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May 22, 2020
On the episode of AvTalk, we discuss the extremely rare incident where a Southwest Airlines 737 struck and killed someone on the runway while landing in Austin. We also see which airlines are continuing to shrink their fleets. And we take a look at the traffic numbers to see where flights are starting to creep up. Southwest Airlines 737 strikes person on the runway A person was struck and killed by a landing Southwest Airlines 737 at Austin Airport on 7 May. The person was on Runway 17R as flight WN1392 touched down in Austin from Dallas. Authorities have since identified the person who was struck and determined they were not supposed to be on the airfield. Fleet retirements Delta is retiring its 777s by the end of the year, Singapore Airlines has retired their 777-200ERs, and other airlines are making similar moves. Bankruptcy, reorganization, and for sale signs We run down the list of airlines working on raising capital, reorganizing their operations, and trying to find buyers. Anyone want to buy Jet Airways? Watch out for sheep on the runway An incident where an An-124 had to divert due to a closed runway leads Ian deep into the FAA’s new NOTAM retrieval service. Garmin Autoland certified on first aircraft The Garmin Autoland system has been certified for use on the Piper M600 SLS. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
May 8, 2020
On this episode of AvTalk, more airlines say goodbye to sizable portions of their fleets while one airline will press an A380 into cargo service. And pilot Jon Weiswasser joins us to talk about his trifecta—landing at Newark, La Guardia, and JFK during the same flight in a Vans RV-8. Fleet retirements spreading far and wide Virgin Atlantic, Qantas, American Airlines, and others took big steps this week to reduce their fleet sizes, with some of our favorite aircraft now slated for desert retirement communities. Qantas puts Project Sunrise on hold Lacking both passenger demand and the cash to buy the planes from Airbus, Qantas has put its ultra-long haul ambitions on hold. Lufthansa Technik’s A380 cargo conversion Lufthansa Technik announced it will convert a passenger A380 to carry cargo only by removing the the seats and making other interior modifications for an undisclosed airlines. We not-so-wildly speculate which airline that may be. Norwegian lives to fly another day Always down, but seemingly never out, Norwegian will live to fly another day thanks to an agreement with bondholders. Bomb threat closes Anchorage Airport, diverts the An-225 A bomb threat to a China Airlines Cargo flight caused it to divert to Anchorage last week, which closed the airport during the investigation. The closure forced the An-225, the world’s largest cargo aircraft, to divert to Fairbanks and then ferry back. Jon Weiswasser completes the trifecta Jon Weiswasser is a doctor, the drummer for Eagles tribute band Eaglemania, and a pilot with an engrossing YouTube channel called Life in the Fast Lane and he joins us to talk about completing the trifecta—landing at Newark, La Guardia, and JFK during the same flight in a Vans RV-8. Generally good news We close the show with a few bits of mostly good news because we could all use a little good news these days.
April 24, 2020
On this episode of AvTalk, we look at some COVID-19 related aviation innovation, Seth Miller returns to help us understand how airlines are navigating the CARES Act, and we talk with Karan Singh from the Lufthansa Group to learn more about managing hundreds of repatriation flights. Airlines over the brink Airlines around the world are in trouble as people stay home and planes are parked. We walk through which airlines are fighting for their financial lives. How do you show you CARES? Seth Miller returns to help us understand how airlines are navigating the CARES act and what it means for airlines, passengers, and airports in the US. Links we discussed with Seth Spirit Airlines ‘milk run’ idea Which airlines got CARES Act exemptions How the DOT initially explained their CARES Act requirements Updated DOT requirements for CARES Act funding What else is changing? We take a look at some of the areas of the aviation industry that are changing due to COVID-19, from aircraft deliveries to seating innovation. And here’s the link to the Titan Airways A318 landing on St Helena. Getting home We talk with Karan Singh of the Lufthansa Group to find out what it takes to operate over 400 repatriation flights across 7 airlines and 106 airports and some of the challenges along the way. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
April 10, 2020
On this episode of AvTalk, we see how far air traffic fell in March and what we’re likely to see in April. We also take a look at some of the more interesting flights that airlines have operated in the past few weeks. And Georgios Hatzimanolis from Marine Traffic joins us to compare notes on what their data can tell us about how COVID-19 is affecting the global economy. And the bottom falls out The first week of March saw global traffic still up 4.5%, but the final week of the month traffic was down 55% from 2019 levels and traffic overall was 21.6% lower than 2019 in March. Airlines have reacted in different ways, but the number of flights continues to fall and the number of stored aircraft continues to rise. Comparing notes with Marine Traffic Georgios Hatzimanolis from Marine Traffic joins us to compare notes on what their ship tracking data can tell us about the state of the global economy. Strange routes because of COVID-19 SAS flying to South America, Ethiopian Airlines flying between Chicago and New Orleans, and Lufthansa in New Zealand, among others. We discuss some of the most interesting flights we’ve seen in the past few weeks. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
March 26, 2020
On this episode of AvTalk, we review which airlines and countries have now canceled all flights. And journalist Ethan Klapper joins us to discuss the impact COVID-19 is having on some air traffic control facilities around the United States. Airlines 0 Nearly 100 airlines have canceled all or nearly all of their operations. We walk through which airlines are down to zero and which are still flying a reduced schedule. Countries 0 Some countries have completed closed to passenger traffic to help stop the spread of COVID-19. India became the largest country to halt all passenger traffic this week. ATC 0 We talk with journalist and aeronautics graduate student Ethan Klapper about the effects positive COVID-19 diagnoses have had on various air traffic control facilities around the United States and what the future may hold in the face of a spreading pandemic. Repatriation and rerouting We’re following the repatriation flights airlines are operating to bring people home, including one that didn’t quite go as planned.
March 20, 2020
On this special episode of AvTalk, Jason and Ian take stock of how the aviation industry has reacted to plummeting demand and ever changing government restrictions as the COVID-19 pandemic takes its toll. Jason and a few others are maintaining a useful list of airline operations as some airlines reduce their planned schedule by more than half and some halt all flying entirely. In addition to cutting flights, airlines are putting aircraft in storage, moving forward fleet retirement dates, and deferring delivery of new aircraft. The number of operated flights began falling precipitously this week as restrictions were put in place. Commercial air traffic is now 10% below where it was in March 2019 and falling. Meanwhile, the pandemic is taking a toll on the people who make the airline industry work, as airlines cut staff, some upwards of 90%. And the actual virus has also impacted air traffic controllers in places like Chicago-Midway and Las Vegas, where the control towers are closed for deep cleaning and flights at those airports operate on a reduced schedule. This episode unfortunately doesn’t have answers to the questions we’re all asking, but we did want to provide some tools to help see what may come next.
March 13, 2020
On this episode of AvTalk, we welcome back The Air Current editor-in-chief John Ostrower for a wide-ranging conversation as we try to understand the effects of the novel coronavirus COVID-19 on the aviation industry. We also look at the state of the 737 MAX and the prospects for the aircraft’s return to service one year after the crash of Ethiopian flight 302 and one year into its worldwide grounding. What’s next for aviation? In our in-depth conversation with Jon Ostrower, we try to add context to the crisis facing the aviation industry and see how COVID-19 is fundamentally changing—or not—aviation as we know it. Although we recorded this episode on 10 March, prior to the restrictions put in place on Schengen area citizens traveling to the US, our conversation about possible risks and responses took the possibility of these additional measures into account. What’s next for Boeing Recording one year after the crash of Ethiopian flight 302 and the grounding of the 737 MAX, we also look at where Boeing stands in their quest to the airplane back in the air and what the future might hold for the company. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
February 28, 2020
On this episode of AvTalk, air traffic in China is down over 80% from the beginning of the year, the first Air France A380 enters retirement, and Air New Zealand’s Skynest may be a way to make ultra-long-haul economy a little less terrible. COVID19-related cancellations continue to grow Cancellations and reductions in service continue to expand as COVID19 cases reach beyond China. Following outbreaks in South Korea, Iran, and Italy, airlines are reevaluating their schedules or cancelling outright. Air traffic in China is down over 80%, while global traffic is down 4.4% in February compared to 2019. FOD bad Boeing is inspecting all of the undelivered 737 MAX for foreign object debris after things like tools and rags were found in the wing fuel tanks of some aircraft. Kazakhstan releases Bek Air update Kazakhstan released an animated video with data from the crashed Bek Air Fokker in Almaty this week, showing the aircraft only barely made it off the ground and suffered multiple tail strikes in an effort to gain altitude. Air Canada A319 loses a wheel An Air Canada A319 lost one of its right main gear wheels on its way from New York to Toronto last week. The flight performed a flypast in Toronto for visual confirmation of the missing wheel before making a safe landing. The NTSB and FAA have subsequently retrieved the wheel. Air Baltic A220 suffers engine failure An Air Baltic A220 en route from Riga to Malaga diverted safely to Bordeaux after one of its engines failed. The aircraft had just climbed from 37,000 feet to 39,000. We discuss how this incident fits with the previous Swiss A220 engine failures. Air New Zealand builds a Skynest In an effort to help economy cabin travelers get a little rest on ultra-long haul flights, Air New Zealand has come up with the Skynest concept. As we discuss, the general idea isn’t new, but implementation on an actual aircraft would be a first. Air France’s first A380 retired Air France’s first A380 made its final flight last week, retiring to Knock in Ireland. We discuss which airlines are planning to discard their A380s and what the secondary market looks like for the superjumbo. From new airlines to zombies We wade through a variety of airline finances, from start up airlines to those that just won’t die. A sandstorm from the Sahara covers the Canaries A sandstorm blown over the Canary Islands from the Sahara desert brought delays and cancellations over the weekend. Satellite imagery shows the extend of the storm. NATS releases colorized images of first control tower Celebrating the 100th anniversary of the world’s first air traffic control tower, NATS released a beautiful collection of colorized photos from the time. Worth a look for any aviation history buff. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
February 14, 2020
On this episode of AvTalk, a Pegasus Airlines 737 overruns the runway in Istanbul, traffic to China grinds to a halt, Air Italy calls it quits, and the jet stream helps British Airways set a new record. Pegasus Airlines flight 2193 On 5 February Pegasus Airlines flight 2193 overran the runway on landing in Istanbul. The aircraft slid down an embankment and broke in to three pieces. Three people onboard died as a result of their injuries. We discuss some of the factors investigators will be looking at as they begin their work. Air traffic in China cut by more than two-thirds Traffic in China has fallen by more than two-thirds since mid-January as impacts from Coronavirus travel restrictions and falling demand are felt throughout the aviation industry. We discuss some of the specific impacts on airlines and what some airlines are doing to mitigate the situation. Air Italy declares bankruptcy Air Italy announced it will cease operations on 25 February. Air Italy’s fleet has been grounded and all flights from 11 to 25 February will be operated by other carriers on behalf of the airline. We discuss our surprise—or lack thereof. British Airways sets a new record Thanks to a strong jet stream British Airways set a new speed record between New York and London. But the record was not without a bit of controversy. And plenty of misunderstandings about ground speed and ground speed. We break it all down and Jason gets to work on finding an appropriate trophy. High winds and snow banks And Icelandair 757 and a UTair 737 are going to need some heavy repair work after the 757’s right main gear collapsed after landing in strong winds in Reykjavik and the 737 hit a snowbank on final approach. Thankfully, no major injuries were reported. Investigative updates United Arab Emirates investigators released their final report on the failed go around and subsequent crash of Emirates 521 in Dubai. And the probe into an Avianca flight that suddenly lost 2,500 feet of altitude continues. Sippy cups required Following two instances where liquid spilled on the center console of the A350 flight caused engine shut downs, Airbus and EASA have determined that the A350 flight decks need liquid-free zones. Sippy cups all around! Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
January 31, 2020
On this episode of AvTalk, we discuss the Coronavirus response, as authorities and airlines try to stop its spread. Kobe Bryant and his daughter are among those killed in a helicopter crash in California this past weekend. And Boeing’s 777X takes flight for the first time. Coronavirus repsonse Travel to and from China is being sharply curtailed as authorities and airlines work to stop the spread of the Coronavirus that originated in Wuhan in December. We discuss what airlines are doing thus far and what kind of impact an extensive reduction in flights in China could have. Note: this episode was recorded on Tuesday, 28 January, before many airlines announced their suspension of flights to cities in China. Kobe Bryant among those killed in helicopter crash Basketball legend Kobe Bryant and his daughter were among those killed in a helicopter crash in California this past weekend. We discuss what data we have and what we don’t know. Boeing’s 777X makes first flight In a turn of good news for Boeing, the 777X successfully completed its first flight on 25 January. We talk about what the 777X means for Boeing right now and which airlines are keen to see it enter service. Money, money, money Air India is trying to sell itself, LOT Polish Airlines parent company PGL purchased Condor, South African Airways is parking A340s to save money, and Airbus agreed to a settlement in the investigation into major fraud committed by the company.
January 17, 2020
On this episode of AvTalk, we begin the year on a somber note to discuss the downing of Ukraine International Airlines flight PS752 in Tehran and the effects of prohibitions by certain countries on flights in Iran and Iraq. We also dig in to some of the new documents released by Boeing regarding the 737 MAX and things do not look good. How we got here We discuss the chain of events that led to restrictions on operations in Iran and Iraq and the downing of PS752 by a surface to air missile just after take off from Iran. And we take a step back to look at larger airspace changes over the last 10 years. Boeing’s ‘damning’ new documents Documents released to Congress and FAA ‘paint a deeply disturbing picture’ of Boeing’s actions, regarding the certification of the 737 MAX, said the chair of the House committee investigating the 737 MAX. We walk through some of the documents and take a wider look at the role of company culture. The document release, which confirms that ‘Boeing rejected a proposed system safety upgrade to the MAX on the grounds that doing so would add cost by triggering a need for all pilots to have flight-simulator training to qualify to fly the MAX’ came just days after the manufacturer announced it would recommend simulator training for all pilots before the 737 MAX returns to service. 2019 orders and deliveries We run the numbers on Airbus and Boeing 2019 orders and deliveries and find Airbus well ahead for the year, but not without challenges of its own. Hunting mystery drones in Colorado A fleet of drones has been spotted in Colorado, Nebraska, and Wyoming and residents and authorities have no idea who is flying them. The military says it isn’t them, the FAA says they have no idea. Now federal, state, and local authorities are trying to track down the operators. Delta flight 89 dumps fuel on Los Angeles neighborhood The Delta 777 suffered an engine issue shortly after takeoff and returned to LAX for safe landing. In the process, the aircraft dumped fuel at a surprisingly low altitude over a neighborhood in Los Angeles County. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
January 3, 2020
Happy New Year! On this episode of AvTalk we look back at some of our favorite conversations from 2019. We’ll be back with the first new episode of 2020 on 17 January. Mark Vanhoenacker We start by revisiting episode 56 and our conversation with Mark Vanhoenaker, a first officer with British Airways and a recent convert from the 747 to 787. Vanhoenaker is also the author of multiple books and we discuss his latest, How to Land a Plane. Maria Langer Next, in episode 62, we spoke with Maria Langer, who has a very specialized piloting job: she dries cherries using a helicopter. Joseph Tar Schmidt In episode 63 we chatted with Joseph Tar Schmidt, a regional airline pilot and accomplished violinist. On a recent Christmas flight, Tar Schmidt not only flew the plane, he serenaded his passengers too. Mark Zee NOTAMs are extremely important for flight safety as they make crews aware of any hazards or special operating instructions at an airport. They can also be long-winded, confusing, and sometimes downright silly. In episode 65, we talked with Mark Zee, the founder of OpsGroup, a professional aviation organization trying to reform the NOTAM. Lisa Norman And finally in episode 67, Qantas 787 fleet captain Lisa Norman joined us to talk about Qantas’ Project Sunrise and what it’s like to fly with a brain wave monitor attached to your head. Who would you like to hear from in 2020? As we plan our episodes for the year, we’d like to hear from you. Who should we talk to, what should we learn? Email us your thoughts. Thank you for listening!
