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November 9, 2019
SPECIAL: Sacred Service If you play this episode on 11/11 starting at 10:03:30 am local, the Bells of Peace will toll at 11am exactly. Episode #148 Host: Theo Mayer This special episode brings you the sound of World War I Armistice Day Sacred Service, a multi-denominational service honoring the Centennial of the WWI Armistice, from the WWI Centennial Commission in partnership with Washington National Cathedral. ----more---- Download the Service program (a keepsake in its own right) at: https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/images/2018-ace/pdf/wwi_armistice_sacred-service_program_11_11_2018.pdf View full length unedited video of service at:  ww1cc.org/sacredservice   Special Thanks Washington National Cathedral   Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Doughboy Foundation   Production: Producer & Host: Theo Mayer
November 4, 2019
SPECIAL: First Man into Germany - And He Did it on a Harley Episode #147 SPECIAL:  First into Germany: SGT Roy Holtz - And he did it on a Harley By author Robert LaplanderRead by Host, Theo Mayer Introduction | 01:55  Part 1: Yup, That’s Me! | 03:10 Part 2: It’s Off to War… | 08:25 Part 3: Rolling With the Red Arrow! | 14:25 Part 4: Oh… You’ve GOT to be kidding!? | 20:05 Part 5: The Real Story Behind the Picture. | 27:10 Epilog | 32:50----more---- RELATED LINKS Rob Laplander Links https://www.amazon.com/Robert-Laplander/e/B06W5MR685%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share  https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/1953-four-questions-for-bob-laplander-of-finding-the-lost-battalion-and-doughboy-mia.html  http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/lostbattalion  https://www.facebook.com/robert.laplander  https://www.wsj.com/articles/doughboy-mia-makes-sure-missing-world-war-i-heroes-get-recognition-1495443601  https://www.army.mil/article/189688/volunteer_doughboy_team_works_to_bring_wwi_mias_home  https://www.legion.org/magazine/239680/doughboy-mia  Links to Harley info :https://www.harley-davidson.com/us/en/museum/explore/archives.html  http://www.ridingvintage.com/2012/12/war-machines-american-motorcycles-of-wwi.html  https://www.thrillist.com/cars/history-of-u-s-military-motorcycles  http://www.foxnews.com/auto/2018/06/29/100-year-old-harley-davidson-returns-from-france-to-honor-american-wwi-soldiers.html  https://www.facebook.com/operationtwinlinks/    Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Doughboy Foundation   Production: Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katherine Akey & Katz Laszlo Interview editing: Mac Nelsen and Tim Crowe Research: JL Michaud
October 27, 2019
WWl Through Many Lenses Host: Theo Mayer Bells of Peace 2019 - Host | @02:05 The Cultural Impact of WWI - Dr. Jay Winter | @05:05 Japan’s Impact on WWI - Dr. Frederick Dickenson | @11:55 The Impact of WWI on the World - Sir Hugh Strachan | @19:50 Speaking WWI: Tank - Host | @27:15 WWI War Tech: Many lenses looking - Host | @28:55 They Shall Not Grow Old: A vision realized - Brent Burge | @33:10----more---- SPECIAL Commission News Bells of Peace 2019 & Bells of Peace Participation App - Host Link: http://ww1cc.org/bells https://tombguard.org/centennial/#national_salute  World War One Then Historians Corner: The Cultural Impact of WWI - Dr. Jay Winter Links:http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-morrison-winter-20140625-column.html http://www.dw.com/en/world-war-i-created-new-culture-of-mourning/a-17233945 https://www.amazon.com/Remembering-War-between-History-Century/dp/0300110685 Japan’s Impact on WWI - Dr. Frederick Disckenson Links:http://www.history.upenn.edu/publications/2001/frederick-r-dickinson http://www.history.upenn.edu/publications/2013/frederick-r-dickinson https://www.dancarlin.com/product/hardcore-history-62-supernova-in-the-east-i/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WG_SzUVNo8I https://www.c-span.org/video/?322722-5/discussion-japan-world-war https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A3oSaG0WiD8 The Impact of WWI on the World - Sir Hugh Strachan Links: https://www.asc.ox.ac.uk/person/67 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hew_Strachan  World War One Now Speaking WWI “Tank” - Host  link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_tank WWI War Tech Imaging - Host Links:https://blog.nationalarchives.gov.uk/blog/aerial-photography-first-world-war/  https://www.wired.com/2014/08/wwi-photos/   http://dronecenter.bard.edu/wwi-photography/  https://unwritten-record.blogs.archives.gov/2017/03/16/shooting-world-war-i-the-history-of-the-army-signal-corps-cameramen-1917-1918/     https://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/06/30/photos-world-war-i-images-museums-battle-great-war/    https://blog.scienceandmediamuseum.org.uk/the-vest-pocket-kodak-was-the-soldiers-camera/   https://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/photography  https://www.amateurphotographer.co.uk/technique/interviews/vest-pocket-kodak-book-107481  Spotlight on the media They Shall Not Grow Old - Brent Burge Links: https://www.fathomevents.com  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74h-o8dFU8E    Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Doughboy Foundation Production: Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katherine Akey Interview editing: Mac Nelsen and Tim Crowe Research: JL Michaud Intern: Rachel Hurt
October 20, 2019
