for free speech policies on campus. As far as I can tell, this doesn’t emanate from liberals. Liberals share on college campuses a lot in common with conservatives in terms of their thinking on free speech issues." On whether left-wing ideology is like a religion: "Everything is different now. I’m not worried about the Left today. I’m really worried about the Right. I’m terrified about what is going on in the country post-Charlottesville…. The academic left, for all the things I dislike about them, has not shown itself to be violent or unlawful in any shape or form. Is it a religious worldview? I think the Marxists were that way in the 30s, 40s, and 50s. The Foucauldians are so hard to figure out. I just don’t understand what makes them tick."   Other episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy.
July 12, 2017
0:00 Why socioeconomic diversity is important 6:21 How UT Austin is increasing socioeconomic diversity 12:10 SES diversity is intertwined with viewpoint diversity 15:05 Cristine’s recent experience with controversial class topics 20:00 Positive class evaluations 22:49 Techniques to have productive conversations in class 26:30: Illustrating unproductive forms of dialogue Chris Martin interviews Cristine Legare, Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Texas-Austin. She specializes in the study of culture, cultural learning, and cognition. She is a winner of the 2015 APS Janet Taylor Spence Award for Transformative Early Career Contributions. She serves on the executive board of Heterodox Academy. Selected Quotes: "And so one of the things that I had them do as an assignment for this book was to use Moral Foundations Theory to present arguments for and against teaching creationism in science classrooms, and the way the students were graded in this particular assignment was the extent to which both sides of that argument were equally persuasive....I wasn’t arguing that we should teach creationism in science classrooms, I don’t think that we should. But I think it’s a useful opportunity to accurately represent and convey beliefs that are very different from your own, and students struggle with this a little bit, but really embraced it and took this on. And gathered data from all kinds of different sources. They kind of spontaneously interviewed friends of theirs that were young-earth creationists. It was really fascinating." "In addition to modeling constructive ways to have a dialogue, I also model a few examples of bad practice...I used examples in class of both very religious people as well as atheists, and ways in which people from both those camps did a good and a bad job at reaching others, and I also use this as an opportunity to talk about how particular styles of argumentation are not persuasive. They're meant basically to further endear you to people who already think the way that you do. That is kind of psychologically satisfying for people but that is not constructive, so when you get a famous atheist scientist talking on and on about how stupid religious people are, his goal is definitely not to convert, not to persuade, from a persuasion perspective, that is entirely ineffective. In fact, I would say destructive."
July 12, 2017
Chris Martin interviews April Kelly-Woessner, Professor of Political Science and Chair of the Department of Politics, Philosophy and Legal Studies at Elizabethtown College. She specializes in public opinion, mass behavior, and political psychology. She is the co-editor of The Still Divided Academy: How Competing Visions of Power Politics and Diversity Complicate the Mission of Higher Education (2011). 2:30 Marcuse reflected in a Harvard Crimson op-ed 7:21 Why political researchers mistakenly thought tolerance was increasing 8:10 Shutting down opinions reflects an insecurity about civic knowledge 12:00 Often, American government classes are taught by high school coaches 13:00 How do you teach students about political tolerance? 19:10 Are conservatives opting out of academia because of college experiences? 21:40 The role of viewpoint diversity in making people tolerant 23:35 At small colleges, students can’t self-isolate 26:28 Is there an effect among people who don’t attend college? 27:10 Social media and intolerance Selected Quotes “What we find is that confidence in civic knowledge correlates pretty strongly and is a good predictor of political tolerance. So if you think you know a lot relative to other people, if you think you can hold your own in a political conversation, you’re more tolerant than people who are insecure about their civic knowledge. So I think the perception of these college students protestors is that they’re ideological radicals who have these strong opinions, and yet what they data shows is wanting to shut down other voices reflects an insecurity to defend your own. So the decline in civic knowledge is a big factor in political intolerance.” “On average, the [people] that aren’t in college are less tolerant than the ones that are. So this [rising intolerance] isn’t just something that’s just happening on college campuses. I think campuses become a spotlight for this. And I wouldn’t even say that college campuses are creating this, but I would argue that if we are serious about the mission of higher education, we have an obligation to counter it. This is the place where we are supposed to listen to other people, and to engage in ideas that are different than their own.”