December 20, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, Boeing halts production of the 737 MAX, Harbour Air’s electric Beaver takes flight, and we run down the list of airlines that didn’t make it through 2019 and a few that could join that list very soon. Boeing halts production of the 737 MAX from January Boeing announced this week it will suspend production of the 737 MAX beginning in January. We discuss what that means for the company, the workers in Renton, and the 737 supply chain. Harbour Air’s electric Beaver Harbour Air debuted its all-electric DHC-2 Beaver last week, the first all-electric commercial aircraft. Qantas picks A350-1000 for Project Sunrise Qantas announced a modified version of the Airbus A350-1000 as its preferred aircraft for Project Sunrise flights. The airline is still in negotiations with Airbus for an order and still needs crew union approvals for the ultra-long haul flights to operate. Airlines that didn’t make it through 2019 We walk through the airlines that ceased operations in 2019 and some that might still join the list. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
December 6, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, our reaction to United Airlines’ surprise order for 50 Airbus A321XLRs, an escape slide escapes mid-air, and the list of airlines to not survive 2019 grows longer. Escaping escape slides A Delta 767 lost one of its over-wing escape slides on approach to Boston last week. The slide landed in Milton, south of Boston. Thankfully it didn’t hit anyone or anything on the ground. Delta 757 N543US back in service After a hard landing in Ponta Delgada back in August, Delta Air Lines 757 N543US has been repaired and returned to revenue service. Photos of the aircraft after landing showed large buckles in the fuselage. The aircraft was initially flown to Atlanta, then to Jacksonville where the complete repair was performed. Trouble for Hong Kong Airlines Hong Kong Airlines is facing financial difficulties that could lead to the revocation of the airline’s operating certificate if additional funding isn’t raised soon. We discuss the ongoing situation. AtlasGlobal ‘temporarily’ suspends operations Turkish airline AtlasGlobal ‘temporarily’ suspended operations last week, citing financial restructuring. We discuss the likely temporal reality of this suspension. Revving the engines Changes to how Indian carrier IndiGo is operating its A320neo aircraft could help solve its engine problems. United Airlines orders 50 Airbus A321XLRs Breaking news during our recording — United Airlines ordered 50 Airbus A321XLR aircraft, the longest range A321neo. We discuss the implications of the order and where United will use the new planes. New Berlin Airport to open October 2020 The long-delayed Brandenburg Airport designed to serve Berlin is now scheduled to open in October 2020. Norwegian lands slots at Heathrow Norwegian has had a busy week, including gaining 6 slots at Heathrow Airport in London. We check in on the airline to see what other changes they’re making. SAS retires its 737-600 fleet SAS retired its 737-600 fleet this week with send off flight that visited all three Scandinavian hubs and drew a 600 in the sky. New weather layers available now New high resolution weather layers are now available on Flightradar24. All thanks to Jason bothering Ian for a very long time.
November 23, 2019
On this week’s episode, our resident numbers expert Gavin Werbeloff joins us to make sense of the orders from this year’s Dubai Airshow. We also say goodbye the first A380 to be dismantled and take a look at a few of the more ridiculous ideas to enter the world this week. Southwest 1380 The NTSB held its board meeting on Southwest flight 1380 on 19 November, 2019, discussing the probable cause of the accident. We discuss their findings and what Boeing is doing to mitigate the problem. Flying barefoot in the mind Concept art is certainly just that, a concept. But this concept is… well, we tell you how we feel about it. Dubai Airshow orders Our resident numbers expert Gavin Werbeloff joins us to make sense of the Dubai Airshow orders and what it might mean for a few major carrier’s strategies. Plus, we look at a few surprises from the show. The first A380 is dismantled TarmacAerosave dismantled its first A380 this week with 90% of the aircraft recycled. Lessons learned from this first aircraft will inform further work as the oldest A380s exit service. Avatar Airlines Flying 747-400s on domestic routes with every ticket less than $99 sounds too good to be true. Is it? Spoiler: probably, but we take a look at Avatar Airlines just for fun.
November 8, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, we chat with Ian Matthews—a Flight Maintenance Engineer for a US-based cargo airline. Plus, a pilot makes a big mistake in Amsterdam, more pickle fork cracks, and we may see another Icelandic airline flying soon. Fat fingers in Amsterdam Sitting at the gate prior to departure from Amsterdam, the pilot of Air Europa flight 1094 was demonstrating the various special ‘squawk codes’, including 7500—which indicates unlawful interference aboard the aircraft—when he accidentally broadcast the code from the aircraft’s transponder setting off an hours long security situation as authorities followed protocols for such an event. The flight eventually departed with a 4.5 hour delay. IAG buying Air Europa IAG announced it is buying Air Europa and strengthening its position in Madrid. What is a flight maintenance engineer? we talk with Ian Matthews, a flight maintenance engineer for a US-based cargo airline, to find out exactly what that is and why it’s a critical role in cargo operations. More cracked pickle forks Inspections have revealed additional cracked pickle forks on 737NGs, adding to Boeing’s headaches. Swiss A220 engine parts found Parts from the first Swiss A220 engine failure over France were recovered this week. The search continues for additional debris as the BEA seeks to determine the cause of the failure. SmartLynx A320 report The Estonian Safety Investigation Bureau issued its final report into the loss of control incident involving SmartLynx A320 ES-SAN this week. During a training flight the aircraft suffered a loss of control incident, which resulted in a runway strike on takeoff damaging both engines severely and causing both to shut down. The aircraft was able to turn back to the airport, touching down 150m before the runway threshold and coming to rest at the side of the runway. Read the full report here. Garmin autoland We discuss Garmin’s recently unveiled autoland feature and what it might mean for the future of commercial aviation. El Al retires its 747 fleet with a special tribute To commemorate the retirement of its 747 fleet after 48 years of service, El Al drew a 747 over the Mediterranean Sea during a special charter flight to Tel Aviv. PLAY is the new WOW Former members of the WOW Air team have a new plan: PLAY. They hope to launch flights late this year from Iceland to Europe with North American flights following next year.
November 1, 2019
Return to service — if? when? On this special episode of AvTalk, we welcome back The Air Current editor-in-chief Jon Ostrower for a discussion on the state of the 737 MAX’s return to service and what we’ve learned this month with the release of numerous reports, including the Joint Authorities Technical Review and the final report from Indonesian investigators on Lion Air flight 610. We also discuss Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg’s testimony to Congress this week. Documents in the discussion In this episode we discuss a number of important documents and reports recently issued by various authorities. You can read the full documents or find links to the testimony discussed below. Joint Authorities Technical Review Download the JATR report Lion Air flight 610 Read the Lion Air 610 final report and see associated data Boeing CEO Dennis Muilenburg’s testimony in Congress Testimony in the Senate Testimony in the House of Representatives Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
October 25, 2019
We unfortunately won’t have a new episode for you this week, but we will be back with a special episode next week that covers a lot of what has happened in the past few weeks, including an analysis of the just released final report on the crash of Lion Air flight 610. We’ll also have at least one special guest joining us to put everything in context. We’ll be back to our regular schedule after next week. Thanks everyone!
October 11, 2019
Cracked pickle forks have been found on dozens of inspected 737NGs, the 737 MAX’s road to return remains a winding one, and we welcome back Andrew Poure who fills us in on the hot new cargo route from Colombo to Columbus and what he learned in flight dispatcher school. Cracked pickle forks After inspections of over 800 aircraft, dozens of 737NGs have been found with cracked pickle forks, a critical part that is designed to last the life of the aircraft. We talk about what exactly pickle forks are and why you don’t want cracks in yours. 737 MAX update Our bi-weekly 737 MAX update comes with new setbacks for the aircraft’s return to service as it looks increasingly likely that the plane won’t fly passengers before the end of the year. We also discuss the 7 safety recommendations made by the NTSB regarding the design of MAX and other future aircraft. Delta buys a 20% stake in LATAM We discuss Delta’s surprise acquisition of a 20% stake in South American carrier LATAM and what that means for other carriers in South America and the US. Colombo to Columbus with Andrew Poure Andrew Poure returns to tell us about the hot new cargo route from Colombo to Columbus. We also chat about his recent experience completing dispatcher school. Demolition derby Jorge Manalang became an action hero last week in Chicago and we break down the play-by-play. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
October 11, 2019
Cracked pickle forks have been found on dozens of inspected 737NGs, the 737 MAX’s road to return remains a winding one, and we welcome back Andrew Poure who fills us in on the hot new cargo route from Colombo to Columbus and what he learned in flight dispatcher school. Cracked pickle forks After inspections of over 800 aircraft, dozens of 737NGs have been found with cracked pickle forks, a critical part that is designed to last the life of the aircraft. We talk about what exactly pickle forks are and why you don’t want cracks in yours. 737 MAX update Our bi-weekly 737 MAX update comes with new setbacks for the aircraft’s return to service as it looks increasingly likely that the plane won’t fly passengers before the end of the year. We also discuss the 7 safety recommendations made by the NTSB regarding the design of MAX and other future aircraft. Delta buys a 20% stake in LATAM We discuss Delta’s surprise acquisition of a 20% stake in South American carrier LATAM and what that means for other carriers in South America and the US. Colombo to Columbus with Andrew Poure Andrew Poure returns to tell us about the hot new cargo route from Colombo to Columbus. We also chat about his recent experience completing dispatcher school. Demolition derby Jorge Manalang became an action hero last week in Chicago and we break down the play-by-play. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
September 27, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, we review an awful week for European airlines and Operation Matterhorn, the largest peace time repatriation effort in history. And we talk with Qantas 787 fleet manager Captain Lisa Norman to get the details on the upcoming Project Sunrise test flights. Thomas Cook, et al Thomas Cook entered administration on Monday stranding hundreds of thousands outside the UK. The UK civil aviation authority has organized Operation Matterhorn, dubbed the largest ever peace-time repatriation effort, to bring those stuck outside the UK home. We also look at the demise (sort of) of XL Airways, Aigle Azure, and Adria Airways. Interview with Captain Lisa Norman Qantas’ 787 fleet manager Captain Lisa Norman sits down with us to chat about the upcoming Project Sunrise test flights, what’s its like to fly while wearing an EEG, and how you actually plan a flight that long. 737 MAX Updates Our bi-weekly updates on the 737 MAX continue. We discuss the recent developments in the effort to the aircraft back in the air. We also review some of the press coverage from the past week, including William Langewieshe’s article in the New York Times Magazine. SAS gets a new livery Our first impressions of the new SAS livery unveiled this week. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
September 27, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, we review an awful week for European airlines and Operation Matterhorn, the largest peace time repatriation effort in history. And we talk with Qantas 787 fleet manager Captain Lisa Norman to get the details on the upcoming Project Sunrise test flights. Thomas Cook, et al Thomas Cook entered administration on Monday stranding hundreds of thousands outside the UK. The UK civil aviation authority has organized Operation Matterhorn, dubbed the largest ever peace-time repatriation effort, to bring those stuck outside the UK home. We also look at the demise (sort of) of XL Airways, Aigle Azure, and Adria Airways. Interview with Captain Lisa Norman Qantas’ 787 fleet manager Captain Lisa Norman sits down with us to chat about the upcoming Project Sunrise test flights, what’s its like to fly while wearing an EEG, and how you actually plan a flight that long. 737 MAX Updates Our bi-weekly updates on the 737 MAX continue. We discuss the recent developments in the effort to the aircraft back in the air. We also review some of the press coverage from the past week, including William Langewieshe’s article in the New York Times Magazine. SAS gets a new livery Our first impressions of the new SAS livery unveiled this week. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
September 13, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, we head to Roswell, New Mexico for the Super80 Send Off. Then we cap off our avgeek week in Los Angeles with Cranky Flier’s Dorkfest and SpotLAX2019. Plus an American Airlines mechanic is arrested for sabotage and there’s a fresh obstacle for the 737 MAX’s return to service. American Airlines mechanic arrested for sabotage An American Airlines mechanic in Miami was arrested for sabotage after disabling a component on a jet’s navigation system in a bid to earn overtime work. easyJet pilot steps in to fly to his own vacation An easyJet pilot ended up flying his own vacation flight after the scheduled captain was unable to make the flight. WOW Air… maybe? A new WOW Air is planned to launch in October. Maybe. Possibly. Who knows? Norwegian under the microscope Norwegian is once again facing a squeeze. Mesa Airlines orders the M100 Space Jet Mesa Airlines signed an MOU for 50 firm, 50 options of the revised Mitsubishi M100 Space Jet. 737 MAX update A division among regulators is threatening to create fresh headaches for the MAX’s return to service. Boeing’s CEO says the company is still targeting the fourth quarter of 2019, but we spend a few moments expressing our skepticism. Super80 Send Off We recap our Super80 Send Off journey and speak with American Airlines CEO Doug Parker. Dorkfest + SpotLAX2019 We visit Los Angeles for Dorkfest and SpotLAX2019 and get to chat with avgeek royalty. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
September 13, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, we head to Roswell, New Mexico for the Super80 Send Off. Then we cap off our avgeek week in Los Angeles with Cranky Flier’s Dorkfest and SpotLAX2019. Plus an American Airlines mechanic is arrested for sabotage and there’s a fresh obstacle for the 737 MAX’s return to service. American Airlines mechanic arrested for sabotage An American Airlines mechanic in Miami was arrested for sabotage after disabling a component on a jet’s navigation system in a bid to earn overtime work. easyJet pilot steps in to fly to his own vacation An easyJet pilot ended up flying his own vacation flight after the scheduled captain was unable to make the flight. WOW Air… maybe? A new WOW Air is planned to launch in October. Maybe. Possibly. Who knows? Norwegian under the microscope Norwegian is once again facing a squeeze. Mesa Airlines orders the M100 Space Jet Mesa Airlines signed an MOU for 50 firm, 50 options of the revised Mitsubishi M100 Space Jet. 737 MAX update A division among regulators is threatening to create fresh headaches for the MAX’s return to service. Boeing’s CEO says the company is still targeting the fourth quarter of 2019, but we spend a few moments expressing our skepticism. Super80 Send Off We recap our Super80 Send Off journey and speak with American Airlines CEO Doug Parker. Dorkfest + SpotLAX2019 We visit Los Angeles for Dorkfest and SpotLAX2019 and get to chat with avgeek royalty. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
August 30, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, we welcome OpsGroup founder Mark Zee to discuss NOTAMs and why his group is trying to change how they’re written. We also get updates on the Ural Airlines A321 that landed in a cornfield, the 737 MAX timeline, and Qantas is set to conduct a trio of Project Sunrise test flights. Ural Airlines A321 to be scrapped The Ural Airlines A321 that suffered dual engine failure following bird strikes and landed in a cornfield will be scrapped. Delta’s crunchy 757 A Delta 757 that suffered a hard landing and fuselage damage in Ponta Delgada looks like it will be repaired. Qantas gets ready to test its Project Sunrise flights Qantas is set to operate three research flights as it nears a final decision on Project Sunrise, its non-stop flights from New York and London to Sydney. MAX updates United is moving their MAX, Southwest is keeping ‘MAX’, and Boeing sets its sights on October for the final certification flight. NOTAM’d We talk with OpsGroup founder Mark Zee about NOTAMs, their usefulness, their uselessness, and why that needs to change. Our Super80 Send Off preview Jason and Ian get ready to help retire the final members of the American Airlines MD-80 fleet.
