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July 21, 2020
Kevin Kreuzer, a freelance front end engineer from Switzerland shares his developer’s journey in this episode of the My JavaScript Story. Kevin is also a Google Developer expert, who loves JavaScript, Angular etc and as such writes a lot of blog posts and maintains some open source libraries. And when he is not engrossed in the tech world, he is out snowboarding or playing soccer. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Kevin Kreuzer Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing CacheFly Links Medium Kevin Kreuzer GitHub Kevin Kreuzer GitHub kreuzerk/svg-to-ts Twitter Kevin Kreuzer: @kreuzercode Picks Kevin Kreuzer: GitHub kreuzerk/ng-sortgrid Jojo Rabbit The Settlers of Catan Charles Max Wood: Narnia Boxed Set
July 7, 2020
React Native Remote Conf Raúl Jiménez runs a small consultancy focused on Angular out of Barcelona Spain. Raul got into programing in High School. He was working on the equivalent of a USA based Associates Degree. He had a computer when he was 5 and got into copy/paste programming on the Spectrum computer. He started writing on his own at 16. He started with TurboPascal and then got into other languages before graduating to Angular and JavaScript. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Raúl Jiménez Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing CacheFly Links AiA 235 Functional Programming with Angular, NgRx with Raul Jimenez Gulpjs GruntJs GitHub Raul Jimenez Byte Default Twitter Raúl Jiménez: @elecash Picks Raúl Jiménez: GitHub joanllenas/ts.data.json GitHub joanllenas/ngx-remotedata Aeon's End Charles Max Wood: Course Creator Pro
June 23, 2020
React Native Remote Conf July 28th to 31th Loiane Groner is an Angular developer from Brazil currently living the USA. She started out working in Java and has worked in Java for nearly 14 years before moving over to Angular. She did an episode on Adventures in Angular about writing documentation in Portuguese. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Loiane Groner Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing CacheFly "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! Links AiA 266: Creating Content in Portuguese with Loiane Groner YouTube Loiane Groner Twitter Loiane Groner: @loiane Picks Loiane Groner: World of Warcraft The Mandolorian Charles Max Wood: The Expanse Rode Procaster Blue Yeti
June 9, 2020
Andrew Evans is a history major turned designer turned developer. His journey leads through doing development in Java, getting and MBA, and eventually picking up Angular and working at Capital One. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Andrew Evans Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing CacheFly "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! Links AiA 229: Deploying to Firebase with CircleCI with Andrew Evans inDepth.dev Picks Andrew Evans: The Expanse Jumanji: The Next Level Charles Max Wood: The Name of the Wind devchat.tv/workshops
May 26, 2020
In this week's episode of My JavaScript Story, Charles Max Wood interviews Farzad Yousefzadehr, who was a guest on the React Round Up show. As a Senior Software Engineer, Farzad has the cool job of designing and refactoring existing games at Epic Games. He currently lives in Helsinki, Finland, with his lovely wife and cat. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Farzad Yousefzadehr Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing CacheFly "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! Links RRU 079: State Machines and State Charts with Farzad Yousef Zadeh The Imposters Handbook Twitter: @Farzad_YZ Picks Farzad Yousefzadehr: Almost Everything on Computers is Perceptually Slower Than It Was In 1983 Charles Max Wood: BusyCal podcastplaybook.co
May 12, 2020
JavaScript Remote Conf 2020 May 13th to 15th - register now! Kay Plößer is an German developer who does front-end and mobile development with React. He primarily focuses on developer relations and will be teaching at a University soon. He got started in programming doing basic scripting and game mods to buy game weapons when the game started. He also build IRC bots and programs that ran in IRC. We dive into his journey through development into React and JavaScript. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Kay Plößer Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing Sentry CacheFly "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! Links RRU 048: Using and Teaching React with Kay Plößer Kay Plößer Twitter: @K4y1s k@kay.is Picks Charles Max Wood: The Expanse Kay Plößer: Undone
April 28, 2020
JavaScript Remote Conf 2020 May 13th to 15th - register now! Håkon Krogh is a Norweigan developer who focuses on web performance. We start out discussing working from home in the current pandemic. His current company works in Product Information Management. It's a headless ecommerce system. We dive into his experience learning learning to build applications and learning JavaScript and leading a team. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Håkon Krogh Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing Sentry CacheFly "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! Links RRU 078: The Uncanny Valley with Håkon Krogh Crystallize FindThatLead Twitter: Håkon Krogh Picks Håkon Krogh: High Performance Browser Networking Tiny Helpers Charles Max Wood: Cleverly Scrabin
April 14, 2020
JavaScript Remote Conf 2020 May 14th to 15th - register now! Varya is an expert in design systems. She talks about the process of working in and building design systems. She learned basic Pascal at school. She did programming exercises on paper. She then got into building web pages for groups she was a part of. She then picked up PHP and went professional at that point. On the front-end, she began picking up JavaScript and worked using Yandex's internal framework. Follow here story through the rest of the podcast. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Varya Stepanova Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing Sentry CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links RRU 068: Design Systems with Varya Stepanova Zend The History of BEM Picks Charles Max Wood: Contigo Water Bottle Run With Hal Varya Stepanova: Learn a New Language!
April 7, 2020
JavaScript Remote Conf 2020 May 14th to 15th - register now! Josh Ponelat is Software Architect at SmartBear working on Swagger and OpenAPI. He's from South Africa. Josh's father is a programmer and was heavily influenced by his father. He started with ANSI-C and hacking on shells. He studied graphic design in school. He got back into programming in PHP and MySQL and wound up transitioning to JavaScript. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Josh Ponelat Sponsors Sentry CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links JSJ 409: Swagger and Open API with Josh Ponelat D3.js Swagger.io What is OpenAPI? SwaggerHub Immutable JSJ 243 Immutable.js with Lee Byron 231 RR GraphQL with Lee Byron Hacker News Clojure ClojureScript Parinfer Datomic Cloud Picks Josh Ponelat: Miro Pour Over Coffee Charles Max Wood: Interview Cake Docking Station
March 31, 2020
JavaScript Remote Conf 2020 May 14th to 15th - register now! Paige Niedringhaus started her career as a Digital Marketer before making the move to becoming a software developer at the Home Depot. She current works with React and Node building internal apps for them. This episode discusses the ins and outs of making that transition in a semi-recent world and community. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Paige Niedringhaus Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links JSJ 398: Node 12 with Paige Niedringhaus Syntax. GitHub testing-library/react-testing-library Gatsby NextJS Interview Cake Medium - Paige Niedringhaus Follow Paige on Twitter: @pniedri Picks Paige Niedringhaus: Breville Milk Frother Stuff You Should Know Charles Max Wood: Instant Pot Sphero BB-8
March 24, 2020
Daniel Caldas is a Portuguese developer working and living in Singapore. He learned to code in high school programming in Pascal. He moved up to the university and that's where he encountered JavaScript. He wound up doing a bunch of design work, static websites, and jQuery. He explains his journey and learning methods leading to a job working for Zendesk on their CRM. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Daniel Caldas Sponsors Sentry | Use the code “devchat” for $100 credit CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links JSJ 411: Unit Testing Jest with Daniel Caldas goodguydaniel.com Picks Daniel Caldas: tweak Charles Max Wood: Shift Bose SoundLink Around Ear Wireless Headphones II
March 17, 2020
Jared Palmer has been a guest on 3 different shows on Devchat.tv. He's talked to us about Formik, Razzle, and React. He's taking a break from consulting to build up Formik, Inc and tools for forms. He got started in programming by taking a programming class at Cornell on a lark and quickly transitioned out of Investment Banking after graduating from university. His first apps were custom lock screens for mobile phones. We then move through framer and CoffeeScript and eventually in to JavaScript and React. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Jared Palmer Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links RRU 014: Razzle with Jared Palmer RRU 052: React Suspense with Jared Palmer Formik feat. Jared Palmer of The Palmer Group Picks Jared Palmer: Remote UI (Shopify) Charles Max Wood: The Man In the High Castle
March 10, 2020
Tommy Hodgins is a developer that typically works on A/B tests figuring out how to get websites the outcomes they want. He got into JavaScript and front-end technologies and then read a paper that led him to realize the capabilities of writing software to solve problems. He maintains a front-end focus with his A/B testing work and CSS in JS and other work. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Tommy Hodgins Sponsors Sentry CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Picks Tommy Hodgins: QuickJS Language Learning with Netflix Charles Max Wood: Gmelius The Man In the High Castle The Name of the Wind Verdict with Ted Cruz
March 3, 2020
Rado Stankov is the Head of Engineering at Product Hunt. He's based in Sofia Bulgaria. He walks us through learning Pascal and PHP and Flash. We then dive into Ruby and JavaScript and what he's working on now at Product Hunt. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Radoslav Stankov Sponsors G2i | Enjoy the luxuries of freelancing CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links MRS 077: Radoslav Stankov RR 396: GrapQL at Product Hunt with Radoslav Stankov RRU 042: React at Product Hunt with Radoslav Stankov React Native at Product Hunt feat. Radoslav Stankov and Vlad Vladimirov Prototypejs jQuery Picks Radoslav Stankov: Dependency cruiser The Unicorn Project Charles Max Wood: The Name of the Wind LinkedIn Clean Coders Podcast Devchat.tv Workshops
February 25, 2020
Carl is a developer from Zimbabwe currently living in London. He explains how he started out as a journalist and wound up doing web development to keep track of news stories coming out in his local area. He leveled up by attending meetups and talking to other developers. He currently works for LimeJump, an energy startup which is creating a virtual power plant by connecting together different power assets Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Carl Mungazi Sponsors Sentry CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links Nailing Your First (Info-Product) Launch CarlMungazi.com Picks Carl Mungazi: React Dev Tools Charles Max Wood: Gmelius Devchat Workshops The Dev Rev Podcast
February 18, 2020
Florian Rival is a React developer who has built his own game engine. He's been a guest on both React Round Up and React Native Radio. This episode provides you a walkthrough on using gDevelop to build games from scratch and goes into his history as a game developer. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Florian Rival Sponsors G2i CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links RNR 126: Native Web Apps with Florian Rival RRU 058: React.js and WebAssembly to Rewrite Native Apps with Florian Rival LinkedIn Florian Rival PixiJS Picks Florian Rival: GDevelop Charles Max Wood: Gmelius
February 11, 2020
This My JavaScript Story episode is a discussion with Kaelig Deloumeau-Prigent. Kaelig works on the Polaris design system from Shopify. We walk through his journey into programming, HTML, and CSS. We wander through is career until he was building design systems at Shopify. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Kaelig Deloumeau-Pregent Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly ___________________________________________________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ___________________________________________________________________________________________ Links JSJ 397: Design Systems with Kaelig Deloumeau-Prigent Design Tokens Community Group JSJ 388: Functional Programming with Brian Lonsdorf Polaris Picks Kaelig Deloumeau-Prigent: The Courage to Be Disliked Charles Max Wood: The Name of The Wind
February 4, 2020
My JavaScript Story this week welcomes Paul Cowan. Paul works as a consultant in front end development. He learned how to program at a really early age but didn't own an email address until he was 30 years old. When he was 30 years old he wanted to change his lifestyle and attended a course in London and took a job as a software developer. Paul was interested in React because, for him, much of programming didn’t make a whole lot of sense until he read about the flux model and React Redux was one of the few frameworks that followed the flux model. Spending most of his life outside of the programming world has granted him a unique perspective framework like React. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Paul Cowan Sponsors G2i CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links RRU 088: Frustrations with React Hooks with Paul Cowan Paul's Twitter Paul's Blog Picks Paul Cowan: https://blog.logrocket.com/ Fitness and MMA Fight Charles Max Wood: "#100daysofvue" Vue Learning Challenge @ Devchat.tv YouTube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCABJEQ57MIn6X3TIHIebJUw/videos Devchat.tv Upcoming Workshops: "How To Stay Current" "How to Find Your Dream Developer Job" "How to Start a Podcast" Sign up for the newsletter @ https://devchat.tv/subscribe/ to receive information about our upcoming workshops
January 28, 2020
My JavaScript Story this week welcomes Maximiliano Firtman. Maximiliano Firtman is a mobile web developer from Buenos Ares, Argentina. He has been a developer for 24 years and his most recent focus has been on progressive web apps. Maximiliano started coding when he was 11 years old by creating games and digital magazines. He got into web development by learning HTML in college. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Maximiliano Firtman Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links JSJ 415: Progressive Web Apps with Maximiliano Firtman Maximiliano Firtman Website Maximiliano Firtman Twitter Picks Maximiliano Firtman: Using Trusted Web Activities Charles Max Wood: Generation Z Unfiltered by Tim Elmore
January 21, 2020
My JavaScript Story this week welcomes Jonathan Lee Martin. Jonathan is an educator, speaker, and author. He has been a developer since high school and he started out by teaching at Big Nerd Ranch and currently has his own teaching brand. He teaches career switchers and senior developers and also has written a book "Functional Design Patterns for Express.js". Teaching career switchers has led him to adopt a pedagogy approach to teaching where he focuses on getting people to absorb relevant information faster. Some of the lessons he has learned when working with career switchers is the role of failure in the classroom. He noticed when something did not work in their code career switchers tended to want to start out again instead of debugging what was wrong with the code. Jonathan had to show that most of developing is turning failure into success and getting code that doesn't work bu debugging and asking for help. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Jonathan Martin Sponsors G2i CacheFly ______________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is now available on Amazon. Get Your Copy Today! ______________________________________ Links JSJ 396: Publishing Your Book with Jonathan Lee Martin Jonathan's LinkedIn Jonathan's Twitter https://jonathanleemartin.com/ Functional Design Patterns for Express.js Picks Charles Max Wood: Pomodoro Timer Amazon Fire tv stick Jonathan Martin: WebXR Device API Innergie USB C Charger
November 20, 2019
"The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood is available on Amazon. Get your copy here today only for $2.99!
