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June 10, 2020
Submissions to AJPH related to the on-going pandemic reveal the disproportionate risks undergone by essential workers, minorities, incarcerated persons, immigrants, persons with disabilities, homeless persons, and other populations made vulnerable by their social and economic position and/or simply because they are discriminated against. So, are we really together in this pandemic? I explore this claim under four different angles: social, statistical, historical, and occupational. My guests are Chenjerai Kumanyika, Ayman El Mohandes, Amy Hillier, and Josi Kalipeni.
May 6, 2020
In this podcast, I review with Mitch Zeller (US FDA) what is the rationale underlying the guidance emitted by the FDA about vaping products. I then discuss with Dr. Rebekah Gee, (formerly Louisiana Health Department,) her concerns about the severity of the youth epidemic of vaping and finally with Tom Miller, (Attorney General of Iowa) I review how he can reconcile having been a prominent anti-tobacco actor in the litigation that led to the tobacco industry settlement of 1999 and now, 21 years later, defend the right of the industry which produces electronic cigarettes such as JUUL to sell their products.
April 13, 2020
Regional Editor of AJPH, Professor Stella Yu, reviews some articles recently published in the January and February issues of AJPH. This podcast focuses on two timely editorials on Covid-19, including an editorial from the ASTHO and one from RAND. The guest presentation features Professor Jennifer Bouey discussing the ‘Strengthening China’s Public Health Response System: From SARS to COVID-19’ editorial.
April 8, 2020
The May AJPH features occupational health and safety, an issue that is both timely and topical in the middle of the dreadful pandemic that is affecting the planet, but in particular workers, whose mission is to keep the economy and public health functioning. My guests are David Michaels (Former OSHA Assistant-Secretary), Peg Seminario (AFL-CIO) and John Howard (NIOSH DIrector). Their message is: Congress needs to quickly require OSHA to pass an infectious disease standard to protect health care and other workers exposed to Covid-19. A draft of the standard exists.
March 11, 2020
This year is the 25th anniversary of the launching of National Public Health Week (#NPHW)in 1995. Before NPHW there has been a 35 year-long National Negro Health Week (#NNHW), from 1915 to 1950. What was #NNHW? What did it achieve? Is there any link between #NNHW and #NPHW? I explore these questions with 3 guests: Pr Vanessa Gamble, from George Washington University, Prof Paul Braff, from Temple University and Dr Georges Benjamin, Executive Director of the APHA.
February 5, 2020
This podcast is about a supplement of the AJPH published in January 2020 and dedicated to the public health dimensions of mass incarceration. The supplement covers many intersections of mass incarceration and public health. In this podcast I focus on a rarely discussed and studied consequence of incarceration: its effect on the relatives of people with a history of incarceration. My interviewees are Lauren Brinkley and David Cloud, Guest Editors of the supplement. Lisa Bowleg, who was AJPH associate editor in charge of the supplement, and Martin Lajous, PI of a Mexican study about the health of the relatives of incarcerated people.
January 19, 2020
Regional Editor of AJPH, Professor Stella Yu, reviews some articles recently published in the November and December issues of AJPH, including: Shift work and mental health; and the series of articles focusing on the Supplemental Nutrition Program Assistance Program. The guest presentation features Professor Jun Zhang discussing the Preterm Birth in China article.
January 8, 2020
Is a revolution taking place in Sex Ed? The podcast focuses on one original experience that takes places in Boston which consists of developing a course for teenagers which uses pornography as a lead to prevent teen dating violence, promote healthy relationships and consent, and encourage critical thinking and healthy communication. My interviewees are Emily Rothman, Professor at the Boston University School of Public Health; Jess Alder, Director of Start Strong (Boston Public Health Commission), and, collectively, several peer leaders of the course.