August 16, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, our quickest 737 MAX update yet, protesters snarl traffic at Hong Kong Airport, and the internet makes a thing out of nothing, part the infinity. Editors note: this episode was recorded on 14 August prior to the Ural Airlines hard landing in Moscow. Our quickest MAX update Boeing is still targeting a return to service by the end of 2019. N7201S, Boeing’s 737 MAX 7 test aircraft has been flying again. And Norwegian is blaming its cancellation of transatlantic service from Ireland on the MAX grounding. Norwegian 787 has a bad day in Rome A Norwegian 787 departing Rome suffered an apparent uncontained engine failure, casting engine components over the neighborhood next to the airport. Hong Kong Airport disrupted by protests Protestors disrupted flights at Hong Kong Airport multiple days this week. Airlines canceled hundreds of flights both 12 and 13 August. The internet turns nothing into something: easyJet edition A woman was photographed sitting in a seat without a seat back on an easyJet aircraft. The seat was inoperative and she was just waiting to move to her new seat, but the picture on twitter spawned news articles for days. We take a moment to complain. JASDF 747 for sale, low mileage A former Japan Air Self Defence Force 747 is now for sale. The low-cycle, low flight time 747 could be yours for a reasonable $28 million. Dorkfest Join Jason and Ian at Dorkfest and SpotLAX on 7 September. We’ll be watching planes in the park next to the In-n-Out Burger. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
August 2, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, we talk with Joseph Tar Schmidt, a regional airline pilot for a major US carrier. Plus, more MAX headaches for Boeing and the airlines and a HiFly A340 makes a mess in Orlando. Boeing’s 737 MAX problems grow Southwest Airlines and Air Canada have removed the 737 MAX from their schedules through the beginning of January 2020, while Ryanair is cutting personnel due to the grounded aircraft. Meanwhile, reports out this week in the New York Times and Wall Street Journal provide new details on the 737 MAX certification process. Hello A220, goodbye A380 Air France announced an order for 60 A220-300s this week to replace its aging A318 and A319 fleet. At the same time, the airline said it would retire all of its A380 fleet by 2020 HiFly’s fuel dump gone wrong A few weeks ago, a HiFly A340 returned to Orlando Airport shortly after takeoff due to a technical issue. Prior to return, the aircraft dumped fuel to reduce landing weight. Unfortunately, for reasons still unknown, the aircraft continued dumping fuel all the way to the ground and while the aircraft was taxiing off the runway. So you want to be a regional pilot? We chat with Joseph Tar Schmidt, a captain at a major US regional airline about what it’s like to be a regional pilot and how it differs from mainline flying. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
July 19, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, we talk to pilot Maria Langer about what it’s like to dry cherry trees with a helicopter. Also, the 737 MAX will stay grounded even longer and Pakistan reopens its airspace to all commercial flights. The 737 MAX’s return delayed again Airlines are now removing the MAX from their schedules through the beginning of November and it seems the MAX could stay out of commercial service into 2020. We discuss the latest developments. Pakistan reopens its airspace to all commercial traffic After nearly 5 months of restrictions on transiting traffic, Pakistan reopened its airspace to all commercial flights this week. We discuss what effect that will have on flights in the region. Co-founder and CEO Bjorn Kjos departs Norwegian Longtime Norwegian CEO Bjorn Kjos has stepped down. We discuss what this might mean for the carrier long-term. Interview with Maria Langer We talk with Maria Langer, a pilot based in central Washington about what it’s like to dry cherry trees with a helicopter. You can follow her flights here. Follow Maria on Twitter, watch her dry cherries and more on her YouTube channel, and learn more about what she does in and out of the helicopter on her website.  Keep your seat belt on An Air Canada flight to Sydney hit unexpected turbulence and injures 35 just days before an Emirates A380 hit turbulence and injured passengers and damaged the aircraft cabin. Please keep your seat belt on. The engine failure will be televised A Delta MD-88 suffered an engine issue that was captured on video by one of the passengers. In the video, the nose cone of the left engine can be seen bouncing in the inlet and the engine core glowing bright orange. The flight landed safely and there were no injuries. KLM India provides some ‘helpful’ statistiscs The KLM India twitter account posted a tweet on air safety statistics, but it didn’t receive the reaction they were looking for. Apollo 11 in real time If you love space and history, visit Apollo 11 in Real Time to follow along 50 years to the second with the Apollo 11 crew as they land and walk on the moon. The creators of the site have done a masterful job with audio, video, archival images, and a transcript of the entire journey. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.  
July 5, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, we’re joined by Jean Charles Perino, co-founder of La Compagnie, the all-business class transatlantic airline, for a wide-ranging discussion about the airline and where La Compagnie finds itself within the industry. We also get an update on when the 737 MAX could return to service, teams in Greenland make a breakthrough in the AF66 investigation, and we bid a final farewell to Joon. Interview: Jean-Charles Perino, co-founder of La Compagnie 16:23 Our interview with Jean-Charles Perino takes us inside the all-business class airline for a look at how the unique carrier operates and how the airline is managing a major transition from its current 757 fleet to new A321neos. Air France 66 fan hub found in Greenland Investigators in Greenland have recovered the fan hub assembly from the engine of the Air France flight that experienced an uncontained engine failure in September 2017. The piece was found under 4 meters of snow and ice. Stowaway falls from wheel well in London A body discovered in London is believed to have fallen from the wheel well of an arriving Kenya Airways flight from Nairobi. 737 MAX Update A new software snag pushes back the MAX’s service re-entry. When will the 737 MAX re-enter service? Good question. Iranian airspace restrictions add to an already complicated situation We discuss the new restrictions and advisories regarding Iranian airspace and how their compounding the already complicated airspace restrictions in the region. Runway excursions in India 5 runway excursions occurred in 3 days with 2 Air India Express and 3 SpiceJet flights exiting the runway on landing in airports around India. Thankfully no serious injuries have been reported, but the SpiceJet runway excursion in Mumbai has led to extensive delays there as work is performed to remove the aircraft.
June 21, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, aviation journalist John Walton joins us from the Paris Air Show to discuss Airbus’ launch of the A321XLR and the importance of IAG’s order of 200 737 MAX aircraft. We also discuss a recent GPS issue that grounded some flights. A Paris Surprise Aviation journalist John Walton joins from the Paris Air Show with reaction and analysis of IAG’s surprising order for 200 737-8 and 737-10 aircraft. We also look at Airbus’ new A321XLR, the 4700 NM version of its A321neo launched at this year’s show. If you’re interested in more from John Walton at the Paris Air Show, especially passenger experience related news, check out the Runway Girl Network ‘In Conversation’ podcast next week. Rename the MAX? We discuss Boeing’s branding options and where the airframer may be heading with the MAX name. GPS Errors resolved We discuss the recent issue affecting Collins Aerospace GPS equipment that grounded some flights and forced others to revert to older forms of navigation. Aeroflot 1492 interim report Russian authorities released an interim report on Aeroflot 1492. We discuss the findings thus far. United 757 gets crunched at Newark A United 757 suffered significant damage on landing at Newark Airport last week. Jason fills us in on what happened. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
June 7, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, Mitsubishi sets its eyes on the CRJ program, we learn more about the Air Astana loss of control incident in Portugal, and Jason and Seth Miller check in from the IATA annual general meeting in Seoul. Mitsubishi eyes CRJ program Fresh from the renaming of the MRJ to the Space Jet, The Air Current first reported that Mitsubishi is in talks with Bombardier to purchase the CRJ program. This development comes as Bombardier continues its exit from commercial aviation after selling the C-Series and Dash 8 programs. Preliminary report on Air Astana incident in Portugal Investigators released a preliminary report on the Air Astana loss of control incident in Portugal that took place in November 2018. The findings so far discovered an incorrect installation of the aileron control cables, which led to reversal of the aileron function. Airbus celebrates its 50th anniversary Airbus celebrated its 50th anniversary with a special formation flight in Toulouse. We put together our own flypast line up as well. Boeing 737 MAX update No update from the FAA or Boeing on when a certification test flight will take place, but airlines have expressed their trepidation with putting the airplane back into service after the MCAS fix is certified. Ethiopian Airlines has said that they will be the last to reintroduce the aircraft to its fleet. IATA AGM Jason and Seth Miller head to Seoul for the IATA annual general meeting, but also for an aviation adventure. Going the distance Airbus discussed their plans to have an A321XLR in service by 2024 and both Boeing and Airbus are finalizing proposals for Qantas’ ‘Project Sunrise’, which would see flights from the east coast of Australia to London. D-Day 75th anniversary To mark the 75th anniversary of D-Day, a fleet of Dakotas departed Duxford in the UK for Normandy to once again drop paratroopers into France. Some of those participating in the drop were also there in 1944.
May 24, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, we get an update on the Aeroflot 1492 accident. Southwest makes a deal with their mechanics while American goes to court with theirs. And Chris Sloan from Airways Magazine stops by to chat about his recent trip to Russia to fly on vintage Soviet aircraft. Aeroflot 1492 New video that captured the full landing sequence of Aeroflot 1492 in Moscow shed light on the nature of accident as authorities examine data from the Flight data recorder and make their initial report.. Mechanics vs airlines Southwest Airlines has reached a labor agreement with its mechanics just as American Airlines goes to court against theirs for what it says is an illegal work slowdown. We see how the disputes have impacted each airline. Canadian airlines making moves WestJet is going private thanks to a takeover by Onex and Air Canada is looking to buy Air Transat. Airbus makes its 12,000th delivery Airbus delivered its 12,000th airplane this week, an A220 to Delta Air Lines. The 12,000th delivery comes 45 years to the month after the first Airbus A300 delivery in 1974. A Russian tour with Chris Sloan Chris Sloan, managing editor of Airways Magazine, stops by to talk about his recent visit to Russia to fly on a variety of former Soviet aircraft. We talk with Sloan about some of the highlights in the air and on the ground. More information about upcoming tours can be found here. New Flightradar24 features The airport panels on the website have received an update to include more information and better visibility and also available across all platforms is new surface movement data. We get into the details. Tribute to Niki Lauda On 20 May 2019, Formula 1 legend and aviation great Niki Lauda passed away at the age of 70. On 21 May, the airline Lauda paid tribute to Niki Lauda with a special flypast and message in the aircraft’s windows at Vienna airport.
May 17, 2019
On this special episode of AvTalk, we welcome The Air Current editor-in-chief Jon Ostrower as we discuss the status of the Boeing 737 MAX and the compendium of reporting that’s come out in the last few weeks. We’re taking a closer look at how the aircraft was developed, what Boeing is doing to get it back in the air, and how the manufacturer is trying to regain the trust of airlines and pilots around the world. Building on our previous conversations with Jon Ostrower regarding the 737 MAX program, we return to the topic to see what progress Boeing has made since then on returning the aircraft to service. As we recorded just after the conclusion of the House Aviation Subcommittee hearings that featured testimony from FAA Administrator Elwell and NTSB chairman Sumwalt, we close with reaction to hearing and what we learned from it. We hope you’ll find this special episode helpful in understanding the 737 MAX situation. As always, we greatly appreciate any feedback you may have.
May 10, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, we discuss Aeroflot 1492 in Moscow, Miami Air’s runway excursion in Jacksonville, new liveries, and Jason heads to Italy. Next week we’ll have a special extended conversation with The Air Current editor-in-chief Jon Ostrower about the 737 MAX and the steady drip of news about how the airplane was developed and what Boeing is doing to get it back in the air. Aeroflot flight 1492 On 5 May, Aeroflot flight SU1492 returned to Moscow not long after takeoff after suffering an unknown failure and a hard landing resulting in a large fire. Russian authorities report that 41 people have died. Photos and video of the evacuation of the aircraft have restarted our conversation about passenger behavior during an evacuation. Miami Air runway overrun in Jacksonville A Miami Air 737 operating a charter flight from Guantanamo Bay to Jacksonville NAS suffered a runway excursion on landing in Jacksonville. No injuries were reported. We discuss the circumstances surrounding the flight. New (special) liveries Jason visited Chicago to see United Airlines’ new livery unveiled and El Al and Brussels Airlines unveiled new special liveries of their own. Venezuelan airspace Last week the US FAA issued a Notam banning US operators from Venezuelan airspace below FL260 (26,000 feet), effectively barring US flights to Venezuela. We look to see who this actually affects. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
April 26, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, Jet Airways halts flights, the FAA lays out its path to re-certification of the 737 MAX, and we sit down for a conversation with pilot and author Mark Vanhoenacker. United’s new livery We recorded prior to the livery’s reveal and we’ll have more in our next episode, but we explore a bit about why United decided to make a change now and we send Jason to check it out in person. Jet Airways ‘temporarily’ halts flights The beleaguered Indian carrier announced it would ‘temporarily’ halt flights due to lack of funding. The airline’s management has said they’re seeking addition sources of funding, but has not specified a plan or date when the airline will resume flying. We discuss the impact on the Indian aviation market and on Boeing, which had taken over 200 737 MAX orders from Jet. Lessors take back planes from Avianca Brazil Avianca Brazil, which is not associated with Avianca, has had two blocks of aircraft slated for repossession by their lessors and their troubles continue to mount. Could it be next on the list of former airlines? Certifying the 737 MAX update The FAA provided an update on the Joint Authority Technical Review timeline this week to certify Boeing’s updates to the 737 MAX. We discuss what may come next. JetBlue finally announces transatlantic flights After years of hinting at an announcement, JetBlue finally announced their intention to fly from the US east coast to Europe. The carrier will do so by converting some of the A321neo orders to A321LRs. In conversation with pilot and author Mark Vanhoenacker We sit down for a conversation with British Airways first officer and renowned author Mark Vanhoenacker about his recent switch from flying the 747 to flying the 787 and his most recent book How to Land a Plane, out in the US this month. Stratolaunch makes its first flight The world’s largest airplane made its first flight last week. The Stratolaunch will operate as a launch platform for space payloads. An avgeek rooftop bar No, not Joon. The new TWA airport revealed its designs for a rooftop bar and pool at JFK Airport in New York and it looks fantastic. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
April 12, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, we discuss the Ethiopian investigators’ preliminary report on the crash of ET302 and Boeing’s efforts to get the MAX back in the air. We’re also joined by our resident numbers expert, Gavin Werbeloff, to discuss how airlines around the world are managing their fleet renewals. And thieves in Albania pull off a brazen heist. ET302 preliminary report Ethiopian investigators released a preliminary report into the crash of ET302 last week. We discuss the data made available in the report and how Boeing and regulators move forward from here. New Istanbul airport opens Istanbul completed its move from Atatürk airport to the newly constructed airport to the northwest of the city last week. What airlines want Our resident numbers expert Gavin Werbeloff joins us to discuss how airlines around the world are reconfiguring their order books. Our WOW Air update Immediately after we recorded our previous episode, WOW Air ceased operations. We recap what happened and where the fleet is at now. Pakistan airspace update We remained a bit confused about what’s happening with Pakistan’s airspace, but try our best to explain. A brazen heist Thieves in Tirana make off with millions of Euros stolen from the cargo hold of an Austrian Airlines flight. Aircraft Interiors Expo Jason and Seth Miller report from the Aircraft Interiors Expo in Hamburg on the latest and greatest new features and facilities coming to airplanes soon Water salute gone wrong A water salute gone wrong in Dubai leads to an open door and a deployed escape slide. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