Overtures To Peace & Baseball Episode #145 Host: Theo Mayer Overtures to peace - Host | @01:30 Atrocities in Syria - Mike Shuster | @08:20  America Emerges: Sgt. Alvin York - Dr. Edward Lengel | @13:00 Remembering Veterans: Charles Edward Dilkes - Dr. Virginia Dilkes | @20:45 Speaking WWI: Teddy Bear Suit - Host | @28:05 Historian’s Corner: Baseball in WWI - Jim Leeke | @31:20 100C/100M: Springdale PA - Mayor Jo Bertoline & Patrick Murray | @37:50----more---- World War One Then 100 Years Ago  https://nyti.ms/2C0dzub https://nyti.ms/2CtilRK https://nyti.ms/2CsOhG6 https://nyti.ms/2CtE0JK https://nyti.ms/2CsJCUp https://nyti.ms/2CtFrrp https://nyti.ms/2CrI0KF https://nyti.ms/2BZNzib https://nyti.ms/2BZNURZ https://nyti.ms/2C0YJnc https://nyti.ms/2CsA7ES https://nyti.ms/2BWtPw6 https://nyti.ms/2BYSZdx https://nyti.ms/2BVm2i9 https://nyti.ms/2CtdmR8 https://nyti.ms/2CsoOMK https://nyti.ms/2CsZmqm https://nyti.ms/2CvMnUQ https://nyti.ms/2BYdtmt https://nyti.ms/2C1RlHQ https://nyti.ms/2CrsVsn https://nyti.ms/2C0ZL2y Great War Project http://greatwarproject.org/2018/10/07/horrible-massacre-in-syria/ America emerges: Military Stories from WW1 http://www.edwardlengel.com/alvin-yorks-tragic-glory/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ World War One Now Remembering Veterans https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/nj-wwi-centennial-events/eventdetail/6717/remembering-world-war-i-through-the-eyes-of-a-wwi-veteran-charles-edward-dilkes.html https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/commemorate/family-ties/stories-of-service/2952-charles-edward-dilkes-sgt.html Speaking WWI - The Teddy Bear Suit  https://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/3087941.pdf   Historian Corner https://www.amazon.com/Dugouts-Trenches-Baseball-during-Great/dp/0803290721 http://www.aabaseball.org/ https://www.loc.gov/collections/stars-and-stripes/?sb=date https://twitter.com/ww1baseball?lang=en   100Cities/100Memorials - Springdale PA www.ww1cc.org/100cities   Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Doughboy Foundation   Production: Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katherine Akey Additional Scripting: Dr. Edward Lengel Interview editing: Mac Nelsen and Tim Crowe Research: JL Michaud Intern: Rachel Hurt
October 12, 2019
October 1918 & The Lost Battalion  Episode #144 Host: Theo Mayer October 1918 Overview Roundtable - Dr. Edward Lengel & Katherine Akey | @02:15 Historians Corner: Lost Battalion - Ron Laplander | @18:25 Shifting sands and hard fighting - Mike Shuster | @25:10 Remembering Veterans: Story of John Foster - Mark Foster | @29:40 US Army CMH WWI Website - Dr. Erik Villard | @35:00 Spotlight On The Media 1: Dr. Edward Lengel | @40:15 Spotlight On The Media 2: Lost Battalion Documentary - Mark Fastoso & John King | @42:50 World War One Then October 1918 Roundtable: Dr. Edward Lengel, Katherine Akey, Host Historian Corner with Rob Laplander https://www.amazon.com/Finding-Lost-Battalion-Legends-Americas/dp/1411676564 https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/doughboy-mia-home.html  World War One Now Remembering Veterans https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/commemorate/family-ties/stories-of-service/4382-john-chester-foster.html https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/commemorate/family-ties/stories-of-service.html http://ww1cc.org/guide  https://history.army.mil/html/bookshelves/resmat/wwi/prologue/default/index.html https://history.army.mil/index.html https://history.army.mil/html/bookshelves/collect/wwi-cb.html Spotlight in the Media https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IF7a-370JeE https://www.c-span.org/video/?450879-1/the-lost-battalion  http://www.echofilmsproductions.com/the-lost-battalion.html Guests: Dr. Edward Lengel, Military historian and author  Rob Laplander, Author, citizen historian and the driving force behind the Doughboy MIA project Mike Shuster, Curator for the great war project blog Dr. Tom Jackson, Executive Director of the Georgia WW1 Centennial Commission Mark Foster, grandson of WW1 Veteran John Foster Dr. Erik Villard, Digital Historian at the Center for Military History Mark Fastoso and John King, two of the Producers of the new documentary titled The Lost Battalion Katherine Akey, WWI Photography specialist and line producer for the podcast Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation Production: Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katherine Akey Interview editing: Mac Nelsen and Tim Crowe Research: JL Michaud Intern: Rachel Hurt
October 6, 2019
It has been 100 Years in The Making - this entire episode is dedicated to story of how the National WWI Memorial In Washington, D.C. is coming to be.
September 28, 2019
Highlights: Dr. John Morrow: Lifetime Achievement Episode #142 Host - Theo Mayer Posts raising money for Nat. WWI Memorial - Derek Sansone & David Hamon  | @ 02:10 100 Years ago - Host | @ 08:55 Born in the Month of September - David Kramer | @ 16:30 Lifetime Achievement in Military Writing - Dr. John Morrow | @ 22:50 The Buzz: Selected Posts from the Internet - Host | @ 37:15----more---- Opening Century In The Making Posts Raising Money for the National WWI Memorial Ken-Ton Bee article https://www.kentonbee.com/articles/town-resident-raising-funds-to-support-wwi-memorial-project-in-washington/ Derek Sansone Email: KillerBee05@hotmail.com David Hamon Email: David.hamon@worldwar1centennial.org  World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago Sources   New York Times Archive (paid)Feather weight cars https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/browser 09/30/1919 page 11 Official Bulletin - President urges congress to pass Suffrage https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/educate/places/official-bulletin/3557-ww1-official-bulletin-volume-2-issue-425-september-28-1918.html The Kentuckian, October 8, 1919, p. 1, https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn86069398/1919-10-08/ed-1/seq-1/#date1=09%2F25%2F1919&index=2&rows=20&searchType=advanced&language=&sequence=0&words=Alvin+York&proxdistance=5&date2=10%2F15%2F1919&ortext=&proxtext=&phrasetext=alvin+york&andtext=&dateFilterType=range&page=1   “Veterans of Thirtieth Start First Big Reunion,” The News Scimitar, September 29, 1919, p. 1, https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn98069867/1919-09-29/ed-1/seq-1/#date1=09%2F25%2F1919&index=7&date2=10%2F15%2F1919&searchType=advanced&language=&sequence=0&words=ALVIN+YORK&proxdistance=5&rows=20&ortext=&proxtext=&phrasetext=alvin+york&andtext=&dateFilterType=range&page=1 