December 4, 2019
A set of commissioned papers in the January issue discusses the public health initiative entitled "Ending the HIV Epidemic: A Plan for America." Here I interview Admiral Brett Giroir, the Assistant Secretary of Health, leader of the Plan, and ask questions regarding stakeholders, hard-to-reach populations, stigma against LGBTQ people and people who inject drugs, the obstacles of low insurance coverage and lack of Medicaid expansion.
November 6, 2019
This month, we review the history, politics, and public health implications of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, abbreviated as SNAP and formerly known as the food stamp program. With Joanna Simmons, who used food stamps herself, we see how the system works and whether it is useful. Then with Prof. Marion Nestle, we will review the history of SNAP, what he program has achieved, and whether it can be improved.
October 21, 2019
Regional Editor of AJPH, Professor Stella Yu, reviews some articles recently published in the September Supplement, September and October issues of AJPH, including: community emergency readiness, immigration health policy issues, racial biases and health disparities 400 years since Jamestown, and lessons learned from surveying hard-to-reach populations in national health surveys. The guest presentation features the History Section of AJPH, prepared by Editor Ted Brown.
October 2, 2019
The November 2019 AJPH podcast is out here: https://am.ajph.link/POD_November2019. The US system of insurance is at a crossroads. Will it continue to grow incrementally or are we on the brink of a profound transformation in which all of the existing financing institutions are canceled and replaced by a single system? This complex machine was built progressively and underwent many social and political battles. The population coverage has improved in quantity and quality over time but remains a combination of sometimes contradictory systems and, importantly, it leaves out 30 million people without health insurance. My guests are Prof Jonathan Oberlander (University of North Carolina) and Dean Sherry Glied (New York University)
September 4, 2019
Since the first sale of African captives in 1619, North America has had about 250 years when slavery was legal and 150 years during which slavery was abolished. In this podcast I discuss whether this slavery past has left an imprint on public health in the United States. I also trace the mechanisms for which the impacts of this history can still be observed today. My guests are Thomas LaVeist, Dean of the Tulane School of Public Health, and Susan Reverby, historian of public health at Wellesley College, MA.
September 4, 2019
Regional Editor of AJPH, Professor Stella Yu, reviews some articles recently published in the June Supplement, July and August issues of AJPH, including: population mental health, science and industry, US food and nutrition policy, and interventions to reduce ageism against older adults. The guest presentation is on Protecting Universal Health Coverage in Non–United Nations Member States: Lessons from Taiwan”.
August 7, 2019
This is the SEPTEMBER 2019 podcast of the American Journal of Public Health. I review what happened in public health over the last 12 months as reflected in the columns of the journal and in its monthly podcast. I replay some snippets of old podcasts, AND conclude with statistics about the journal’s performance last year.
July 3, 2019
Last week the Supreme Court has prevented the Census Bureau from adding a question about the citizenship of the respondents in the coming 2020 US census. But the decision has not entirely clarified what will happen next year in terms of participation. I review the importance of the census for public health and what is at stake next year with my two guests, Prof Margo Anderson,(Uni of Wisconsin Milwaukee), and Prof Nancy Krieger (Harvard School of Public Health.)
June 19, 2019
Regional Editor of AJPH, Professor Stella Yu, reviews some articles recently published in the April to June issues of AJPH, including: National Public Health Week, protecting immigrant health, public health workforce issues, maternal and child health topics, despair among US adults entering midlife, 50 years after the publication of Our Bodies, Ourselves, and tribute to Dr. Elizabeth Fee. The guest presentation is on Injury prevention in China: government–supported initiatives on the leading causes of injury-related deaths.
June 5, 2019
This month I discuss the role of science in assessing public health risks associated with industrial products, reviewing two cases prominently featured in the news recently: ovarian cancers linked to asbestos present in talc powder, and glyphosate contained in the herbicide Roundup associated with cancer and neurological troubles. I address the complex relationships between corporations and governmental agencies when consumers’ public health comes into question with David Rosner, historian, Columbia University, Howard Rodenberg, a former health officer in Kansas, and Jonathan Samet, Professor and Dean at the Colorado school of Public Health.