November 19, 2019
Douglas Crockford is a language architect and helped with the development of JavaScript. He popularized the data format JSON, and has developed various JavaScript related tools such as JSLint and JSMin He started working with JavaScript in 2000. He talks about his journey with the language, including his initial confusion and struggles, which led him to write his book JavaScript: The Good Parts. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Douglas Crockford Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Adventures in DevOps Adventures in Blockchain CacheFly Links JSJ 392: The Murky Past and Misty Future of JavaScript with Douglas Crockford JavaScript: The Good Parts How JavaSript Works Picks Charles Max Wood: https://www.mypillow.com/
November 12, 2019
Chris is an independent consultant working with open source startups. He taught himself to program and started in open source. He talks about how he got into programming and how he learned to code. Chris' first access to programming was writing index.hml files when he was younger and again when he was majoring in Arts in university he was introduced to ActionScript. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Chris Biscardi Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan iPhreaks Adventures in DevOps CacheFly _______________________________________________________ "The MaxCoders Guide to Finding Your Dream Developer Job" by Charles Max Wood will be out on November 20th on Amazon. Get your copy on that date only for $1. _______________________________________________________ Links JSJ 386: Gatsby.js with Chris Biscardi Chris' LinkedIn Chris' Twitter https://www.twitch.tv/chrisbiscardi Picks Charles Max Wood: Follow Charles Max Wood on Instagram at CharlesMaxWood Follow Charles at https://devchat.tv/events/ Suggest a topic/guests on podcast pages at https://devchat.tv Follow Devchat.tv on Instagram at devchat.tv Join us on Discord by going to https://discordapp.com/invite/z7RNTHR Go to Maxcoders.io to find out more about MaxCoders movement Chris Biscardi: Follow Chris on Instagram at ChrisBiscardi
November 5, 2019
This week, My Javascript Story welcomes Javan Makhmali,a Programmer at Basecamp from Ann Arbor, Michigan. Javan attended Community College to study Computer Science but then decided to work as a Freelancer developer. Javan and Charles debate whether having a 4-year college degree is better to become a developer and conclude that it depends on the person. Some people prefer a structured 4 year degree to feel ready for a full time jo and some people do better with bootcamps. Javan mentions he knows several people that switched careers after completing an 8 week bootcamp and that the industry was really flexible to accomodate both options. Charles and Javan then continue talking about Javan's journey as a developer and particularly his journey with Basecamp. Javan started out working with Ruby on Rails and after a couple of years applied for a job at Basecamp (then known as 37 Signals). Javan then started working with CoffeeScript which helped him understand working with JavaScript. Charles and Javan talk about the projects Javan is working on currently at Basecamp. Outside of work Javan, is a new parent and enjoys spending time with his daughter. He feels ever since he has become a parent, his work life balance has been better. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest:  Javan Makhmali Links JSJ 376: Trix: A Rich Text Editor for Everyday Writing with Javan Makhmali Javan's Twitter Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Dev Ed Podcast Adventures in Blockchain CacheFly Picks Charles Max Wood: https://maxcoders.io/
October 29, 2019
Charles Max Wood talks to Filipa Lacerda in this week's My JavaScript Story. Filipa has been working as a front end engineer since 2011 and she currently works at GitLab. Filipa originally wanted to study Economy but when she got to university she decided to major in Communications thinking it would be a lot more about communication and not as much about coding. At first she really didn't like the coding aspect of it but then as time went by she actually started to enjoy coding. When she first started working she started out on the User Experience side, but then she wanted to switch to building stuff with code because she wanted to see results really fast and enjoyed that aspect of coding. Charles asks why she stuck with that degree instead of switching it and Filipa explains that at first because she didn't want to go back and re - take the exams and also decided that this degree offered many job opportunities in many different industries and now she can't imagine herself doing anything else. Filipa then talks about why she is working with Vue and all the different kind of projects she has done using Vue as well as what working for GitLab looks like on a day to day basis. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Filipa Lacerda Links https://devchat.tv/views-on-vue/vov-025-gitlabs-journey-with-vue-with-filipa-lacerda-and-jacob-schatz/ https://devchat.tv/views-on-vue/vov-009-building-modal-component-with-filipa-lacerda/ https://filipa.gitlab.io/ https://twitter.com/FilipaLacerda Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Adventures in .NET Elixir Mix CacheFly Picks Filipa Lacerda: Why We Sleep by Walker PhD, Matthew Charles Max Wood: RxJS Live: Conference Nikon D5600 Camera RØDE Microphones
October 22, 2019
In this episode of My JavaScript Story is Charles talks to Mike Hartington. Mike Hartington is a Developer Advocate for Ionic Framework and a Google Developer Expert, but he is most famous in the developer community because of his beard. Charles asks how Mike got introduced to development. Mike tried to code Tic-Tac-Toe and that was a challenge because knowing the rules to the game and trying to tell a computer the rules are two very two different things. Mike then majored in Graphic Design at Rhode Island College, and started learning Flash and ActionScript. Mike talks about what kind of projects he created with Flash and ActionScript and then the process of teaching himself JavaScript. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Mike Hartington Links Mike's Twitter Ionic Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Adventures in DevOps Adventures in Blockchain CacheFly Picks  Mike Hartington Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker Trailer Charles Max Wood: Atomic Habits by James Clear Superfans by Pat Flynn
October 15, 2019
In this episode of My JavaScript Story, Charles talks to Thorsten Lünborg. Thorsten is a Business Service Manager at MVV Energy Solutions from Frankfurt Germany. Charles asks about Thorsten's developer journey in particular how he was introduced to JavaScript. Thorsten is also a core team member for Vue.js and he talks about his involvement with the Vue community. Thorsten mainly focuses on working on Vue CLI and answering questions in forums. He describes the Vue community as a very friendly and helpful one. According to Thorsten, Vue is very stable and seems to satisfy a lot of the needs of Vue community and so people are not looking for the "next best thing" with Vue. Out of all the frameworks i tried to learn, i found Vue was the one that i liked the most and i started answering questions about Vue on the forums. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Thorsten Lünborg Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Sustain Our Software Adventures in DevOps CacheFly Links VoV 060: Our Least Favorite Parts of Vue with An Phan and Thorsten Lunborg VoV 022: How I became a Vue.js core team member without a professional background‌ with Thorsten Luenborg Thorsten's Twitter Picks Thorsten Lünborg Preacher TV Series Borderlands 3 Vue.js London 2019 https://github.com/vuejs/rfcs Charles Max Wood Running a Marathon Honeywell wifi thermometer
October 8, 2019
In this episode of My JavaScript Story is Charles talks to Eduardo San Martin Morote. Eduardo is a freelance developer, a core team member of Vue.js, and loves contributing to open source. Eduardo started web development with games. He then majored in Computer Science and Mathematics. Eduardo works as a freelancer so he can work on Open Source projects in his free time. One of the problems he draws attention to is the sustainability of Open Source Projects. The developers that maintain the projects on Open Source are not funded, and even though many companies use Open Source code they don't have sponsor it even though they have the financial means to do so. Charles Max Wood recommends another podcast Devchat.tv hosts, Sustain Our Software that addresses this problem among others for Open Source. Eduardo and Charles talk about characters that have accents that have to be encoded and how they deal with this problem. Eduardo then talks about some of the projects he is working on currently with Vue.js. Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Adventures in Blockchain Adventures in DevOps CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Eduardo San Martin Morote Links VoV 038: Webassembly and Typescript with Eduardo San Martin Morote VoV 010: “Vue Libraries, Open Source, Meetups” with Eduardo San Martin Morote Eduardo's LİnkedIn Eduardo's Twitter J2EE jQuery Picks Eduardo San Martin Morote Tajin Eduardo's GitHub Charles Max Wood Subscribers Subscribe to your favorite podcast on Devchat.tv https://canny.io Suggest a Topic or a Guest for your Favorite Podcast on Devchat.tv by clicking on Suggest A Topic Or Guest
October 1, 2019
In this episode of My JavaScript Story, Charles talks to Dan Pastori, Co-Founder, Software Architect at 521 Dimensions. Charles asks about Dan's average day and what his life looks like before diving into his coding journey. Dan talks about how he got into web development. Dan taught himself PHP and JavaScript. Charles talks about the Views on Vue episode Dan was on VoV 012: Re-using VueJS Mixins and Filtering Google Map Data with Dan Pastori, and wants to know how Dan got into Vue. Dan compares learning times of Vue and Angular and mentions he learned Vue in a week as opposed to the months he spent learning Angular. Dan talks about his involvement in the Vue community and the future of Vue as well as the projects he is currently working on. Dan then talks about his future projects and plans. They finish off with picks. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Dan Pastori Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Adventures in DevOps Adventures in Blockchain CacheFly Links VoV 012: Re-using VueJS Mixins and Filtering Google Map Data with Dan Pastori Dan's LinkedIn https://github.com/521dimensions/amplitudejs 521 Dimensions https://avotoast.app/ https://github.com/521dimensions https://serversideup.net Dan's Twitter Picks Dan Pastori: Clean Code by Robert C. Martin The Food Lab: Better Home Cooking Through Science by Cherie Mason and J. Kenji López-Alt Charles Max Wood: Headliner App
September 23, 2019
This episode of My JavaScript Story is coming to you live from OSCON. Joining Charles Max Wood is Daniel Gruesso from GitLab to talk about developing in the Open Source and the Developer Report. GitLab works with an open core model, Daniel talks about the trade - offs of having code open to public, the first of which is having everything up-to-date so any contributions made will work with the latest version. Daniel calls this the "bus-factor" where if one of the team members gets hit by a bus, the rest of the team will have everything to work with. They then talk about the GitLab 2019 Global Developer Report results. One of the most interesting results of this survey with over 4,000 respondents, was that remote teams outperformed on site teams. This ties into the current Twitter discussion about "10x Performing Engineers". Remote teams are able to work on their own most productive hours and are not disturbed by their teammates when they are doing dedicated work on a deadline. Also remote teams by nature have to be more conscious of security. Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Adventures in DevOps Adventures in Blockchain CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Daniel Gruesso Links Daniel's LinkedIn GitLab Open Source & Software Development| O'Reilly OSCON GitLab 2019 Global Developer Report | GitLab 10x Engineer Twitter
September 17, 2019
Episode Summary My JavaScript Story this week meets with Nick Basile, UX instructor at Lambda School from Austin, TX. Nick talks about how much he enjoys working with Laravel and Vue as well as his journey as a developer. Upon graduating from university in Switzerland with a degree in Economics, he started working for two start-ups doing UX/UI design. He then wanted to be able to build UI as well so he taught himself JavaScript and HTML. He then got a job as a front-end developer to further develop his skills. Charles makes a comment about how many developers don't have a Computer Science Degrees. Nick then talks about how he got into Laravel and Vue and also how he started working for Lambda. They briefly discuss Lambda's business model and Nick's approach to teaching. Finally Nick talks about how he spends his life outside work in Austin, which nowadays involves looking after his 4-month old daughter. Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Nick Basile Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Adventures in DevOps Adventures in BlockChain CacheFly Links VoV 008: Getting Started with TDD on Vue.js with Nick Basile Nick's LinkedIn Lambda School Nick's Twitter https://nick-basile.com/ https://laravel-news.com/the-10-best-laravel-podcasts   Picks Charles Max Wood: SEMrush SEO Tools https://neilpatel.com/ubersuggest/ ActiveCampaign Nick Basile: How It Actually Works Tailwind CSS Going Back to the Gym
September 10, 2019
Episode Summary Rachel Roumeliotis and Roger Magoulas from O'Reilly Media join Charles Max Wood at OSCON to talk about the process of content development for OSCON. Rachel is the Vice President of Content Strategy at O'Reilly and Roger is Vice President of Radar at O'Reilly. Rachel and Roger talk about the history of OSCON Conference as well as the key technologies they wanted to cover this year such as Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and Cloud-Native applications. They then talk about the future of OSCON and the highlights they wat to cover next year such as security. Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Adventures in DevOps Adventures in Blockchain CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Rachel Roumeliotis and Roger Magoulas Links Rachel's LinkedIn Roger's LinkedIn Open Source & Software Development| O'Reilly OSCON O'Reilly Radar O'Reilly Media - Technology and Business Training  
September 3, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Ruby Rogues React Native Radio CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Sam Selikoff Episode Summary Sam Selikoff, Co-Founder at EmberMap shares his journey of how he became a developer. Sam was an Economics major in college and he really loved the theory of economics. When he graduated, he started working as a consultant and while working with data for statistical analysis he found that he enjoyed working with SQL and that how he started his developing career. Sam explains why he prefers Ember.js framework to other frameworks. He also talks about the projects he is working on currently. Apart from coding Sam enjoys reading economics books and playing music with his family. He shares some of his favorite books to read on the Theory Of Economics. Links JSJ 364: Ember Octane with Sam Selikoff EmberMap Podcast Sam's Twitter Picks Charles Max Wood Podcast Movement Sam Selikoff UPLIFT Desk Midsommar Movie
August 27, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Ruby Rogues React Native Radio CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Thomas Grassl Episode Summary Thomas Grassl from SAP joins Charles Max Wood at OSCON to talk about what SAP is doing in the Open Source world. Thomas talks about SAP's recently released a UI5 Web Components. Charles wonders how the components will work with different frameworks and Thomas explains UI5 Web Components are HTML components and they should be used how regular HTML components are used. UI5 Web Components is Open Source so Thomas expects contributions from the Open Source community. Thomas then talks about UI5 Web Components' enterprise-ready functionality and scalability features as well as the security and accessibility aspects. They then talk about Thomas' position as Developer Relations in SAP and what it entails. Thomas then talks about the career opportunities that comes with customization on the enterprise scale. Finally Charles and Thomas talk about how SAP approaches developer relations and what developers should do if they would like to contribute to SAP Open Source project.   Links UI5 Web Components- SAP Thomas' LinkedIn Thomas' Twitter Open Source & Software Development| O'Reilly OSCON SAP Open Source | Developer
August 20, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Ruby Rogues React Native Radio CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Jeffrey Meyerson Episode Summary Jeffrey Meyerson, founder of FindCollabs and host at Software Engineering Daily joins Charles Max Wood for a discussion about latest trends in developer world, ways of monetizing podcasts and finding ads for podcasts.Jeffrey shares how he started hosts podcasts and how he became a developer. Jeffrey's journey as a developer started out with his interest through music and poker. They compare advertising through sponsoring a booth in a conference versus advertising through a podcast. Tune in for a fun chat that covers everything from Keto dieting to software buzz words. Links Jeffrey's LinkedIn https://www.secretsofsongwriting.com/ https://www.hooktheory.com/ FindCollabs Software Media with Charles Max Wood Picks Charles Max Wood #75Hard Jeffrey Meyerson Owning a Rice Cooker
August 13, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly A $100 discount for RxJS Live tickets for all listeners with the code "chuckforlife" Host: Charles Max Wood Joined by Special Guest: Aaron Frost Episode Summary Aaron Frost joins Charles to talk about what Observables are and why developers should learn about them and use them in their code. He explains the difference between Observables, Promises and Callbacks with an example. Aaron then invites all listeners to attend the upcoming RxJS Live Conference and introduces the impressive speaker line-up. The conference will take place on September 5-6 in Las Vegas and tickets are still available. Aaron also offers a $100 discount to all listeners with the code "chuckforlife". For any questions you can DM Aaron on his Twitter account. Links RxJS Live Conference RxJS Conference Tickets Aaron's Twitter
July 30, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Episode Summary Charles talks about his journey as a podcaster and his mission with Devchat.tv. Devchat.tv  is designed to home podcasts that speak to all developer communities. Charles also plans Devchat.tv to host shows for technologies that are on the verge of a breakthrough and will be a lot more widely available in the near future such as Artificial Intelligence (AI), Internet of Things (IoT), Virtual Reality (VR) and Augmented Reality (AR). There are new shows being added continuously to reach out to new communities, some examples of which are: a Data Science show, a DevOps show and an Open Source show. As a kid, Charles would record his own shows on a tape recorder. He was always interested in technology. While studying Computer Engineering at Brigham Young University, he worked in the University's Operations Center. Upon graduation, he started working for Mozy where he was introduced to podcasts. Listen to the show to find out the rest of Charles' story, some of the lessons and tips he learned throughout his journey and the evolution of the shows on Devchat.tv. If there isn't a show for your community and you would like there one to be, reach out to Charles. Also if there was a podcast about a programming related subject that ended abruptly and you would like it to continue, reach out to Charles. Devchat.tv would like to host these podcasts. Links Charles' Twitter EverywhereJS JavaScript Community EverywhereRB Ruby and Rails Community Find Your Dream Job As A Developer Devchat.tv on Facebook Devchat.tv Picks EverywhereJS JavaScript Community EverywhereRB Ruby and Rails Community Netlify Eleventy https://github.com/cmaxw/devchat-eleventy
July 16, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Jeremy Fairbank Episode Summary Jeremy is a Software Developer at Test Double and the author of Programming Elm book. Even though Jeremy majored in Chemistry in college, he was always interested in programming since middle school. After he graduated from college he went to work as a web developer at Plastic Industries and relied on blog posts and other online resources to teach himself how to code. Gradually as the company’s needs changed, Jeremy transitioned into an application developer. He taught himself JavaScript using the book Professional JavaScript for Web Developers . He then attented a Coursera classto learn on principles of functional programming and gained experience with many front end frameworks and libraries, including Elm, React, Redux, Backbone.js, and Marionette.js. Jeremy is based out of Hawaii and when he isn't coding, he spends his time playing his guitar and hiking and going to the beach with his family. Links JSJ 325: Practical functional programming in JavaScript and languages like Elm with Jeremy Fairbank Jeremy’s GitHub Jeremy's LinkedIn Jeremy’s Blog Professional JavaScript for Web Developers by Nicholas C. Zakas Professional JavaScript for Web Developers by Matt Frisbie https://knockoutjs.com/ https://marionettejs.com/ https://www.coursera.org/ https://www.coursera.org/learn/programming-languages elm-lang.org https://www.facebook.com/javascriptjabber https://twitter.com/JSJabber https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv Picks Jeremy Fairbank: Programming Elm The Umbrella Academy Beyond Burger Charles Max Wood: Orphan Black https://devchat.tv/ https://www.netlify.com/ https://www.11ty.io/ https://github.com/cmaxw/devchat-eleventy JavaScript Jabber - Devchat.tv
July 9, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Noam Rosenthal Episode Summary Noam has recently started offering his services and experiences independently after 20 hands-on years in the software industry. His most recent position was as a Software Architect working on the Wix Editor at Wix, an Israeli cloud-based web development platform. Noam was first introduced to programming at the age of seven when he started creating games in Pascal language. He then went onto learn HTML. Charles and Noam talk about how the programming community has changed over the years and how it is a lot easier to access knowledge today. On how to improve as a developer, Noam recommends not staying in the comfort zone of the job description and doing as many volunteer projects as possible. Noam is also a musician and he plays base in Lost Highways music band. When he isn't coding he is busy producing the songs for their new upcoming album with his band. Links Noam's LinkedIn Noam's Twitter Noam's Medium Rack Rust Language TensorFlow Shadertoy Lost Highways Ultimate Guitar Tabs https://www.facebook.com/javascriptjabber https://twitter.com/JSJabber https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv Picks Noam Rosenthal: For developers working with JavaScript - learn another language such as Rust Language TensorFlow Shadertoy Learn to play an instrument Ultimate Guitar Tabs Do volunteer projects and do not stay in the comfort zone of work Charles Max Wood: Cibola Burn The Seven Principles for Making Marriage Work Book by John M. Gottman and Nan Silver OBS: Open Broadcaster Software
July 2, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Christian Heilmann Episode Summary Christian is a Principal Software Development Engineer at Microsoft, working out of Berlin, Germany. Links JavaScript Jabber 332: “You Learned JavaScript, Now What?” with Chris Heilmann https://christianheilmann.com/ Christian's Twitter Christian's LinkedIn Christian's Medium Christian's GitHub https://www.facebook.com/javascriptjabber https://twitter.com/JSJabber https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv Picks Christian Heilmann: https://webhint.io/ http://csstricks.com/ https://dev.to/ https://codepen.io/ Microsoft Edge Insider Charles Max Wood: Privacy Badger - Google Chrome Emacs Adventures in DevOps - new podcast on https://devchat.tv/
June 25, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Sarah Dayan Episode Summary Sarah Dayan is a Frontend Software Engineer working for Algolia in Paris. She is also the author of Dinero.js which was the result of a production bug they discovered in JavaScript. Sarah first got introduced to computers when she was a child. She spent hours playing on her grandmother's computer with dial-up internet. At age 15, she created her first HTML website. Sarah and Charles discuss the evolution of front-end development. Listen to the show to find out more about Sarah's journey as a front-end developer and the projects she is working on now. Links JavaScript Jabber 351: Dinero.js with Sarah Dayan Sarah's Twitter Sarah's GitHub Sarah's Medium Dinero.js https://www.facebook.com/javascriptjabber https://twitter.com/JSJabber https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv Picks Sarah Dayan: Zdog Library Dear White People TV Series Mass Effect Trilogy for PC Charles Max Wood: Taking a roadtrip Hotels.com Velocity 2019 Food Fight Show Netlify Dev
June 11, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Anatoliy Zaslavskiy Episode Summary Anatoliy Zaslavskiy has been interested in computers since he was 7 years old, and began his programming career in high school, doing web development in PHP for the online community for his favorite show  Avatar: The Last Airbender. Anatoliy currently works for Hover as a Frontend developer transforming home photos into 3D models to help visualize what the final project will look like. Anatoliy shares his journey as a developer with bipolar disorder and tells us how he restructured his career with his employer so he can focus on projects that he enjoys working on. This way he performs at his best and both him and Hover can benefit from his talents. Anatoliy and Charles stress the importance for companies to talk to their developers to understand their nature as both parties benefit from open and honest dialogue. Links JavaScript Jabber 358: Pickle.js, Tooling, and Developer Happiness with Anatoliy Zaslavskiy Anatoliy's Website Anatoliy's Facebook Anatoliy's LinkedIn https://www.facebook.com/javascriptjabber https://twitter.com/JSJabber https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv Picks Anatoliy Zaslavskiy: XState - JavaScript State Machines and Statecharts Nozbe/WatermelonDB: High-performance reactive database Monorepo Charles Max Wood: https://www.twitch.tv/ OBS: Open Broadcaster Software
June 4, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: Phil Hawksworth Episode Summary Currently the Head of Developer Relations at Netlify, Phil has been a developer for 20 years. Even though he was interested in computers from an early age, he started  studying Civil Engineering in university before changing course and switching to Computer Science. Though he didn't particularly enjoy studying Computer Science, he really liked working with HTML where he didn't have to compile any code and that's when he started thinking about a career in web development. Phil talks about his favorite projects he has worked on using JAMstack and JavaScript. He works remotely out of London, UK and as head of developer relations he spends a lot of time traveling for conferences for work. He doesn't have a 'typical' work day, but when he is not traveling for work he enjoys catching up on conversations on Slack and Twitter about JAMstack and collaborating with the rest of is team in San Francisco. Links JavaScript Jabber 347: JAMstack with Divya Sasidharan & Phil Hawksworth Eleventy JAMstack Phil’s Medium   Phil's Twitter Phil's GitHub Phil's LinkedIn Phil's Website https://www.thenewdynamic.org/ Netlify https://www.facebook.com/javascriptjabber https://twitter.com/JSJabber https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv Picks Phil Hawksworth: Rich Harris - Rethinking reactivity Charles Max Wood: EverywhereJS JavaScript Community
May 28, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Joined By Special Guest: James Shore Episode Summary James Shore, the author of the book, “The Art of Agile Development” and a thought leader in the Agile software development community, talks about his journey in Agile development. James and Charles discuss how Agile has transformed software development process and the traits that a good software developer should have. James talks about his contributions to the developer community, his CSS testing tool quixote and the Agile Fluency Project. Links JavaScript Jabber 360: Evolutionary Design with James Shore JavaScript Jabber 349: Agile Development – The Technical Side with James Shore My Angular Story 061: James Shore The Art Of Agile Development By James Shore James Shore’s Website   James Shore Twitter James Shore’s GitHub  https://www.agilefluency.org/ Agile Fluency Join The Conversation https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv Picks James Shore: Neil Killick Twitter http://vihart.com Charles Max Wood: ng-conf Ready Player One (2018)    
May 21, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Special Guest: Dan Shappir Episode Summary In this episode of My JavaScript Story, Charles hosts Dan Shappir from Tel Aviv, Israel, who is a computer software developer and performance specialist at Wix. Listen to Dan on the podcast JavaScript Jabber on this episode. Dan got a TI-99/4 when he was very young and enjoyed programming games. He first started with Basic language. After he studied Computer Science at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, he joined the Israel army to serve his military service. While in the military he also obtained his Masters Degree in Computer Science. Currently Dan is working as a Performance Tech Lead at Wix, he works on  speeding up the delivery and execution of 50+ million websites hosted on the Wix platform, as well as Wix own applications and services. Links JavaScript Jabber 334: “Web Performance API” with Dan Shappir Dan Shappir’s Twitter Dan Shappir’s LinkedIn Dan Shappir’s Crunch Base Dan Shappir’s GitHub Dan Shappir’s Talk through Fluent Dan Shappir’s Medium Wix Dan Shappir’s YouTube Talk: JavaScript riddles for fun and profit https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv Picks Dan Shappir: Open Source Functional JavaScript Library Dan's JavaScript Riddles on Twitter Dan's JavaScript Riddles in Conference Talk Wix Engineering Blog Charles Max Wood: VDOT O2 Charles Max Wood Instagram Account
May 14, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Special Guest:  Dan Fernandez Episode Summary In this episode of My JavaScript Story, Charles hosts Dan Fernandez, Principal Group Program Manager at Microsoft. Listen to Dan on the podcast JavaScript Jabber on this episode. Dan went to a programming camp and fell in love with programming. He majored in Computer Science in college and started working for IBM upon graduation.  Listen to the show for Dan’s journey into programming and much more! Links JavaScript Jabber 241: Microsoft Docs with Dan Fernandez Dan’s Twitter Dan's LinkedIn https://twitter.com/JSJabber https://www.facebook.com/javascriptjabber Picks Dan Fernandez: Microstang: Microsoft helps build a custom Mustang packed with Windows 8 and Kinect JavaScript Jabber 347: JAMstack with Divya Sasidharan & Phil Hawksworth  
May 7, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Special Guest:  Shawn Clabough Episode Summary In this episode of My JavaScript Story, Charles hosts Shawn Clabough, Information Systems Manager and Senior Developer at Washington State University. Listen to Shawn on the podcast JavaScript Jabber on this episode. Shawn got interested in computers in high school. His first computer was a TRS-80. Upon graduating from Washington State University, he worked as an assistant buyer at a computer chain store before going back to university to receive further education as a programmer. He then got a job at the University of Idaho where he worked in web application development for 17 years before switching to Washington State University. Currently he is a senior developer and a developer manager at Washington State University. Shawn also works as a custom .NET application development consultant. Links JavaScript Jabber 258: Development in a Public Institution with Shawn Clabough Shawn's GitHub Shawn’s Twitter Shawn's LinkedIn Pathfinder Roleplaying Game https://devchat.tv/my-javascript-story/ https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv Picks Shawn Clabough: UtahJS Slack Group Utah .Net Slack Group Boise Code Camp Visual Studio 2019 Launch Event - Visual Studio Time Bandits The  Movie (1981) Charles Max Wood: if you want to be a host on a podcast on tv on any of the below topics, contact Charles Max Wood  Open Source Sustainability and Maintainability AI & Machine Learning Data Science Augmented Reality & Virtual Reality & Mixed Reality Internet of Things (IoT) Python .Net If you are interested in becoming a sponsor for any of the above topics or the existing podcasts on devchat.tv, contact Charles Max Wood    If you are interested in being represented by Charles Max Wood for a sponsorship contract for a podcast in any of the above topics, contact Charles Max Wood   If you were listening to a podcast in any of the above topics or any other programming related subject that ended abruptly within the last 6 months and would like it continued please contact Charles Max Wood. We would like to host these shows on devchat.tv. Most of time time podcasts stop being recorded due to lack of time or lack of money.   Become a Podwrench Beta User! If you would like to host a podcast but do not want to do it on tv then Podwrench is for you! Podwrench is a complete podcasting system that allows you to manage your podcast and sponsorship contracts all in one place! Please contact Charles Max Wood for more info.  