Born In The Month Of Theodore Roosevelt Jr: 9/13/1887-7/12/1944 Jane Addams: 9/6/1860-5/21/1935 Maurice Chevalier: 9/12/1888-1/1/1972 Scott Fitzgerald: 9/24/1896-12/21/1940   Sources   Hall, Zoe Dare, “French Entertainer Tricks His Way Out of German POW Camp,” The Telegraph, November 29, 2013, https://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/world-war-one/inside-first-world-war/part-four/10483881/prisoner-of-war-camp-escape-chevalier.html   Whitman, Alden, “The Elegant Boulevardier,” New York Times, January 2, 1972, https://www.nytimes.com/1972/01/02/archives/the-elegant-boulevardier-maurice-chevalier-singer-and-actor-is-dead.html   “Theodore Roosevelt Jr., The Theodore Roosevelt Center https://www.theodorerooseveltcenter.org/Learn-About-TR/TR-Encyclopedia/Family-and-Friends/Theodore-Roosevelt-Jr.aspx   BG Theodore Roosevelt Jr., Military Hall of Honor https://militaryhallofhonor.com/honoree-record.php?id=1622   Zahniser, J. D., “Jane Addams, Secular Saint, Scorned During World War I,” American History,  https://www.historynet.com/jane-addams-secular-saint-scorned-during-wwi.htm   Michals, Debra, Jane Addams, National Women’s History Museum https://www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/jane-addams   Scott Fitzgerald, (1896-1940), F. Scott Fitzgerald Society, https://fscottfitzgeraldsociety.org/about-us-2/biography/ World War I - NOW Historians Corner John Morrow, recipient of the 2019 Pritzker Military Museum & Library Literature Award for Lifetime Achievement in Military Writing https://willson.uga.edu/history-professor-john-morrow-wins-pritzker-award-for-lifetime-achievement-in-military-writing/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_H._Morrow_Jr. http://history.uga.edu/directory/people/john-morrow-jr https://www.linkedin.com/in/john-morrow-92685321/ The Buzz https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-09-24/how-world-war-i-changed-watches-forever   https://lititzrecord.com/news/wilbur-employees-world-war-history-to-be-preserved-in-the-park/   https://www.forces.net/news/pre-wwi-battleship-wreck-granted-heritage-protection   https://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/World-War-I-Veterans-Honored-in-Denton-560985601.html   http://www.wbiw.com/2019/09/23/orange-county-historical-society-hosting-traveling-exhibit/   https://www.miragenews.com/historic-ww1-field-gun-for-barkly-gardens/   https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/west-virginia/articles/2019-09-14/huntington-man-reunited-with-fathers-wwi-items   https://www.wgrz.com/article/news/community/local-wwi-vet-receives-purple-heart/71-9477f935-a0e6-4db0-86e1-c5518d9c91c7   https://www.recordnet.com/news/20190913/history-in-making-all-over-again-convoy-of-historic-wwi-military-vehicles-stops-in-sj   https://www.centralmaine.com/2019/09/12/guardsmans-purple-heart-returns-to-maine-after-101-years/   https://www.nj.com/highschoolsports/2019/09/butler-football-honoring-hometown-vets-with-help-from-west-point.html Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Doughboy Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Juliette Cowall Written by: Theo Mayer and David Kramer Editing: Mac Nelsen Tim Crowe Website support: JL Michaud Special guests: Derek Sansone David Hamon Dr. John Morrow
September 20, 2019
FOCUS ON: The Animals of WWI Host - Theo Mayer Breaking News: CFA’s final approval of Memorial design- Host | @01:25 Horses in WWI - Cindy Rullman & Joe Ellen Hayden | @05:05 Pigeons in WWI - Andrew Blechman | @12:20 Dogs and Mascots in WWI - Jacy Jenkins & Jordan Beck | @21:00 Legless, Wingless critter serving in WWI - Leah Tams  | @30:25 ----more----  PODCAST NOTES Download approved Memorial Design  http://ww1cc.org/memorial-design    Brooke USA web site http://ww1cc.org/horses    Sources Nalewicki, Jennifer, “The Animals that Helped Win World War I,” Smithsonian, https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/animals-that-helped-win-world-war-I-180963042/   Tams, Leah, “How Did Animals (Even Slugs) Serve in World War I?” National Museum of American History, https://americanhistory.si.edu/blog/how-did-animals-even-slugs-serve-world-war-i   World War One Centennial Commission Episode 13 https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/weekly-sync-call/2106-ww1-centennial-news-episode-13-3-29-2017.html   World War One Centennial Commission Episode 50 https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/weekly-sync-call/3851-ww1-centennial-news-episode-50-12-15-2017.html   World War One Centennial Commission Episode 94 https://www.wo...-19-2018.html   World War One Centennial Commission Episode 63 https://www.wo...-16-2018.html   World War One Centennial Commission Episode 52 https://www.wo...-29-2017.html   World War One Centennial Commission Episode 120 https://www.wo...04-26-19.html Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Doughboy Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Juliette Cowall Written by: David Kramer & Theo Mayer Editing: Mac Nelsen Tim Crowe Website support: JL Michaud Special guests: Cindy Rullman and Jo Ellen Hayden from Brooke USA Journalist and Author Andrew Blechman Jacy Jenkins and Jordan Beck from Fun Academy Motion Pictures Leah Tams from the University of Mary Washington
September 14, 2019