July 12, 2017
Political scientist Sam Abrams teaches at Sarah Lawrence College. His New York Times piece on the polarization of the New England professoriate garnered national attention. In this episode I talk to him about what inspired his work on the professoriate, and where his current research is taking him. 1:03 What inspired Sam to start researching the professoriate? 3:30 Can you find a centrist or conservative professor in New England? 9:34 Is the think-tank world different and better? 12:05 Grad students considering job opportunities at think tanks vs. universities 13:55 It’s a “messy crazy time” in DC, which makes it hard for political research 18:08 Did Norm Ornstein get it right when he traced polarization to Newt Gingrich’s tactics as speaker? 22:10 Centrists need to participate at a local level 23:57 Less polarized regions and states, and the universities in those places 27:10 Students are more centrist and more curious than people may assume Selected Quotes: “This research started for two reasons. The first was that when I entered Sarah Lawrence College, I was immediately uncomfortable. I hoped and was excited about joining a community that was deeply engaged in scholarship and took the search for truth very seriously. And by my second day, I realized we were not necessarily looking for truth in the most open-minded sense. People had lenses they brought to the table. This is the faculty, and they expected you to come in with such a lens. I came in without a particularly strong lens. I am an empirical social scientist. I try to operationalize social questions, and answer these questions.” “One of the things that my empirics have shown that while faculty may have taken a hard left, college freshmen haven’t. College freshmen are a little left of center, the average American is a little right of center…I would say that many of these students are fairly open minded. Many of them want these ideas. Many of them want to argue with you which is sometimes a lot of work to handle, but also a joy.”
July 11, 2017
In this episode, Chris Martin (@Chrismartin76) interviews Lee Jussim (@PsychRabble), Professor of Social Psychology at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. He conducts research on stereotypes and stereotype accuracy, and blogs at Rabble Rouser.   0:00 Lee’s work on the myth of stereotype inaccuracy 7:11 Blatant biases in conventional social research 10:26 What’s inside Lee’s upcoming books about politics & social psychology? 14:57 Is stereotype accuracy finally getting the coverage it needs? 23:20 People mostly discard stereotypes when they have individuating information 26:57 Stereotypes of liberals and conservatives—accuracy, inaccuracy, and real-world problems 33:00 It’s the prejudice, not the stereotyping **** You can learn more Lee Jussim at his website. Here’s a recent talk by Lee: Science Going Bad and How to Improve It. Books mentioned during the interview: Social Perception and Social Reality: Why Accuracy Dominates Bias and Self-Fulfilling Prophecy by Lee Jussim: The Politics of Social Psychology, edited by Jarret T. Crawford and Lee Jussim Handbook of Prejudice, Stereotyping, and Discrimination, 2nd edition, edited by Todd D. Nelson:   Selected Quotes "I would like to think of my field of social psychology as a scientific field. I believe in science. I am enthusiastic about it. And so I am acutely pained when the field that I so strongly identify with, and want to advance, has basic failures in conduct as a normal science. And I discovered these failures when I examined the claims about stereotype inaccuracy." * "The idea of confirmation bias is people they selectively seek out information that confirms their pre-existing beliefs, and they’re more critical of information that disconfirms their beliefs. And as far as I can tell those patterns really do pervade the social sciences. And one way that manifests is—compare stereotype accuracy or inaccuracy to almost any area! If people are going to make any claim that say intrinsic motivation increases academic achievement, they’re going to have data to support the claim. They’re either going to have their own data or cite some famous review article or meta-analysis. But if they want to claim that stereotypes are inaccurate, they don’t need any data—that’s fine! You can just do that!!!" * "If people on the extreme left are over-represented—and there is good evidence for that in academia, especially in the social sciences and humanities—and if such people are most likely to unjustifiable exaggerate the views of their ideological opponents, you’re going to have academia filled with people who despise conservatives because they truly see them as fascists and Nazis. And so why is that a problem? It’s a problem intellectually for all sorts of reasons. It feeds back into the confirmation bias problem. To the extent that the social sciences address political issues and simply stigmatize people who disagree with their views then it’s going to be very difficult to have an honest conversation about zillions of politicized issues."   Other episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy.