April 30, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Guest: Brian Woodward Summary Brian Woodward shares his programming story starting at 7 or 8 messing around on his dad's computer and getting a degree in computer science. Brian discusses his journey through technologies and why he decided to work with JavaScript. Brian discloses his struggle with deciding what to do as a programmer and his decision to get a business degree. Today Brian is the co-founder of Sellside, he discusses their tools and stack and what they are currently working on. Links https://devchat.tv/js-jabber/098-jsj-assemble-io-with-brian-woodward-and-jon-schlinkert/ https://github.com/enquirer/enquirer https://github.com/generate/generate https://github.com/assemble/assemble https://github.com/verbose/verb https://github.com/update/update https://twitter.com/doowb https://github.com/doowb https://doowb.com Picks Brain Woodward: https://www.cypress.io/ https://github.com/jonschlinkert/maintainers-guide-to-staying-positive https://github.com/jonschlinkert/idiomatic-contributing https://github.com/jonschlinkert/guide-to-staying-productive http://www.toastmasters.org/ Charles Max Wood: https://www.instagram.com/charlesmaxwood/ https://problogger.com/31-days-to-build-a-better-blog-course/
April 23, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Special Guest: Ethan Brown Summary Ethan Brown shares his story starting with his homeschooling days and getting into programming. He started selling commercial software through his dad’s company at age 16. At age 17 he was recruited for a programming job and moved to New Jersey. Ethan and Charles discuss getting university degrees, whether or not to get them and share their experiences at university. Ethan talks about getting into javascript, what he has done in the Javascript community, and his experience giving talks at conferences. They discuss what the stack looks like for Ethan's company, Value Management Strategies, and what Ethan is currently working on. Ethan ends the episode by talking about one turning point in his career. Links Web Development with Node and Express: Leveraging the JavaScript Stack by Ethan Brown https://vms-inc.com/ http://automerge.com/ https://ant.design/ https://twitter.com/EthanRBrown Picks Charles Max Wood: https://andyfrisella.com/products/the-power-list-daily-planner/ Audiograms https://wavve.co/ https://snappa.com/ Ethan Brown https://cooperpress.com/ https://regexcrossword.com/
April 16, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Special Guest: Isaac Schlueter Episode Summary In this episode of My JavaScript Story, Charles Max Wood hosts Isaac Schlueter, co-founder and Chief Product Officer at NPM. Listen to Isaac’s journey as a developer on the podcast My Java Story on this episode and on the podcast My Angular Story on this episode. Isaac recently switched roles from Chief Executive Officer to Chief Product Officer, he explains the reasoning behind this switch. He talks about NPM Enterprise and its value proposition. He talks about projects he is working on currently and also the future of NPM. He also talks about the current available positions at NPM, both in Oakland, CA and remote. Links My JavaScript Story Isaac Schlueter My Angular Story Isaac Schlueter JavaScript Jabber Node & NPM with Isaac Schlueter Isaac's Twitter NPM's Twitter NPM's blog NPM website https://devchat.tv/my-javascript-story/ Picks Isaac Schlueter: Ink Umbrella Academy Netflix I Love Hue Do By Friday Charles Max Wood: The Expanse (TV Series) The Travelers (TV Series) Podfest Multimedia Expo Netlify Eleventy We're Alive Charles’ Personal Blog  
April 9, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Special Guest: Gil Tayar Episode Summary In this episode of My JavaScript Story, Charles Max Wood hosts Gil Tayar, a Senior Architect at Applitools from Israel. Listen to Gil on the podcast JavaScript Jabber Testing in JavaScript with Gil Tayar. Gil started his developing journey when he was 13 years old. He continued his training during his military service and became an instructor for the PC unit. During this time, he learned and taught C, C++ and Windows. He then started working  for Wix before he went onto co-found his own startup. You can listen to Dan Shappir, another developer from Wix that has been a guest on the podcast JavaScript Jabber on this episode. During this experience Gil realized he loves the coding side of the business but not the management side. Gil also loves testing and he very much enjoys his work at Applitools. As a Senior Architect in Applitools R&D, he has designed and built Applitools' Rendering Service. Links JavaScript Jabber: Testing in JavaScript with Gil Tayar JavaScript Jabber: “Web Performance API” with Dan Shappir Start-up Nation: The Story of Israel's Economic Miracle by Dan Senor and Saul Singer WIX Gil’s LinkedIn Gil’s Twitter Gil’s Medium Applitools Kubernetes https://devchat.tv/my-javascript-story/ Picks Gil Tayar: The Polish German War The Great War 1919 Channel Peaky Blinders My Struggle (Knausgård novels) Charles Max Wood: The MFCEO Project Podcast - Andy Frisella The #AskGaryVee Show podcast! - Gary Vaynerchuk A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway    
March 28, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Clubhouse CacheFly  Host: Charles Max Wood Special Guest: Chris Ferdinandi Episode Summary In this episode of My JavaScript Story, Charles Max Wood hosts Chris Ferdinandi, a Senior Front-End Engineer at Mashery. Chris is also a panelist on the podcast JavaScript Jabber and runs Go Make Things. Chris started out his career as in Human Resources, decided he wanted to go into development after he was asked to work on a coding project by his manager and he really enjoyed it. He got his first coding job as an entry level developer after attending a web development conference. Chris authors Vanilla JavaScript Pocket Guides which are short, focused e-books and video courses made for beginners. Links JavaScript Jabber: How To Learn JavaScript When You’re Not a Developer with Chris Ferdinandi Vanilla JavaScript Pocket Guides Go Make Things Chris' GitHub Chris' Twitter Chris' LinkedIn Mashery https://devchat.tv/my-javascript-story/ Picks Chris Ferdinandi: Accessibility: Back to the Future by Bruce Lawson Ralph Breaks the Internet | Disney Movies Charles Max Wood: Running along San Francisco Bay Marriage
March 27, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Clubhouse CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Guest: Joe Eames Episode Summary In this episode of My JavaScript Story, Charles Max Wood hosts Joe Eames, CEO of Thinkster.io and organizer of many different conferences, two of which are the AngularJS conference, ng-conf, and the WordPress developer conference, LoopConf. Joe is a front end web developer and an educator. He has authored over 10 Pluralsight.com courses. He is also a panelist on the JavaScript Jabber podcast and the Adventures in Angular podcast on DevChat.TV. Joe talks about his passion project, being on the organization team of Framework Summit, a two-day conference focused on all front end JavaScript frameworks, the first of which was held in Utah in October 2018. It was a great success and he and the rest of the organization team will be looking to repeat it in January of 2020. Another conference Joe was involved in organizing was React Conf 2018 which took place in October in Henderson, Nevada. He is in the process of organizing the React Conf 2019 with the rest of the organization team. Aside from organizing conferences Joe’s second passion is education. He has started up a podcast called Dev Ed Podcast. Joe has recently become the CEO of Thinkster.io. Thinkster.io is a unique platform where learners can really master web development with a lot of hands on training. Joe wants developers to be able to learn how to “generate” solutions to problems. He explains the concept of “interleaving” while learning a subject which helps students retain more and learn faster. Links https://webflow.com/ My Angular Story 049: Joe Eames My Angular Story 073: Joe Eames https://twitter.com/josepheames https://medium.com/@josepheames https://github.com/joeeames https://thinkster.io/ https://reactrally.com https://github.com/sveltejs/svelte https://github.com/stimulusjs/stimulus https://www.ng-conf.org/ https://twitter.com/loopconf http://www.pluralsight.com/author/joe-eames https://www.facebook.com/adventuresinangular https://twitter.com/angularpodcast https://www.frameworksummit.com/ https://conf.reactjs.org/ Dev Ed Podcast Picks Joe Eames: Gizmo Board Game Chronicles of Crime Board Game Deep Space D-6 Board Game https://boardgamegeek.com/ Charles Max Wood: Villainous Board Game Pandemic Legacy Season 2 Board Game Splendor Board Game Harry Potter: Hogwarts Battle Board Game
March 20, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Clubhouse CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Guest: Christopher Buecheler Episode Summary In this episode of My JavaScript Story, Charles hosts Christopher Buecheler, novelist, web developer and founder of CloseBrace, a JavaScript tutorial and resource site. Christopher is a self-taught full-stack web developer with extensive experience in programming with JavaScript, jQuery, React.js, Angular.js, and much more. Listen to Christopher on the  JavaScript Jabber podcast. Christopher started CloseBrace because he really enjoys helping people and giving back to the community. In his spare time, he writes science fiction novels and is also working on a web application for knitting called Stitchly with a friend. Links https://devchat.tv/js-jabber/jsj-338-its-supposed-to-hurt-get-outside-of-your-comfort-zone-to-master-your-craft-with-christopher-buecheler/ CloseBrace React.js https://twitter.com/closebracejs Christopher Buecheler’s Twitter Christopher Buecheler’s Website Christopher Buecheler’s LinkedIn Christopher Buecheler’s GitHub https://closebrace.com/categories/five-minute-react contact@closebrace.com http://stitchly.io/ Christopher Buecheler's Amazon link Elixir by Christopher Buecheler https://devchat.tv/my-javascript-story/ https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv https://www.facebook.com/javascriptjabber https://devchat.tv/my-javascript-story/ Picks Christopher Buecheler: Bracket Pair Colorizer Highlight Matching Tag https://gitlens.amod.io/ Fifth Season by N. K. Jemisin Charles Max Wood: Language Server Extension Guide RRU 015: Visual Studio Code with Rachel MacFarlane and Matt Bierner LIVE at Microsoft Build VoV 015: Visual Studio Code with Rachel MacFarlane and Matt Bierner LIVE at Microsoft Build
March 13, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Triplebyte offers a $1000 signing bonus Clubhouse CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Guest: Vitali Zaidman Episode Summary In this episode of My JavaScript Story, Charles hosts Vitali Zaidman, Technical Lead at WellDone Software Solutions. He is also the author of the popular blog piece: “An Overview of JavaScript Testing in 2019”. Vitali has been writing code since he was 13 years old. After completing his military service, he attended The Open University of Israel where he took computer science courses. He picked JavaScript not knowing that it was going to be so popular. He has been working for WellDone Software Solutions since he was a student where he has had the chance to work in many different projects. Vitali feels in order to keep up with technology it is important to work in different projects. Vitali talks about projects he has worked on that he is proud of, one of which is his library at https://github.com/welldone-software/why-did-you-render Links JSJ 331: An Overview of JavaScript Testing in 2018 with Vitali Zaidman https://www.facebook.com/vzaidman https://twitter.com/vzaidman https://github.com/vzaidman https://medium.com/@vzaidman https://bitsrc.io/vzaidman https://www.welldone-software.com/ https://www.powtoon.com/home/? Picks Vitali Zaidman: https://www.testim.io/ https://applitools.com/ An Overview of JavaScript Testing in 2019 by Vitali Zaidman https://github.com/welldone-software/why-did-you-render Charles Max Wood: https://www.vrbo.com/ https://paradehomes.com/web/ https://www.tripit.com/web Player's Handbook Dungeons & Dragons Core Rule Book
March 6, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Clubhouse CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Special Guest:  Charles Lowell Episode Summary In this episode of My Ruby Story, Charles hosts Charles Lowell, founder and  developer at The Frontside Software based in Austin, TX. Listen to Charles on the podcast JavaScript Jabber on this episode. Links JavaScript Jabber 337: Microstates.js – Composable State Primitives for JavaScript with Charles Lowell & Taras Mankovski Charles Lowell’s Twitter Charles Lowell’s GitHub Charles Lowell’s Frontside Bio https://devchat.tv/my-javascript-story/ https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv Picks Charles Lowell: Yousician App Charles Max Wood: Parade of Homes - St. George, Utah Vrbo.com
February 26, 2019
Sponsors: Sentry– use the code “devchat” for $100 credit Clubhouse Host: Charles Max Wood Guest: Bart Wood Episode Summary In this episode of My JavaScript Story, Charles Max Wood speaks with his namesake Bart Wood. They talked about tools for tracking and monitoring problems while using apps.  One app in particular was able to track new releases and errors, automatically scrub passwords to secure information as well as customize the scrubbing process while allowing users to provide feedback.  Charles delves into the past of Bart Wood who has been working with the same company, Henry Shine.  He started studying Economics before he got into programming by chance and eventually ended up graduating with a Masters in Computer Science.  Initially Bart had misconceptions of computing and eventually realized that it was not only about maintaining the OS system and learning keyboard strokes, but creating new apps and delving into the world of creating new software.