May 8, 2019
"Our Bodies, Ourselves" was conceived in 1969 as a self‐help guide about health written by women for women. Most of the listeners who were at least teenagers in the sixties are familiar with the book but younger people are less likely to have ever read it, perused it, or even seen it. So is "Our Bodies, Ourselves" history or does it still have a role to play in today’s world? My interviewees are Judy Norsigian, Sally Guttmacher, and members of the 2019 AJPH Student Think Tank Jay Balagna, Shanae Burch, Emily Dalton, Jeremy Wang, and Caitlin Williams.
April 10, 2019
This month we tackle a major crisis occurring in the governmental public health workforce, in state and local health departments. With JP Leider I review the massive wave of retirement that will slash a third of the workforce, with Karen DeSalvo I discuss what needs to be done to adapt the workforce to the current needs and challenges of public health 3.0, and with Katie Sellers we discuss how PH-WINS is conducted and what it tells us about the current interests and needs of the workforce.
March 13, 2019
As you may know National Public Health Week (#NPHW) occurs every year during the first full week of April. The mission of Week is to showcase the importance of public health in our daily life and promote its strengthening. The theme for 2019 is “For science. For action. For health.” I have invited scientists and policymakers to talk about how they can base policymaking on scientific evidence, how they can communicate the evidence to make it available for the public health actors, and, as a result, how they can proactively advance the health of the public.
March 13, 2019
Regional Editor of AJPH, Professor Stella Yu, reviews some articles recently published in the January to March issues of AJPH, including: Editor’s Choice on AJPH podcasts, pain management, issues facing American health workers; opioid related mortality; fast food children’s menu improvements; and public health and the faith community. The guest presentation is on Rates and Medical Necessity of Cesarean Delivery in the Era of the Two-Child Policy in China. Supplement issues on health disparities and health promotion research.
February 6, 2019
A multifaith team of guest editors, led by Ellen Idler, and comprising Anwar Khan, Jeff Levin, and Tyler VanderWeele, has assembled a set of articles illustrating how faith-based organizations have contributed to public health at the local, state, or global levels. I further discuss if the mission of public health is compatible with views expressed by some religious congregations that appear to contradict the fundamental principles of equity and health. My interviewees are Ellen Idler (Emory), Bill Foege (Emory), Rob, Pyne (St Norbert) , and Mimi Kiser (Emory).
January 16, 2019
This pod discusses a paper by Himmelstein and Venkataramani about the prevalence of low income and of poverty among female health care workers in the US and estimates the ability of a minimum wage of $15 to improve the condition of the currently 1.7 million female health care workers who live in poverty. My interviewees are: Kayty Himmelstein, one of the authors; Mandy Rae Hartz from the Healthcare Workers Council of the United Steel Workers; Henrie Treadwell who is with Community Voices in Atlanta; and Paul Leigh, who is a labor and health economist in Davis, California. Who are the health care workers? How prevalent are low wages and poverty among them? Is the culprit the health care industry or more generally gender and racial inequity? Finally, if the minimum wage was raised to $15 per hour, what would be the impact for health care workers, and also for US workers in general.
December 19, 2018
The dramatic epidemic of opioid addiction and death by overdose has obscured the fact that millions of people suffer from pain, need to be treated, but are denied access to care. The two problems of pain management and opioid addiction are intricate and the situation has grown out of control, there is little or no evidence to support an alternative approach, and the possible solutions are years away from being even implemented. My interviewees are Richard Bonnie, Mark Rothstein, Mark Schumacher, and Daniel Carr.
November 7, 2018
Is there a risk for the epidemic of legal and illegal opioid consumption to extend to Mexico? Is this risk only a Mexican problem or would a Mexican epidemic have consequences in the United States too? My interviewees are Dr. David Goodman-Meza, from the Division of Infectious Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, Professor Larry Palinkas, Chair, Department of Children, Youth and Families, at the Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work of the University of Southern California, in Los Angeles, and Professor Steffanie Strathdee, Associate Dean of Global Health Sciences, at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine.