March 29, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, we discuss Boeing’s MCAS software update, the continued grounding of the 737 MAX fleet, and passengers on one flight are surprised to find themselves in the wrong country upon landing. MCAS gets an update We discuss Boeing’s software and display update to the MCAS system, congressional and other inquiries into the certification of the 737 MAX, and an update on the investigation into the crash of Ethiopian 302. This isn’t Düsseldorf… A WDL Aviation flight operating on behalf of British Airways was supposed to fly from London to Düsseldorf, but mistakenly ended up in Edinburgh. We break down how that could have happened. WOW We discuss WOW Air’s saga to try and stay in business. (Note: this episode was recorded just prior to their closure.) Odds and ends Special liveries, a strategic purchase, and a quick preview of our next episode, which will involve some math Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
March 15, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk we’re joined by The Air Current editor-in-chief Jon Ostrower to discuss the crash of Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 and the subsequent grounding of the 737 MAX. We also get an update from the NTSB on the crash of Atlas Air flight 3591 and an update on the closure of Pakistan’s airspace to most flights. Download a transcript of this episode Ethiopian Airlines 302 and the 737 MAX Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 operated by a Boeing 737 MAX 8 crashed shortly after take off from Addis Ababa on 10 March. The following day some airlines and national regulators began grounding their 737 MAX fleets, culminating in the worldwide ground of the entire fleet on 13 March. The Air Current editor-in-chief Jon Ostrower joins us to discuss the facts surrounding the crash and the reaction by airlines and regulators. We also take a step back and revisit how the MAX came to be. Atlas Air 3591 update The NTSB issued an investigative update on 12 March, detailing finds from the Flight data recorder. This update is not a final report, nor is it a finding of probable cause. We discuss the details of the update and the status of the investigation. Pakistan airspace remains closed to most traffic Pakistan’s airspace remains closed to most traffic, affecting hundreds of flights per day that would normally transit the country. We look at the circumstances surrounding the closure of Pakistan’s airspace and some of the interesting effects on flights. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
March 1, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, we review what we know about the crash of Atlas Air 3591, incredulously read through the Aeromexico Connect flight 2431 report, recap our correct predictions about the A380, and Jason and Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren head to Florida for some rare planespotting. Atlas Air 3591 We discuss what we know so far about the crash of Atlas Air 3591 and the current status of the NTSB’s investigation. Aeromexico Connect Crash Report Mexican authorities released a report detailing the circumstances surrounding the crash of Aeromexico Connect flight 2431—and they are not good. We discuss the report’s findings including wind shear conditions and an unqualified pilot at the controls. A380 Production to end in 2021 As soon as we finished recording the last episode, Airbus announced that they’re shuttering the A380 production line in 2021 after existing orders are built. Jason and Jeremy head to Miami for some rare planespotting Jason is joined by Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren in southern Florida for some planespotting, including Convairs and rare cargo airlines. Norwegian 737 MAX stuck in Iran flies home The Norwegian 737 MAX LN-BKE, which had been stuck in Shiraz, Iran for more than two months after diverting with an engine issue, left Iran last week after receiving a new engine. The aircraft has since been put back in service. The camera in your seatback is not spying on you Jason explains the controversy surrounding the seatback cameras installed on various airlines and what they’re actually used for. Spoiler alert: they’re not used at all. Special liveries to see British Airways is adding its second heritage livery, the BEA scheme to an A319 and Austrian has gone back to the 1980s with its latest retro livery. Winds in Gibraltar Landing in Gibraltar is always subject to the special set of wind conditions that develop thanks to the massive rock, but BA492’s go around this week caught our attention. As the aircraft climbs, there’s a noticeable roll movement to the right and left. We’ve heard various explanations, but would love to hear from an A320 family pilot who might have insight. Please get in touch if that’s you. @GibChronicle @RockRadio @GBCNewsroom this is the original version…. apologies for the swearing. pic.twitter.com/F7wtmwtVqi— MackeminGib (@mackemsin) February 25, 2019 Stop throwing coins into the engine Another incident of coins being thrown into an engine in China. We’ve seen this before,
February 15, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, we discuss Airbus’ plans for the future of the A380, see which European low-cost carrier is no longer operating this week, tow a 747 across a field, and add some Flair to the podcast. The Future of the A380 Note: we recorded this episode just prior to Airbus’ announcement We discuss Airbus’ plans for the A380 and what that means for the future of flying. Ground collisions galore We unfortunately revisit the topic of airplanes colliding while on the ground. Thankfully no injuries were reported in this latest trifecta of incidents. Germania files for insolvency German low-cost carrier Germania filed for insolvency last week, joining the ranks of other European low-cost carriers to cease operations over the past few years. Go around With strong winds affecting flights and the folks at Big Jet TV standing by with HD cameras, the world got a great view of quality piloting as a strong downdraft made a go-around for BA276 necessary last week. Read our in-depth guide to go arounds We discuss the often-misunderstood procedure and how a quick social media education on the part of a British Airways pilot helped change the conversation. Adding a bit of Flair to the podcast Here’s the full promotional video released by Flair. Canada's @FlairAirlines has rebranded and revealed a new livery. It's….interesting. pic.twitter.com/YBCkAnMGm2— Jason Rabinowitz (@AirlineFlyer) February 13, 2019 747 towed around Schiphol to become new hotel attraction In the latest, airplane-to-attraction conversion, an ex-KLM 747 has been repainted into Corendon livery and transported to a hotel just outside of Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
February 1, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, we celebrate our 50th episode and the 50th anniversary of the Boeing 747. We discuss aviation’s role in ending the US government shutdown, how British Airways’ is celebrating its centenary, and we see if anyone wants to buy an abandoned MD-87. Snow, ice, and cold Winter weather throughout the United States made travel difficult over the past few weeks. Ian spends this episode in the deep freeze, while Jason cracks a window. Open for business, for now We discuss the role aviation played in the end of the US government shutdown, and what looms on the horizon. We also look at some of the more interesting developments to arise during the shutdown Aer Lingus’ new livery Aer Lingus debuted a new livery. We lament the ongoing trend of livery standarization. Aer Lingus’ new livery on A330 EI-EDY BOAC is back British Airways is celebrating its centenary and reviving some classic liveries, beginning with the BOAC livery. We look forward to seeing the others as well. A BOAC 747-100 in Boston, 1972. Celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Boeing 747 N7470, the first Boeing 747 On 9 February 1969, the Boeing 747 took flight for the first time. Ian and Jason reflect on the Queen of the Skies and 50 years of flight. Let us know what you think Thank you so much for listening! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
January 18, 2019
On this episode of AvTalk, Indonesia finds the Lion Air 610 cockpit voice recorder, we look at the effects the US government shutdown is having on aviation, and our favorite roof top bar that’s also an airline announces last call. Lion Air JT610 CVR found Indonesian officials announced the recovery of the Cockpit Voice Recorder from JT610 nearly 3 months after the crash. We discuss the vital role the CVR will play in the investigation. US Government shutdown affecting aviation We look at the effects the US government shutdown is having on aviation in the US and around the world. Boeing + Embraer joint ventures approved Brazil gave approval to the Boeing + Embraer joint ventures, bringing the world one step closer to an aircraft manufacturer super-duopoly. Air France to reabsorb Joon Air France will end its experiment with the ‘also an airline’ Joon, reabsorbing the sub-carrier into Air France proper. We take a look at why the experiment failed. 2018 orders and deliveries We dig into the order and delivery numbers from 2018 to see how Airbus and Boeing fared. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
January 4, 2019
2018 was a year of highs, lows, and head scratchers. We take you through the year that was and we also revisit some of our favorite interviews from last year. What was new in 2018 We begin the show with new aircraft, either taking to the air for the first time in 2018 or achieving certification and entering service. Featured interview Jon Ostrower, editor-in-chief of The Air Current joined us to discuss Boeing’s plans for its New Mid-market Airplane (NMA), which will likely be unveiled at this year’s Paris Air Show. Airlines no longer with us We revisit some of the airlines that ceased operations in 2018. Brett Snyder at Crankyflier has a full list on his blog. Accidents and incidents We discuss some of the accidents and incidents that shaped the year, including Southwest 1380 and Lion Air 610. Featured interview UPS Airlines Captain Ken Hoke joins us to discuss his life as a cargo pilot flying for UPS Airlines and how that differs from passenger flying. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
December 21, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk, we discuss the recent incidents allegedly involving drones, Norwegian ends up with a 737 in Iran, Korean Air takes on overzealous K Pop fans, and one restaurant wants to help flyers with some emotional support chicken. Droning on We discuss recent incidents involving and allegedly involving drones in London and Mexico. Note: this episode was recorded on 19 December when the incident at Gatwick Airport was understood to be a nuisance and not a deliberate attempt to affect operations. We’ll discuss recent developments in a future episode. Norwegian diverts to Iran After an issue with an engine, a Norwegian 737 MAX 8 diverted to Shiraz, Iran. Due to recent US sanctions on Iran returning the aircraft to service may be challenging. Two engines shut down in Australia A Virgin Australia ATR 72 flying through heavy rain had both engines shut down and automatically restart on 13 December. The ATSB released an incident report and has opened an investigation. K-Pop predicament for Korean Air K-Pop fans are buying refundable tickets just to get on board and see their favorite groups for a minute before leaving the plane and requesting a refund. ANA’s first A380 is painted ANA and Airbus unveiled the first painted A380 for the airline. Airbus also released a video showing how the aircraft was painted, which is well worth a watch. Emotional support chicken The Popeyes chicken restaurant in the Philadelphia airport is now offering its own emotional support for passengers. WOW Air restructuring shrinks the fleet further WOW Air’s planned restructuring will reduce its fleet even further and see long-haul flights to the US cut as well as the recently introduced route to Delhi. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
December 7, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk, Indonesian investigators release a preliminary report on Lion Air 610, Anchorage gets shaken up, WOW Air lives to fly another day, and we travel to Stockholm for some pickled herring and Australian pronunciation. Lion Air 610 preliminary report Indonesian investigators released their preliminary report on the crash of Lion Air 610, detailing data recovered from the flight data recorder and maintenance actions performed on the aircraft prior to the crash. Anchorage shakes off an earthquake An earthquake near Anchorage, Alaska briefly halted operations at the airport there and force air traffic controllers out of the tower. While safety checks were carried out, the airfield briefly operated uncontrolled. Frontier is latest airline to lose a cowling A Frontier A320 lost its right engine cowling as it climbed out of Las Vegas. The aircraft returned safely to Las Vegas and passengers were given a free breakfast. WHOA! My aunt snapped this pic of a shredded engine on Frontier flight 260 from Vegas to Tampa. The plane was able to turn around and land. She says all passengers got a free breakfast voucher. pic.twitter.com/vc4t4uxMmh — Dan Ponce (@DanPonceTV) November 30, 2018 WOW Air lives—for now Indigo partners is bringing a bit of blue to the purple airline as it steps in to fund WOW Air. We discuss Icelandair’s cold feet and WOW’s prospects for the future. Air France’s Show Reel Air France spent a year filming and editing a beautiful air-to-air film and put together a stunning behind the scenes video as well. Watch both videos here. Joon no more? Is the rooftop bar closing? Air France’s new CEO Ben Smith isn’t on the state of mind flying passengers under the Joon brand and the ‘not-an-airline’ may soon be actually not an airline. British Airways says goodbye to the 767 Last week, British Airways retired their 767 fleet and began operating their first A321neo. China receives its 2000th Boeing aircraft China received its 2000th Boeing aircraft this week, a 737 MAX 8 for Xiamen Airlines. The first 1000 aircraft took 40+ years to deliver, the next 1000 took just 5. Airbus delivers first A330neo to TAP The first A330neo went home to Portugal last week as launch customer TAP took delivery of the first of 21 aircraft. El Al flight struggles off the runway An El Al pilot twice entered weight information incorrectly into the computer of a 787, causing the aircraft to believe it was 40 tonnes lighter than it actually was. According to a report released by Israeli investigators this week, this led to aircraft responding lazily to commands and struggling to take off. Mexico is selling their VIP 787 Mexico’s new president has decided to sell the countries VIP 787. The aircraft was flown to Victorville on 3 December for storage until a buyer can be arranged. Pronunciation: Cairns We enlist our resident Flightradar24 Australian to help us with our pronunciation. UAE National Day flypast The United Arab Emirates celebrated their National Day with a fl...
November 23, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk, The Air Current editor-in-chief Jon Ostrower joins us to discuss the investigation into the crash of Lion Air 610 and the attention now being paid to Boeing’s Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS). We also discuss Airbus’ plans for future aircraft development and the many incidents that occurred over the last two weeks, from Air Astana’s loss of control incident to runway overruns in Halifax and Gerorgetown. Air Astana loss-of-control incident in Lisbon An Air Astana E190 experienced a serious loss-of-control incident in Lisbon shortly after departure from Alverca Airport. The crew, which was conducting a post-maintenance ferry flight back to Kazakhstan, safely diverted to Beja Air Base. Overruns In Halifax, a SkyLease Cargo 747 overran the runway while landing from Chicago, while an Air Jamaica 757 overran the runway in Georgetown after returning to the airport due to a hydraulic issue. Man struck by 737 in Moscow A departing Aeroflot 737 fatally struck man on the airfield in Moscow earlier this week. Unaware they had struck the man, the flight proceeded as normal to Athens. Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) We welcome back Jon Ostrower to the show to learn more about the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) introduced by Boeing on the 737 MAX. This system and how familiar its features are to 737 MAX pilots has become a focus in the aftermath of the crash of Lion Air 610. Airbus’ future We also talk with Jon about Airbus’ intentions for its future aircraft portfolio, including a new narrow body aircraft and a re-engining of the A350. Virgin Orbit carries LauncherOne rocket with Cosmic Girl 747 for the first time Virgin Orbit, which intends to use a rocket mounted under the wing of a modified 747 to launch small satellites into orbit, completed its first captive carry of the rocket this week in California. The oldest flying 747-100 makes its final flight N747GE, the oldest flying 747-100, made its final flight to the Pima Air & Space Museum this week. GE Aviation had retired the aircraft from service a year ago. The aircraft had been used for engine development, including the GE90.
November 9, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk, Jason heads to South Africa, we discuss the crash of Lion Air flight 610, Brandon Buz, senior social media analyst with the Greater Orlando Airport Authority joins us to discuss social media use by airports and the fun conversation that is “Airport Twitter”. And Captain Ken Hoke is back to get SLOP-py. Lion Air 610 Lion Air 610 crashed shortly after takeoff on 29 October. In the intervening two weeks, attention has focused on possible instrumentation issues affecting the aircraft. We discuss the latest developments, including Boeing’s FCOM bulletin and the subsequent FAA Emergency Airworthiness Directive. See complete Flightradar24 data from Lion Air 610 and the full FAA Airworthiness Directive Icelandair buys WOW Air Icelandair will purchase WOW Air in an all stock transaction, consolidating the two Icelandic carriers. We discuss what it means for the two airlines and transatlantic ultra-low cost carriers writ large. Istanbul’s New Airport opens—sort of Istanbul’s new airport has opened to limited traffic and all commercial traffic will move over at the end of the year See the plan for the switch to the new airport in December Connecting with Airports on Social Media We talk with Brandon Buz, senior social media analyst for the Greater Orlando Airport Authority about how airports are using social media to improve the passenger experience and just what is #AirportTwitter. Captain Ken Hoke gets SLOP-y Captain Ken Hoke returns to the program to fill us in on SLOP and how it helps keep aircraft flying over remote regions safely separated.