February 20, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Clubhouse CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Special Guest: Miško Hevery Episode Summary In this episode of My JavaScript Story, Charles hosts Miško Hevery, creator of Angular and Senior Computer Scientist at Google. Miško was introduced to computers when his father brought a Sinclair ZX Spectrum home for them to play with. When they moved to the United States from Czech Republic, Miško attended Rochester Institute of Technology and studied Computer Engineering. After working for companies such as Adobe, Sun Microsystems, Intel, and Xerox, he joined Google where created the Angular framework. For more on the story of how Miško created AngularJS, listen to the ‘Birth of Angular’ episode on the Adventures in Angular podcast here. Miško is currently working on Angular Ivy at Google and plans to restart a blog in the future. Links Adventures in Angular: The Birth of Angular JavaScript Jabber: Dependency Injection in JavaScript with Vojta Jína & Misko Hevery Miško's Twitter Miško's GitHub Miško's Medium Miško's LinkedIn How to Talk so Kids Will Listen and Listen so Kids Will Talk https://devchat.tv/my-angular-story/  Picks Miško Hevery: Prusa3D - 3D Printers from Josef Prusa Charles Max Wood: The Kingfountain Series by Jeff Wheeler
February 13, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Special Guest:  Lee Byron Episode Summary In this episode of My Ruby Story, Charles hosts Lee Byron, web engineering lead at Robinhood, a financial services company based in California. Listen to Lee on the podcast JavaScript Jabber on this episode and on the podcast Ruby Rogues on this episode. Links JavaScript Jabber 243: Immutable.js with Lee Byron Ruby Rogues 231: GraphQL with Lee Byron Lee’s Medium Lee’s Website Lee’s Twitter Lee’s GitHub https://devchat.tv/my-javascript-story/ https://www.facebook.com/DevChattv Picks Lee Byron: The Arm Cortex-M4 processor Charles Max Wood: allrecipes.com Walmart Grocery Pick Up
February 6, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code "devchat" for $100 credit Clubhouse CacheFly  ​Episode Summary In this episode of My JavaScript Story, Charles Max Wood hosts Ben Lesh, RxJS Lead and senior software engineer at Google. Ben studied to be an illustrator in Columbus College of Art & Design, but upon graduation he realized he wanted to work in web development. Ben thinks having an interest in problem solving was a key factor on his journey in becoming a developer. For his first programming job, he applied to a position and when he didn’t hear back he kept calling them until they gave him an opportunity. He then worked as a consultant at several other positions before he was offered a job at Netflix where he became the development lead for RxJS 5. Ben then switched over to Google’s Angular team. He is currently working on Angular Ivy at Google. Ben then talks about the projects he has worked on that he is proud of. In his journey as a developer, Ben believes that the take-away lesson is asking lots of questions. He himself had no formal programming training and he got to where he is today by asking sometimes embarrassingly simple questions. Links JSJ 248 Reactive Programming and RxJS with Ben Lesh VoV 020: Reactive Programming with Vue with Tracy Lee, Ben Lesh, and Jay Phelps AiA 199: RxJS with Ben Lesh, Tracy Lee, and Jay Phelps Ben's LinkedIN Ben's Twitter Ben's GitHub http://refactr.tech/ https://devchat.tv/my-javascript-story/ Picks Ben Lesh: Angular Ivy reactive.how Ben's Workshop http://refactr.tech/ Charles Max Wood: Charles' Twitter
January 31, 2019
Sponsors Sentryuse the code “devchat” for 2 months free on Sentry small plan Clubhouse CacheFly Host: Charles Max Wood Special Guest: Shashank Shekhar Episode Summary In this episode of My JavaScript Story, Charles Max Wood hosts Shashank Shekhar, a product developer at Localtrip from India. Shashank was introduced to programming when he was in school with Logo language. He then attended freeCodeCamp and learned JavaScript. Shashank talks about his journey as a developer and the projects he is working on now at Localtrip. Links Shashank's LinkedIN freeCodeCamp https://devchat.tv/my-javascript-story/ Picks Shashank Shekhar: Do what you love Charles Max Wood: Dev Rev
January 24, 2019
Sponsors Sentry use the code "devchat" for $100 credit Clubhouse
December 19, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: A.J. O’Neal This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles talks with A.J. O’Neal who is a panelist on My JavaScript Jabber usually, but today he is a guest! The guys talk about AJ’s background and past/current projects. Today’s topics include: JavaScript, Ruby, jQuery, Rails, Node, Python, and more. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: 0:00 – Advertisement: Get A Coder Job! 1:23 – Chuck: Introduce yourself, please. 1:27 – AJ: I brief introduction: I am a quirky guy who is ADD and I love to figure out why/how things work. I like self-hosting or owning things in technology. 2:00 – Chuck: Where do you work now? 2:02 – AJ: I work in UTAH at Big Squid! 3:29 – AJ: I have my own company, too! 3:41 – Chuck: Yeah we’ve talked about that before. Where can we go? 3:54: AJ: We have 2 products that are both Node. Greenlock for Node.js is one of them! The other one is Telebit. 5:44 – Chuck: This interview is all about your background. How did you get into programming? 6:04 – AJ: I was in middle school but before that my grandmother was a secretary at the Pentagon. She worked on getting people paid and she wrote a program to assist these paychecks to be printed with fewer errors. Because of that she had a computer at home. I remember playing games on her computer. The guest talks about his background in more detail. 15:21 – Chuck: No it’s interesting! I’ve done a couple hundred interviews and they all say either: I went to school for it OR I did it for my free time. It’s interesting to see the similarities! 16:00 – AJ: Yep that’s pretty much how I got into it! I went on a church service mission to Albania and really didn’t do any computer work during those 2 years. 19:39 – Chuck: You went to BYU and your mission trip. A lot of that stuff I can relate to and identify with b/c I went to BYU and went on missions trip, too! And then you got into Ruby and that’s how we met was through Ruby! 20:25 – AJ: Yep that’s it. Then that’s when I learned about Node, too. There was a guy with a funny hate – do you remember that? (No.) 21:03 – Chuck: Maybe? 21:07 – AJ continues. 27:53 – Chuck: What made you make the transition? People come into and out of different technologies all the time. 28:18 – AJ: Yeah it started with me with jQuery! Rails has layers upon layers upon layers. AJ talks about different technologies their similarities/differences and mentions: JavaScript, Rails, Python, Node, Ruby, and much more. 31:05 – Chuck: Node went out of their way on certain platforms that Rails didn’t prioritize. 31:11 – AJ continues to talk about different technologies and platforms. 33:00 – Chuck: You get into Node and then at what point does this idea of a home-server and Node and everything start to come together? How much of this do you want to talk bout? At one point did they start to gel? 33:33 – AJ: It’s been a very long process and started back in high school. It started with me trying to think: How do I get this picture on my phone to my mom? I thought of uploading it to Flickr or could I do this or that? What about sending it to someone in China? 39:57 – Chuck. 40:01 – AJ continues and talks about libraries and certificate standards. 42:00 – AJ continues with the topic: certificates. 42:44 – Chuck: I am going to go to PICKS! Where can people find you? 42:55 – AJ: Twitter! Blog! GitHub! Anywhere! 43:55 – Chuck: Picks! 43:58 – Advertisement – Fresh Books! 30-Day Trial! END – Cache Fly Links: React Angular JavaScript Webpack.js Serverless jQuery Node AJ’s Twitter Chuck’s Twitter Sponsors: Cache Fly Get A Coder Job Fresh Books Picks: A.J. JC Penny! Stafford Shirts Express for Men Chris Ferdinandi’s GOMAKETHINGS. COM Chuck Wordpress – Plugin KingSumo Getdrip.com Softcover.io
December 12, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Gareth McCumskey This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles talks with Gareth McCumskey who is a senior web developer for RunwaySale! They talk about Gareth’s background, current projects and his family. Check out today’s episode to hear all about it and much more! In particular, we dive pretty deep on: 0:00 – Advertisement: Get A Coder Job! 0:53 – Chuck: Hey everyone! Welcome! We are talking today with Gareth McCumseky! 1:05 – Gareth: Hi! 1:22 – Chuck: Are you from Cape Town, Africa? (Guest: Yes!) 1:35 – Gareth and Chuck talk about his name, Gareth, and why it’s popular. 1:49 – Chuck: I am in my late 40’s. You were here for JSJ’s Episode 291! It’s still a hot topic and probably should revisit that topic. 2:20 – Guest: Yes! 2:30 – Chuck: It’s interesting. We had a long talk about it and people should go listen to it! 2:45 – Guest: I am a backend developer for the most part. 3:03 – Chuck: Yeah I started off as an ops guy. It probably hurt me. 3:21 – Guest: Yeah, if you poke it a certain way. 3:29 – Chuck: Let’s talk about YOU! How did you get into programming? 3:39 – Guest: South Africa is a different culture to grow-up in vs. U.S. and other places. I remember the computer that my father had back in the day. He led me drive his car about 1km away and I was about 11 years old. We would take home the computer from his office – played around with it during the weekend – and put it back into his office Monday morning. This was way before the Internet. I was fiddling with it for sure. The guest talks about BASIC. 6:20 – Chuck: How did you transfer from building BASIC apps to JavaScript apps? 6:30 – Guest: Yeah that’s a good story. When I was 19 years old...I went to college and studied geology and tried to run an IT business on the side. I started to build things for HTML and CSS and build things for the Web. The guest goes into-detail about his background! 9:26 – Chuck: Yeah, jQuery was so awesome! 9:34 – Guest: Yeah today I am working on an app that uses jQuery! You get used to it, and it’s pretty powerful (jQuery) for what it is/what it does! It has neat tricks. 10:11 – Chuck: I’ve started a site with it b/c it was easy. 10:19 – Guest: Sometimes you don’t need the full out thing. Maybe you just need to load a page here and there, and that’s it. 10:39 – Chuck: It’s a different world – definitely! 10:48 – Guest: Yeah in 2015/2016 is when I picked up JavaScript again. It was b/c around that time we were expecting our first child and that’s where we wanted to be to raise her. Guest: We use webpack.js now. It opened my eyes to see how powerful JavaScript is! 12:10 – Chuck talks about Node.js. 12:21 – Guest: Even today, I got into AWS Cognito! 13:45 – Chuck: You say that your problems are unique – and from the business end I want something that I can resolve quickly. Your solution sounds good. I don’t like messing around with the headaches from Node and others. 14:22 – Guest: Yeah that’s the biggest selling point that I’ve had. 15:47 – Chuck: How did you get into serverless? 15:49 – Guest: Funny experience. I am not the expert and I only write the backend stuff. Guest: At the time, we wanted to improve the reliability of the machine and the site itself. He said to try serverless.com. At the time I wasn’t impressed but then when he suggested it – I took the recommendation more seriously. My company that I work for now... 17:39 – Chuck: What else are you working on? 17:45 – Guest: Some local projects – dining service that refunds you. You pay for a subscription, but find a cheaper way to spend money when you are eating out. It’s called: GOING OUT. Guest: My 3-year-old daughter and my wife is expecting our second child. 18:56 – Chuck and Gareth talk about family and their children. 22:17 – Chuck: Picks! 22:29 – Advertisement – Fresh Books! 30-Day Trial! END – Cache Fly Links: React Angular JavaScript Webpack.js Serverless jQuery Node AWS Cognito Gareth’s Website Gareth’s GitHub Gareth’s Twitter Sponsors: Cache Fly Get A Coder Job Fresh Books Picks: Charles Max Wood Podcasts: MFCEO Project & Gary Vaynerchuk Pokémon Go! Gareth McCumskey Serverless.com Ingress Prime
December 5, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Nicholas Zakas This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles talks with Nicholas Zakas who is a blogger, author, and software engineer. Nicholas’ website is titled, Human Who Codes – check it out! You can find him on Twitter, GitHub, and LinkedIn among other social media platforms. Today, Nicholas and Chuck talk about Nicholas’ background, JavaScript, and current projects. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: 0:00 – Advertisement: Get A Coder Job! 1:00 – Chuck: Welcome! Give us a background, please, Nicholas! 1:14 – Guest: I am probably best known for making ESLint and I have written a bunch of books, too! (See links below.) 1:36 – Chuck: JSJ 336 and JSJ 075 episodes are the two past episodes we’ve had you on! (See links below.) Let’s go back and how did you get into programming? 1:58 – Guest: I think the first was written in BASIC, which was on a Laser computer. It was a cheaper knockoff version. I think I was into middle school when I got into BASIC. Then when I got into high school I did this computer project, which was the first time someone else used one of my programs. 4:02 – Chuck: Was it all in BASIC or something else? 4:13 – Guest: Just BASIC, but then transferred to something else when we got our first PC. 5:13 – Chuck: How did you get to use JavaScript? 5:18 – Guest: 1996 was my freshman year in college. Netscape 3 got into popularity around this time. I had decided that I wanted to setup a webpage to stay in-touch with high school friends who were going into different directions. I got annoyed with how static the [web] pages were. At the time, there was no CSS and the only thing you could change was the source of an image (on webpages). On the you could do... 8:35 – Chuck: You get into JavaScript and at what point did you become a prolific operator and author? 8:52 – Guest: It was not an overnight thing. It definitely was fueled by my own curiosity. The web was so new (when I was in college) that I had to explore on my own. I probably killed a few trees when I was in college. Printing off anything and everything I could to learn about this stuff! 10:03 – Guest (continues): Professors would ask ME how to do this or that on the departmental website. When I was graduating from college I knew that I was excited about the WEB. I got a first job w/o having to interview. 12:32 – Guest (continues): I got so deep into JavaScript! 13:30 – Guest (continued): They couldn’t figure out what I had done. That’s when I got more into designing JavaScript APIs. About 8 months after graduating from college I was unemployed. I had extra time on my hands. I was worried that I was going to forget the cool stuff that I just developed there. I went over the code and writing for myself how I had constructed it. My goal was to have an expandable tree. This is the design process that I went through. This is the API that I came up with so you can insert and how I went about implementing it. At some point, I was on a discussion with my former colleagues: remember that JavaScript tree thing I wrote – I wrote a description of how I did it. Someone said: Hey this is really good and you should get this published somewhere. Huh! I guess I could do that. I went to websites who were publishing articles on JavaScript. I went to submit the article to one of them. I think it was DevX or WebReference. 18:03 – Guest: A book is a compilation of different articles?! I can do that. I wanted to write a book that would fill in that next step that was missing. I didn’t know what the book was going to be, and I decided to start writing. Once I’ve had enough content I would take a step back and see what it was about. (Check out Nicholas’ books here!) 19:01 – Chuck: Oh you can turn this into a book! 19:10 – Guest: There was very little that I had planned out ahead of time. Anything that happened to me that was exciting had stumbled into my lap! 19:37 – Chuck: That’s how I felt about podcasting – it fell into my lap/life! 19:50 – Chuck: Listeners – check out the past episodes with Nicholas, please. Nicholas, what are you proud of? 20:10 – Guest: In 2006, I was at Yahoo and started off with My Yahoo Team. This was the first time that I was exposed to a massive amount of JavaScript in a single web application. 26:21 – Chuck: Can you talk about your health issues? People would definitely benefit from your example and your story. 26:44 – Guest: I think it is something important for people to understand. The guest talks about Lyme Disease. 35:49 – Chuck: Yep taking care of yourself is important! 36:00 – Guest: Yes to enjoy time with friends and explore other hobbies. Help yourself to de-stress is important. Cognitive work is very draining. When you aren’t getting the right amount of sleep your body is going to get stressed out. Take the time to do nonsense things. You need to let your brain unwind! I love these adult coloring books that they have! 38:07 – Chuck: I love to take a drive up the canyon. 38:12 – Guest. 38:24 – Chuck: Yeah to focus on ourselves is important. 38:36 – Guest: Your body will make it a point to say: pay attention to me! Your body goes into flight or fight mode and your systems shut-off, which of course is not good. You don’t want your body to stay in that state. New parents get sick frequently with newborns, because they aren’t getting enough sleep. 41:08 – Guest: Get some R&R! 41:20 – Chuck: This is great, but I have another call! Let’s do some Picks! 41:35 – Advertisement – Fresh Books! 30-Day Trial! END – Cache Fly Links: React Angular Vue.js JavaScript Ember Elm jQuery Node DevX WebReference Nicholas C. Zakas’ Books ESLint NPM – ESLint Signs and Symptoms of Untreated Lyme Disease Lyme Disease Nicholas’ Twitter JSJ 336 Episode with Zakas JSJ 075 Episode with Zakas Sponsors: Cache Fly Get A Coder Job Fresh Books Picks: Charles Max Wood Wall Calendars – 6 ft. x3 ft. Nicholas Zakas Book: The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined by Steven Pinker Adult Coloring Books
November 28, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Rob Eisenberg This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Rob Eisenberg who is a principal software engineer at InVision, and is the creator of Caliburn.Micro, Durandal, and Aurelia. Today, they talk about Rob’s past and current projects among other things. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: 1:40 – Chuck: Our special guest is Rob Eisenberg. We’ve had you on Adventures on Angular (09 and 80), JavaScript Jabber, and others like Episode 203. 2:36 – Rob: That was over the period of 4 years all of those podcasts. I am getting older. 2:50 – Chuck: Anything that you’ve done that you want to talk about? 3:04 – Rob: I am known for opensource work over the years. Maybe we can talk about my progression through that over the years. 3:25 – Chuck: How did you get into this field? 3:29 – Rob: When I was 8 years old my dad wanted to buy a computer. We went to Sears and we bought our first computer. You’d buy the disk drive and the keyboard looking unit. You could by a monitor, we didn’t, but we used a black and white TV for our monitor. Later we bought the colored monitor and printer. That’s where my fascination started. We set up the computer in my bedroom. We played games. I got intrigued that you could write code to make different games. It was just magical for me. As being an adult engineer I am trying to go back to that moment to recapture that magical moment for me. It was a great creative outlet. That’s how I first started. I started learning about Q basic and other flavors of Basic. Then I heard about C! I remember you could do anything with C. I went to the library and there wasn’t the Internet, yet. There were 3 books about C and read it and re-read it. I didn’t have any connections nor a compiler. When I first learned C I didn’t have a compiler. I learned how to learn the codes on notebook paper, but as a kid this is what I first started doing. I actually saved some of this stuff and I have it lying around somewhere. I was big into adventure games. That’s when I moved on C++ and printed out my source code! It’s so crazy to talk about it but at the time that’s what I did as a kid. In JHS there was one other kid that geeked-out about it with me. It was a ton of fun. Then it was an intense hobby of mine. Then at the end of HS I had 2 loves: computers and percussion. I was composing for music, too. I had to decide between music or coding. I decided to go with music. It was the best decision I ever made because I studied music composition. When you are composing for dozens of instruments to play one unified thing. Every pitch, every rhythm, and it all works together. Why this note and why that rhythm? There is an artistic side to this and academia, too. The end result is that music is enjoyed by humans; same for software. I did 2 degrees in music and then started my Master’s in Music. I then realized I love computers, too, how can I put these two together? I read some things on audio programming, and it stepped me back into programming. At this time, I was working in music education and trying to compose music for gamming. Someone said look at this program called C#! I don’t know cause...how can you get any better than C++?! In 2003 – I saw a book: teach yourself C# in 24 hours. I read it and I was enthralled with how neat this was! I was building some Windows applications through C#. I thought it was crazy that there was so much change from when I was in college. 17:00 – Chuck: You start making this transition to web? What roped you in? 17:25 – Rob: I realized the power of this, not completely roped in just, yet. Microsoft was working (around this time) with... 19:45 – (Continued from Rob): When Silver Light died that’s when I looked at the web. I said forget this native platform. I came back to JavaScript for the 2nd time – and said I am going to learn this language with the same intensity as I learned C++ and C#. I started working with Durandal. 21:45 – Charles: Yeah, I remember when you worked with the router and stuff like that. You were on the core team. 21:53 – Rob: The work I did on that was inspired by screen activation patterns. 23:41 – Rob (continued): I work with InVision now. 24:14 – Charles: I remember you were on the Angular team and then you transitioned – what was that like? 24:33 – Rob comments. 25:28 – Rob (continued): I have been doing opensource for about 13 years. I almost burned myself a few times and almost went bankrupt a few times. The question is how to be involved, but run the race without getting burned-out. It’s a marathon not a sprint. These libraries are huge assets. Thank God I didn’t go bankrupt but became very close. The more popular something if there are more varieties and people not everyone is so pleasant. It’s okay to disagree. Now what are the different opinions and what works well for your team and project? It’s important to stay to your core and vision. Why would you pick THIS over THAT? It’s a fun and exciting time if you are 28:41 – Charles: What are you 28:47 – Rob: InVision and InVision studio. It’s a tool for designing screens. I work on that during the day and during the night I work on Aurelia. 30:43 – Chuck: I am pretty sure that we have had people from InVision on a show before. 31:03 – Rob comments. Rob: How we all work together. 31:20 – What is coming in with Aurelia next? 31:24 – Rob: We are trying to work with as much backwards compatibility as we can. So you don’t see a lot of the framework code in your app code. It’s less intrusive. We are trying next, can we keep the same language, the same levels, and such but change the implementation under the hood. You don’t learn anything new. You don’t have new things to learn. But how it’s implemented it’s smaller, faster, and more efficient. We have made the framework more pluggable to the compiler-level. It’s fully supported and super accessible. Frameworks will come and go – this is my belief is that you invest in the standards of the web. We are taking that up a notch. Unobtrusiveness is the next thing we want to do. We’ve always had great performance and now taking it to the next level. We are doing a lot around documentation. To help people understand what the architectural decisions are and why? We are taking it to the next level from our core. It’s coming along swimmingly so I am really excited. We’ve already got 90% test coverage and over 40,000 tests. 37:33 – Chuck: Let’s get you on JavaScript Jabber! 38:19 – Chuck: Where can people find you? 38:22 – Twitter, and everywhere else. Blog! 39:17 – Chuck: Picks? 39:23 – Rob dives in! Links: jQuery Angular JavaScript Vue C++ C# InVision Aurelia Aurelia Blog by Rob Rob Eisenberg’s Twitter Rob’s Website Rob’s LinkedIn Rob’s GitHub Rob’s Episode 9 Rob’s Episode 80 Rob’s Episode 203 Sponsors: Get A Coder Job Fresh Books Cache Fly Picks: Rob Database: Orbit DB Robit Riddle The Wingfeather Saga Charles Used to play: Dungeons and Dragons Little Wizards Park City, UT VRBO