October 10, 2018
We have arrived at the 100 year anniversary of the deadly Great Influenza pandemic of 1918, often unfairly referred to in our collective memory as the Spanish Flu. Are we better prepared against the next deadly influenza epidemic? Opinions in public health diverge. My interviewees are Michael Greenberger (Center for Health and Homeland Security at the University of Maryland), Barbara Jester (Battelle contractor at CDC) and Mark Rothstein, Associate Editor of AJPH.
September 12, 2018
In this October podcast we discuss lung cancer screening. It is currently recommended that specific categories of heavy smokers be screened for lung cancer using low dose cat scan. However, some occupational exposures also cause lung cancer, as asbestos and radiations. I interview Dr Steven Markowitz from the Worker Health Protection Program (Queens College, CUNY), Fred Carpenter, a participant of the program who screened positive for lung cancer, and Dr David Weissman, Director of the Respiratory Health Division, at NIOSH.
August 8, 2018
The September podcast reviews episodes from podcasts recorded over the last twelve months that were particularly timely with respect to hot issues in American public health. I selected four of them, which, I believe, revealed inspiring solutions: rebuilding after hurricanes with Reed Tuckson (Tuckson Health Connection), public health advocacy with Georges Benjamin (APHA), gun violence prevention with Colleen Barry (Johns Hopkins University) and institutional racism with Lisa Bowleg (George Washington University).
July 11, 2018
In this podcast we explore this notion of so-called institutional racism (IR) with Mary Bassett (NYCDOH), Lisa Bowleg (George Washington University) and Georges Benjamin (APHA). It has three chapters. We start by defining institutional racism. From there, we illustrate these definitions. We follow this discussion by specifying how public health agents, researchers, and policymakers can play an active role to combat institutional racism and its impact on the health of the public.
June 6, 2018
The July 2018 podcast of AJPH asks the following questions: If there are realistic goals that could slash gun violence in the US, what can be done by gun violence researchers and by gun owners to reduce the burden of deaths and disabilities caused by gun violence? How can both sides of the controversy be brought to find a common ground and start a constructive dialogue? My guests are Professors Colleen Barry (Johns Hopkins), Sandro Galea (Boston University), Matthew Miller (Northeastern University), and Jonathan Metzl (Vandebilt University, TN).
June 5, 2018
Regional Editor of AJPH, Professor Stella Yu, reviews some articles recently published in AJPH, including: Adaptive behavior of sheltered homeless children in the French enfams survey; cumulative prevalence of maltreatment among New Zealand children; a selection of articles that focus on climate change and environmental justice; rising trends of prescription opioid sales in contemporary Brazil; maternal folic acid supplementation and plasma folate concentrations in the Boston Birth Cohort (Dr. Guoying Wang from Johns Hopkins University, an author of the article on Folate in pregnancy to introduce their paper); and the Collaborative Improvement And Innovation Network (COLIN) to reduce infant mortality: an outcome evaluation from the US South.
May 9, 2018
Is the new public health activism different from the old one? I address this question because we are in 2018 and that 50 years ago, 1968 remains the symbolic year of a transformative decade, the sixties, from which public health emerged profoundly transformed. Today there is a new public health activism challenges which challenges injustices. How different is the new activism from the older one? My guests are Prof Nick Freudenberg, from CUNY, and Prof Jeanne Stellman, from Columbia, both public health scientists who were student activists in the sixties, and Kelsey Schertz, who is currently a MPH student.
April 4, 2018
In the May issue of AJPH we tackle a sensitive question: when and how widely should we use causal language to describe scientific findings of direct public health relevance? When can we say X is the cause of Y? This question is polarizing epidemiologists. Here, after having spoken with Miguel Hernan who coined the C-Word, I interview Professors Jennifer Ahern from UC Berkeley, Heidi Jones, from City University of New York, and Dana March, from Columbia University, all senior, experienced, and influential teachers, about whether we should use the C-Word more often or not.