October 26, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk, an Air India Express 737 clips a brick wall, Cobalt Airlines becomes the second airline this month to cease operations, and fresh off the relaunched world’s longest flight, Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren fills us in on the journey. Air India Express hits a wall and keeps on going An Air India Express 737 hit part of the Instrument Landing System lighting array and clipped a fence and brick wall on take off from Tiruchirapalli and flew towards its destination in Dubai for hours before making a precautionary diversion to Mumbai. We discuss the circumstances of the flight and what we know so far. Skywest returns to Chicago because the plane is too big A Skywest flight operating for United between Chicago and Chattanooga returned to Chicago last week after someone at the airline realized the aircraft was too large for Chattanooga. Cobalt Airlines ceases operations Cobalt Airlines abruptly ceased operations last week after failing to secure additional funding. Onboard the world’s longest flight Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren climbed aboard the world’s longest flight and fills us in on the journey. We also look toward to the future of ultra-long haul flights. UPS air-to-air photo shoot UPS published behind the scenes footage from their air-to-air photo flights over Los Angeles. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
October 12, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk, Jason and Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren report on their visit to London on the 60th anniversary of the first transatlantic jet flight. We get ready to welcome back the longest flight in the world and we look at Primera Air’s bankruptcy and what it might mean for the ultra low cost transatlantic market. The longest flight in the world Singapore Airlines relaunches the world’s longest flight this week between Singapore and New York (EWR). We debate the merits of a non-stop versus connecting flight. We also discuss Singapore Airlines’ introduction of the A350ULR. Primera Air declares bankruptcy Primera Air, which made a splash in the ultra-low cost transatlantic market earlier this year declared bankruptcy last week. We discuss the effects and what it might foreshadow in the industry. Jason and Jeremy take us back in time Transatlantic jet flight celebrated its 60th anniversary and Jason and Jeremy traveled to London to visit British Airways for the occasion. Air Niugini crash in Chuuk An Air Niugini 737 crashed in Chuuk, landing short of the runway in the water. We discuss what we know so far. 50th anniversary of the Boeing 747 roll out The Boeing 747’s 50th anniversary celebrations kick off with the roll out anniversary Norwegian overtakes British Airways in New York Norwegian has surpassed British Airways as the largest passenger carrier in New York, according to data released by the Port Authority. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
September 28, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk, Seth Miller joins us as he and Jason take in the Airline Passenger Experience Expo in Boston. We revisit some of the aviation mistakes made last week and with a Bloomberg report suggesting Emirates could take over Etihad, we try to envision what a merger between the two carriers might look like. We apologize for the poor audio quality in some portions of this episode. It’s Jason’s fault. APEX Expo in Boston Jason and Seth fill us in on the highlights at the APEX Expo in Boston so far, including a network connected overhead bin. One of Jason’s favorite twitter accounts, referenced during the show Dorkfest + SpotLAX Ian recaps Dorkfest and SpotLAX2018 at Los Angeles International Airport last weekend. Singapore Airlines takes delivery of the first A350ULR The first Airbus A350ULR for Singapore Airlines has been delivered to the airline ahead of the airline’s resumption of Singapore-Newark service in October. Track the aircraft as 9V-SGA. Cathay Paciic A Cathay Pacific 777 needed a bit of corrective work. The first 777 built heads to Pima The first 777 ever built (WA001) was sent to Pima Air and Space Museum last week after retiring from service with Cathay Pacific. Air India A320 prematurely opens new runway in Maldives An Air India A320 mistakenly landed on the new runway in Maldives before it was officially open. NTSB board meeting regarding Air Canada incident in San Francisco The NTSB board met to determine the probable cause of the Air Canada taxiway overflight incident last July in San Francisco. See the full NTSB docket What might an Emirates takeover of Etihad look like? We discuss what a takeover of Etihad by Emirates might actually look like. And it looks complicated. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
September 14, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk, tropical cyclones dominate the discussion. We also look at a close—or not so close—call in Kenya. And Crankyflier himself, Brett Snyder joins us to preview the upcoming LAX Dorkfest next weekend. Hurricane Florence and Typhoon Mangkhut We discuss the aviation effects of each storm and give some advice if you’re traveling through an affected airport. Our dedicated page for Hurricane Florence The AN-225 brings typhoon relief supplies to Guam The AN-225 was used to bring typhoon relief supplies to Guam this week. We talk about its mission and Jason wonders why the AN-225 was needed at all. Photo of the AN-225’s fax number Photo of Concorde departing over the AN-225 in New York, 2002 Neos 767 and Ethiopian 737 over Kenya We discuss a recent incident—or not—above Kenya and the ongoing airspace issues in the region. Wheels fall off A student pilot on her first ‘cross-country’ solo flight received an unexpected lesson when the right main wheel of her Piper fell off as she departed Beverly airport in Massachusetts. In communication with the air traffic controller and her flight instructor she safely landed the aircraft. Flight data Twitter thread with ATC audio from the incident. Dorkfest 2018 Coming up on 22 September, we’ll be joining Crankyflier Brett Snyder for Cranky Dorkfest at Los Angeles International Airport (LAX). We talk with Brett about what Dorkfest is and why you should come. Reasons include, but are not limited to: airplanes, In-N-Out burgers, airplanes, enjoying the company of other avgeeks, possibly unique airplanes, like Voodoo 1. If you do make the journey, look for Ian there, he’ll have some Flightradar24 goodies. 22 September | 11am – 1pm | The park across from the In-N-Out at LAX Map to Dorkfest at LAX Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
August 31, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk, we spend as little amount of time talking about Post Malone as possible. We find out that some aircraft are equipped with a ‘flux capacitator’. And Chris Sloan, the managing editor of Airways Magazine, joins us to discuss what he’s learned from interviewing leaders at Delta, United, and JetBlue this month. An uneventful event Last week rapper Post Malone’s Gulfstream IV suffered burst tires on the left main landing gear on departure from Teterboro. The aircraft burned fuel for a few hours before diverting to Stewart Airport in New York. We remark on how unremarkable the flight was. An eventful event A Capital Airlines A320 B-6952 landed in Shenzhen without its nose gear wheels, which separated from the aircraft during a landing attempt in Macau. Capital Airlines A320 (B-6952) flight #JD5759 experienced windshear on approach to Macau. The aircraft made an abnormal runway contact (hard landing). Both nosegear tires broke away from the strut. Pilots did a go-around and diverted to Shenzhen. https://t.co/OZcc2VJgoE pic.twitter.com/IrWw1V2OOf — JACDEC (@JacdecNew) August 28, 2018 Great Scott! A reporter with Boston 25 was given a bit of bad information regarding an aviation accident this week. A defective what? 📹@boston25 #back2thefuture #marty #doc #88mph pic.twitter.com/ea9tAGsqRP — Tom Podolec Aviation (@TomPodolec) August 28, 2018 Azores Glider This week marked the anniversary of the Azores Glider. The aircraft involved is still in service with Air Transat. C-Suite Interviews with Chris Sloan Airways Magazine managing editor Chris Sloan joins us to discuss his interviews with leadership at Delta, United, and JetBlue Airways. Virgin Orbit 747 conducting test flights Virgin Orbit’s 747 launch vehicle preparing for first launch with multiple test flights. We discuss some other aircraft used for launching rockets. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
August 17, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk we welcome Jon Ostrower back to the program to discuss the Horizon Air Q400 incident last week in Seattle. We review some of the other incidents over the past few weeks and recap fleet updates from various airlines around the world. The Horizon Q400 Incident The Air Current editor-in-chief Jon Ostrower joins us to discuss the theft and crash of the Horizon Q400 in Seattle last week. Read Jon’s column on the Horizon Q400 incident on The Air Current Listen to the ATC audio from the incident. Planes that go bump Over the past few weeks, a few ground collisions have caught our interest. A Royal Air Maroc 787 collided with a Turkish Airlines 777 in Istanbul A Cathay Pacific 777-300ER is pushed back into a pole in Rome In Chicago, two United aircraft clipped wings Norwegian puts the HiFly A380 to work Norwegian is the first regular customer of HiFly’s A380 wet lease, but that’s not without its own problems. Want to fly for JANET? The world’s most secretive airline is hiring a first officer. Apply today! 737-600 Operators Air Algérie EG&G (Janet) SAS Tunisair WestJet AvGeek Notes El Al’s newest 787 features a retro jet livery The first Lufthansa A340-600 has been repainted in new livery Cathay Pacific’s 747-8F B-LJA has been repainted out of Hong Kong Trader livery Mainland Chinese carriers Air China and Sichuan Airlines have taken delivery of their first A350s. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
August 3, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk, we discuss Aeromexico flight 2431 and what we know so far. We delve in to this week’s strange-but-true aviation news. And Jason tries his hand at aircraft sales. Aeromexico Flight 2431 Aermexico flight 2431 suffered an accident on takeoff in bad weather in Durango. The aircraft came to rest 1300 feet from the end of the runway, where all passengers and crew were evacuated before fire engulfed the aircraft. We discuss what we know so far. Michael Bay angers Thai Airways We find out why Thai Airways is very upset with film director Michael Bay. Pushing buttons and pulling levers A man at Texarkana Regional Airport tries to steal a plane and fails. HiFly A380 HiFly put its A380 to use for the first time this week, operating for Thomas Cook Scandinavia. We discuss where it will go next. TSA considers eliminating security at smaller airports The US Transportation Safety Administration is considering a proposal that would eliminate security at smaller airports that are served by smaller aircraft. We dive into why that seems like a bad idea. Jason sells some planes Jason received an unsolicited email asking for some help. We’re going to see what we can do. I got a “special offer” in my inbox today. A company would like me to find buyers for some @Airbus aircraft… They have 6 A320s for just $64m each 3 A321s for the low price of $79m each Need a pair of A350-900s? How does $195m each sound? They promise me a “good commission” pic.twitter.com/98yT4iNmxI — Jason Rabinowitz (@AirlineFlyer) July 30, 2018 The world’s first billion dollar route A report by OAG provides the revenue breakdown for the world’s top routes. We run through the report thanks to Chris McGinnis at SFGate. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
July 20, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk, we review the order book from the Farnborough Airshow to see who bought what and how many. Airbus rebrands the C Series, we climb aboard the A330neo for a route proving flight, and two Air China pilots are now out of a job. Airbus welcomes the A220 As the Bombardier C Series joins the Airbus family, Airbus has officially rolled out its new branding and commercial distinction for the C Series.  The CS300 joins Airbus as the A220-300 and the CS100 becomes the A220-100. Farnborough 2018 Editor’s note: this podcast was recorded prior to Day 4 of the airshow, please see here for a full order tally. The Farnborough Airshow, the biennial aviation extravaganza, played host to over a thousand aircraft orders. We recap the order book to see who bought what. Article Jason references regarding undisclosed orders and trade tensions Link to FlightGlobal order tracking page, requires free sign up The next 20 years Airbus and Boeing released their 20 year forward looking view of the air transport sector. We discuss the reports and try to understand what both airframers thinking into the future. Read Airbus’ Global Market Forecast Read Boeing’s Commercial Market Outlook HiFly debuts its first A380 in special livery Track HiFly’s A380 in special livery supporting the Mirpuri Foundation1 with registration 9H-MIP. 9H-MIP photos © Jonathan Mifsud Route Proving with the A330neo Ian steps aboard the A330neo and talks with Ned Russell of FlightGlobal about the new aircraft and who might be in the market to buy some. Ryanair picking fights on Twitter In an almost surreal exchange, Ryanair and the British air navigation service provider NATS traded tweets regarding responsibility for delayed flights. Two Air China pilots are out of a job An Air China flight made an emergency descent due to the first officer mistakenly turning off the 737’s air conditioning system while trying to hide his e-cigarette use on the flight deck. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
July 6, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk we break records, we learn more about aircraft leasing with our resident numbers expert Gavin Werbeloff, and Jonathan Khoo joins us to insist he isn’t an avgeek while listing the dozens of lesser-known carriers he’s flown on around the world. Record breaking flights On 29 June, we tracked 202,157 flights tracked in a single day, the most flights we’ve ever tracked and the first time we’ve tracked over 200,000 flights. Meet the new whale Airbus unveiled the first fully painted Beluga XL. We discuss the unique new livery and the Beluga XL’s mission. China Airlines’ new A350 in special livery China Airlines’ + Boeing co-branded 747 livery Aircraft leasing We talk with Gavin Werbeloff, our resident numbers expert, who walks us through how aircraft leasing works. A reluctant avgeek Jonathan Khoo joins us to talk about his travels on some of the world’s lesser known carriers and how he manages more flying in the back of the airplane than most anyone we know. Flights to Rome Moovel lab took a bit of Flightradar24 data and made beautiful illustrations of the world’s mobility. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
June 22, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk, the A330neo sets off on a 5 continent adventure, aviation finds its way into the World Cup, and we find out we’re overqualified for a seemingly important aviation job in the UK. Cathay Pacific’s first A350-1000 Cathay Pacific took delivery of their first A350-1000 this week, making it the second carrier to add the aircraft to its fleet. The first aircraft is registered B-LXA. A330neo route proving tour Airbus is taking its A330neo show on the road with a 15 city, 5 continent tour. We talk about what to expect from the A330neo and preview our own tour of the aircraft in early July. No experience necessary The UK government is looking for a Head of Airspace Strategy/Head of Aviation EU Exit Negotiations. But, if you’re feeling under-qualified, worry not, ‘Prior knowledge of airspace and the aviation sector is an advantage but not necessary.’ A long way down An Atlas Air 747 crew received a cargo fire indication prior to landing in Chicago. After safely landing and exiting the runway, they evacuated the aircraft via the escape slides. It’s a long way down from the upper deck of a 747. #5Y2134 close-up view from one of the ramp workers of the emergency slide deployed with one of our airport fire trucks watching pic.twitter.com/xi2EVRwixK — ORD Airport Insider (@ORDInsider) June 20, 2018 Final report on BA2276 engine failure released The NTSB released its final report on the 2015 engine failure on a British Airways 777 departing from Las Vegas. The report states the ‘uncontained left engine failure resulted from a fatigue crack in the high-pressure compressor (HPC) stage 8 disk.’ You can view the full report on the NTSB website. Read more about QF32, the Qantas A380 that suffered an uncontained engine failure in 2010. World Cup flying Some of the most popular flights this month have been national teams on their way to the world cup. The Germany and England teams were particularly well-followed. But it hasn’t been all smooth sailing, as the Saudi Arabian team’s Rossiya A319 to Rostov-on-Don suffered an engine issue. The flight landed safely. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
June 8, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk, the first A380s to fly passengers find out their flying days are over. Heathrow moves one step closer to a third runway. Singapore Airlines officially announces the return of service between Singapore and Newark. And Captain Ken Hoke fills us in on how he gets gas for his airplane. Parts for sale In 2007, the first Airbus A380s entered commercial service with Singapore Airlines. Now just 11 years later the first two A380s to fly paying passengers (MSN 003 and MSN 005) are slated to be dismantled and sold for parts. After trying unsuccessfully to find a lessee for the two aircraft, aircraft owner Dr Peters Group decided that the sum of the parts is greater than the whole. We discuss how this might impact the A380 program and just what exactly will happen to the aircraft. Tarbes LFBT the graveyard of the first A380 to be scrapped. How sad it is since I had the pleasure to fly with one of the first in 2005. pic.twitter.com/5wKHeXEmAF — Wulf Höflich (@wulfruediger) June 6, 2018 Heathrow moves closer to a third runway London’s Heathrow Airport moves one step closer to expansion with a third runway this week as the Northwest runway plan gained ministerial approval. We talk about the challenges that still lie ahead for London. Canada’s Transportation Security Board issues report on WestJet low approach to Sint Maarten We discuss the flight, Sint Maarten’s sometimes challenging conditions, and the TSB’s recommendations. Read the TSB’s full report (PDF) Hamburg Airport goes dark for a day Hamburg Airport suffered a power failure that forced the airport to suspend flight operations for the day last Sunday. American Airlines flight damage by hail American Airlines flight 1897 from San Antonio to Phoenix safely diverted to El Paso after flying through a hail storm. NEW PHOTO: Here’s what damaged @AmericanAir flight 1897 from San Antonio looks like the daylight after it made an emergency landing in El Paso https://t.co/0joYZRNa1k (Photo Credit: Holly Rush) pic.twitter.com/ue40a3QonL — CBS Austin (@cbsaustin) June 5, 2018 Singapore Airlines relaunches Singapore-Newark flights Singapore Airlines announced it will resume non-stop service between Singapore and Newark using the new A350-900ULR beginning in October, marking the return of the world’s longest flight. We talk about the 15,000 km, 19 hour flight and what makes the A350ULR different. Captain Ken Hoke fills up the tanks Ken Hoke explains how much fuel is needed for a flight and who decides. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback,
May 25, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk, we discuss the aviation incidents that have occurred in the past two weeks and delve into the fortunes of major carries in the Middle East. And we’re joined again by Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren to discuss vintage aviation advertising and… strapping rockets to a Convair? Download a transcript of this episode Incident Reports The past two weeks have been quite eventful—and not in a good way. A Global Air 737 operating on behalf of Cubana crashed shortly after takeoff in Havana. A Sichuan Airlines A319 lost its right main windscreen. A Turkish Airlines A321 had its tail chopped off by an Asiana Airlines A330 in Istanbul. Airbus A380 strikes Comair CRJ in New York Saudi Arabian Airlines flight SV3818 (operated by Onur Air) diverted to Jeddah and landed with a retracted nose gear. #عاجل فيديو لطائرة #الخطوط_السعودية المستأجرة تهبط قبل قليل اضطرارياً بسلام في #مطار_الملك_عبدالعزيز الدولي في جدة رحلة sv3818 المدينة – دكا نتيجة لعطل فني في عجلة الهبوط الأمامية ولا وجود لإي إصابات معلنة حتى الان ، الطائرة من طراز A300 pic.twitter.com/L8Vf92lOT1 — عشاق عالم الطيران (@AviationWG) May 21, 2018 Vintage Aviation Advertising Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren joins us to discuss vintage aviation advertising and how one ad in particular really caught his eye. Boeing 727 JATO take off from Mexico City Boeing XB-47 JATO take off Air Italy and other ME3 moves We discuss Air Italy’s first 737 MAX and Qatar’s plans for the airline. We also take a look at Emirates’ pilot shortage and Etihad’s struggling financial position. Michael O’Leary’s Interview with Bloomberg We dig in to Ryanair CEO Michael O’Leary’s interview with Bloomberg earlier this week, including the future of other low-cost airlines in Europe and the introduction of Airbus aircraft into the Ryanair family. Airbus H160 visits Jason in New York In addition to enjoying a nice lunch outside, Jason got to see Airbus’ new H160 performing a photo flight in New York. Qantas + Tesla do a thing A plane, a Tesla Model X, a tow bar. Worth a minute of your time.