November 21, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: James Adams This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with James Adams who is a web and a full stack developer who currently resides in Melbourne, Australia. Chuck and James talk about James’ background, current projects, JavaScript, Ruby, Meetups, and much more! Check out today’s episode to hear all of the details. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: 0:00 – Advertisement: Get A Coder Job! 0:55 – Chuck: Welcome to My Java Script story! You are the 4th person I have talk to today. I have only talked to one person in the U.S. Other people were from Denmark, Tennessee (USA), and Bulgaria. 1:39 – Guest: I am in Australia! 1:48 – Chuck: I try to open it up for different times and different locations. I started making my own program. I want one tool to manage my podcast company. 2:20 – Guest. 2:26 – Chuck: Introduce yourself, please! 2:33 – Guest: I have been working in JavaScript for 2 years now, and I just FOUND it. I could have been put anywhere but working with a large company. I discovered React.js. I went to study Math and Chemistry originally. 3:24 – Chuck: What was it – why did you change from mathematics to programming? 3:38 – Guest: I like solving problems and that has been true my whole life. 4:25 – Chuck: I identify with that – you’re right – for me, it’s more tangible and it’s neat to see something being built. White line on a black floor is mentioned. 5:30 – Guest: I had a great education, but seems like the education in the U.S. is more fun. We didn’t get to program and stuff like that. 5:51 – Chuck: My experience was that I got to do really interesting things in High School. 6:20 – Guest: I think you reap benefits by diving into one topic. 6:36 – Chuck: We were building little circuits that were turning on/off LED. We then went to building robots and then computer chips. How did you get into JavaScript? 7:01 – Guest: We didn’t touch JavaScript until my 3rd year. I went to a school in Jerusalem for a while. 9:05 – Chuck: How did you get your first programming job? 9:10 – Guest: I wasn’t really applying – I thought I would travel for a year or so. It was weird I didn’t think I had to apply to jobs right away. I applied to a few jobs, and my friend started sharing my resume around and I ended up doing some contract work for that company. I used RUBY for that team. 10:18 – Chuck: First few jobs I got were through the “spray-and-pray” method. The best jobs I got are because I KNEW somebody. 10:30 – Guest and Chuck go back-and-forth. 11:31 – Guest mentions networking. 11:41 – Chuck: What have you done with JavaScript that you are especially proud of? 11:45 – Guest. 13:43 – Chuck: I didn’t know that honestly. I never really thought of integrating React Native into a native app. 14:00 – Guest: Yeah, it’s really cool. I didn’t think about it before either! 14:24 – Chuck: What are you working on now? 14:28 – Guest: Actually, I am working on some integration with different parties. Now we are routing everything back to the backend. 15:46 – Chuck: I think I have heard of Pro... 15:52 – Guest: Yeah, they are located in the U.S. 16:01 – Chuck: Every community/country is different, but what is it like to be a programmer in Melbourne, Australia? 16:16 – Guest: It’s cool and I think it has a way to go. We have a React Meetup. 16:55 – Chuck: Sounds like you have a healthy community down there. So in Denmark if you get away from the bigger cities then you have a harder time finding a community in the rural areas. 17:30 – Guest: Do you spend more time online? 17:50 – Chuck: Yeah, I don’t know. I live in Utah. It is hard because there is a community North in Logan, UT. 18:13 – Guest: You have 5-6 main cities in Australia. We don’t have medium-sized cities. In the U.S. you have a mixture out there. 18:42 – Chuck talks about the population throughout Utah. 19:03 – Guest asks a question to Chuck. 19:09 – Chuck: Yes, Facebook is putting in Data Center about 20 minutes away from my house. They have built satellite offices here. The startup scene is picking up, too. 19:49 – Chuck: We are fairly large land wise. We can spread-out more. 20:07 – Guest talks about the population density in Australia vs. U.S. 20:20 – Chuck: It’s interesting to see what the differences are. If you are in a community that HAS a tech community you are set. 20:39 – Guest: I find it really interesting. 21:25 – Guest: Humans are a funny species – you can put out your hand, shake it, and you start talking. 21:45 – Chuck talks about the tech hubs in Fort Lauderdale, Florida in U.S. 22:17 – Guest: Yeah, if you aren’t interested than you aren’t interested. 22:28 – Chuck. 22:37 – Guest. 22:53 – Chuck: Join the mailing list, get involved and there are online groups, too. 23:11 – Guest: I really didn’t get into functional programming at first. I got to talk about this at a React Meetup. 24:25 – Chuck: The logic is the same. 24:32 – Guest: You put these functions together and there you go! 24:40 – Chuck: Go ahead. 24:48 – The guest is talking about React’s integrations. 24:56 – Chuck: Anything that is shared and put in some functional component, hook it up, and that’s it. Picks! 25:09 – Advertisement – Fresh Books! 30-Day Trial! END – Cache Fly 29:55 – Guest: Shout-out to my mentors. I am really blessed to have these mentors in my life and I wouldn’t be here today if it wasn’t for them. Lucas is one of them who work with Prettier. Links: React Angular Vue.js JavaScript Ember Elm jQuery Node Tweet Mash Up Guest’s Twitter React Melbourne ReactJS Melbourne JavaScript Meetups in Melbourne Sponsors: Cache Fly Get A Coder Job Fresh Books Picks: Chuck Presser switch for my Furnace – Goggle Search James Tweet Mash Up
November 14, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Chris McKnight This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Chris McKnight who is a software developer who knows Angular, Ruby, Node.js, and iOS. He went to college at Louisiana State University and graduated with a computer science degree from LSU. They talk about Chris’ background, past/current projects, among other things. Check out today’s episode to hear the panel talk about JavaScript, Angular, C and C++, Node, React, and much more! In particular, we dive pretty deep on: 0:00 – Advertisement: Get A Coder Job! 1:12 – Chuck: Hello! Introduce yourself, please! 1:15 – Guest: I am a software engineer outside of Nashville, Tennessee. I work for a medium consultancy company. I know JavaScript, Angular, NativeScript, and JS, too. 1:41 – Chuck: Cool! Tell us your story and how you got into programming? 2:00 – Guest: I was a really big nerd in high school and grew up in Louisiana, USA. There was one other person in the school that knew what I was talking about. I was learning C++ and Visual Studio in 2003. That was really back in the day and Microsoft Foundation class was a thing. I moved onto PHP and started working for a company in Baton Rouge after graduating college. I have a computer science degree with a secondary discipline in mathematics. I graduated from LSU and got a job offer before I graduated. Doing some part-time work for them b/c they were swamped. I was writing PHP and they said that they used jQuery a lot. 4:47 – Chuck: You got started and you said you used C and C++, why those languages? 5:05 – Guest: I did a little bit of Java, but it was the “new kid on the block.” I wanted to get into a program that was user-friendlier. 6:21 – Chuck: I took C and C++ classes in college. Eventually I did Ruby on Rails. I totally understand why you went that way. 6:44 – Guest: I picked-up Rails, because a company (that I worked for at the time) used it. I usually reached for jQuery among other options. 7:31 – Chuck: When did you start taking JavaScript seriously? 7:40 – Guest: 2012-2013. Frustrations of not using JavaScript as good as I could. For jQuery you have to call when you have an issue. Then you run into all of these bugs, and... 9:18 – Chuck: It sounds like it was more out of necessity. 9:30 – Guest: Yep, exactly. Those pain points have been reduced b/c I have been using Type Script and Angular and now version 6 and version 7. You try to call a number method on a string and vice versa, and app development time. 10:03 – Chuck: ...it has a process running with it. 10:13 – Guest: Catching a lot of those easy mistakes (bugs) and it’s a 5-10 minute fix. It takes a lot of that away. Sometimes you can say: I want to ignore it. Or it doesn’t give you runtime guarantees. Some other libraries out there have been on the forefront of fixing those problems. REST TYPE is an example of that. 11:39 – Chuck: When I talk to people about JavaScript a lot of times I get basically that they are saying: I started doing more things in Node or React – I fell in love with the language. Your reasons for starting JavaScript are because “I hated running into these problems.” Did you start loving to work in JavaScript? 12:11 – Guest: I did start loving it but it took a while. I could write a short amount of code and then at the end I get a result. Another thing that bothers me is FILTER. What does it return? It’s actually FIND and FIND INDEX and you use the pattern of filter and run this expression and give me index zero. 14:16 – Chuck: What work have you done that you are proud of? 14:20 – Guest: I started a new job last month; beforehand I worked at a mortgage company. I was proud of the Angular application and applications that I worked on. 16:55 – Chuck: How did you get into Angular? 17:00 – Guest: Interesting story. October of 2016 – at this time I was all against Angular. However someone came to me and said we have to... At the time I wasn’t impressed with the language. I learned about Angular at the time, though, and learned through Egghead. I learned a lot in 2 days, and I got pretty decent at it. I was writing Angular applications pretty quickly, and it made sense to me. 20:53 – Chuck: I am a fan of the CLI b/c that’s what we have in Rails. It’s really nice. What are you working on these days? 21:13 – Guest: Less on Angular b/c of the new job. I will do Angular on my free time. I work on Angular at nighttime. I build some things in React these past few weeks. 23:07 – Chuck: Any part of your experience that could help people? 23:17 – Guest: Learn what’s happening under the hood of libraries such as jQuery. Explore and find resources to help you. Keep learning and keep at it. Tools are so god now – such as Prettier and Lint – they will tell me “you don’t want to do this.” Use the tooling and learn the fundamentals. Also, use Babel! Those are my tips of advice. 25:55 – Chuck: That’s solid. Yes, the fundamentals and the poly-fills will fill in the gaps. So now it’s: what do I want to stack on top of this? Once you know the fundamentals. 26:55 – Guest: Learn what the frameworks and libraries are doing. Don’t get overwhelmed. That’s my advice. 28:16 – Chuck: Where can people find you? 28:24 – Guest: GitHub and Twitter. I’ve been working on a website, but not ready, yet. 29:08 – Chuck: Picks! 29:15 – Advertisement – Fresh Books! 30-Day Trial! 35:45 – Cache Fly Links: React Angular Vue.js JavaScript Ember Elm jQuery Node Find and Find Index NativeScript Lint Babel Prettier Christopher’s GitHub Christopher’s Twitter Sponsors: Cache Fly Get A Coder Job Fresh Books Picks: Chris Angular Explorer VS Code Finance – Staying out of Debt – Swish App Chuck Discord DomiNations
November 7, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Henry Zhu This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Henry Zhu who is working full-time on Babel! They discuss Henry’s background, past/current projects, Babel, and Henry’s new podcast. Check-out today’s episode to hear more! In particular, we dive pretty deep on: 0:00 – Advertisement: Get A Coder Job! 1:00 – Chuck: Today we are talking with Henry Zhu! You are the maintainer of Babel – and we have had you on the show before. Anything else? 1:25 – Henry: I used to work with Adobe and now live in NY. 1:44 – Chuck: Episode 321 we talked to you and you released Babel 7. Tell us about Babel, please. 2:01 – Henry: It’s a translator for programming languages and it’s a compiler. It only translates JavaScript to JavaScript. You would do this because you don’t know what your users’ are using. It’s an accessibility thing as well. 3:08 – Chuck: Later, we will dive into this some more. Let’s back-up: how did you get into programming? 3:22 – Henry: I think I was in middle school and I partnered with a friend for science class and we made a flash animation about earthquakes. Both of my parents worked in the field, too. They never really encouraged me to do it, but here I am. 4:07 – Chuck: How did you get into Java? 4:11 – Henry: I made some games and made a Chinese card game. Then in college I went to a bunch of Hackathons. In college I didn’t major into computer science, but I took a bunch of classes for fun. I learned about Bootstrap and did a bunch of things with that. 5:12 – Chuck: How did you settle on JavaScript? 5:28 – Henry: It was my experience – you don’t have to download anything. You can just open things up in the console and it’s easy to share. I think I like the visual part of it and their UI. 6;07 – Chuck: At some point you ran across Babel – how did you get into that? 6:17 – Henry: After college I wanted to do software. I threw out my degree of industrial engineering. I tried to apply to Google and other top companies. I applied to various places and picked something that was local. I met Jonathan Neal and he got me into open source. Through that, I wanted to contribute to Angular, but it was hard for me. Then I found a small issue with a linting error. After that I made 30 commits to Angular. I added a space here and there. JSES is the next thing I got involved with. There is one file for the rule itself and one for the test and another for the docs. I contributed there and it was easy. I am from Georgia and a year in I get an email through Adobe. They asked if I wanted to work through Enhance in Adobe. I moved to NY and started working here. I found JS LINT, and found out about Babel JS LINT. And that’s how I found about Babel. 9:24 – Chuck: Was Sebastian still running the project at the time? 9:33 – Henry. 10:53 – Chuck: It seems like when I talk with people that you are the LEAD on Babel? 11:07 – Henry: I guess so, because I am spending the most time on it. I also quit the job to work on it. However, I want people to know that there are other people out there to give you help, too. 11:45 – Chuck: Sebastian didn’t say: this is the guy that is the lead now. But how did that crystalize? 12:12 – Henry: I think it happened by accident. I stumbled across it. By people stepping down they stepped down a while ago and others were helping and making changes. It was weird because Sebastian was going to come back. It’s hard when you know that the person before had gotten burnt-out. 14:28 – Chuck: What is it like to go fulltime on an open source project and how do you go about it? 14:34 – Henry: I don’t want to claim that you have to do it my way. Maybe every project is different. Maybe the focus is money. That is a basic issue. If your project is more of a service, then direct it towards that. I feel weird if I made Babel a service. For me it feels like an infrastructure thing I didn’t want to do that. I think people want to do open source fulltime, but there are a lot of things to take into consideration. 16:38 – Chuck. 16:50 – Guest. 16:53 – Henry. 16:55 – Chuck: How do you pay the bills? 17:00 – Henry: Unlike Kickstarter, Patreon is to help donate money to people who are contributing content. If you want to donate a lot then we can tweak it. 19:06 – Chuck: Is there something in particular that you’re proud of? 19:16 – Henry: I worked on JS ES – I was a core team member of that. Going through the process of merging them together was quite interesting. I could write a whole blog post about that. There are a lot of egos and people involved. There are various projects. Something that I have been thinking about... 20:53 – Chuck: What are you working on now? 20:58 – Henry: We released 7 a while ago and 7.1. Not sure what we are going to do next. Trying to figure out what’s important and to figure out what we want to work on. I have been thinking long-term; for example how do we get reviewers, among other things. I can spend a lot of time fixing bugs, but that is just short-term. I want to invest ways to get more people in. There is a lot of initiatives but maybe we can do something new. Maybe pair with local universities. Maybe do a local Meetup? Learning to be okay with not releasing as often. I don’t want to put fires out all day. Trying to prioritize is important. 23:17 – Chuck. 23:2 – Henry: Twitter and other platforms. 23:37 – Chuck: Picks! 23:38 – Advertisement – Fresh Books! 30-Day Trial! 24:45 – Picks. Links: React Angular Vue.js JavaScript Ember Elm jQuery Henry Zhu’s Twitter Henry Zhu’s GitHub Henry Zhu’s Website Patreon to Donate Towards Babel Babel Babel JS Sponsors: Cache Fly Get A Coder Job Fresh Books Picks: Henry My own podcast – releasing it next week Podcast about Faith and Open Source Charles Ruby Rogues’ cohost + myself – Data Podcast – DevChat.Tv Reworking e-mails
October 31, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Christine Legge This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Christine Legge who is a computer software engineer who works for Google in New York. Previous employment includes Axiom Zen, and Vizzion, Inc. She and Chuck talk about her background, past and current projects, and her future goals. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: 1:07 – Hello! 1:10 – Chuck: You were on Episode 328 in the past. Tell us about yourself! 1:24 – Christine: I started working with Google about 2 weeks ago. In the past I worked in Vancouver, Canada. 2:05 – Chuck: Let’s start with how you got into programming? 2:14 – Christine: When I was in HS I wasn’t interested at all into computers. I wanted to do applied math in Toronto Canada for college. For engineering you have to take an introduction to programming in the 1st year. I had a 4-hour computer science course in the morning and I dreaded it. I dropped out 3 months later b/c I didn’t like the program. Surprisingly, enough, I did like the computer science course. I went back to Vancouver and I said to my parents that I wanted an office job. I went to the YMCA center and wanted to be hired. The man there asked if I had any interest in data entering, and I started working for him. I worked 4 hours a week with him where he taught me C+. I decided to go back to school for it. 5:37 – Chuck: What did you like about it? 5:43 – Christine: I liked the problem solving part of it. I like how you can break things down. The technology doesn’t interest me that much, but I like the problem-solving aspect. The guy wasn’t that up-to-date with the newest technologies either. 6:53 – Chuck: You have a 4-year degree in computer science. 7:05 – Yes that and statistics, too. 7:13 – Chuck: I was going to say “nerd.” How do you go from desktop applications to web apps? 7:25 – Christine: I worked with a company part-time and fulltime depending on the year/season. I didn’t know what web development was but I thought that THAT was computer science. I thought that if I knew how to do web development then I was going to be good to go. This company asked: What do you want to do? And I answered that I wanted to do web development b/c I thought that’s what I was lacking. I basically got thrown into it. I didn’t understand anything at all. It took me to write one line of CSS and it took 4 hours. 10:35 – Why did JavaScript attract you more so than C# or other languages that you’ve used? 10:43 – It’s simpler and you don’t need a lot of setup; from top to bottom. I am working in typescript, I like it even more, but I like how Java is more free to do what you want. I like functional programming in JavaScript. I like the big community for Java, and there are tons of applications for it. I really like how flexible the language is. You can do functional and oriented or you can combine the two. You aren’t constrained. 12:00 – Chuck: You get in, you work through JavaScript, were you only doing backend? 12:14 – Christine: Yep, backend. 13:00 –Chuck: I know you talked at the conference, and what are you most proud of? 13:14 – Christine: To be honest, no. My mentor (Pablo) at the last company – he wrote a book about D3. He started learning and writing the book. To me that I had thought that all these people are experts from the get go. I realized that everyone has to start somewhere to eventually become an expert. I do want to make an impact even outside of my job. I don’t have anything new that I’ve been working on. It’s a goal for me within the next couple of months. 15:30 – Chuck: I understand that. 15:36 – Christine: I haven’t found that balance, yet. When I gave that talk during Developer Week I was moving and stressed out. “I am NEVER doing this again!” It was over and it was very rewarding. People gave good feedback, and I would like to do that again. 16:56 – Chuck: People have different experience with that kind of stuff. People are interested in different things. So you’ve been working on moving and all that stuff right? What would you like to dive back into? 17:32 – Christine: Yes we are using Angular 2 and typescript and a Reactive Library. Angular is interesting to me. I would like to dive into the dependency injection in Angular. I really like typescript. 19:24 – Chuck: Have you looked at resources? 19:39 – Christine: I read the documentation so far. Like for React I just read the documentation but I haven’t found a central source just, yet. Not a single source. The docs are okay to get started but I haven’t found that they were enough. 20:50 – Chuck: This is about your story. I worked through the Tour of Heroes, and that helped me with Angular. It’s in the Angular Documentation. 21:23 – Christine: When you are starting at a new job I want to make sure I’m settled-in. And now I want to start thinking at a high-level of how these things work. I think the cool thing working here is that you can talk to the people who are working on Angular and get some insight that way. 22:27 – Chuck: People are usually very approachable. 22:34 – Christine: Yes, I agree. To be apart of the communities people want you to use their stuff. 22:48 – Chuck: Do you have another talk in mind when you are ready to give your next talk? 22:59 – Christine: Not sure. I have one thing on my list right now and that’s it. 23:42 – Chuck: I haven’t looked at RJX documentation but I think it’s pretty easy to pick-up. Ben who is the main developer RJX joined the team last year. 24:04 – Christine: It’s a lot of promises. When I figure it out that’s how something would work if it were a promise then I can usually get there. 24:25 – Chuck: Yeah. 24:38 – Christine: I kind of want to make connections in the office rather than me trying to do myself. I don’t want to waste time. Working on those connections would be good. 25:20 – Chuck: Let’s do some picks! 25:30 – Advertisement – Fresh Books! 30-Day Trial! Links: React Angular Vue.js JavaScript Ember Elm jQuery Christine Legge’s LinkedIn Christine Legge’s Twitter Christine Legge’s GitHub Sponsors: Cache Fly Get A Coder Job Fresh Books Picks: Charles My Calendar Software – BusyCal and Google Calendar Google Calendar just started appointment slots Christine Podcast: The Pitch Podcast: How I Built This