March 7, 2018
The two dialoguing guitars in the podcast intro announce an issue about dialoguing in public health between people having as different worldviews as republicans and democrats. I interview Georges Benjamin (APHA), David Sundwall(R-Utah), Dick Gottfried (D-NY), Pete Kirkham(R), Dick Zimmer(R-NJ). My last question to all is about a possible bipartisan public health initiative that could have some chances of success in the coming weeks. Check it out. You may be surprised to see how their opinions may sometimes converge.
February 6, 2018
This month we review the role of work in public health and in population health research. Work, whether we have one or not, is central to our lives but it clearly does not have the major place in public health it should have. Why is it so? To answer this difficult question my guests are Emily Ahonen (Indiana University), Michael Wright (USW), Adam Finkel (Michigan University, former OSHA), Paul Landsbergis (State University of NY), and Celeste Monforton (Texas State University).
January 9, 2018
Hello and welcome to AJPH February 2018 podcast. This month we will be discussing the very worrisome epidemic of hepatitis C occurring in the United States. I first review with Professor Kimberly Page from the University of New Mexico how likely it is that, in a foreseeable future, the epidemic of hepatitis C could be controlled by a vaccine. Then the CDC epidemiologist Alice Asher explains why the epidemic is exacerbated by another epidemic of injection drug use, in particular of opioids, and why it is affecting young, non Hispanic white populations in the Appalachian region. And with Dr John Wong, clinical decision maker from Tufts University, we discuss how the availability of effective treatments may have transformed the prognosis of newly infected persons.
December 8, 2017
Regional Editor of AJPH, Professor Stella Yu, reviews some articles recently published in AJPH, including: Evolution of Public Health Emergency Management From Preparedness to Response and Recovery, PH and despair in the American heartland, Legacies of the Bolshevik Revolution, The Changing Pattern of Nutrition Intake by Social Class in Contemporary China, 1991–2011 (including a summary by Dr Zhun Xu, Changes in Sugar-Sweetened Soda Consumption, Weight, and Waist Circumference: 2-Year Cohort of Mexican Women, Autism Spectrum Disorder Among US Children (2002–2010): Socioeconomic, Racial, and Ethnic Disparities, and Shade Sails and Passive Recreation in Public Parks of Melbourne and Denver: A Randomized Intervention.
December 8, 2017
Este mes hablamos con el Profesor Carlos Rodríguez-Díaz de la Escuela Graduada de Salud Pública de la Universidad de Puerto Rico en San Juan. Hablamos de la situación de la salud publica en Puerto Rico dos meses y medio después que los huracanes Irma y María devastaron las islas del archipiélago.
December 8, 2017
The hurricanes and wildfires are announcing a new normal in public health: a time in which natural disasters occur and recur regularly, most likely at an accelerating pace. With my guests I review what it is to be victim of a hurricane, what can be done to prevent some of the humanitarian and environmental consequences, and what can be done after the disaster to rebuild often poorly built communities the right way. Th last interview is about whether and how this new public health normal is linked to climate change. My interviewees are: Tara Zolnikov, Carlos Rodrigues-Díaz, Maureen Lichtveld, Reed Tuckson, and Alistair Woodward.
November 8, 2017
What is the role of public parks in the prevention of skin cancer and many chronic health conditions? How can we build parks that promote skin protection and physical activity? I discuss these questions with Dr Robert Zarr, from ParkRXAmerica, Dr Dave Buller, who publishes a randomized intervention study in AJPH, aimed at establishing whether building sails providing shade in parks increases the use of parks, and with Professor Carolyn Heckman, expert in skin cancer prevention.