May 11, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk, aerospace journalist John Walton joins us for a wide ranging discussion about aircraft and airlines new and old. And we speak with Joe Duval, the chief test pilot at Honeywell Aerospace about what it’s like to fly a 757 with an engine attached to the fuselage and some of the other interesting projects he’s working on. Download a transcript of this episode Lufthansa Group’s Aircraft Order Lufthansa Group announced an order for new aircraft for its Lufthansa, Swiss, and Lufthansa Cargo airlines. We discuss why this relatively small order is of interest. ‘Papa Fox’—Austria’s new (to them) 777 Labor Relations We explore the turmoil at Air France, which recently saw its CEO resign and is dealing with crew strikes, and where the airline possibly goes from here. We also return to Joon, which presents an interesting challenge and opportunity for Air France. Joe Duval, Chief Test Pilot and Site Leader, Honeywell Aerospace Joe Duval is the chief test pilot for Honeywell Aerospace and leads the team of test pilots who operate aircraft ranging from the Boeing 757 to the Embraer E170 to the Convair CV-580. We talk with Joe about his job and what its like to fly a wide range of aircraft in a unique environment. The JCPOA and Aircraft Orders With the recent withdrawal of the US from the JCPOA (Iran nuclear deal), we look at what’s next for Boeing and the orders from Iranian airlines. A bigger picture on engine issues We talk about how consolidation in the aerospace industry affects how airlines can react to problems, like issues affecting a whole family of engines.
April 27, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk, we take an in depth look at Southwest flight 1380, including some of the media coverage after the accident. And we talk to Jon Ostrower about the new Emergency Airworthiness Directive requiring inspections of the CFM56-7B engine. We also see how engine issues are affecting the 787-9 and we try to best Airbus in a rebranding of the C Series. Download a transcript of this episode Southwest flight 1380 On 17 April 2018, Southwest Airlines flight 1380 from New York to Dallas suffered an uncontained engine failure of the number 1 engine. The aircraft diverted safely to Philadelphia. Debris from the engine impacted the fuselage, breaking one of the cabin windows, and leading to the death of one passenger. We discuss the accident, how it has been covered in the media, and we talk to Jon Ostrower about the ongoing efforts to ensure a similar accident does not occur. FAA Emergency Airworthiness Directive regarding CFM56-7B engines EASA Airworthiness Directive regarding CFM56-7B engines Previously proposed FAA AD regarding CFM56-7B engines Rolls Royce Trent 1000 Engine issues are also plaguing the Rolls Royce Trent 1000 engine, which powers roughly a quarter of the 787-9 fleet. The need for inspections and remediation has led to multiple airlines, including Air New Zealand, Virgin Atlantic, LATAM, and British Airways to find workarounds to keep their operations running. Some airlines have employed wet leases while others are bringing retired aircraft out of storage. EASA Airworthiness Directive regarding Trent 1000 engines Help us rebrand the C Series Now that it has acquired the  C Series, Airbus is considering rebranding the aircraft to fit in with the rest of the Airbus family of aircraft. The reported proposal will see the CS100 and the CS330 renamed as the A210 and A230, respectively. We think you can do better. Email us with your suggestions for what you think Airbus should call the C Series. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
April 13, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk, Gavin Werbeloff steps in for Jason as we dig into the numbers around some recent aircraft orders. And we send Jason to Hamburg for the Aircraft Interiors Expo. Download a transcript of this episode Flights in eastern Mediterranean EASA issued a rapid alert notification for traffic in the eastern Mediterranean / Nicosia FIR. We talk about what that is and how it does and does not affect air traffic. American Airlines adds more 787s Gavin helps us understand the numbers behind American Airlines’ recent new Boeing 787 order and we explore the case of the disappearing A350 order. IAG takes a stake in Norwegian Airline holding company IAG—owners of British Airways, Iberia, Aer Lingus, and Vueling—took a stake in Norwegian this week in advance of possible take over talks. We explore what this might mean for Norwegian, IAG, and the airline industry writ large. Aircraft Interiors Expo Jason and Seth Miller join us from the Aircraft Interiors Expo in Hamburg, Germany to fill us in on some of the new developments affecting the passenger experience that we may soon see onboard our flights. Guys. @RockwellCollins built a thermoelectric cooling and heating chip into a galley sidewall. Using the Peltier Effect, it warms cookies and chills drinks for passenger self service. Warm cookies!! #AIX18 #PaxEx pic.twitter.com/2WV0zGBPzU — Jason Rabinowitz (@AirlineFlyer) April 10, 2018 myFlightradar24 As promised, Gavin’s travels from 2017 as seen on myFlightradar24. Learn more about myFlightradar24 here. Virgin Galactic’s VSS Unity makes first powered flight Space Ship Two made its first powered flight, a big step towards space. We tracked it with MLAT, but it turns out MLAT at supersonic speeds is a bit of a challenge. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
March 30, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk, Air India and Qantas make history and Singapore Airlines takes home the first 787-10. Plus, Ken Hoke is back to fill us in on RVSM airspace. Download a transcript of this episode. Air India flies to Tel Aviv through Saudi Arabia On 22 March, Air India’s inaugural Delhi-Tel Aviv flight became the first commercial flight to transit Saudi Arabian airspace en route to Israel in 70 years. AI139 will operate thrice weekly service between Delhi and Tel Aviv, overflying Saudi Arabian airspace to save approximately two hours over the previous fastest routing between India and Israel. A new kangaroo route Qantas launched the first ever non-stop flight between Australia and the United Kingdom last week, connecting Perth and London via a 17 hour flight. The new QF9 also becomes the world’s second longest flight (by distance) at 14,500 km. Qantas’ first flights between Australia and London took four days and stopped in six cities in between London and Australia. Singapore takes delivery of the first 787-10 Singapore took delivery of the first 787-10, the largest member of the 787 family. An-225 prepares for commercial work The An-225 is set to fly in April. We’re awaiting on the finalized schedule, but look for it to be flying over Europe soon. Here’s video of its first test flight after being equipped with ADS-B. An A330 or Piper PA-28? An A330 had an identity crisis and look at the reasons why. RVSM airspace Captain Ken Hoke returns with a new glossary term: RVSM airspace. Things we promised to put in the show notes It’s (mostly) done! I have put together my own little @yvrairport @LEGO_Group airport. #AvGeek pic.twitter.com/jMqIXa2Jle — Jason Rabinowitz (@AirlineFlyer) March 26, 2018 Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.  
March 16, 2018
In this episode, we celebrate 1 year of AvTalk! We talk to aerospace journalist Jon Ostrower about Boeing’s new mid-market airplane, the 10,000th 737 rolls off the production line, and the massive GE9X flies for the first time. Boeing’s NMA We talk with Jon Ostrower to learn more about Boeing’s plan for the NMA, the manufacturer’s first new airplane since the 787. You can read Jon’s in-depth reporting on the NMA here. The 10,000th 737 The 10,000th 737 ever produced rolled off the production line this week. N8717M, a 737 MAX 8, will go home with Southwest Airlines soon. The GE9X Flies The GE9X, which will power the Boeing 777X, flew for the first time this week aboard GE Aviation’s 747-400 flying test bed. Recent Crashes and MLAT Coverage We discuss recent crashes and how the data available is affected by how the aircraft were tracked. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
March 2, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk, we welcome UPS Airlines captain Ken Hoke for an extended conversation about life as a cargo pilot. We also discuss some recent deliveries, certifications, and another recent crash. An Extended Conversation with Captain Ken Hoke Ken Hoke, a captain flying the 757 and 767 for UPS Airlines joins us for an extended conversation about flying cargo. Captain Hoke explained Metars for us in our last episode, and has contributed to our blog in the past, giving us great information on go-arounds and what happens when an aircraft squawks 7700. Certified and Delivered Embraer E190-E2 certified, Boeing 737 MAX 9 certified, Airbus A350-1000 delivered. Plus, a random journey for an Embraer E175. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
February 16, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk, we get an update on the investigation into the crash of Saratov Airlines flight 703, two airlines suffer engine incidents, we explain why London City Airport closed for a day, and we learn once and for all how to use a Metar. Download a full transcript of this episode Saratov Airlines flight 703 Saratov Airlines flight 703 crashed shorty after takeoff from Moscow’s Domodedovo Airport. The flight was operated by an Antonov An-148-100B, registered RA-61704. Russian officials have released a preliminary report on the crash, available here. Flightradar24 data from flight 703 United Airlines flight 1175 United 1175 suffered an engine issue en route from San Francisco to Honolulu, losing the cowling and additional parts from its right engine about 45 minutes before landing. The flight landed safely in Honolulu. that looks bad, plane and simple ✈️ #ua1175 pic.twitter.com/EKXUxDBw9q — Erik Haddad (@erikhaddad) February 13, 2018 Delta Air Lines flight 55 A Delta flight from Lagos to Atlanta also suffered an engine issue shortly after takeoff. That flight returned to Lagos safely and passengers were evacuated via emergency slides on the runway. A handful of non-serious injuries were reported. London City’s (World War II) bomb scare London City Airport was closed for a day after the discovery of World War II ordnance near the end of the runway. The device was removed for safe detonation elsewhere and the airport reopened. Lufthansa’s new livery Lufthansa introduced their new livery as it celebrates the 100th anniversary of the iconic crane logo. We try to figure out if we like it. The new livery is currently painted on 747-8I D-ABYA and A321 D-AISP. The A321LR’s first big test Airbus sent the new A321LR on its first big test flight this week across the Atlantic Ocean from Paris to New York. Metar? What’s that? Captain Ken Hoke explains what a Metar is and how its used in aviation. Metar resources See current and historical Metars Decoding a Metar    
February 2, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk, we welcome back CNN aviation editor Jon Ostrower to discuss the surprise ruling by the ITC in the Boeing—Bombardier C Series tariff case. We round up some news from the past few weeks and we answer the age old question: how many plumbers does it take to fix a broken lavatory? ITC rules in favor of the C Series In a surprise ruling, the ITC voted in favor of the C Series, and against Boeing, in a trade dispute that has wide-ranging implications for the aviation industry. We invite CNN aviation editor Jon Ostrower back to the program to discuss what the ruling means for the industry and where Bombardier and Boeing go from here. Plugged up plane plunges plumbers’ plans We recap the past few weeks in aviation, including the Norwegian flight with 85 plumbers aboard that needed to return to Oslo… because the toilets stopped working. Elsewhere, Alaska Airlines unveiled the first former Virgin America A320 to wear the Alaska livery, the 787-10 earned FAA certification, WOW Air sent and A321neo from Reykjavik to Los Angeles, and Mike Isler continues to have one of the best jobs in the world. More @Delta air-to-air work with the Airbus A350 in California. No passengers on board, pre-coordinated flight. pic.twitter.com/NAFfWQ60Fz — Mike Isler (@MikeIsler) January 30, 2018 Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
January 19, 2018
On this episode of AvTalk we recap the meltdown at JFK Airport in New York after a blizzard that forced some flights to wait over 7 hours for a gate. A 737 tries to go swimming in the Black Sea. We review the 2017 Airbus and Boeing delivery numbers. And we remember a few moments from this week in aviation history. JFK Meltdown We addressed JFK’s meltdown in a special YouTube episode, but in this episode we look in to see if the situation has been resolved. Spoiler: it hasn’t. We also talk about the various investigations underway and Jason offers some ideas on how to fix it. This week in Aviation History This week marked the 9th anniversary of the ‘Miracle on the Hudson’, the successful water landing and evacuation of a US Airways A320 in the Hudson River, and the 10th anniversary of the BA38 forced landing at London-Heathrow after losing power in both engines. 2017 Airbus and Boeing Delivery Numbers We review the Airbus and Boeing delivery numbers for 2017 and hit some of the highlights. We also talk about how financially ill-equipped we are to purchase an aircraft from either manufacturer. Pegasus PC8622 A Pegasus 737 overran the runway in Trabzon this week, sliding down a cliff toward the Black Sea. The daylight images of the Pegasus Airlines 737-800 that ran off the runway at Trabzon (and off a cliff) are just unreal. https://t.co/rrBk1mQ6ut Curiously, the network blurred out the branding on the aircraft. (via IHA News) pic.twitter.com/tpQJ8QyzgC — Jon Ostrower (@jonostrower) January 14, 2018 Goodbye Redwood As part of the Alaska Airlines + Virgin America merger, the airlines are now operating under the Alaska operating certificate and the Virgin America callsign ‘Redwood’ has gone away. We’re also keeping an eye on N625VA, which may be the first former Virgin America A320 in Alaska Airlines paint. Ground Stop Our first in a series of glossary terms. What’s a ground stop? We answer that question. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
January 5, 2018
Happy new year from AvTalk! We’ll be back in 2 weeks with our first new episode of the year. In this episode, we revisit three interviews from our earlier episodes that really stood out to us. 225,000 pounds of ketchup First up is Andrew Poure, who filled us in on the world of cargo airlines and how getting things from A to B is not as simple as it seems. Listen to the full episode The future of Chinese aviation Just after the first flight of the COMAC C919 in May, we sat down with Jon Ostrower, CNN’s aviation editor to learn more about where the C919 fits into the airliner landscape and how the Chinese aviation market is reshaping the industry. Listen to the full episode Low-cost, long-haul Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren has covered some amazing aviation stories over the years, from the final flight of the last passenger DC-10 to the first flight of the A350, Jeremy has been all over the world capturing the world of flight. But one story he wasn’t sure he wanted to cover was 9 hours in a Norwegian 737 MAX on delivery from Seattle to Oslo. But Jeremy did go, and we had him on to discuss that trip and to talk about the proliferation of long-haul, low-cost carriers around the world. Listen to the full episode Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
December 22, 2017
On this episode of AvTalk, we look back at 2017 for an aviation year in review and look forward to what may happen in 2018. Download a transcript of this episode Editor’s note: we recorded this episode prior to news of a possible Boeing acquisition of Embraer breaking. This is surely now at the top of the list of things to watch in 2018. 2017 In our survey we asked listeners to tell us what they thought the biggest stories of the year were. By far, the Airbus + Bombardier news was mentioned the most. Also of note were the various airline bankruptcies, and multiple retirements of 747s from fleets around the world. 2018 We also look ahead to 2018 and some bold—and not-so-bold—predictions about the year ahead. Thank you! Thank you for listening! We’re thrilled to have finished 21 episodes and we’re looking forward to the year ahead. Happy Holidays and happy new year! Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
December 8, 2017
On this episode of AvTalk, we head to Stockholm to go inside Flightradar24. We sit down with co-founder Mikael Robertsson to learn how FR24 got started, and we talk to chief technology officer, Sean Atkinson to learn more about how FR24 works. We also check-in on a volcano in Bali, the world’s largest turboprop aircraft, and our favorite new airline, Joon. Download a transcript of this episode The Antonov An-22 The world’s largest turboprop, the Antonov An-22 is flying this week and drawing the eyes and ears of many in the UK, Finland, Canada, and Cuba. Take a look at the video I caught of the @AirlinesAntonov AN22 approaching @manairport pic.twitter.com/sLYlpmwlIk — Martin Orme (@ormey150873) December 2, 2017 Mt Agung eruption cancels flights in Bali The eruption of Mt Agung and the resulting ash cloud led to the cancellation of flights in Bali. We talk about why volcanic ash and aircraft engines don’t mix. Iraqi airspace reopens to international overflights After a few years of avoiding Iraqi airspace, airlines are beginning to return to the country. We talk about what this might mean for your next flight. How Flightradar24 got started We sit down with Mikael Robertsson, co-founder of Flightradar24 to talk about how it all got started and how an empty sky in 2010 was a big leap for flight tracking. We flew on planes Ian and Jason offer mini-trip reports on the flights to Stockholm. Spoiler: Jason’s trip was a bit rougher than Ian’s. How Flightradar24 works Chief Technology Officer Sean Atkinson joins the podcast to talk about how Flightradar24 works. Joon! Joon, our favorite coffee shop inside a pet store that is ‘also an airline’ launched service this week. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