October 24, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Benjamin Hong This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Benjamin Hong who is a Senior UI Developer at Politico where he lives in the Washington, D.C. area. He has worked with other companies including Treehouse, Element 84, and Udacity. Charles and Benjamin talk about his past and current projects, and how it’s different working for the government vs. working for a business. Check it out! In particular, we dive pretty deep on: 1:06 – Chuck: Tell us a brief introduction, please. 1:23 – Ben: I am a lead frontend developer at Politico. 1:43 – Chuck: It’s an area that can affect everyone. How did you get into developing? 1:52: Ben: I had everything you can think of to develop at first. 2:10 – Chuck: For me it was a TI90 calculator! 2:18 – Chuck: Was it somebody or something that pushed you towards this area? 2:32 – Ben: I wanted to change something with the theme, Googled it, and it went from there, and the Marquis Tag. 2:51 – Chuck: And the Blink Tag! The goodies. So you got the he HTML book – and what website did you build that was your first big project? 3:07 – Ben: It was fiddling around, but it was fortune cookie universe. 3:20 – Chuck: You will have to recreate it! 3:27 – Ben: I think this was 1993/1995 timeframe. 3:40 – Chuck: Yep, me too same time frame. If you had something move on your website it was so cool. You went to building... 4:02 – Ben: JavaScript was a roadblock for me. There was nobody to correct me. I had a JavaScript book and it was a massive failure. 4:33 – Chuck: You took a break and you came back? 4:40 – Ben: Oh – people will PAY you to do this?! 4:54 – Chuck: Did you go to college? 5:01 – Ben: Yes, I have a Master’s in a different field. I was always a tech junkie. I just wanted to put things together. 5:20 – Chuck: Take us through your journey through JS? 5:30 – Ben: I started off with the jQuery piece of it. I needed Java, and it took me awhile to wrap my head around it at first. Through the trial and process of trying to get into Angular and React, too. 6:19 – Chuck: Did you play with Backbone, Knockout, or Ember? 6:32 – Ben: I did do SOME Ember and some Knockout. Those were my first interactions. 6:49 – Chuck: What got you into the profession? How did you get from your Master’s to being a tech guy? 7:14 – Ben: From the Master’s field I learned a lot about human experience, and anted to breed the two together. Also, consulting and helping to build things, too. 7:44 – Charles: What was the career change like? 7:53 – Ben: I went to the federal government at first around the recession – it was good having a stable job. I was bored, though. While I was working for the government I was trying to get my foot in the door. From there I have been building my way up. 8:30 – Ben: I was working on Medicare.gov and then later... 8:46 – Charles: We won’t use the word “disaster”! What is it like to work for the government? 9:20 – Ben: Yep. The federal government is a different area because they are stake holders. They were about WHO owned the content, and who do we have to talk to get something approved. It was not product oriented like a business. I made my transition to Politico, because I wanted to find solutions and diversify the problems I was having. 10:31 – Chuck: Have you been there from the beginning? 10:39 – Ben answers the question. Ben: They were looking for frontend developers 10:54 – Chuck: You are the lead there now. What was that like with the transition? 11:08 – Ben talks about the beginnings stages of his time with Politico and the current situation. He talks about the different problems, challenges, and etc. 11:36 – Chuck: Do you consider yourself a news organization or? 11:47 – Ben: We have Politico Pro, too. I have been working with this site more so. There are updates about campaign and voting data. People will pay a fee. 12:25 – Chuck: Do they pain themselves as leaning one way or another or nonpartisan? 12:38 – Ben: We are objective and nonpartisan. 12:51 – Chuck: I know, I was hesitant to ask. What’s the mission of the company and into what you do? 13:09 – Ben: The projects get dumped to us and we are about solving the problems. What is the best route for solving it? I had to help pioneer the new framework into the tech staff is one of my roles. 13:48 – Chuck: What’s your tech stack? 13:55 – Ben: JavaScript and Vue.js. We are experimenting with other software, too. 14:16 – Chuck: We should get you talking about Vue on the other show! Are you working at home? 14:32 – Ben answers the question. Ben: One thing I am helping with Meetup. Community outreach is important and I’m apart of that. 15:09 – Chuck: Yep, it’s interesting to see various fields into the tech world. I am not one of those liberal arts majors, I do have a computer science degree. It’s interesting to see the different perspectives. How little it is for someone to be able to dive-in right away. What are you working on? 16:09 – Ben: Meetup population and helping with the work at Politico. 16:27 – Chuck: Reusable components. Are those opensource or only internal? 16:41 – Ben: They are now opensource but we are seeing which portions can be opensource or not. 17:01 – Chuck: Different companies have come out and offered their opensource. Where do they find you? 17:20 – BenCodeZen! They are more than welcome to message me. 17:36 – Chuck: Any advice on newbies to this field? 17:46 – Ben: Attending those meetings and making those connections. 18:18 – Chuck: I have been writing a book on HOW to get a job as a coder. That’s the same advice that I am giving, too. 18:46 – Chuck: Picks! 18:51 – Advertisement – Fresh Books! 30-Day Trial! Links: React Angular Vue.js JavaScript Ember Elm jQuery BenCodeZen Ben’s LinkedIn Ben’s Crunch Base Sponsors: Cache Fly Get A Coder Job Fresh Books Picks: Charles Framework Summit – UT (Ember, Elm, and tons more!) Microsoft Ignite Code Badge Ben Conference in Toronto Conference in Atlanta, GA (Connect Tech) Conference in London – Vue
October 17, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Christiané Heiligers This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Dr. Christiané Heiligers who is new to the industry. Her background is in physics where she has her Ph.D. in the field. Listen to today’s episode to hear her background, experience with the different programs/languages, and much more! In particular, we dive pretty deep on: Beginning – Advertisement: Code Badges! 1:07 – Christiané: Hello! 1:17 – Chuck: I like hearing people’s stories from our community. Tell us where you come from and who you are? 1:33 – Christiané: I am from South Africa, and have been in the US for 2 years now. My formal training is in physics. I have been a researcher with lab coats and test tubes. Through immigration, which took 2 years. I couldn’t be still, and started learning code on my own. I enjoyed the art. I had to use Python, and then I was hooked. I enjoyed the functional programming and other things. I had some experience with Ruby on Rails. I enjoy development because its problem solving, methodically approach, and uses your creative side, too. My preference is a Mac, need the Internet and decided to go to camps and take courses. I snagged a job a week before I graduated! 4:36 – Chuck: your journey, thus far. You said that you couldn’t be idle – so why code? 4:53 – Guest: The UK is cold you don’t want to do anything outside! From South American I couldn’t stand the cold. I kept busy indoors – hint the code. You can’t get bored – frontend or backend. 5:28 – Chuck: Can you give us background on the Grace Hopper Academy. 5:40 – Guest: Sure! It’s based in NY City. 6:26 – Chuck: Did you move somewhere or was it remote? 6:30 – Guest: I had to live somewhere e 6:51 – Chuck: Where did you 6:55 – Guest: NY City. There were 16 of us in the course. 7:14 – Chuck: Why did you feel like you had to go to coding school? 7:25 – Guest: I am impatient with myself. The home-life you ask yourself: “Am I doing the right thing? Am I going in the right direction?” I wanted to go and pick up some skills. 7:56 – Chuck: You go through Grace Hopper – is this how you got into JavaScript? 8:11 – Guest: I didn’t know a line of JavaScript. I did my application code line in Ruby. My husband has been in software development my whole life. 9:16 – Chuck: What have you done with JavaScript since learning it? 9:24 – Guest: Some card playing games for my nieces in South Africa. 10:50 – Guest: Stack Overflow is wonderful. 11:05 – Chuck. 11:11 – Guest: I wasn’t actively contributing, but I did... 11:30 – Chuck: What is it like being a prof 11:37 – Guest: It’s addictive. When I am writing code in the frontend / backend side. It’s always learning. 12:11 – Chuck: What’s next for you? 12:18 – Guest: I would love to continue this journey. Maybe into the DevOps, but my passion happens with React. The Hapi Framework. 13:10 – Guest: The community is wonderful to work with – everyone is very helpful. 13:22 – Chuck: People are usually talking about Express and not Hapi.js. 13:35 – Guest: I have some contact names you can call. 13:43 – Guest: I am working on a few small projects right now. Some Angular sites that need assistance. Helping out where I can. It’s a small team that I am working with. There is only a few of us. 14:31 – Chuck: Usually people stick with one. What’s your experience using the different frameworks? 14:40 – Guest: It’s an eye-opener! React vs. Angular. 15:07 – Chuck: How can people find you? 15:14 – Guest: LinkedIn, Twitter, Tallwave, etc. 15:37 – Chuck: Picks! 15:40 – Advertisement! Links: React Angular Grace Hopper Academy Christiané’s Instagram Christiané’s Facebook Sponsors: Code Badge Cache Fly Get A Coder Job Picks: Charles Podcasts that Chuck listens to: Code Newbie Our podcasts through DevChat Food – Kedo Diet – 2 Keto Dudes Christiané Heiligers Hapi Framework Hapi Slack Channel – Hapi.js
October 10, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Ely Lucas This week on My JavaScirpt Story, Charles speaks with Ely Lucas who is a software developer. He loves technologies and mobile technologies among other things. Let’s listen to today’s episode where Chuck and Ely talk about Ionic, Angular, React and many other topics! Check it out! In particular, we dive pretty deep on: 1:33 – Hello! 1:40 Chuck: Give us a background on who you are, and tell us how famous you are! 2:31 – Chuck: What do you do with Ionic? 2:40 – Ely answers the question. 3:51 – Chuck: How did you get into your field? 3:55 – Ely: When I was a kid and played with video games. Later on I got into web development, like my website. Then I got into a professional-level of developing. Ely goes into detail about how his passion for developing began and developed. 6:30 – Chuck: Yeah, I’ve talked with people who have gotten into video games, then got into software development. 7:01 – Ely: Someday I would like to develop games. 7:12 – Chuck: Yes, web developing is awesome. Chuck asks Ely another question. 7:25 – Ely answers the question and mentions web controls. 9:17 – Ely: I thought Ajax was easier. 9:38 – Chuck: When I got into web development jQuery was sort of new. It made things a lot easier. 9:58 – Ely: A lot of people like to sneer at jQuery now, but back in the day it was IT. 10:28 – Chuck: How did you get into Ionic? 10:43 – Ely: I got a fulltime gig working on Ionic; I like the framework. I saw a job application and sent in my résumé. Two days later I got a callback and was amazed. They were hiring remotely. The team liked me and started over a year ago. 11:46 – Chuck asks a question. 11:54 – Ely answers the question. 13:20 – Chuck: Why Ionic? 13:35 – Ely: It was based off of Angular. 15:17 – Chuck: You mentioned...what has the transition been like? 15:32 – Ely talks about past programs he has worked with. He taught React in the early React days. 16:37 – Ely: I have a deep appreciation on React now. 17:09 – Chuck: I like seeing the process that people go through. 17:24 – Ely continues the conversation. Ely: It is interesting to see the learning process that people go through to arrive in the same place. 18:18 – Chuck: Redux is a good example of this. Anyway, this is near the end of our time. 18:39 – Chuck: Anything else you want to talk about? 18:48 – Ely: Yes, I have been involved in the Denver community. Check us out. Links: Ionic jQuery JavaScript React Ely Lucas’ Twitter Ely Lucas’ LinkedIn Ely Lucas Ely Lucas’ GitHub Sponsors: Get A Coder Job Code Badges Digital Ocean Picks: Charles Audible Book: Seven Proven Principles... Tony Robbins’ Book: Unshakeable Ely Fantasy Novel: Shadow of what was lost. Ionic
October 3, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Michael Garrigan This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with http://michaelgarrigan.com who is one of the podcast’s listeners. He is changing careers midway and has had many exciting careers in the past, such as being a professional chef, carpenter, repairman, and so on. Listen to today’s episode to hear Michael’s unique experience with programming and JavaScript. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: 1:18 – Chuck: I started this show but interviewing guests and then opened up to listeners. Michael scheduled an interview and here we go! I find that his experience will be different than mine than others. We will be getting guests on here, but wanted this to be a well-rounded view within the community. 2:25 – Michael’s background! His experience is a mid-career change. To see the things that are intimidating and exciting. 3:16 – How did you get into programming? 3:23 – Michael: How do people talk to machines? What are the different computer languages out there? What do people prefer to use? The C programming language, I saw as the “grandfather” program. That’s the first thing I looked at. Then I was like, “what is going on?” I got a copy of the original K&R book and worked through that. 4:58 – Chuck: I did the C language in college. The Java that I was learning then was less complicated. How did you end up with JavaScript then? 5:26 – Guest: It was easy and you can just open up a console and it works. You want to see things happen visually when you program is great. It’s a great entry point. We started building things in React and how fun that is. I enjoy JavaScript in general. 6:11 – Chuck: What is your career transition? 6:18 – Guest: I have always been a craftsman and building things. I had a portion time I was a professional chef, which is the cold side like sausages and meats and cheeses, etc. I used to do a lot of ice carvings, too. Stopped that and opened a small business and repaired antique furniture for people. Wicker restoration. It was super cool because it was 100+ years old. To see what people did very well was enjoyable. Every few years I wanted to see how something worked, and that’s how I got into it. That was the gateway to something that was scary to something that made programs. 8:24 – Chuck: I was working in IT and wrote a system that managed updates across multiple servers. There is some automation I can do here, and it grew to something else. What made you switch? Were you were looking for something more lucrative? 9:01 – Michael: Main motivation I appreciate the logic behind it. I always build physical items. To build items that are non-physical is kind of different. Using logic to essentially put out a giant instruction sheet is fun. 9:52 – Chuck: At what point do you say I want to do a boot camp? 10:04 – Michael: I might to this as a career. Hobby level and going to work is definitely different. I could see myself getting up every day and going to meetings and talking about these topics and different issues. Coding day to day. 10:51 – Chuck: Who did you talk to who got you started? 10:57 – Guest: Things I read online and friends. They said get the basics behind programming. Languages come and go. Be able to learn quickly and learn the basics. 12:13 – Chuck: In NY city? It’s pricy to live there. 12:33 – Guest: Cost of living is much greater. 12:42 – Chuck: What was it like to go to a boot camp? 12:50 – Guest answers question. 14:30 – Advertisement – Get a Coder Job 15:11 – Chuck: What different projects have you worked on? 15:19 – Guest talks about his many different projects. Like senses.gov. 18:11 – Michael: Working on getting a job. I put together a portfolio and just graduated this past week. 19:38 – Charles: Anything that has been a huge challenge for you? 19:47 – Not really just one. I’ve done big projects in the past. Seeing that I can do them and sheer amount of work that I have put in. Not really too concerned. Only concern is that mid-30s any bias that is out there. I don’t think that will really affect me. 20:25 – Chuck: Yeah, it’s rally not age-bias. 20:55 – Michael: “Making your bones” is an expression in culinary school. That means that you put in the hours in the beginning to become a professional at it. So I have had transitioned several times and each time I had to make my bones and put in the time, so I am not looking forward to that for me right now, but... 21:43 – Chuck: Anything else? 21:51 – Guest: Meetups. 22:40 – Chuck: I have been putting time into making this book. 22:53 – Guest puts in his last comments. 24:00 – Chuck: Thinking about what I want DevChat TV to be. I have been thinking and writing the mission statement for DevChat TV. 25:14 – Chuck: It’s a big deal to get out of debt. My wife and I will be at the end of the year. 25:37 – Guest: Discipline not to spend money, and peer pressure. 25:48 – Picks! 25:57 – Advertisement for Digital Ocean! Links: Book Dave Ramsey: Introducing Our Brand-New Book! Hack Reactor JavaScript Meetup Michaelgarrigan.com – website Sponsors: Code Badge Digital Ocean Cache Fly Get A Coder Job Picks: Charles TNT – The Last Ship Board game – Pandemic Legacy Kickstarter – Code Badges Michael Garrigan Brad’s YouTube channel - ½ million subscribers Michaelgarrigan.com – website