July 7, 2017
Chris Martin talks to Matt Grossmann, associate professor of political science at Michigan State University and director of the Institute for Public Policy and Social Research. He specializes in the study of interest groups and parties. His latest book is Asymmetric Politics: Ideological Republicans and Group Interest Democrats, co-authored with David A. Hopkins. 0:00 What do undergraduates know about the parties? 04:00 Should we trace change to the Gingrich era? 07:35 Matt’s new book on asymmetric politics 15:00 People project their mirror image on the opposite party 17:10 Does Donald Trump represent the core of Republican party? 20:00 Comparing American parties to parties elsewhere 24:11 New research #1: Do the rich buy off politicians? 28:53 How this relates to Heterodox Academy’s mission 31:58 Think tanks and ideology Selected Quotes: "I think we may be overlearning a little bit on the public level. I wouldn’t want students to come away thinking the public is divided into two clear factions, that they disagree with each other on everything, and they’re sort of driving the parties. I think it’s worth separating what elites are doing in Congress and the ways that the public is changing." "Each party tends to understand itself but they sort of misunderstand the other political party, so the Democrats commonly portray the Republican party as just a vehicle for the rich, for big business, and they’re just about distributing benefits to their constituencies, and that’s just basically the Democrats seeing the Republicans as the mirror image of themselves. And in similar terms, the Republicans tend to see the Democrats as a more ideological party than they are, that is, they see the Democrats as favoring big government for its own sake, favoring centralization for its own sake and rather than just pursuing lots of benefits for their constituencies and trying to solve their constituencies’ problems." "Our only difference with [social psychological research] is that those studies tend to compare liberals with conservatives, which is a pretty reasonable thing to do, except that when it comes to the American public, if you’re comparing conservatives, you have the fact that almost all Republicans are conservatives, whereas only about the half the Democratic party is liberals, so you get these comparisons that are really your modal Republican with your—kind of—half of the Democratic Party. There’s a whole other section of the Democratic Party that really doesn’t identify as liberal, and might have a tie to the Democratic party that’s just based on one issue or based on the sense that the party represents their minority group and so they’re not necessarily going to follow those same practices that you would get if you’re comparing liberals and conservatives."
July 7, 2017
Chris Martin talks to sociologist George Yancey, another founding member of Heterodox Academy. George Yancey teaches sociology at the University of North Texas. He has published numerous books on anti-Christian bias within the academy and in the community at large. He has also written about multiracial churches and a “mutual responsibility model” for addressing structural racism.
July 3, 2017
n this episode, Chris Martin (@Chrismartin76) talks to Matt Grossmann (@MattGrossmann), associate professor of political science at Michigan State University and director of the Institute for Public Policy and Social Research. He specializes in the study of interest groups and parties. His latest book is Asymmetric Politics: Ideological Republicans and Group Interest Democrats, co-authored with David A. Hopkins.