November 24, 2017
On this episode of AvTalk, we welcome back Seth Miller to discuss his recent adventures on a variety of Japanese low-cost carriers and his flight on the COMAC ARJ 21. He also fills us in on the status of Operation Puerto Rico Care Lift and the upcoming Operation Gift Lift. And we recap the massive order book of the Dubai Airshow and check in on a few A380s in the news. Download a transcript of this episode (pdf) Dubai Airshow recap Airlines and leasing companies walked away from the Dubai Airshow this year with over 800 orders for new aircraft. The largest order, from Indigo Partners will see 430 aircraft delivered to 4 low-cost carriers. Fly Dubai also placed a large order, purchasing up to 225 Boeing 737 MAX. Emirates also ordered 40 Boeing 787-10, adding a new type to its fleet. Take an A380, leave an A380 The damaged Air France A380 in Goose Bay will get the engine needed for weight and balance to ferry back to Europe on 3 operable engines. The damaged engine will be ferried back to Europe for further examination. A detailed explanation and the flight schedule for the engine transport is available here. The first commercial A380 recently returned to lessor by Singapore Airlines may see new life with Hifly soon, but many questions still remain about who it will be operating for or if the plane will actually fly again. In conversation with Seth Miller The Delta A350 inaugural flight, 5 Japanese low-cost carriers in 44 hours, a flight on the COMAC ARJ21, and Operation Puerto Rico Gift Lift. We chat with Seth Miller about his recent adventures and a very worthy cause. The A350-1000 receives EASA & FAA certification After almost a year of flight tests, the Airbus A350-1000 has received certification from EASA and the FAA, paving the way for delivery to the launch customer Qatar Airways toward the end of the year. AvTalk episode 20 from Stockholm Ian and Jason head to Stockholm in a few weeks to record episode 20. We’ll be talking about how Flightradar24 works and some upcoming projects. If you have questions about Flightradar24, email us and we’ll do our best to answer them in Episode 20. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
November 11, 2017
In this episode of AvTalk, we send Jason to Hawaii on the final United Airlines 747 flight, the Maho Beach Cam comes back after Hurricane Irma, and Emirates takes delivery of its 100th Airbus A380. A United 747 Farewell After nearly 50 years of service, United Airlines retired its 747 fleet in style this week with a recreation of its first 747 flight from 1970. Jason, and many, many other avgeeks, were on board to celebrate the end of an era. We dig deep into the airline’s 747 history and talk with some of the people on board to see what the United 747 meant to them. On departure from San Francisco, the flight made a special flypast of the Golden Gate bridge. We got a special departure from @United out of SFO. Low and slow over the Golden Gate Bridge and downtown. #UA747farewell pic.twitter.com/lfXpoP9kkh — Ryan McBride (@rpmcb) November 8, 2017 The Maho Beach Cam Returns After being destroyed in Hurricane Irma, the Maho Beach Cam has returned, broadcasting live from next to the runway in St Maarten. Head over to MahoBeachCam.com to see and hear live traffic and track flights thanks to the Flightradar24 receiver hosted next to the camera. Emirates gets its 100th A380 Emirates took delivery of its 100th A380 this week. A6-EUV will enter revenue service shortly. Emirates still has dozens of A380s on order and rumors are swirling that they will announce additional orders at this year’s Dubai Air Show. Pilots to Follow on Twitter Last week we asked followers on Twitter about the pilots they like to follow. The response was impressive and we’ve compiled a list. Get the details here. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
October 27, 2017
On this episode of AvTalk, we sit down with Jon Ostrower, CNN’s aviation editor, for an extended conversation about the recent Airbus and Bombardier C Series news. Jason makes a quick trip to France for the A330neo’s first flight, we go around for one last pass at Air Berlin, and we run through some news you may have missed in the past few weeks. The Airbus A330neo first flight Jason made the trip to Toulouse for the A330neo’s first flight. We talk about what’s new on the neo and one of its defining features. A final go around at Air Berlin Listen at 6:07 Air Berlin’s final long-haul flight featured a low pass and go around by the pilots in Düsseldorf, which has caused quite a stir. We discuss the flight and preview Air Berlin’s final flight on 27 October. Airbus + C Series Listen at 10:31 We sit down for an extended conversation with Jon Ostrower, CNN’s aviation editor, about the joint future of Airbus and the Bombardier C Series. How’d we get here, what does it mean for Airbus and the C Series, and what does it mean for the competitive landscape? Aviation news round-up Listen at 42:48 Southwest announces their finally headed to Hawaii, Alaska Airlines retires its last Combi, an Air Canada flight makes news in San Francisco again, and United brings its 747 Friend Ship to say goodbye to employees. 225,000 pounds of ketchup and other stories from the cargo world Coming up Captain Ken Hoke will join us to talk about go arounds and how they help enhance flight safety. Hoke, who runs the AeroSavvy blog, recently published a guest post with some fantastic in-depth information on go arounds on the Flightradar24 blog. We’ll have him on the podcast to discuss his piece and dig a little deeper. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
October 14, 2017
On this episode of AvTalk, Jason finally gets to fly the Bombardier C Series, we say goodbye to Monarch Airlines, get an update on the Air France A380 that suffered an engine failure over Greenland, and find out how Loon balloons might soon be helping the people of Puerto Rico recover from Hurricane Maria. Trouble in Europe In a sad conclusion to a once-great airline, Monarch Airlines has entered administration. The airline ceased operations at the beginning of October, leaving the UK’s CAA to arrange repatriation to the UK for thousands of Monarch’s passengers. We take a look at the repatriation effort and some of the airlines you may not have heard of. We also look into the fate of Monarch’s fleet. Another fleet that will soon find a new home is Air Berlin’s. The airline is ceasing all operations by 28 October. Air Berlin had previously announced it was ceasing long-haul operations by 15 October. And we look into Ryanair’s recent schedule difficulties as they cancel 18,000 flights affecting 400,000 passengers. Air France loses (most of) an engine On 30 September, Air France flight 66 en route from Paris to Los Angeles suffered an engine failure over Greenland, leading to a safe diversion to Goose Bay in Canada. The aircraft, an Airbus A380-861 powered by Engine Alliance GP7200 engines, suffered a failure of the number 4 engine—the outer, right engine, resulting in a large portion of the engine falling to the ground from approximately 37,000 feet. We talk about the investigation and impressive manner in which the aircraft will return to Europe. See Captain Dave Wallsworth’s list of requirements for A380 three-engine operation The avgeek trifecta Jason heads to Europe to connect with Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren again for an avgeek adventure aboard the Bombardier C Series CS100 and the Avro RJ85. We put them to work testing the sound inside each aircraft. Jason also discovered this interesting quirk on the RJ85. Speaking of curious things, these Avro RJ85 indie shades are bizarre. Never seen a split shade before. pic.twitter.com/rCszaWCmYx — Jason Rabinowitz (@AirlineFlyer) October 13, 2017 Loons to Puerto Rico Loons may soon be helping Puerto Rico connect after Hurricane Maria. Project Loon, which is a project inside X, the innovation lab of Alphabet (Google’s parent company), provides connectivity via large helium balloons. We talk about how the balloons work and how you can track them on Flightradar24. Let us know what you think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
September 29, 2017
On this episode of AvTalk, Jason reports from the APEX EXPO in Long Beach, we chat with Seth Miller about the fate of the Bombardier C Series in the US, and we Swoop in to discuss Air France’s newest creation, Joon. Swoop and Joon WestJet introduced their new ultra low-cost carrier, Swoop, this week and Air France’s new airline Joon received a full roll out. We talk about each airline’s prospects. A Big Blow to Bombardier We discuss with Seth Miller the ITC’s decision to place a 219.63% tariff on Bombardier C Series aircraft imported into the United States and the major impact this could have on Delta Air Lines. We also try to make sense of the decision and work through some of the possibilities for the future. The APEX Expo And here’s the @GEE_Media Grumman Albatross landing with Mr sitting in the node bubble. Amazing ride. #AvGeek pic.twitter.com/uqpICLWkSP — Jason Rabinowitz (@AirlineFlyer) September 29, 2017 Bi-weekly Air Berlin Update Air Berlin is sending its leased A330s to storage and winding down its long-haul operations by 15 October. The rest of the airline’s assets are being divided among bidders. COMAC C919 Flies Again After nearly five months, the COMAC C919, the first large jetliner designed and built in China, made its second flight. Let Us Know What You Think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
September 15, 2017
On this episode of AvTalk, we discuss the massive aviation impacts of Hurricane Irma. From Caribbean devastation to a total lack of flights in the air over Florida for more than a day, we take an in-depth look at what’s happened and how the recovery effort has begun. And Jason’s 15-minutes of television fame comes from an unexpected source. Hurricane Irma Hurricane Irma moved through the Caribbean and Florida last week, leaving a devastating path of destruction in its wake. We talk about the effects of Irma on aviation from the Leeward Islands to Atlanta and check in on some of the more harder hit areas like St. Maarten. Jason walks us through how a Delta flight to San Juan became a viral sensation. Jason, go make your bed We run down the list of rescue flights and post-Irma evacuation and supply flights and take a look at where airlines parked planes out of Irma’s path. We also talk about the planes that didn’t make it out ahead of the storm. We also take a look at how Irma affected ADS-B coverage in the area of the storm, and how that’s made for increased use of estimated coverage. The Hurricane Hunters were also busy during Irma and we talk about how they help forecast the hurricane’s path. #NOAA42 live through the eye of #Irma, while #NOAA49 surveys the edge of the storm. 📡 https://t.co/HLCIitPWzN pic.twitter.com/WPqKyJF8Zg — Flightradar24 (@flightradar24) September 8, 2017 Tracking the Pope’s Travels We talk about the Pope’s travels and how that means a bit more work for the Flighradar24 servers. Our Bi-weekly Air Berlin Update We check in on Air Berlin’s insolvency and how it’s affecting other airlines as well. United Decides More, but Smaller United shifted its order of Airbus A350s to more aircraft, but a smaller variant. Let Us Know What You Think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
September 1, 2017
In episode 13, we look at the effects of Hurricane Harvey on aviation and see how airlines are helping with relief efforts. GE Aviation retires the oldest active 747. Southwest Airlines takes delivery of its first 737 MAX and American Airlines isn’t too far behind. We get surprised by the possible new home for the first production A380s. And we again welcome Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren to the podcast to hear about another 747 retirement and how we can improve our avgeek photography. Hurricane Harvey Devastates Houston Hurricane Harvey devastated Houston earlier this week and brought flooding to much of the Houston area. Both major Houston airports, George Bush Intercontinental-IAH and William P. Hobby Airport-HOU were closed for days to commercial traffic. Airlines worked hard to help get stranded passengers out of the airports and to bring relief supplies in. Traffic is slowly returning to normal as the airports reopen. GE Aviation Retires the Oldest Active 747 Listen at 10:28 GE Aviation officially retired its 747-100 Flying Test Bed, the oldest active 747. GE had used the flying test bed registered N747GE since 1992 to develop engines like the GE90 (777), GEnx (747-8 & 787), Engine Alliance GP7200 (A380), CFM-56 (various), and the LEAP (737 MAX, A320neo, C919). Interview—EVA Air Retires their Passenger 747s and How to Improve Your AvGeek Photography Listen at 16:44 We talk again with Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren, who just flew on EVA Air’s final passenger 747 flight from Hong Kong to Taipei. We also get Jeremy to tell us how we can improve our avgeek photography. EVA Air 747’s unusual upper deck seating arrangement. Southwest Takes Delivery of its First 737 MAX Listen at 33:07 Southwest Airlines took delivery of their first 737 MAX this week and American Airlines is getting ready for theirs as well. We talk about how the MAX fits in to Southwest’s fleet and why Jason may soon need new knees. A Surprising New Home for Used A380s Listen at 36:27 The first production A380s have been parked by Singapore Airlines ahead of lease return and a surprising airline may be putting them back into service. We try to understand what HiFly is up to. Air Berlin Cuts Long-haul Routes Listen at 39:21 As we discussed in episode 12, Air Berlin has entered insolvency, but they are now cutting long-haul routes as other airlines begin to figure out how to acquire pieces of Air Berlin’s operations. Let Us Know What You Think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
August 18, 2017
On episode 12 of AvTalk, we discuss Air Berlin’s insolvency and what that might mean for other airlines in Europe, NASA gets ready to study the eclipse, and we list some of our favorite airports. We also talk with Dan Kierna, an airport operations supervisor at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago about what it takes to keep one of the world’s busiest airports running on a daily basis. Air Berlin files for insolvency Air Berlin filed for insolvency this week after Etihad withdrew its support for the airline. We discuss what might be the fate of the airline and its aircraft. NASA gets ready for the eclipse NASA will send two of its WB-57 aircraft to chase the eclipse over the United States on 21 August. They will be conducting high-altitude research during the eclipse. Track the aircraft as N926NA and N927NA. From NASA: Taking observations from twin telescopes mounted on the noses of the planes, Caspi will capture the clearest images of the Sun’s outer atmosphere — the corona — to date and the first-ever thermal images of Mercury, revealing how temperature varies across the planet’s surface. See NASA’s fuller explanation of their eclipse mission in the video below. Boeing draws a 787 with a 787 Of course, this occurred just after we recorded the last episode. To perform ETOPS testing on the new Rolls Royce Trent 1000 TEN engine, which will power the new Boeing 787-10, Boeing spent 18 hours in the sky over the US drawing a 787. More on that here. Our favorite airports Jason posed the question on twitter, so we decided to do our own lists, and get a little impromptu lesson on cemeteries in the middle of airports. Not Atlanta, as Ian states in the episode, but Savannah Airport has two headstones in the runway. Chicago-O’Hare’s remaining cemetery, surrounded by the rest of the airport. Keeping the Airport Running We chat with Dan Kierna, airport operations supervisor at Chicago’s O’Hare International Airport, one of the busiest in the world, to see what it takes to keep the airport running and what happens when things go bad. A new receiver near Chernobyl This week we activated a new receiver new Chernobyl. We discuss how the receiver got there and why it’s a helpful location for tracking very large aircraft. Read more about our new receiver near Chernobyl Russian Treaty on Open Skies observation flights Twitter and cable news were abuzz last week when a Russian surveillance aircraft overflew Washington D.C. We discuss the flights and note that they’re nothing new. See more on the Open Skies flights and view flight data New planes for the Patriots New airkrafts. pic.twitter.com/Af2gI3G0vQ — New England Patriots (@Patriots) August 9, 2017 After having issues with charter operations, the New England Patriots football team purchased two Boeing 767s for use during their season. The 767s formerly flew for American Airlines and had been sto...