Highlights: The American Worker & WWI Episode #140 Host - Theo Mayer Government, Industry & Labor in WWI - Host | @ 05:15 Labor Gains & Labor Losses - Dr. Mark Robbins | @ 10:05 A Century in the Making: Article by Traci Slatton- Host | @ 19:20 Historian's Corner - Col. Michael Visconage, USMC (ret.) | @ 30:15 The Buzz: Posts from the internet - Host | @ 39:05----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago The American Worker & WWI   Sources Helgeson, Jeffrey, “American Labor and Working-Class History, 1900-1945,” Oxford Research Encyclopedias https://oxfordre.com/americanhistory/view/10.1093/acrefore/9780199329175.001.0001/acrefore-9780199329175-e-330 Keir, Malcolm, “Post-War Causes of Labor Unrest,” The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, January 1919, pp. 101-109,  https://www.jstor.org/stable/1014423 Mintz, Steven, “Historical Context: Post-World War I Labor Tensions,” The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, https://www.gilderlehrman.org/content/historical-context-post-world-war-i-labor-tensions  “How War Amplified Federal Power in the Twentieth Century,” Foundation for Economic Education,  https://fee.org/articles/how-war-amplified-federal-power-in-the-twentieth-century/ Exploring the Labor Movement in WWI Dr. Mark Robbins Links: https://www.delmar.edu/degrees/history/faculty-listing.html https://www.amazon.com/Middle-Class-Union-Organizing-Post-World/dp/0472130331 World War I - NOW CENTURY IN THE MAKING Traci Slatton: https://medium.com/@tslatton/and-so-it-begins-sabin-howard-starts-sculpting-the-national-wwi-memorial-e31d4b20cda7 Gallery of images and videos https://photos.app.goo.gl/bEdrAjQCdYuLRa1V8   Remembering Veterans A Historian Commemorates WWI - Col. Micheal Visconage, USMC (Ret.) Links: https://www.militarycityusaradio.org/main/marine-corps-colonel-ret-mike-visconage/ The Buzz Links Veterans worried as WWI monument faces demolishing http://www.fox2detroit.com/news/local-news/-that-legacy-needs-to-be-carried-on-veterans-worried-as-wwi-monument-faces-demolishing Veterans Group Marks 100-Year Milestone for WWI’s Polish-American Freedom Fighters https://citylimits.org/2019/09/11/veterans-group-marks-100-year-milestone-for-wwis-polish-american-freedom-fighters/  “ETCHED IN MEMORY” https://www.facebook.com/theworldwar/photos/a.10150262914016241/10157508089181241/?type=3&theater John Logie Baird https://www.helensburghadvertiser.co.uk/news/17894519.john-logie-baird-features-new-ww1-exhibition-holyrood/   Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Doughboy Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Juliette Cowall Written by: Theo Mayer and David Kramer Editing: Mac Nelsen Tim Crowe Website support: JL Michaud Special guests: Col. Michael Visconage, US Marine Corps (Ret.) Dr. Mark Robbins Special thanks to novelist Traci Slatton for allowing us to read her article in M on the show
September 8, 2019
FOCUS ON: The Non-Combatants of WWI Episode #139 Host - Theo Mayer Unprecedented  logistics - Joe Johnson | @ 05:00 The US Army Signal Corps - Host | @ 09:15 The Hello Girls - Dr. Elizabeth Cobb | @ 11:30 Medical Support Services & the AFS - Nicole Milano | @ 15:50 The US Postal Service in WWI - Lynn Heidelbaugh | @ 22:15 The Stars & Stripes - Robert Rheid | @ 25:40 The Doughboy’s Sweetheart: Elsie Janis - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 28:15 Bringing Soldiers to God and God to Soldiers - Dr. John Boyd | @ 32:05 Donuts and Coffee - Patri O’Gan | @ 34:25 ----more---- FOCUS ON: The Non-Combatants of WWI Sources Terrett, Dulany, “The Signal Corps: The Emergency (to 1941),” The Army Signal Corps, https://history.army.mil/html/books/010/10-16/CMH_Pub_10-16-1.pdf   DARPA https://www.darpa.mil/about-us/about-darpa   Gray, Andrew, “The American Field Service,” American Heritage, December 1974, https://www.americanheritage.com/american-field-service   “World War I Rations:  Full Belly, Fully Ready,” Army Heritage Educational Center, https://www.armyheritage.org/75-information/soldier-stories/359-worldwar1rations   World War I Centennial Commission Podcast, Episode 27 https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/weekly-sync-call/2747-ww1-centennial-news-episode-27-7-05-2017.html   World War I Centennial Commission Podcast, Episode 62 https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/weekly-sync-call/4179-ww1-centennial-news-episode-62-03-09-2018.html   World War I Centennial Commission Podcast, Episode  82 https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/weekly-sync-call/4838-ww1-centennial-news-episode-82-7-27-2018.html   World War I Centennial Commission Podcast, Episode 34 https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/weekly-sync-call/3043-ww1-centennial-news-episode-34-8-23-2017.html   World War I Centennial Commission Podcast, Episode 68 https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/weekly-sync-call/4369-ww1-centennial-news-episode-68-04-20-2018.html   World War I Centennial Commission Podcast, Episode 69 https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/weekly-sync-call/4385-ww1-centennial-news-episode-69-04-27-2018.html   World War I Centennial Commission Podcast, Episode 54 https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/weekly-sync-call/3949-ww1-centennial-news-episode-54-01-12-2018.html   World War I Centennial Commission Podcast, Episode 115 https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/weekly-sync-call/6077-ww1-centennial-news-episode-115-03-22-19.html   Senate Hello Girl Bill https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/senate-bill/206/all-info House Hello Girl Bill https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-bill/1953 Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Doughboy Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Juliette Cowall Written by: Theo Mayer and David Kramer Editing: Mac Nelsen Tim Crowe Website support: JL Michaud Special guests: Joe Johnson of the Defense Acquisition University Professor Elizabeth Cobbs Nicole Milano from the American Field Services Lynn Heidelbaugh from the Smithsonian’s National Postal Museum Robert Rheid from Stars & Stripes Historian Dr. Edward Lengel The US Army Chaplains Corps Dr. John Boyd Patri O’Gan from the Smithsonian Institution
September 1, 2019