September 26, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Steve Edwards This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Steve Edwards who is a website developer and lives in Portland, OR. He is a senior developer at an international corporation called, Fluke. Today’s main topic of conversation is Drupal. Check out the episode to hear about this and much more! In particular, we dive pretty deep on: 1:05 – Chuck: Welcome! I appreciate your contributions with hooking me up with some people. 2:22 – Started in IT in 1995. 2:38 – Chuck: How did you get into software development? 2:46 – Steve: In high school not much courses on it. Then in college did some programming there. After college, I was supposed to get married. I was thinking finance. Never nailed down what I wanted to do. Called Bank of America in 1991 – called them. He said let me put in touch with someone. One of the things I got to put classes on “how does this system work.” I got into the banking job and realized not for me. Did realize that I do like teaching. Got software support for another bank. My banking software experience got me the job. We did interfaces – data from PC base to main systems like IBM, etc. I dealt with the source. Same time, I was a diehard racket ball player; on the board state organization. Someone organizing a website for group through Front Page. Hey do you want to take this over? Got to know Front Page. It’s painful to think about it. Same time a position opened up. I got PHP books, and created a new website for our racket ball organization. Off-time learning this. At work I used other tools for the job. That’s where I got into programming and developing. I was an analyst and wanted to program. I created a website from nothing in 2004 for a mountain bike shop. Learned a lot about PHB – and learned that I never want to build anything from scratch ever again. 2006 I start looing for a CMS and I got into some evaluations and got into Drupal. Now I got to do fulltime Drupal. Some guys left the company and got to do Drupal, also. There’s a book on basic JavaScript, and haven’t gotten into it. It’s nice because since 2009 I have been working from home. 3-4 years ago I heard about Angular and how it was used in Drupal. Weather.com – they did things with Angular. I started diving into Angular. Then a small project – worked with Travis then we started with our new ideas/projects. Then I went and took some Angular classes, and I was working on my project. I had these questions. They said that this was used for a one-time use. Okay, I had to figure it out. Travis one day asked: What are you doing? I showed him with the calendar and integrated with... Travis asked if I wanted to go to work with him. Then the past few years I have been working with Vue.js. 12:41 – Chuck: In 2006 I got into Ruby on Rails. I got into jQuery and did some backbone and progressed the same way you did. Worked with Angular and Vue. There is a lot going on there. Interesting to see how this has all progressed. At what point did you decide – JavaScript is the focus to some of these projects? 13:42 – Steve: Lightweight functions. 15:25 – Advertisement – Coder Job 16:05 – Chuck: What are you proud of with the work you’ve done? 16:20 – Steve: Article - All the different projects that it looks like for a developer – I have 5 or 6 projects that I want to get to that I haven’t had time to get to. Steve talks about one of the projects he is working on. 17:55 – Chuck: What are you working on now? 17:59 – Steve: My company, Fluke, we have a cool setup. It has a three-legged system. In that we have all the background data, another for digital assets, and... Steve: It’s so fast – I am trying to enhance it to make it even faster. Another thing that I am working on is that we have a scheduling website for the fire department I am apart of. Band-Aids and glue hold it together. I am trying to work with a calendar so it can integrate – take over the data of a cell and put y stuff in there.  It would be efficient so I don’t get all these errors with this old system. It would give me grand control. 20:16 – Steve: I want to get more and more into JavaScript. The one thing that I like about my story is that you did in your spare time. That’s how I got into Google. Multiple years working up late, working with people and different modules. I got good enough (in 2009) and got good enough – it got me into the door. 21:13 – Chuck talks about his course on how to get a job. Chuck: All you have to do to level-up is to put into the time. Working on open-source project 21:56 – Steve: Learning – find a project you want to do. What is something you want to tackle? What and how can you get it done with your tools? Stack overflow, or Slack questions. We started a new Meetup (last meeting was last month) and people do Vue on a regular basis. Slack room. That’s how I got into... Personal experience you can help people and find 23:00 – Chuck: People want to level-up for different reasons. Whether you are trying to get better, or learn new things – getting to know people and having these conversations will shape your thinking. 23:33 – Steve: Also, networking. 24:10 – Chuck: I wasn’t happy where I was at and talked to people. Hey – what else is out there? 24:37 – Chuck: Any recommendations? 24:42 – Steve: The amount of courses that are out there, and it can be overwhelming. Find courses when they go on sale. I found some courses that were only $10.00. There is stuff that is free and things that you can pay for. It can be inexpensive. 26:38 – Chuck: I do the same thing. I wait for things to go on sale first. I’ve done that with courses. However you learn it. Some people work through a book and for others that’s not the way. Sometimes I will start with a video course then I get frustrated. It helps, though. There are different ways to do it. Go do it. 27:39 – Steve: There is a lot of good jobs – get your foot in the door as a junior guy. Getting the real-life experience. 28:15 – Chuck: How do people get ahold of you? 28:18 – Steve: Twitter, GitHub, wherever... 28:48 – Picks! 28:53 – Advertisement for Digital Ocean Links: Weather.com Angular Drupal DevChat TV Plural Sight Events – Drupal Fluke JavaScript Slack Meetup Vue.js jQuery Steve Edwards @Wonder95 Steve Edwards’ LinkedIn Steve Edwards' Blog Sponsors: Code Badge Digital Ocean Cache Fly Picks: Charles Book: Launch by Jeff Walker Get A Coder Job Code Badge System to help manage the podcast – scheduling, promotion, etc. The Librarians – TV show Sling – BYU football games Steve Edwards Rodney Stark – History Books – History of Christianity – Title: The Victory of Reason CrossFit CrossFit Games
September 19, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Sérgio Crisóstomo This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Sérgio Crisóstomo. Charles is now interviewing podcast listeners, not just guest speakers. Check-out toady’s episode to hear Sérgio’s background as a musician and as a programmer. Also, to hear Sérgio’s latest projects and how he fell in-love with Sweden and ended up moving there! In particular, we dive pretty deep on: 1:46 – Chuck: How did you get into programming? 1:53 – Sérgio: As a child, I got interested into gaming. I wrote coding. Spectrum. 2:22 – Chuck: I think that makes you about my age. 2:41 – Sérgio: I was born in 1978. 2:51 – Sérgio: I had a cousin who got inspired by me and we started doing things together. We would show each other what we were doing. Better games and better computers came around. Turned out that I came back to it later in life. 3:29 – Chuck: what got you interested? 3:30 – Sérgio: It was all about problem-solving. There was no book. It was trial and error. It was magic. I was doing small steps, and it was empowering to me. 4:29 – Chuck: I used Logo. How did you get into programming at the professional-level? 4:45 – Sérgio: It was a long journey. My family was deep into a musical background. I went to the conservatory. I had a background in math, music, and physics. I went into programming because my father pushed me towards that direction. I did my Master’s in violin. After that I moved to Sweden. I really liked Sweden’s educational system. After 20 years I got into program working. I faked it until I made it. I had no one who could help me day-to-day life. I love solving problems. I found myself helping people in Portugal and other countries, since their English wasn’t strong. I liked that I was helping the community. That made me feel good about c 10:15 – Chuck: You switch from PHP to Node? What was the reasoning to that? 11:30 – Chuck: What things have you built in JavaScript? 11:47 – Sérgio: I started doing some freelance work. In the beginning it was helping friends. 13:22 – Chuck: Football – do you mean soccer or football? 13:35 – Sérgio: One day in the school, we got a new principal that the school didn’t like. I left because I wasn’t happy. I was a fulltime musician, and looked at this fulltime-programming job. I went to an interview where there were code quizzes. I loved the challenges. I had to choose between two different careers. After some negotiations it was a great fit for me. I got to be in-charge of different projects. Right now, I am a senior developer. It’s a small company but it is growing. 15:48 – Advertisement  E-book! 16:31 – Chuck: It’s interesting to see how you weren’t happy with your original job and how you got into programming fulltime. 17:29 – Sérgio: It’s important to have a good perspective. I am used to meeting people because I worked with choirs, orchestras, dance, and people and I can use those tools that I learned with musicians and transfer over to programming. Since I was good in JavaScript that helped me. Also, it was good that I was head-in-chief, because of my background of being a teacher. I found similarities and made it happen. That was my way in. 19:36 – Chuck: I find that very interesting. Yes, in the larger markets they might have their pick, but if you look into the smaller markets they might need you. 20:21 – Sérgio: People will invest into you if you are willing to learn and stay for a while. 20:48 – Chuck: What is the community like over in Sweden? 21:12 – Chuck: Do you have a lot of communities/boot camps out there to help people to code out in Sweden? 21:32 – Sérgio: Yes. It’s a really active community, and I have been involved helping connect people. People are curious and wanting to grow. It’s really open. 22:39 – Chuck: How do you start a program like that? 22:53 – Sérgio: I went to MEETUP.COM. 23:45 – Sérgio: I fell in-love with the concept of Sweden’s education system. I was there touring and decided I wanted to move to Sweden. It was worth staying. Sweden is having different political winds now. They are open to foreigners. I am a Swedish citizen now. 25:18 – Chuck: What are you working on now? 25:26 – Sérgio answers Chuck’s question. 26:45 – Chuck: Anything else? 26:54 – Sérgio: I can talk about music a lot! I find a lot of programmers are musicians, too. 27:23 – Chuck: One more question. I have met, too, a lot of programmers who are musicians, too. What is the correlation? 27:43 – Music has a lot of mathematics. You have to play on time and solve problems all the time. I was in a workshop with musicians and entrepreneurs, and I learned a lot in this workshop. There are different attitudes when conducting. There is problem solving and managing people. I see the connections there. Links: Meetup.com Sergio’s GitHub Sergio’s Website Sergio’s Website Sergio’s Twitter Sponsors: Code Badges Digital Ocean Cache Fly Picks: Charles Views on Vue – DevChat Code Badge - Kick Starter Sérgio Chopin! Checkout Sweden if you want a job as a programmer! Email me!
August 29, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Kevin Griffin This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Kevin Griffin. Kevin is one of the hosts of the 2 Frugal Dudes Podcast which helps programmers learn how to be smarter with handling their money. He first got into programming really young when his Dad brought home a computer and he was curious about it so he read books and taught himself basic programming that way. They talk about his first job out of college and how that has impacted him now, the fact that you have to create your own job security, and what kind of frameworks he uses. They also touch on the importance of exposing yourself to new technologies and being open-minded, what he is working on currently, and more! In particular, we dive pretty deep on: JavaScript Jabber Episode 273 Helping programmers handle their money 2 Frugal Dudes Podcast Runs financial peace university at his church Mindset is everything How did you first get into programming? Got started really young when his Dad brought home a computer DOS for Dummies Taught himself very basic coding Really into text adventures as a child – wrote some of his own Taught Logo in Middle school Computer Science degree in college Got into software developer community because he was laid off from first job You have to build your own job security Do you do JavaScript full-time? Doesn’t like to pigeon hole himself into one language C++ and C# Didn’t want to support JavaScript originally Using jQuery, Knockout, Ember, and Backbone Working with Vue and React now The same problems persist now, just with different frameworks Looking at the project and then deciding which tool to use And much, much more! Links: JavaScript Jabber Episode 273 2 Frugal Dudes Podcast DOS for Dummies jQuery JavaScript Knockout Ember Backbone Vue React @2frugaldudes @1kevgriff kevgriffin.com Kevin’s Twitch Swift Kick Sponsors: Code Badges Digital Ocean Picks Charles The Expanse Kevin Twitch – His twitch
August 22, 2018
Show notes coming shortly!
August 15, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Scott Wyatt   This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Scott Wyatt. Scott is a VC partner and is the CTO at Cali Style Technologies, works with startups, and was the CTO of the Dollar Beard Club. He first got into programming because his dad was a computer programmer and he really got hooked from a young age writing games and playing on the computer. They talk about the benefit of not living in the hustle and bustle of California and the Silicon Valley, how he got into JavaScript, what was it about JavaScript that hooked him, and more!   In particular, we dive pretty deep on: JavaScript Jabber Episode 282 Scott intro Works remotely from Indiana The pros to not living in Silicon Valley How did you first get into programming? Father was a computer programmer Strong arts background Started coding really young How did you get into JavaScript? Started out with ActionScript JavaScript to jQuery The cool part of having a diverse background as a programmer What was it that got you into JavaScript? Back-end JavaScript Node.js JavaScript is very versatile How did you get into doing something like Trails.js? Sails.js Fabrix and TypeScript  What have you done in JS that you are most proud of? Partitioned apps Contributing to freedom of information What are you working on now? And much, much more!   Links:  JavaScript Jabber Episode 282 Cali Style Technologies Dollar Beard Club JavaScript jQuery Node.js Trails.js Sails.js Fabrix TypeScript @ScottBWyatt Scott’s GitHub   Sponsors:  Loot Crate FreshBooks   Picks Charles  Get a Coder Job Course Golf Clash Golfing Planning in sanity time Suggest a Topic Chuck@DevChat.tv    Scott Gun.js Bitcoin
August 8, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Tara Z. Manicsic This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Tara Z. Manicsic. Tara is a developer advocate for Progress, is on their Kendo UI team, and is also a Google developer expert on the Web Technologies team. She first got into programming in the second grade when she learned Logo and came back to development when she was asked to do Crystal Reports at Harvard Law School. They talk about how she found Women Who Code, the importance of understanding open source software, having a support system, what is was about Node that got her excited, and more! In particular, we dive pretty deep on: Tara intro Very excited and fascinated with the web Helped to start up React Round Up as a panelist Her experience as a developer Started out as a business school dropout How did you first get into programming? Learned Logo in the second grade Loved the ability to help people and create change Crystal Reports at Harvard Law CS courses with tuition assistance Getting back into CS Being a non-traditional student Finding Women Who Code First job as a Node software engineer How did Women Who Code help you? OpenHatch Being familiar with open source software The importance of having support How did you first get into JavaScript? Seeing jobs for Ruby on Rails Matt Hernandez on JavaScript Jabber NG conf Her intro to the Angular community in person And much, much more! Links: Progress React Round Up Crystal Reports Women Who Code Node OpenHatch JavaScript Ruby on Rails Matt Hernandez on JavaScript Jabber NG conf Angular @Tzmanics tzmanics.com Tara’s GitHub Sponsors: Loot Crate FreshBooks Picks Charles Get a Coder Job Course Golf Clash Tara Connect.Tech DevFest Atlanta Cedar Point
August 1, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Orta Therox This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Orta Therox. Orta is a native engineer that believes that the right way to build systems is to understand as many systems as possible. He works predominately on iOS programming at a company called Artsy, where they make it easy to buy and sell art on the internet. He first got into programming because he loved playing video games as a child, loved creating his own video games, and worked his way up from there. They talk about his work at Artsy, how he used open source to learn himself how program, how he got into Ruby and then React and React Native, and more! In particular, we dive pretty deep on: JavaScript Jabber Episode 305 Orta intro Artsy iOS programming Hates lack of documentation CocoaPods Trouble with building native apps His move to React and React Native Used to run iOS team at Artsy How did you get into programming? Played video games as a kid Taught himself with books Using open source to learn Open source by default idea Loves giving back through blogging and open source How did you get into Ruby? MacRuby Boundaries are very obvious in React Native How did you get into React and React Native? Native developers building stuff in JavaScript Culture conflicts How they dealt with dependencies in their apps And much, much more! Links: JavaScript Jabber Episode 305 Artsy CocoaPods React React Native MacRuby JavaScript @orta orta.io Orta’s GitHub Artsy Engineering Sponsors: Loot Crate FreshBooks Picks Charles South Pacific Get a Coder Job course Framework Summit Orta Prettier
July 25, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Kye Hohenberger This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Kye Hohenberger. Kye is a senior front-end engineer at Gremlin, where they do chaos as a service and break your stuff on purpose so that you can fix it and it hopefully won’t happen again. He also created the Emotion library, which is a CSS-in-JS library. He first got into programming because his Grandpa was always working on computers and Kye was curious about how they worked. They talk about how he got into JavaScript, what he's built in JavaScript that he’s proud of, what he’s working on now, and more! In particular, we dive pretty deep on: JavaScript Jabber Episode 286 Kye intro Works at Gremlin as a front-end engineer How did you first get into programming? Always had a burning curiosity for computers Worked on HTML first Worked with flash in High School Tried to major in Computer Science and dropped out of it Job in IT Wordpress maintenance Hooked on wanting to learn more Python with Django What was it that caught your attention? How did you get into JavaScript? Job at cPanel What led you to build something like Emotion? Didn’t like having to use the Sass compiler What problem were you trying to solve? Have you worked on anything else in JavaScript that you’re proud of? What are you working on now? APIs from Java to Node Wrote Qordoba apps for 2 years What made you switch from Angular to React? Learning WebPack And much, much more! Links: JavaScript Jabber Episode 286 Emotion Wordpress Python Django JavaScript cPanel Sass Node Angular React WebPack @tkh44 Kye’s GitHub Kye’s Medium Sponsors: Loot Crate FreshBooks Picks Charles Home Depot Tool Rentals Framework Summit Podcast Movement Kye The Console Log Brian Holt on Frontend Masters Emotion Team
July 18, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood   Guest: Jerome Hardaway   This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Jerome Hardaway. Jerome used to be a panelist on Ruby Rogues and loved the ability to share his knowledge and interact with so many people from the community. He first got into programming by accident when he couldn’t find a job after becoming a veteran. He saw a commercial about job opportunities in coding, ended up finding a book on SQL and taught himself how to program. They talk about where he ran across Ruby on Rails, what he has worked on that he is particularly proud of, what he is doing currently, and more! In particular, we dive pretty deep on: Jerome’s experience being a panelist on Ruby Rogues Loves being able to reach his goals in a speedy manner Ruby Rogues Episode 279 JavaScript Jabber Episode 239 How did you first get into programming? In the military during the recession and had trouble finding a job Saw a commercial about coding Taught himself SQL Wordpress Focusing on making Vets Who Code better People would go for products over projects any day Chose Ruby on Rails  Setting himself apart by picking to focus on Ruby on Rails Where did you come across Ruby on Rails? From PHP to Ruby on Rails Ruby Have you found the learning curve has gotten steeper for Rails? Keeping up with the JavaScript community What have you done on Ruby in Rails that you are proud of? Being the right person for the job when you don’t look like it on paper What are you working on now? And much, much more!   Links:  Ruby Rogues Episode 279 JavaScript Jabber Episode 239 Vets Who Code Ruby Rogues Wordpress Ruby on Rails Ruby JavaScript @JeromeHardaway Vets Who Code blog Jerome’s GitHub   Sponsors:  Loot Crate FreshBooks Picks Charles  Take some time with the people you care about Mattermost Jerome Brian Holt Frontend Masters Pragmatic Studio
July 11, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Lizzie Siegle This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Lizzie Siegle. Lizzie is a senior computer science major at Bryn Mawr College, works for Twilio as a contracting developer evangelist, and also contributes to their documentation. She first got into programming when her AP calculus teacher told some of her classmates to attend a one day all girls coding camp at Stanford and she overheard and was interested by it. She was inspired at this camp to pursue a career in coding because she loved that you can build anything with code and be creative. They talk about what got her hooked on coding, why she chose JavaScript, why she chose to work as a developer evangelist, and more! In particular, we dive pretty deep on: Lizzie intro Computer Science Major Works at Twilio Greg Baugues was her assigned mentor this past summer How did you first get into programming? Grew up in Silicon Valley Hated STEM growing up Was inspired at a one day all girls coding camp at Stanford Loves being able to be creative with code What was the coding camp like? Camp was for high-schoolers HTML and CSS What was it that got you interested in code? Seeing the application of code in the real world Why JavaScript? Works also in Python, Swift, and Haskell Loves how versatile JS is Why developer evangelism? Internship at PubNub Loves being able to teach others as an evangelist What have you done in JavaScript that you’re proud of? Eon.js What are you working on currently? Get comfortable with being uncomfortable And much, much more! Links: Twilio JavaScript Python Swift PubNub Haskell Eon.js @lizziepika Her newsletter Lizzie’s Website Lizzie’s GitHub Sponsors: Loot Crate FreshBooks Picks Lizzie The importance of a mentor or a sponsor
July 4, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Ian Sinnott This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Ian Sinnott. Since being on JavaScript Jabber for Episode 227, he has being writing a lot in JavaScript and has been taking a break from the meetups and podcast scene. He first got into programming when he took two CS courses in college that focused on Java graphical programming and SML. Once these courses were through, he stopped programming for a while and came back to it when he was creating an HTML email template. They talk about why he was excited with web development, how he got into JavaScript, what he is working on currently, and more! In particular, we dive pretty deep on: JavaScript Jabber Episode 227 Ian intro How did you first get into programming? 2 CS courses in college Left programming after the classes Why did you decide to come back? Learning on PHP and WordPress What was it about web development that got you excited? Web development is high level and you can get quick wins What made you cross over into JavaScript? Really likes native apps Rise of the single-page web app Interactive apps What’s your flavor of choice? React is his go to MJS Episode 43 - Nick Disabato JSX, Angular, TypeScript, and Vue What are you working on now? Johnny-Five and Arduino Learning hardware allows you to attach an API to anything Is there anything that you have done that you are proud of? Rendering static sites in React Gatsby react-static-webpack-plugin and react-static-boilerplate RxJS and Redux-Observable And much, much more! Links: JavaScript Jabber Episode 227 JavaScript WordPress React MJS Episode 43 - Nick Disabato JSX Angular TypeScript Vue Johnny-Five Gatsby react-static-webpack-plugin react-static-boilerplate RxJS Redux-Observable @ian_sinn Ian’s GitHub iansinnott.com Sponsors: Loot Crate FreshBooks Picks Charles Sling TV JS Dev Summit Views on Vue, React Round Up, and Elixir Mix Ian Salary Negotiation: Make More Money, Be More Valued by Patrick McKenzie A Curious Moon Cortex Podcast