August 4, 2017
In Episode 11, we check in on the 747 to note a few melancholy milestones and the possibility that two 747s might soon find an interesting new home. We run through some of the flights that made the news recently, including some for the wrong reasons. And we ponder the thorny legal issues that airborne labor and delivery can create. Melancholy Milestones As the 747 ages, many airlines are sending their fleet to the desert, marking the end of long-haul routes and the conclusion of domestic service. We walk through some of the milestones, including the delivery of what is likely the last commercial passenger 747. Also in the news this week, the US Air Force and Boeing moved closer to a deal to use two 747s originally ordered by now-defunct airline Transaero and currently stored in the California desert as the next presidential aircraft. We debate the merits of this approach. Happy Milestones In July, Flightradar24 set a monthly record of 5.3 million flights and a daily record of 189,168. We also installed a few new remote receivers, including the third receiver on St Helena and one in far-north Greenland. Flights in the News An Air India flight forgot to retract its landing gear and needed to divert because it ran low on fuel. As part of its ongoing dispute with countries in region, Qatar has requested its own Flight Information Region. International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Extraordinary Session Urges All Member States to Abide by Chicago Convention pic.twitter.com/mTdknIhh5C — المواصلات والاتصالات (@MOTC_QA) July 31, 2017   A interesting flight over Ontario, Canada caught our eye. MNR @ONresources Twin Otter plane flying low level pattern over Halton. Likely dropping rabies vaccination bait drops (fox, raccoon, skunk). pic.twitter.com/bzZ3Xrdobp — Tom Podolec CTV News (@TomPodolec) July 28, 2017   There was a hail of a storm in Istanbul and at least four aircraft were damaged, including severe damage to an Atlas Global A320. A320 encounters a hail storm at 5000ft, Istanbul Turkey. pic.twitter.com/Tus2NVil9n — Marty Abbott ✈ 🇬🇧 (@martyabbott936) July 28, 2017 Video of the Atlas Global A320 landing back at Istanbul with significant hail damage. Photos of the Delta 747 damaged by hail in 2015. Spending 3.5 hours holding waiting for the weather to clear at Funchal, Enter Air flight 834 ended up diverting away anyway. Lufthansa 543 welcomed an additional passenger en route from Bogota to Frankfurt when a pas...
July 21, 2017
In episode 10, we talk to Andrew Poure, a flight operations supervisor for a U.S.-based major cargo airline. We see how construction fumes and cows affected aviation last week, celebrate an impressive milestone, and quickly preview next week’s Airventure. All Cargo, All the Time We sat down with Andrew Poure, who works for a major U.S. cargo airline, to learn more about what it takes to ship anything from cherries to horses around the world. Construction Fumes Cause Airspace Closure Construction fumes caused the evacuation of the Washington ARTCC in Leesburg, Virgina last week, leading to airspace closures and significant delays along the U.S. east coast. Airspace clearing (2200-0100 UTC) following the evacuation of Washington ARTCC. Live flights: https://t.co/cjH7MbkPNK pic.twitter.com/R0rCirKMR2 — Flightradar24 (@flightradar24) July 11, 2017 Cows on a Plane Facing a milk shortage due to restrictions related to its ongoing dispute with other countries in the region, Qatar is importing dairy cows. The first 165 of 4000 cows arrived last week. 🐄 🥛 Facing a milk shortage, Qatar flew in 165 cows yesterday from Budapest. 📼 https://t.co/uDNw0Ys8Ty 📺 https://t.co/B4xNFv9Gvv pic.twitter.com/EiYwPbo3VT — Flightradar24 (@flightradar24) July 12, 2017 ‘Al’ Blackman’s 75 Years of Service American Airlines maintenance technician Azriel ‘Al’ Blackman has worked for the airline for 75 years. This week AA’s 777 N751AN was painted with Blackman’s signature on the forward fuselage in celebration of his service, which is now officially a Guinness world record. Oshkosh Airventure, the world’s largest aviation gathering begins Monday in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. We give you a quick preview of what to expect. We attended Oshkosh last year to tour Cathay Pacific’s ‘Hong Kong Trader’ 747-8F. Watch our video tour. Let Us Know What You Think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
July 7, 2017
In episode 9, we talk about some of the stranger aviation stories over the past few weeks, including a passenger new to approach patterns and a woman who threw coins into an engine for luck. We also talk with Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren Norwegian’s first 737 MAX delivery and long-haul, low-cost flying. Approach and Landing A passenger, not understanding how approach patterns work, accused the pilots of her flight of being ‘drunk’. It escalated from there. We talk about why that’s such a serious accusation and how approaches to major airports can sometimes lead to a circuitous path. The original tweet has since been deleted and person who made the accusation has since protected their twitter account, but the main thread begins here. Long-haul, Low-cost Flying Norwegian took delivery of its first 737 MAX last week and our guest, Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren was on board the 9 hour flight from Seattle to Oslo. Jeremy describes the flight and we discuss the perks and perils of long-haul, low-cost flying. British Airways leases Qatar A320s British Airways is flying some short- and medium-haul routes with Qatar Airways aircraft and crews. We talk about why and how you can see which flights will be operated by Qatar Airways aircraft. An Aircraft Engine is Not a Wishing Well An elderly woman flying from Shanghai to Guangzhou on China Southern Airlines delayed the flight by five hours after throwing nine coins into the engine for luck during boarding. That’s a 34 minute per coin delay. Let Us Know What You Think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
June 23, 2017
In episode 8, we recap some of the major announcements from the Paris Air Show, like the launch of the 737 MAX 10, this year’s big seller, Boeing’s tease of a ‘New Market Airplane’, and Airbus’ new A380plus winglets. A brief apology, as we had earlier planned to discuss ATC privatization, but as everyone we wanted to bring on the show was already in Paris, this was not possible. We will discuss the issue in a future episode. Paris Air Show Highlights The 737 MAX 10 was launched and quickly purchased. Boeing’s NMA or what may become the 797 was teased by the company. Airbus added winglets to the A380 to complete the A380plus. Airbus also developed ejectable data and voice recorders for inclusion on the A350 and other aircraft beginning in a few years. And we briefly cover Flightradar24’s partnership with NAVBLUE on N-tracking, a new global coverage solution. We’d love to hear your thoughts on Airbus’ A380plus winglets. Email us or drop us a note on twitter or Facebook. In our discussion of Paris Air Show flying displays, we mentioned a special transponder mode. Here’s what that switch looks like on a Boeing 737-800. Boeing Takes the 737 MAX 9 and 787-10 Out for Spin Prior to the Paris Air Show, Boeing took its 737 MAX 9 and 787-10 up over Washington to shoot some amazing air-to-air video. Watch the video and see the data behind the flight. Weather Balloon Buzzed by a Delta A319 at 37,000 feet A weather balloon above Newark, New York (near Rochester) got a close look at Delta flight 159 on its way from Boston to Detroit. Watch the video below. Let Us Know What You Think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
June 9, 2017
In episode 7, we discuss the flight ban affecting Qatar and how it is reshaping air traffic in the region. We also attempt to understand the IT problems that forced British Airways to cancel a full day of flights at London-Heathrow. Qatar Flight Ban Following the severing of diplomatic relations with Qatar, Bahrain, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates banned all flights to and from Qatar and overflights by Qatar-registered aircraft. Restrictions put in place by Bahrain leave Qatar Airways with one route in and one route out of Doha. We discuss the particulars and what effects the ban is having on air traffic in the region. For more on the Qatar flight ban, see our in-depth blog post British Airways’ IT Meltdown We try to understand the British Airways IT meltdown that stranded thousands of passengers and created headaches for the better part of a week. Quick Bits of Good News We leave bans and meltdowns behind for a few small pieces of good news as well. ✈️ The first Airbus A321neo (N921VA) entered service with Virgin America. ✈️ We set a single-day tracking record on 26 May, tracking 182,790 flights. ✈️ Stratolaunch rolls out ✈️ Follow Virgin Galactic’s White Knight Two and VSS Unity. Upcoming in a Special Episode 8 We’ll have an in-depth discussion of Air Traffic Control privatization in our next episode with guests who know much more than Jason and Ian. Tune in then! Let Us Know What You Think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast! Want to send us additional feedback, just email us.
May 25, 2017
In Episode 6 we head to Japan for an interview with John Walton to get an update on the status of the Mitsubishi MRJ regional jet program. We also delve into the peculiarities of Japanese aviation. Checking in on the MRJ Jason travels to Japan to meet up with John Walton, Runway Girl Network’s deputy editor, to visit the Mitsubishi MRJ program in Nagoya. We discuss the state of the program and the aircraft’s commercial potential. How Japanese Aviation Stands Out Also in our conversation with John, we learn more about how Japanese aviation stands out in terms of aircraft utilization and service. Ladies and Gentlemen, This is Your Captain, the King, Speaking Unbeknownst to passengers and the public, Dutch King Willem-Alexander has been piloting KLM short-haul flights for the past 21 years. Ex-Singapore Airlines A380s now for Sale Singapore Airlines is retiring 5 early-build A380s as they take new A380s from Airbus. We ponder their fate as they go up for sale. New ICAO Type Codes Make Tracking 737 MAX and A320neo Easier With a recent update to its list of aircraft type codes, ICAO makes it easy to track the A320neo and 737 MAX families. We talk about the new codes and how to use them. Let Us Know What You Think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast!
May 12, 2017
In Episode 5 we sit down for an extended interview with CNN Aviation Editor Jon Ostrower to talk about the COMAC C919’s first flight and burgeoning Chinese aviation market. We also learn how to track newly built aircraft and send Jason off to Japan. COMAC C919 First Flight and Chinese Aviation We sat down with CNN aviation editor Jon Ostrower for an extended discussion of the COMAC C919’s first flight and what the C919 means to the rapidly expanding aviation market. Tracking New Aircraft Following our discussion of the C919, we explain how to track newly built aircraft from Airbus and Boeing to newer entrants like Mitsubishi. For more on using aircraft filters, see our quick tutorial. Jason Flies to Japan Jason is headed to Japan, where he’ll meet up with John Walton to discuss Japanese aviation for our next episode. New Liveries and Flights We also discuss the first passenger flight to St. Helena, Hawaiian Airlines’ new livery, and the new special livery Iceland Air has painted on one of its 757s. Let Us Know What You Think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast!
April 25, 2017
In episode 4, we learn how most airlines navigate their way around North Korea, sit down with Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren to talk about the last US-based 747-200 flight, and learn about tracking aircraft that may be broadcasting the sporting event you’re watching on TV. Help more listeners find the show by leaving us a review on iTunes Navigating North Korea Jumping off from our blog post earlier this month, we talk about how airlines navigate around North Korean airspace and what effect, if any, current tensions might be having on traffic in the region. The First A321neo Goes Home Virgin America took delivery of the first Airbus A321neo this week to a muted reception. We talk about the reason for the less-than-normal fanfare and what it means for the A321neo’s future with the airline. The last US-based 747-200 The last US-based 747-200 completed its final revenue flight last week so we sit down with Jeremy Dwyer-Lindgren who was on hand for the final touchdown in Seattle. Patterns in the Sky Jason happened to be poking around and found a plane circling Boston last week. We investigate the world of television relay, aerial imaging, and instrument calibration flights. What are you doing up there, @DynamicAvi? pic.twitter.com/mjZh4yUVHz — Jason Rabinowitz (@AirlineFlyer) April 14, 2017 Let Us Know What You Think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast!
April 8, 2017
In a special Episode 3, we visit the Aircraft Interiors Expo in Hamburg, Germany to see what you might find inside or connected to an aircraft in the coming years. Help more listeners find the show by leaving us a review on iTunes The Aircraft Interiors Expo At this year’s Aircraft Interiors Expo, we walked the floor to see some of the new and interesting items that will make it into aircraft in the next few years. We sat in the newest seats, used the newest inflight entertainment systems, and learned about the future of inflight WiFi. Jason got a first hand look at Bombardier’s newest CS300 when airBaltic’s YL-CSC landed in Hamburg with only 30 flight hours. The CS300 is leading the way in cabin comfort and other seat manufacturers are following suit in making seats wider, especially for short-haul flights. Actual cooking on board an aircraft. This @LHTechnik induction stovetop let’s airlines cook, not just reheat. #AIX17 #PaxEx pic.twitter.com/tOvJTBK0fP — Jason Rabinowitz (@AirlineFlyer) April 4, 2017 We also got a first hand look at Lufthansa Technik’s induction cooking system, which allows food to be cooked, instead of just reheated, on board the aircraft. When it comes to cleaning up the dishes, we got a demo of the GermFalcon, a new system for sanitizing aircraft. We also heard about some of the news from the show that will make connecting to in-flight WiFi even easier on new planes. Let Us Know What You Think Like the podcast? Have suggestions for future shows? Let us know by leaving us a review on iTunes. Reviews on iTunes not only help us make a better show, they help more people find the podcast!
March 25, 2017
In Episode 2, Jason crawls inside a plane, we talk in circles about circular runways, wonder about the best job in aviation, and quickly preview the upcoming Aircraft Interiors Expo. Jason Crawls Inside a Plane Jason takes us to Malta where he spent the day with Lufthansa Technik at their MRO facility getting up close and personal with many places on the aircraft passengers don’t get to see. Descending into the electronics and engineering bay of an A330. #LHTAvDays #AvGeek pic.twitter.com/NE1pb0b5RE — Jason Rabinowitz (@AirlineFlyer) March 17, 2017 Aircraft Interiors Expo We preview the Aircraft Interiors Expo in Hamburg that we’ll be visiting the first week of April. Episode 3 of AvTalk will come to you from the Expo’s show floor. Circular Runways We discuss Dutch researcher Henk Hesselink’s idea for an airports with massive circular runways. Without spoiling too much, this article from NYCAviation’s Phil Derner is a close approximation of our thoughts. The Best Job in Aviation? Mike Isler probably has the best job in aviation. But the lawn care tractor driver at Auckland airport is a close second. We ponder what other jobs might be out there. Have thoughts on the best job in aviation? Let us know on Twitter, Facebook, or email us. Like the podcast? Leave us a review on iTunes, Stitcher, TuneIn, or Google Play.
March 14, 2017
Introductions We’re excited to introduce ‘AvTalk’, our new Flightradar24 aviation podcast, hosted by Ian Petchenik and Jason Rabinowitz, two aviation geeks with a passion for anything that flies. Ian is Flightradar24’s communications director, whom you may remember from such films as the Cathay Pacific 747 tour at Oshkosh. Jason’s been researching and writing about aviation (especially in-flight connectivity) for years for publications like Airline Reporter, Runway Girl Network, and Forbes. We’ll be bringing you a half-hour dose of aviation highlights every other week by avgeeks, for everyone. You can listen or download the podcast today from the blog and it will be available soon from your other favorite podcast outlets like iTunes, Stitcher, and Google Music shortly. The Maho Beach Cam Returns Yes folks, you guessed it — https://t.co/TUjTdZ79Jp is back! Thanks to Travel Rent-A-Car and AAA Car Rental at SXM #avgeek @flightradar24 pic.twitter.com/MzJi0dYvkN — PTZtv (@PTZtv) March 4, 2017 We welcome the HD Maho Beach Cam back with open arms. New and Exciting ADS-B Coverage New receivers in the Flightradar24 network and keeping tabs on the receiver in Antarctica. 17 Hours on a Plane Would you sit on a plane for 17 hours? We weigh the pros and cons and decide we might just walk. Conversions, combis, and the ‘Milk Run’ The first 737-700 freight conversion for Alaska Airlines is finished, we talk about how the airline will be using its newest aircraft type. New York Traffic JFK Airport in New York begins a major runway rehabilitation project. Jason fills us in on what that means for flights in and out of the airport. Air Canada and Who Else Might Need a New Livery With Air Canada’s recent livery refresh, we wonder who else might be due for some new paint. Hint: We Want Your Feedback We want this to be something you’ll enjoy! Let us know what you want us to talk about. What aviation questions do you have? Who would you like to hear from? Let us know via Twitter, Facebook, or email us so we can craft a podcast that you’ll want to listen to.
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