Highlights: War Football & The NFL Episode #138 Host - Theo Mayer 100 Years Ago: Woodrow Wilson’s last chapter - Host | @ 02:15 A Century In The Making: From the Sabin Howard Sculpture Studio - Host | @ 12:15Remembering Veterans: Camp Doughboy “4” - Kevin Fitzpatrick | @ 13:45  Spotlight on the Media: “War Football: World War I and the Birth of the NFL” - Chris Serb | @ 22:30 Articles & Posts: Weekly Dispatch - Host | @ 34:50 ----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago Woodrow Wilson’s last chapter - Host Sources Dorsey, Leroy G., “Woodrow Wilson’s Fight for the League of Nations: A Reexamination,” Rhetoric and Public Affairs, pp. 107-135 Spring, 1999 (Vol. 2, No. 1) https://www.jstor.org/stable/41939493?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents    Glass, Andrew, “Wilson Collapses During Western Tour: Sept. 25, 1919,” Politico, September 25, 2017 https://www.politico.com/story/2017/09/25/this-day-in-politics-sept-25-1919-243039   Lynn, Kenneth S., “The Hidden Agony of Woodrow Wilson,” The Wilson Quarterly, Winter 2004 http://archive.wilsonquarterly.com/essays/hidden-agony-woodrow-wilson   MacMillan, Margaret, Paris 1919, pp. 489-491   Markel, Howard, “”When a Secret President Ran the Country,” PBS Newshour, October 2, 2015 https://www.pbs.org/newshour/health/woodrow-wilson-stroke   “Wilson Embarks on Tour to Promote League of Nations, History Channel, July 28, 2019 https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/wilson-embarks-on-tour-to-promote-league-of-nations   “President Wilson Suffers a Stroke,” Eyewitness to History http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/wilsonstroke.htm   “Woodrow Wilson: Strokes and Denial,” University of Arizona Health Sciences Library, https://ahsl.arizona.edu/about/exhibits/presidents/wilson World War I - NOW A Century in The Making From the Sabin Howard Sculpture Studio - Host Remembering Veterans Camp Doughboy #4 - Kevin Fitzpatrick Links: https://www.eastcoastdoughboys.com https://eastcoastdoughboys.com/wwi-history-weekend-camp-doughboy-sept-14-15/ https://govisland.com/things-to-do/events/4th-annual-camp-doughboy-wwi-history-weekend http://www.fitzpatrickauthor.com/tag/doughboy/ Commission News Spotlight on the Media “War Football: World War I and the Birth of the NFL” - Chris Serb Links: https://www.amazon.com/War-Football-World-Birth-NFL/dp/153812484X https://www.linkedin.com/in/chris-serb-7324496/ Articles and Posts Highlight from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host  Link: http://ww1cc.org/dispatch Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Doughboy Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Juliette Cowall Written by: Theo Mayer and David Kramer Editing: Mac Nelsen Tim Crowe Website support: JL Michaud Special guests: Kevin Fitpatrick Chris Serb
August 25, 2019
Highlights: American Legion Post #43: Revitalized and Relevant Episode #137 Host - Theo Mayer 100 Years Ago: Headlines last week of August 1919 - Host | @ 02:15 Born in the Month of August- Dave Kramer | @ 09:05 Remembering Veterans: American Legion Post 43 Revitalized - Fernando Rivero & Lester Probst | @ 14:45  Articles & Posts: Dispatch Newsletter - Host | @ 32:55----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago: Headlines last week of August 1919 - Host Sources Carnegie’s Estate, At Death, Worth About $30,000,000, New York Times, August 29, 1919, p. 1 https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1919/08/29/issue.html “Pershing Rejects Call to Testify,” New York Times, August 31, 1919, p.1 https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1919/08/31/109332474.html?pageNumber=1 “Pershing Rank Bill to Pass Tomorrow, Washington Post, August 31, 1919, p. 1 https://www.nationalgeographic.org/events/event/explorer-trivia-night-f19/ Girl Ordered Shot Arrives here Safe”, New York Times, August 26, 1919, p. 6, https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1919/08/26/issue.html Jemison, Dick, “Record Price is Offered for Ruth,” Atlanta Constitution, August 30, 1919, p.21 https://newspaperarchive.com/atlanta-constitution-aug-31-1919-p-21/ Born in the Month of August - Dave Kramer Sources Christy Mathewson Biography, https://baseballhall.org/hall-of-famers/mathewson-christy First Division Museum, Robert McCormick Biography, https://www.fdmuseum.org/researchers/robert-r-mccormick-biography/ Shipman, Pat, “Why Mata Hari Wasn’t a Cunning Spy After All, National Geographic History, https://www.nationalgeographic.com/archaeology-and-history/magazine/2017/11-12/mata-hari-history-killing/ Hamilton, David E., “Herbert Hoover: Life Before the Presidency,” University of Virginia Miller Center, https://millercenter.org/president/hoover/life-before-the-presidency World War I - NOW Remembering Veterans American Legion Post #43: Revitalized and Relevant Links:  https://www.hollywoodpost43.org/ Articles and Posts Highlight from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host  Link: http://ww1cc.org/dispatch Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Doughboy Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Juliette Cowall Written by: Theo Mayer and David Kramer Editing: Mac Nelsen Tim Crowe Website support: JL Michaud Special guests: Lester Probst and Fernando Rivero
August 18, 2019
Highlights: The Ghost Fleet of Mallows Bay Episode #136 Host - Theo Mayer 100 Years Ago: The Turning Tide - August 1918 - Host | @ 02:10 100 Years Ago: The Aftermath - August 1919 - Host | @ 07:20 Remembering Veterans: The Ghost Fleet of Mallows Bay - Daniel J. Basta | @ 09:25  Commission News | @ 22:05 Spotlight on the Media: “Over There with Private Graham” - Steve Badgley, Bruce Jarvis | @ 24:55  Articles & Posts: Weekly Dispatch - Host | @ 35:55 “Making History”: The Hello Girls Cast Album -Music Snippet | @ 42:55 ----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago The Turning Tide - August 1918 - Host The Aftermath - August 1919 - Host Sources St. John, Rachel, “The Raging Controversy at the Border Began with This Incident 100 Years Ago,” Smithsonian Magazine, July 2018 https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/raging-controversy-border-began-100-years-ago-180969343/ “Our Cavalry Pursues Bandits in Mexico,” New York Times, August 20, 1919, https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1919/08/20/issue.html Mintz, Steven, “Historical Context: Post World War I Labor Tensions,” History