October 11, 2017
Este mes hablamos con el Doctor Martin Lajous del Instituto Nacional de Salud Publica de México, en Cuernavaca. Dr Lajous es el Co-Investigador Principal del Estudio de la Salud de las Maestras en México Y publica con sus co-autores un análisis de la asociación entre consumo de refrescos azucarados y peso en mujeres mexicanas. Hablamos de cómo estos resultados pueden influenciar la decisión del gobierno mexicano de crear un impuesto sobre la bebidas azucaradas para reducir el consumo y luchar contra la obesidad.
October 11, 2017
With my guests, who conduct research in Russia, we review the evolution of access to abortion and contraception, the magnitude and treatment of drug addition, and the policy towards tobacco smoking in the USSR, created 100 years ago, and in Russia today. Interviewees are Michele Rivkin-Fish is a cultural anthropologist, Trish Starks, a historian, and historian Nikolai Krementsov who, with AJPH history Editor, Ted Brown, curated this special section.
September 13, 2017
Regional Editor of AJPH, Professor Stella Yu, reviews some articles recently published in AJPH, including: APIA Health Forum comments on national data collection on Asians. Paul-Ram comments on oversampling of Asians in NHANES. Doering – air mattress and infant suffocation. Chinese researchers paper to compare consumption of carbonated soft drinks among young adolescents in 53 low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). CARDOSO –Violence Against Women and Household Ownership of Radios, Computers, and Phones in 20 Countries. June supplement is devoted to oral health inequities. Completely open access. Abrogation of Sexual Orientation Question to Older Americans: Misstep or Homophobia? And more.
September 13, 2017
La esperanza de vida de los blancos americanos que viven en el campo al contrario de otras comunidades en los Estados Unidos o muchas otras partes del mundo disminuyó durante los diez últimos años. Desesperación de la clase obrera blanca? Hablamos de esto con María Mora, de la Universidad de Wisconsin, y con Ana Diez-Roux, de la escuela de salud publica de Filadelfia.
September 13, 2017
This month we tackle the decline in life expectancy of Whites living in rural regions of the US because of suicide, addiction to opioids, and alcohol. Is it despair generated by the stifled future of American white working class? My interviewees are Professors Beth Stein, Ana Diez-Roux and Associate Editor Paul Erwin.
August 8, 2017
Welcome to the podcast of AJPH. In this issue of AJPH I have three guests (Carolyn Brooks, Anisha Patel, and Kelley Dearing-Smith) to discuss a massive public health problem which is rarely mentioned and probably underestimated: unequal access to water in the United States.
July 11, 2017
Welcome to the podcast of AJPH. In this issue of AJPH we discuss the decision last spring by the new administration to erase a question about sexual orientation in a survey submitted to beneficiaries of the Older American Act. I interview Kathy Greenlee, Randy Sell, Gary Gates, Joanna Semlyen, and Laura Durso.
June 7, 2017
Regional Editor of AJPH, Professor Stella Yu, reviews some articles recently published in AJPH.
June 7, 2017
Welcomed to the podcast of AJPH. In this issue I discuss of chemical risk assessment with Associate Editor Michael Greenberg from Rutgers University and Dr Maureen Gwinn from the Office of Research and Development of the Environmental Protection Agency.
June 7, 2017
Bienvenidos al podcast mensual de la Revista Americana de Salud Pública para el mes de junio. Soy Alfredo Morabia, el Editor en Jefe de la AJPH. Este mes hablo con Diego Vasquez, un investigador de la Universidad Católica de Santiago de Guayaquil, en el Ecuador, sobre terremoto y Zika. Con sus colegas comparó el riesgo de contraer el virus Zika en las zonas afectadas por el terremoto de 2016 y en las zonas control.
May 12, 2017
Hola y bienvenidos al podcast mensual de la Revista Americana de Salud Pública para el mes de junio. Soy Alfredo Morabia, el Editor en Jefe de la AJPH. Este mes hablo con Jorge Alonzo y Lilli Mann, dos investigadores de la Wake Forest University en Carolina del norte, de un estudio controlado randomizado para aumentar el uso de condones y la pruebas de VIH entre los hombres latinos que tienen sexo con hombres,
May 12, 2017
This is the AJPH monthly podcast for June 2017. I am Alfredo Morabia, the Editor-in-Chief. The theme is Emerging Methods in Public Health Surveillance and I interview Lorna Thorpe (about new challenges), Denys Lau (about the new Journal section and about NCHS), Ryne Paulose (about the Asian-American NHANES), and Kathy Ko Chin (about why the AAPI community is excited about NHANES).