June 27, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Tracy Lee This week on My Angular Story, Charles speaks with Tracy Lee. Tracy is the co-founder This Dot and her goal with it is to bring the JavaScript community together. She first got into programming when she tried to build websites for people and then was interested in learning JavaScript and really fell in love with the community. She really stayed with Angular because of the community she found there, the size of the community, and the fact that it gave her the ability to have a voice. In particular, We dive pretty deep on: This Dot ContributorDays.com How did you first get into programming? Really loves community Angular community being so welcoming What made you pick the Angular community? Ember originally Loves how big the Angular community is Business background Loves the challenge of trying to create things On the RxJS Core team This Dot Media This Dot Labs Loves to builds brands and consult The importance of mentors Starting an apprentice program She loves being able to help others People underestimate the impact they have on the world AngularAir and JavaScript Air And much, much more! Links: This Dot ContributorDays.com JavaScript Angular Ember RxJS Core Team This Dot Media This Dot Labs AngularAir JavaScriptAir Tracy’s Medium @LadyLeet LadyLeet.com DevChat.tv Youtube This Dot Media Youtube Picks: Charles Ready Player One by Ernest Cline Bad Lip Reading YouTube Tracy Mermaid Tail Makeup Brushes Beauty Fix Box
June 20, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Henrik Joreteg This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Henrik Joreteg. Henrik has been on JavaScript Jabber previously discussing &yet back in December of 2014 on episode 137. He has since then left &yet and now does independent consulting and works on his own projects. He first got into programming when he started a company that created online video tours for houses and he needed to teach himself programming in order to create the website. They talk about what led him to JavaScript, what he’s proud of contributing to the community, what he is working on now, and much more! In particular, we dive pretty deep on: JavaScript Jabber Episode 137 &yet How did you first get into programming? Liked computers as a child but didn’t want to spend his life on it originally Studied Business in college Create house touring video company Adobe ColdFusion How were you exposed to JavaScript? Gig as a ColdFusion developer jQTouch, jQuery, and Django Interested in building app-like experiences What have you done with JavaScript that you are proud of? Want to push the web into an app-like space Helped to create Ampersand.js Wrote Human JavaScript Created Simple WebRTC Promote web as an application platform What are you working on now? Redux and React New book: Human Redux Independent consulting Speedy.gift Redux-bundler And much, much more! Links: JavaScript Jabber Episode 137 JavaScript Jabber &yet JavaScript jQTouch jQuery Django Human JavaScript Ampersand.js Simple WebRTC Human Redux Redux React Speedy.gift Redux-bundler Henrik’s GitHub Joreteg.com @HenrikJoreteg Sponsors: Loot Crate FreshBooks Picks Charles Hogwarts Battle React Dev Summit JS Dev Summit Newspaper Theme on Themeforest Get a Coder Job Course Henrik Preact Parcel.js Rollup.js Space repetition systems Anki
June 13, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Greg Wilson This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Greg Wilson about his educational and programming background, a Canadian company (Rangle) who’s doing amazing things, and much more! Currently, Greg is the head of instructor training at DataCamp. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: Past Episode – 184 JavaScript The one unavoidable language. Company in Canada – Rangle. 1980’s when Greg got into super computing – everything was custom hardware. Want to be “rich, famous, and popular?” – check out 11:58! Rangle – what a great company! Emily Porta Rangle’s program, Bridge, aimed at women who are trying to get into the tech industry. How did you get into programming? Queen’s University – 1980. Started off as chemistry major. From Vancouver, Canada. Engineering degree. Got hired to do math with computers. Software. 1985 – working for a lab in Ottawa. Master’s degree in Artificial Intelligence (AI) – Scotland. Ph.D. Academia. Moved to Toronto. Ruby Greg is a Python user. Not familiar with Ruby. Violence and video games? Where is the data? If people had the habit of being skeptical, such as fake news and other things, that simply isn’t true. For example: are vaccines dangerous? Professor Marian Petre – Open University Book: “Software Designs Decoded: 66 Ways Experts Think” by Marian Petre Links: Digital Ocean, LLC FreshBooks Greg Wilson’s Third Bit Greg Wilson’s Twitter Greg Wilson’s GitHub Greg Wilson’s LinkedIn Greg Wilson’s “What We Actually Know About Software Development, and Why We Believe It’s True” JavaScript Past Episode – 184 Rangle Rangle’s Bridge Python Ruby Professor Marian Petre – Open University Book: “Software Designs Decoded: 66 Ways Experts Think” by Marian Petre CacheFly Charles Max Wood’s Twitter Sponsor: Digital Ocean, LLC Picks: Charles St. George, Utah Parade of Homes Upside Bose SoundLink Headphones ATR2100 Microphone Greg Rangle’s Bridge Inclusivity and diversity AOSABOOK.ORG Samson Meteor Microphone
June 6, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Troy Hunt This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Troy Hunt who is from Australia. In this episode, Troy and Charles talk about web security and how Troy got into the field. Troy writes a blog, creates courses for Pluralsight, and he is a Microsoft Regional Director and an MVP who travels the world speaking at events and training technology professionals. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: Web security This show is not about code or technology, but about the person. How did you get into programming, Troy? 1995 Troy started at the university. Book: HTML for Dummies How did you get into web development and JavaScript in general? 1999 – JavaScript Bank – Cahoot What have you done with JavaScript that you are particularly proud of? At the time, I was proud of my work with the Pizza Hut application. Fast-forward – I still use JavaScript but also framework. How did you get into security? Architectural role in Pfizer pharmaceutical company. Troy started writing a blog in 2009. What are you working on now? Launched my Version 2 of “Pwned Passwords.” Cloud Flare E-mails and Passwords breached Have a program that tells you to do something different instead. Try to find a balance. Do most people think about web security? Probably not. Bring awareness about this. Make systems usable Give people enough advice. Service Pwned.com Troy’s Real-Life Stories How do you stay current with all of this web security information? Having a healthy following in Twitter. Stay on top of the mentions. Interesting spread of people within this field. Links: Digital Ocean Troy Hunt’s Website Book: HTML for Dummies JavaScript Cahoot Troy’s Blog Version 2 of “Pwned Passwords” Pwned.com Troy Hunt’s Twitter Troy Hunt’s Medium Troy Hunt’s Facebook Troy Hunt’s LinkedIn Troy Hunt’s GitHub Fresh Books CacheFly Sponsors: Digital Ocean Picks Charles The Greatest Showman – Musical JavaScript Troy BrowseAloud Subresource Integrity – Blog at Hunt’s Website CSP’s Supply chain
May 30, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Fred Zirdung This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Fred Zirdung. Fred is currently the head of curriculum at Hack Reactor, where he essentially builds all of the tools and learning materials for the students there. He is also an instructor and has been there for five years. Prior to that, he worked for multiple companies such as Walmart Labs as well as many small startups. He first got into programming with the Logo programming language in the 6th grade and he had always been interested in working with computers since a young age. They talk about what got him into web programming, what enthralled him about JavaScript and Ruby on Rails, and what he is proud of contributing to the JavaScript community. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: JavaScript Jabber Episode 76 Fred intro How did you first get into programming? Coding professionally for 20+ years Coding prior to college graduation Logo programming language QNX operating system Were you always interested in programming? Always interested in computers Commodore 64 Basic programming in high school Programming didn’t click for him until high school In college when the web became popular Computer engineering degree in college What was it that appealed to you about software over hardware? Software vs hardware Embedded systems software How did you get into web programming? Dolby Laboratories What technologies got you excited? JavaScript, Perl, and Ruby on Rails Loved the flexibility of JS and Rails Found something he could be productive with What are you proud of contributing to the JavaScript community? What are you working on now? And much, much more! Links: JavaScript Jabber Episode 76 Hack Reactor Walmart Labs Dolby Laboratories JavaScript Perl Ruby on Rails @fredzirdung Fred’s GitHub Fred’s Medium Picks Charles React Developer Tools plugin PluralSight React Round Up and Views on Vue Framework Summit Fred Navalia Koa Vue
May 23, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Zachary Kessin This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Zachary Kessin. Zach is a web developer who has written Programming HTML5 Applications and Building Web Applications with Erlang. Currently, he works a lot with functional programming. He first got into programming because his mother used to write in Lisp and he earned his first computer by begging his relatives to help pitch in to get him one when he was seven. They talk about what led him to Erlang and Elm, why he wanted to be a programmer from a young age, and what he is most proud of in his career. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: JavaScript Jabber Episode 57 JavaScript Jabber Episode 169 Zach intro Elm and Erlang How did you first get into programming? Mother was writing Lisp when he was a kid RadioShack color computer Mother taught him Basic Pascal and AP Computer Science Studied CS originally in college and then switches to Physics First web app written in Pearl 4 Did PHP for a living for a while and hated it Elm saves him time and effort What was it that made you want to program from a young age? Don’t be afraid to jump into programming at a late age Elm error messages Writes fewer tests in Elm code that JS code What are you most proud of? Loves mentoring Making a difference in the community It’s not just about the code, it’s about the people What are you doing now? And much, much more! Links: JavaScript Jabber Episode 57 JavaScript Jabber Episode 169 Programming HTML5 Applications Building Web Applications with Erlang Elm Erlang Lisp Zach’s GitHub @zkessin Zach’s YouTube Zach’s LinkedIn Picks Charles Masterbuilt Smoker Crock-Pot Zach If you like a book, tell the author! How to Get a Meeting with Anyone by Stu Heinecke 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed by Eric Cline
May 16, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Kyle Simpson This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Kyle Simpson. Kyle is most well-known for being the writer of You Don’t Know JS. He first got into programming because his friend’s dad was a programmer and he was hooked by the software side of computers. He grew up writing games with QBasic and Turbo Pascal and then in his teens did some client projects. He was very much a self-taught programmer and ended up sticking with it into his career today. They talk about what led him to JavaScript and what he is doing currently. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: Kyle intro You Don’t Know JS How did you first get into programming? Dad’s friend was a programmer Dad built computers Wrote games with QBasic and Turbo Pascal Some client projects in teen years Very much self-taught programmer CS degree in college First professional job at a biotech company Do you feel people need to get a CS degree these days? Grateful for his degree What engineering taught him Striving to understand why and how things work Don’t need a CS degree but you do need a certain mindset Valuable but not necessary What led you to JavaScript? Web Portal at his college What made you want to deepen your knowledge of JS? What are you working on now? And much, much more! Links: You Don’t Know JS JavaScript Kyle’s GitHub Functional-Light JavaScript @getify Kyle on Front-end masters Picks Charles Template Weeks Working Out Kyle Fluent Conf Node RSA
May 9, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Jeff Cross This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Jeff Cross. Jeff has been working on Angular and JavaScript for the past five years with Google and now with Nrwl, which he created in the past year. He got started with programming around 12 years old when his Mom taught him and his siblings how to create websites using FrontPage. He then worked as a web designer utilizing Flash and joined an agency when he was in his 20’s that focused on Flash. Jeff talks about his path to his success and the different steps it took him to get to where he is today.  In particular, We dive pretty deep on: How did you get into programming? HTML and FrontPage Dreamweaver GeoCities Gifs Started off as a web designer Flash Object-Oriented Programming JavaScript Backbone From JavaScript to Angular Node Programming APIs Deployd Angular Team at Google What have you contributed to angular? Embarrassing stories Consulting NX And much, much more! Links: FreshBooks Nrwl Deployd Linode @JeffBCross @nrwl_io Nrwl Blog Picks: Jeff Things App Charles Apple Air Pods Astro Reality
May 2, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Merrick Christensen This week on My Angular Story, Charles speaks with Merrick Christensen. Christensen works at a company called Webflow, where they try to empower people to create software without code. The company is similar to Squarespace or Wix, except they give 100% design control to the client. Christensen talks about his journey into programming, starting by creating websites for his childhood band. He moved on from Microsoft to Dreamweaver, and his Dad got him started with some freelance jobs to create websites for people, which really sparked his interest. Christensen discusses his path to where he is as a programmer today. In particular, We dive pretty deep on: How did you get into programming? Getting into JavaScript Infogenix job Red Olive job using Flash Got into JavaScript through ActionScript Discovered Moo Tools Flex Steve Jobs says no Flash on iPhone Why Moo Tools and not jQuery? Liked flexibility of JavaScript How did you get into Angular? Angular was trendy at the time and was easier to use New code base with React Backbone Programming as an art form Webflow Meta-layers Working a remote job Framework Summit Angular, React, View, and Backbone And much, much more! Links: Linode.com/MyAngularStory Webflow Squarespace Wix Framework Summit @iamMerrick MerrickChristensen.com Picks: Merrick Sho Baraka Grid Critters Flex Zombies Charles Fresh Books Lyft Game Vice Audio-Technica 2100
April 25, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Dean J Sofer This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Dean J Sofer. Dean currently works at PlayStation now and has recently taken a step back from open source recently. He first got into programming because his Dad was really into technology, and he first started off with scripting and creating portfolio websites. They also talk about his time using Angular and what he is working on now. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: Episode 95 JSJ Dean intro Realized he prefers working at larger corporations How did you first get into programming? Dove into computers because of his Dad Started with scripting Creating portfolio websites CSS, HTML, and MVC Node scripts Took a visual basic class in High School Liked being able to create things that other people could interact with Cake PHP and Node What was it that made you want to switch over to JavaScript? Angular What was it about Angular that appealed to you? Why he went searching for Angular Angular UI Don’t be zealot when it comes to frameworks Create states in your application Is there anything that you are particularly proud of in your career? And much, much more! Links: Episode 95 JSJ Cake PHP Node JavaScript Angular Angular UI Dean’s GitHub Picks Charles Brandon Sanderson Books Writing Excuses Podcast Life, the Universe, and Everything Conference Bullies by Ben Shapiro Fire and Fury by Michael Wolff Dean Wallaby.js You Suck at Dating Podcast
April 18, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: David Luecke This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with David Luecke. David currently works for Bullish Ventures, which is a company that builds APIs and mobile web applications for clients using their open source tools. He first got into programming when he got his first computer and started programming using Delphi with Pascal. They also touch on how he first got into JavaScript, Feathers JS, and what he is working on now. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: David intro How did you first get into programming? Tinkered a lot with electronics as a child Delphi with Pascal Planned on doing an apprenticeship computer programming Went to University and got a CS degree How critical do you think a CS degree is? Having a CS degree helps you to pick up things faster How did you get into JavaScript? Did some website development in the beginning of his career Java Dojo and JavaScript MVC Works a lot with React Native now What products have you worked on that you’re proud of? Feathers JS How did you come around to creating this? In-server architecture idea at university What are you working on now? mySam And much, much more! Links: Bullish Ventures Pascal JavaScript Dojo JavaScript MVC React Native Feathers JS mySam David’s GitHub @daffl David’s Medium Picks Charles Merge Cube Primo Octagon Augmented Reality Cards CES David Idieyoudie.com How to Fix Facebook—Before It Fixes Us by Roger McNamee
April 11, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Jonathan Carter This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Jonathan Carter. Jonathan is a PM at Microsoft and has been a web developer for over 15 years. At Microsoft, he’s had the opportunity to work on tooling, platform pieces for JavaScript applications, and many other things. He first got into programming when his uncle let him shadow him and the IT department he had working for him, and this is where he was first introduced to software and the idea of working with computers as a career. They talk about his proudest accomplishments within the JavaScript community as well as what he is working on now. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: Jonathan intro Asure How did you first get into programming? Interest in creating a website Dual enrollment in high school at local community college Started off with VB6 Uncle was very active in his programming start .net Scrappy boredom mixed with curiosity led to him actually getting into software Everyone comes into programming differently Your past is important in explaining where you have ended up Node.js on Asure How did you get into JavaScript? Worked at a newspaper in the software division Ajax jQuery Wanted to write better apps CodePush Stayed in JavaScript community because it brings him inspiration and excitement Likes to be able and look back on his past projects App development for fun Is there anything that you are particularly proud of? Profiling tools Liked building tools that meet people where they are at and simplify their jobs Qordoba React Native And much, much more! Links: JavaScript Microsoft Asure Node.js jQuery CodePush Qordoba React Native @LostinTangent Jonathan’s GitHub Picks Charles Anti-Pick: Intellibed Tuft and Needle Jonathan Notion Doomsday by Architects
April 4, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Johannes Schickling This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Johannes Schickling. Johannes is the CEO and Co-Founder of GraphCool and works a lot on Prisma. He first got into programming when he started online gaming and would build websites for gaming competitions. He then started getting into creating websites, then single page apps, and has never looked back since. He also gives an origin story for GraphCool and the creation of Prisma. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: Johannes intro How did you first get into programming? Always been interested in technology PHP to JavaScript Creating single page apps Self-taught The problem-solving aspect keeps people coming back to programming Always enjoyed math and physics Programmers make up such a diverse community How did you find JavaScript? Has used a wide range of front-end frameworks Node WebAssembly Opal What drew you into doing single page apps? Like the long-term flexibility of single page apps Don’t have to worry about the back-end right off the bat GraphQL What have you done in JavaScript that you are most proud of? Open source tooling GraphCool origin story What are you working on now? Prisma And much, much more! Links: JavaScript GraphCool Prisma PHP Node WebAssembly Opal GraphQL @_Schickling @GraphCool GraphCool Blog Picks Charles PopSocket DevChat.tv/YouTube Johannes Gatsby GraphQL Europe GraphQL Day
March 28, 2018
Panel: Charles Max Wood Guest: Gordon Zhu This week on My JavaScript Story, Charles speaks with Gordon Zhu. Gordon is the founder of Watch and Code. The mission of the company is to take total beginners and turn them into amazing developers. He first got into programming by trying to avoid programming. He studied business in college and was really interested in the internet, leading him to have to learn coding. He talks about the importance of being focused, especially in the beginning, and the ability to figure things out. In particular, we dive pretty deep on: Watch and Code How did you first get into programming? Studied business in college Peak Two different eras of programmers There is more than one way to get into programming Culture is promoting a new way of thinking about technology Black Mirror How did you get into JavaScript? Marketing, product management, and engineering Angular Tried to avoid JS and focused on Python Importance of focus The ability to figure things out How to spend your time in the beginning Current focus Focus gives you freedom Reading a lot of code What are you proud of? And much, much more! Links: JavaScript Watch and Code Peak Black Mirror Angular Python @Gordon_Zhu Practical JavaScript Picks Charles 4k Camcorder 25 ft XLR Cables Zoom H6 Roland R-09 USB-C Dongle Docking Station ScreenFlow PB Works Gordon How I Built This podcast Stay Tuned with Preet podcast
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