Now, Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, https://www.gilderlehrman.org/content/historical-context-post-world-war-i-labor-tensions World War I - NOW Remembering Veterans The Ghost Fleet of Mallows Bay - Daniel J. Basta Links: http://www.woodrowwilsonhouse.org/event/exhibit-opening-ghost-fleet https://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/mallows-bay/ Google Earth of Mallows Bay http://dnr.maryland.gov/ccs/Pages/MallowsBay_History.aspx Commission News American Legion Conference Link: https://www.legion.org/convention   Digital Download The Hello Girls Cast Album Promo Link: http://ww1cc.org/hello    Digital Download WWI Genealogy Research Guide Promo Link: http://ww1cc.org/guide    Sabin Howard Facebook Page Link: https://www.facebook.com/sabinhoward Spotlight on the Media “Over There With Private Graham? - Steve Badgley, Bruce Jarvis Links: https://militaryhistorynow.com/2019/01/13/a-doughboys-diary-unearthed-wartime-journal-offers-extraordinary-glimpse-into-experiences-of-ww1-u-s-soldier/ Book on Badgley Publishing: http://www.badgleypublishingcompany.com/OverThereWithPrivateGraham.html Book on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Over-There-Private-Graham-Compelling/dp/0998804525 Articles and Posts Highlight from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host  Link: http://ww1cc.org/dispatch   Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Doughboy Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Juliette Cowall Written by: Theo Mayer and David Kramer Editing: Mac Nelsen Tim Crowe Website support: JL Michaud   Special guests: Daniel J.  Basta Steve Badgley and Bruce Jarvis
August 10, 2019
Highlights: Focus ON: War in the Sky Episode #135 Host - Theo Mayer SPECIAL: Focus ON: War in The Sky Introduction - Host | @ 01:45 Balloonatic: James Allen Higgs Jr. - Host | @ 04:35 Erwin Bleckley & the Lost Battalion - LtCol Doug Jacobs USA (Ret.) | @ 08:05 WWI War Tech: Interrupter Gear - Host | @ 13:50 PTSD in WWI Pilots - Mark Wilkins | @ 16:40 Eddie Rickenbacker Profile - Host | @ 23:30 Quentin Roosevelt Killed - Host | @ 26:05 New Memorial to WWI Airmen - Michael O’neal & Robert Casperzack | @ 28:05----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago This Week Segment - Host | @ 02:00 Links: Episode 86: https://www.ww1cc.org/episode-86 War in the Sky Timeline: http://ww1cc.org/warinthesky   https://www.engr.ncsu.edu/news/2017/05/26/above-the-battlefields-of-world-war-i/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observation_balloon https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_military_ballooning#World_War_I https://mashable.com/2016/03/02/wwi-balloons/#nGRfpJmxX8qR https://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2014/04/world-war-i-in-photos-aerial-warfare/507326/ https://www.jstor.org/stable/3087941?mag=doughboy-slang&seq=7#page_scan_tab_contents http://www.worldwar1.com/dbc/balloon43.htm   Episode #91: https://www.ww1cc.org/episode-91 https://www.amazon.com/Thunder-Argonne-Americas-Greatest-Campaigns/dp/0813175550 http://roadstothegreatwar-ww1.blogspot.com/2018/03/thunder-in-argonne-reviewed-by-peter-l.html https://www.kentuckypress.com/live/title_detail.php?titleid=4777   Episode #30: https://www.ww1ccl.org/episode-30 https://www.engr.ncsu.edu/news/2017/05/26/above-the-battlefields-of-world-war-i/   Episode #68: https://www.ww1cc.org/episode-68 https://www.upi.com/Archives/1918/04/14/American-flyers-down-pair/9481523634159/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manfred_von_Richthofen#Death https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015075629603;view=1up;seq=46 http://www.firstworldwar.com/airwar/earlyfighters.htm http://www.firstworldwar.com/airwar/deflectorgear.htm http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/fokker.htm https://www.uh.edu/engines/epi1369.htm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysB-SH19WRQ   Episode #66: https://www.ww1ccl.org/episode-66 https://www.airspacemag.com/military-aviation/world-war-i-pilot-ptsd-180967710/#0VKtyZX7JLXCy3JU.01 http://thelafayetteescadrille.org/ http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/4084-four-questions-for-mark-wilkins.html Episode #80: https://www.ww1ccl.org/episode-80.html https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/07/18/102723502.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/07/19/102724244.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/svc/tmach/v1/refer?pdf=true&res=9B01E5DB143EE433A2575AC1A9619C946996D6CF   Episode #42: https://www.ww1cc.org/episode-42 https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=coo.31924060892019;view=1up;seq=436 https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=patentimages.storage.googleapis.com/pdfs/US1388932.pdf   Other: “Viewpoint: How WWI Changed Aviation Forever,” BBC Magazine, October 20, 1014 https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-29612707 www.ww1cc.org/warinthesky https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/weekly-sync-call/5468-ww1-centennial-news-episode-91-9-28-2018.html https://www.ksn.com/news/local/veterans-look-to-honor-wichitan-killed-in-wwi/1292796854 https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/weekly-sync-call/4369-ww1-centennial-news-episode-68-04-20-2018.html https://www.amazon.com/Oswald-Boelcke-Germanys-Fighter-Father/dp/1910690236 https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/weekly-sync-call/4284-ww1-centennial-news-episode-66-04-06-2018.html https://www.amazon.com/Aero-Neurosis-Pilots-Psychological-Legacies-Combat/dp/1526723123 https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/weekly-sync-call/4407-ww1-centennial-news-episode-70-05-04-2018.html http://www.firstworldwar.com/bio/rickenbacker.htm http://www.historynet.com/captain-eddie-rickenbacker-americas-world-war-i-ace-of-aces.htm http://acepilots.com/wwi/us_rickenbacker.html https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/weekly-sync-call/4773-ww1-centennial-news-episode-80-7-113-2018.html This Day in Aviation History https://www.thisdayinaviation.com/tag/american-expeditionary-force/ Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission Pritzker Military Museum and Library The Doughboy Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Written by: Theo Mayer and David Kramer Editing team Mac Nelsen Tim Crowe Website support: JL Michaud