April 11, 2017
Hola y bienvenidos al podcast mensual de la Revista Americana de Salud Pública para el mes de mayo. Soy Alfredo Morabia, el Editor en Jefe de la AJPH. Hablamos de la prevención de la obesidad en las comunidades latinas de California con dos estudios. Entrevisto a la Profesora Hortensia Amaro sobre una intervención para mejorar la dieta y a la Profesora Elva Arredondo sobre una intervención para aumentar la actividad física.
April 11, 2017
This is the AJPH monthly podcast for May 2017. I am Alfredo Morabia, the Editor-in-Chief. The theme is National Public Health Week and I interview Susan Polan (about #NPHW), Georges Benjamin (about APHA), Tom Burke (about the EPA), Mona Hanna-Attisha (about Flint, MI), David Sundwall (about the ACA), Ann Philbrick (about refugees) and Steffie Woolhandler (about a PH vision for the 21stC).
March 7, 2017
Hello and welcome to the Editor’s highlights of some of the contents of the April 2017 issue of AJPH. This is Alfredo Morabia, the Editor-in-Chief. One of the themes discussed in this issue is that of driverless cars. In this podcast I interview Janet Fleetwood and Noah Goodall their vision of a future in which most cars will be driverless and the related ethical issues for public health. In the second part, I interview Sherry Glied, an expert on health insurance, about her assessment of the future of Obamacare under the new Administration.
March 7, 2017
Hola y bienvenidos al audio resumen sobre algunos artículos del número de Abril 2017 de la Revista Americana de Salud Pública. Soy Alfredo Morabia, el Editor en Jefe de la AJPH. En este número de la AJPH hablo con el Dr Yannine Estrada de las razones por las cuales condujo un ensayo clínico randomizado llamado Familias Unidas, hecho en Florida, para prevenir comportamientos a riesgo en jóvenes hispanos. Entrevisto también a 3 de los cuatro estudiantes que preparan la pagina de Noticias Globales para la revista.
February 6, 2017
Hola y bienvenidos al audio resumen sobre algunos artículos del número de febrero 2017 de la Revista Americana de Salud Pública. Soy Alfredo Morabia, el Editor en Jefe de la AJPH. Este número de la AJPH entrevisto al Prof Sandro Galea sobre una iniciativa para involucrar las universidades en el control de las armas de fuego. Hablo támbien de la ambivalencia de la industria alimenticia, de registro electrónico para salud comunitaria, y de inseguridad alimentaria en los indios americanos.
February 6, 2017
Hello and welcome to the Editor’s highlights of some of the contents of the March 2017 issue of AJPH. This is Stella Yu, Regional Associate Editor. This month the special section is about the role of universities in gun control. I also talk about the ambivalence of Big Food, digital community surveillance, and food insecurity among native indians.
February 6, 2017
Hello and welcome to the Editor’s highlights of some of the contents of the March 2017 issue of AJPH. This is Alfredo Morabia, the Editor-in-Chief. This month I interview Prof Sandro Galea about an initiative to involve universities into gun control. I also talk about the ambivalence of Big Food, digital community surveillance, and food insecurity among native indians.
January 9, 2017
Hello and welcome to the Editor’s highlights of some of the contents of the February 2017 issue of AJPH. This is Alfredo Morabia, the Editor-in-Chief. This month AJPH has a special section on the health of the transgender community. Other papers discuss the lessons for public health of the November 8 election, the use of lethal force by police, and comprise a book review.