June 20, 2017
In this episode, Chris Martin (@Chrismartin76) interviews Cristine Legare (@CristineLegare), Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Texas-Austin. She specializes in the study of culture, cultural learning, and cognition. She is a winner of the 2015 APS Janet Taylor Spence Award for Transformative Early Career Contributions. She serves on the executive board of Heterodox Academy. *** 0:00 Why socioeconomic diversity is important 6:21 How UT Austin is increasing socioeconomic diversity 12:10 SES diversity is intertwined with viewpoint diversity 15:05 Cristine’s recent experience with controversial class topics 20:00 Positive class evaluations 22:49 Techniques to have productive conversations in class 26:30: Illustrating unproductive forms of dialogue You can learn more Cristine Legare at her website. Cristine's argument for greater socioeconomic diversity can be found here. Articles and books mentioned during the interview: Big Gods: How Religion Transformed Cooperation and Conflict by Ari Norenzayan The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion by Jonathan Haidt Selected Quotes: "And so one of the things that I had them do as an assignment for this book was to use Moral Foundations Theory to present arguments for and against teaching creationism in science classrooms, and the way the students were graded in this particular assignment was the extent to which both sides of that argument were equally persuasive....I wasn’t arguing that we should teach creationism in science classrooms, I don’t think that we should. But I think it’s a useful opportunity to accurately represent and convey beliefs that are very different from your own, and students struggle with this a little bit, but really embraced it and took this on. And gathered data from all kinds of different sources. They kind of spontaneously interviewed friends of theirs that were young-earth creationists. It was really fascinating." -- "In addition to modeling constructive ways to have a dialogue, I also model a few examples of bad practice...I used examples in class of both very religious people as well as atheists, and ways in which people from both those camps did a good and a bad job at reaching others, and I also use this as an opportunity to talk about how particular styles of argumentation are not persuasive. They're meant basically to further endear you to people who already think the way that you do. That is kind of psychologically satisfying for people but that is not constructive, so when you get a famous atheist scientist talking on and on about how stupid religious people are, his goal is definitely not to convert, not to persuade, from a persuasion perspective, that is entirely ineffective. In fact, I would say destructive."   Other episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy.
June 5, 2017
In this episode, Chris Martin interviews April Kelly-Woessner, Professor of Political Science and Chair of the Department of Politics, Philosophy and Legal Studies at Elizabethtown College. She specializes in public opinion, mass behavior, and political psychology. She is the co-editor of The Still Divided Academy: How Competing Visions of Power Politics and Diversity Complicate the Mission of Higher Education (2011).   2:30 Marcuse reflected in a Harvard Crimson op-ed 7:21 Why political researchers mistakenly thought tolerance was increasing 8:10 Shutting down opinions reflects an insecurity about civic knowledge 12:00 Often, American government classes are taught by high school coaches 13:00 How do you teach students about political tolerance? 19:10 Are conservatives opting out of academia because of college experiences? 21:40 The role of viewpoint diversity in making people tolerant 23:35 At small colleges, students can’t self-isolate 26:28 Is there an effect among people who don’t attend college? 27:10 Social media and intolerance *** Selected Quotes "What we find is that confidence in civic knowledge correlates pretty strongly and is a good predictor of political tolerance. So if you think you know a lot relative to other people, if you think you can hold your own in a political conversation, you’re more tolerant than people who are insecure about their civic knowledge. So I think the perception of these college students protestors is that they’re ideological radicals who have these strong opinions, and yet what they data shows is wanting to shut down other voices reflects an insecurity to defend your own. So the decline in civic knowledge is a big factor in political intolerance." *** "On average, the [people] that aren’t in college are less tolerant than the ones that are. So this [rising intolerance] isn’t just something that’s just happening on college campuses. I think campuses become a spotlight for this. And I wouldn’t even say that college campuses are creating this, but I would argue that if we are serious about the mission of higher education, we have an obligation to counter it. This is the place where we are supposed to listen to other people, and to engage in ideas that are different than their own." *** You can learn more April Kelly-Woessner at her faculty page. Her posts on the Heterodox Academy blog can be found here. Some articles and books mentioned during the interview: Social Justice and Social Order: Binding Moralities across the Political Spectrum The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion Hearing the Other Side: Deliberative versus Participatory Democracy Other episodes of Half Hour of Heterodoxy.  
May 30, 2017
Political scientist Sam Abrams teaches at Sarah Lawrence College. His New York Times piece on the polarization of the New England professoriate garnered national attention. In this episode Chris Martin talks to him about what inspired his work on the professoriate, and where his current research is taking him.
May 22, 2017
This week Chris Martin talks to sociologist George Yancey, another founding member of Heterodox Academy. George Yancey teaches sociology at the University of North Texas. He has published numerous books on anti-Christian bias within the academy and in the community at large. He has also written about multiracial churches and a "mutual responsibility model" for addressing structural racism.
May 15, 2017
In this inaugural interview, Chris Martin speaks with Jon Zimmerman, professor of history of education at the Graduate School of Education, University of Pennsylvania. Jon Zimmerman is a former social studies teacher and Peace Corps volunteer. His research has been about educational controversies and debates.
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