August 3, 2019
Highlights:American Philanthropy & WWI Episode #134 Host - Theo Mayer 100 Years Ago: American Philanthropy and WWI - Host | @ 02:00 A Century of the Rockefeller Foundation - David Rockefeller Jr. | @ 09:20 Commission News: Focus on the Memorial - Host | @ 17:00 Remembering Veterans: Americans All - Nancy Gentile Ford | @ 19:10 Articles & Posts: Weekly Dispatch - Host | @ 30:40----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago This Week American Philanthropy and WWI - Host | @ 02:00 Abrahamson, Eric John, Beyond Charity: A Century of Philanthropic Innovation, Rockefeller Foundation Centennial Series, https://assets.rockefellerfoundation.org/app/uploads/20131001184008/Beyond-Charity.pdf.pdf   “The Rich History of Philanthropy, NPR https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5516260   Kelly, Matt, “U. Va. Professor Uncovers the Rich History of Philanthropy in America,” UVA Today, January 23, 2012, https://news.virginia.edu/content/uva-professor-uncovers-rich-history-philanthropy-america   “A History of Modern Philanthropy,” National Philanthropic Trust https://www.historyofgiving.org/introduction/   “Philanthropy in America: An Historical and Strategic Overview,” Stanford Graduate School of Business, Case SI-66, May 28, 2004 https://www.gsb.stanford.edu/gsb-cmis/gsb-cmis-download-auth/354111   World War I - NOW A century of the Rockefeller Foundation - David Rockefeller Jr. Links: https://www.rbf.org/people/david-rockefeller-jr www.drfund.org/information-contact/contact/ http://www.aroundtheamericas.org/log/our-team/   “Beyond Charity: A Century of Philanthropic Innovation”: https://assets.rockefellerfoundation.org/app/uploads/20131001184008/Beyond-Charity.pdf.pdf Commission News: Focus on the Memorial - Host Link: http://ww1cc.org  Remembering Veterans Americans All - Nancy Gentile Ford  Links: http://ww1cc.org/americans  http://www.worldwar1.com/dbc/ngf.htm https://books.google.com/books/about/Americans_All.html?id=SfRz8DhrFn0C https://intranet.bloomu.edu/research_scholars/ford https://www.facebook.com/nancy.g.ford.3 http://www.worldwar1.com/dbc/ngf.htm https://www.amazon.com/Nancy-Gentile-Ford/e/B001JAR7CO%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/1105546.Nancy_Gentile_Ford https://www.linkedin.com/in/nancy-gentile-ford-47839499 Articles and Posts Highlight from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host  Link: http://ww1cc.org/dispatch   Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission Pritzker Military Museum and Library The Doughboy Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Juliette Cowall Written by: Theo Mayer and David Kramer Special guests: David Rockefeller Jr. Dr. Nancy Gentile Ford Interview Editing Mac Nelsen Tim Crowe Website support: JL Michaud
July 28, 2019
Highlights: WWI Remembered in KC & DC Episode #133 Host - Theo Mayer How Treaties Are Created - Host | @ 02:23 Food Sales at Post Offices - Host | @ 08:50 National WWI Museum and Memorial in KC - Dr. Matthew Naylor | @ 10:55 Doughboy Foundation - Dan Dayton | @ 21:20 Born in the Month of July - Dave Kramer | @ 31:30  Articles & Posts: Weekly Dispatch - Host | @ 34:35----more----   World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago This Week Peace Treaty and Senate Confirmation - Host Sources “The Senate’s Role in Treaties,” The U.S. Senate: Art and History, https://www.senate.gov/artandhistory/history/common/briefing/Treaties.htm “Open Treaty Hearings Begin Tomorrow,” New York Times, July 30, 1919, p.1 https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1919/07/30/issue.html War Surplus Food - Host Sources “U.S. Army Will Sell Surplus of Food in Post Offices,” New York Times, July 31, 1919, p. 1 https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1919/07/31/issue.html “Promise Quick Action to Punish Profiteers,” Seattle Star, August 13, 1919, https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093407/1919-08-13/ed-1/seq-1/#date1=07%2F31%2F1919&index=10&date2=08%2F15%2F1919&searchType=advanced&language=&sequence=1&words=food+FOOD+Food+foods+office+post&proxdistance=5&state=&rows=20&ortext=&proxtext=&phrasetext=&andtext=food+post+office&dateFilterType=range&page=1 “Hoarded Stocks of Food to Be Placed On Market,” The Daily Gate City, August 9, 1919, p.1, https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87057262/1919-08-09/ed-1/seq-1/#date1=07%2F31%2F1919&sort=relevance&date2=08%2F15%2F1919&searchType=advanced&language=&sequence=1&index=15&words=food+Food+foods+office+post+Post&proxdistance=5&state=&rows=20&ortext=&proxtext=&phrasetext=&andtext=food+post+office&dateFilterType=range&page=2 World War I - NOW National WWI Museum and Memorial, Kansas City - Dr. Matthew Naylor National WWI Museum and Memorial, Kansas City: https://www.theworldwar.org/ World War 1 Commission: https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/about/the-commission.html National World War I Memorial in Washington, D.C. http://ww1cc.org/memorial  HistoryNet.com: https://www.historynet.com/matthew-naylor-legacy-world-war.htm NonProfit Pro: https://www.nonprofitpro.com/article/2018-executive-of-the-year-dr-matthew-naylor/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mattnaylor Commission News: Announcing the Doughboy Foundation - Dr. Dan Dayton Doughboy Foundation: https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/about/the-foundation.html LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/dan-dayton-3934228/ World War 1 Commission: https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/about/the-commission.html National World War I Memorial in Washington, D.C. http://ww1cc.org/memorial  Born in the Month of July Read by Dave Kramer