January 9, 2017
Hola y bienvenidos al audio resumen sobre algunos artículos del número de febrero 2017 de la Revista Americana de Salud Pública. Soy Alfredo Morabia, el Editor en Jefe de la AJPH. Este número de la AJPH incluye una serie de artículos sobre la salud de las personas transgénero y otra serie sobre las lecciones y el pronóstico para la salud publica después de la elección presidencial norteamericana. Ud encontrara también un artículo sobre el uso de la fuerza mortal por la policía y una reseña de libro.
December 6, 2016
Hello and welcome to the Editor’s highlights of some of the contents of the January 2017 issue of AJPH. This is Alfredo Morabia, the Editor-in-Chief. This month AJPH has a special section on "Public Health Legacy of The Obama Presidency." Papers discuss the Obama family, the personality of Barack Obama, Obamacare, women's health, opioid epidemic and more. Other papers deal with Pokemon Go, noise and books.
December 6, 2016
Hola y bienvenidos al audio resumen sobre algunos artículos del número de enero 2017 de la Revista Americana de Salud Pública. Soy Alfredo Morabia, el Editor en Jefe de la AJPH. Este número de la AJPH incluye una serie de artículos sobre la huella que la administración Obama dejó sobre la salud publica. Los artículos discuten de la familia Obama, del ombre Obama, de Obamacare, de la salud de las mujeres, de la epidemia de opioides y de más. Otros artículos tratan de Pokémon Go, del ruido y de libros.
December 6, 2016
Hello and welcome to the Editor’s highlights of some of the contents of the January 2017 issue of AJPH. This is Alfredo Morabia, the Editor-in-Chief. This month AJPH has a special section on "Public Health Legacy of The Obama Presidency." Papers discuss the Obama family, the personality of Barack Obama, Obamacare, women's health, opioid epidemic and more. Other papers deal with Pokemon Go, noise and books.
November 10, 2016
Hello and welcome to the Editor’s highlights of some of the contents of the December 2016 issue of AJPH. This is Alfredo Morabia, the Editor-in-Chief. This month AJPH has a special section on "Public Health in Asia," home of 60% of the world population. Other papers deal with cyclist safety and remediation of urban blight.
November 10, 2016
Hola y bienvenidos al audio resumen sobre algunos artículos del número de diciembre 2016 de la Revista Americana de Salud Pública. Soy Alfredo Morabia, el Editor en Jefe de la AJPH. Este número de la AJPH incluye una serie de artículos sobre la "salud publica en Asia". Otros artículos tratan de la seguridad de los ciclistas y del efecto de la revitalización del deterioro urbano sobre la violencia armada.
November 10, 2016
Hello and welcome to the Editor’s highlights of some of the contents of the December 2016 issue of AJPH. This is Stella Yu, Regional Associate Editor. This month AJPH has a special section on "Public Health in Asia," home of 60% of the world population. Other papers deal with cyclist safety and remediation of urban blight.
October 7, 2016
Hello and welcome to the Editor’s highlights of some of the contents of the November 2016 issue of AJPH. This is Stella Yu, Regional Associate Editor. This month AJPH has a special section on Whither WHO? In the spring of 2017 WHO will elect its new Director General. This election has considerable implications for our global health leadership.
October 7, 2016
Hello and welcome to the Editor’s highlights of some of the contents of the November 2016 issue of AJPH. This is Alfredo Morabia, the Editor-in-Chief. This month AJPH has a special section on Whither WHO? In the spring of 2017 WHO will elect its new Director General. This election has considerable implications for our global health leadership.
October 7, 2016
Hola y bienvenidos al audio resumen sobre algunos artículos del número de noviembre 2016 de la Revista Americana de Salud Pública. Soy Alfredo Morabia, el Editor en Jefe de la AJPH. Este número de la AJPH incluye una serie de artículos sobre la ¿A dónde va la OMS? En la primavera del 2017 la OMS elegirá a su nuevo Director General. Esta elección tiene por lo tanto implicaciones considerables para nuestro liderazgo de salud global.
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