Sources  Paul, Steve, “Young Mr. Hemingway in Italy, https://www.theworldwar.org/learn/young-hemingway Putnam, Thomas, “Hemingway on War and Its Aftermath,” Prologue Magazine, Spring 2006 https://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/2006/spring/hemingway.html Ernest Hemingway Biography - World War I, http://www.lostgeneration.com/ww1.htm Raymond Chandler on the Western Front, 1918,” https://centenarynews.com/article/raymond-chandler-on-the-western-front-1918 Woodward, Richard B., “The Hard-Boiled Bard,” The Guardian, https://www.theguardian.com/world/2007/nov/28/usa.biography Daniel, Douglass K., “Bad Grandpa? Book DownplaysActor Walter Brennan’s Dark Side,” The Washington Times,  https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/sep/9/bad-grandpa-book-downplays-actor-walter-brennans-d/ “From the Archives: Walter Brennan, Oscar Winner Dies, Los Angeles Times, https://www.latimes.com/local/obituaries/archives/la-me-walter-brennan-19740922-snap-story.html “How War Poet Robert Graves Nearly Died at the Somme,” Imperial War Museum, https://www.iwm.org.uk/history/how-war-poet-robert-graves-nearly-died-at-the-somme  Articles and Posts Highlight from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host  Link: http://ww1cc.org/dispatch     Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission Pritzker Military Museum and Library The Doughboy Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Juliette Cowall Written by: Theo Mayer and David Kramer Special guests: Garrett Peck Dr. Patricia O’Toole Dr. Matthew Naylor Daniel S. Dayton Interview Editing Mac Nelsen Tim Crowe Web support: JL Michaud
July 20, 2019
Highlights: Red Summer Riots 1919 Episode #132 Host - Theo Mayer 100 Years Ago: Red Summer Riots - Dr. Jeffrey Sammons | @02:10 Great War Project: Retrospective - Mike Shuster | @15:15 Introducing the A.E.F. Memorial Corps - Host | @25:15 New Digital Download: Hello Girls Single - Host | @27:35 Articles & Posts: Weekly Dispatch - Host | @31:00----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago This Week Red Summer 1919 - Dr. Jeffrey Sammons https://as.nyu.edu/content/nyu-as/as/faculty/jeffrey-sammons.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeffrey_Sammons https://www.meridian.org/profile/dr-jeffrey-sammons/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Summer https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/about/the-commission/advisory-boards/historical-advisory-board.html http://ww1cc.org/valor  Henry, Charles, “Remembering the Red Summer of 1919, UC Berkeley Blog, https://blogs.berkeley.edu/2019/03/02/remembering-the-red-summer-of-1919/ Klinker, Adam, “The Legacy of 1919,” Creighton Magazine, https://www.creighton.edu/creightonmagazine/2019sprfeaturelegacyof1919/ Krugler, David, 1919, the Year of Racial Violence: How African Americans Fought Back, 2014 Railton, Ben, “Racial Terrorism and the Red Summer of 1919.” Saturday Evening Post, June 19, 2019 https://www.saturdayeveningpost.com/2019/06/considering-history-racial-terrorism-and-the-red-summer-of-1919/ Tabler, Dave, “Knoxville’s Red Summer of 1919,” http://www.appalachianhistory.net/2018/08/knoxvilles-red-summer-of-1919.html Williams, Chad, “African American Veterans Hoped Their Service in World War I Would Secure Their Rights at Home. It Didn’t,” Time, November 12, 2018, https://time.com/5450336/african-american-veterans-wwi/ Race Riots of 1919 (a partial map) https://www.arcgis.com/apps/MapJournal/index.html?appid=56186312471f47eca8aff16a8a990aa8 World War I - NOW The Great War Project - Mike Shuster https://www.GreatWarProject.org mail:podcast@worldwar1centennial.org  Commission News: Announcing A.E.F. Memorial Corps The VFW Convention starts Saturday, July 20 and runs through the 24th in Orlando. Link: https://www.vfw.org/media-and-events/120th-vfw-national-convention Remembering Veterans New Digital Download: Hello Girls Promo Link: http://ww1cc.org/hello  Articles and Posts Highlight from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host  Link: http://ww1cc.org/dispatch    Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission Pritzker Military Museum and Library The Doughboy Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Juliette Cowall Written by: Theo Mayer and David Kramer Special guests: Dr. Jeffrey Sammons Mike Shuster Interview Editing Mac Nelsen Tim Crowe Research and support: JL Michaud
July 14, 2019
Highlights: Monumental Scale!  Episode #131 Host - Theo Mayer 100 Years Ago: Let Me Count The Ways - host | @02:15 A Century In The Making - Sabin Howard | @14:40 Education: NHD WWI History Award Winner - Tim Proskauer | @25:25 Articles & Posts: Weekly Dispatch - Host | @37:45----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago This Week Let Me Count The Ways - Host WWI - Where the money came from and what it bought? Links “The War with Germany: A Statistical Summary,” U. S. War Department, Statistics Branch of the General Staff, http://net.lib.byu.edu/estu/wwi/memoir/docs/statistics/statstc.htm#2    “The War with Germany “ charts, maps and diagrams https://archive.org/details/warwithgermanyst00ayreuoft/page/n5  “Official Report Issued Yesterday, Graphically Shows America’s Part in the War, New York Times, June 27, 1919 https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1919/06/27/issue.html    Savell, Stephanie, https://www.commondreams.org/views/2018/03/21/we-have-spent-32-million-hour-war-2001   “Disposal of Surplus War Materials,” Library of Congress http://library.cqpress.com/cqresearcher/document.php?id=cqresrre1943113000     National Bureau of Economic Research https://www.nber.org/papers/w10580    World War I - NOW A Century In The Making Update the National World War I Memorial sculpture - Sabin Howard Links www.ww1cc.org/memorial https://www.sabinhoward.com/ Education National History Day winning Senior level award for WWI submission - Tim Proskauer Links Sebastian’s Project: https://drive.google.com/a/student.dodea.edu/file/d/1rjt9U3J1jWAXO8VsyOUDCJ-9MgkfRpc5/view?usp=drivesdk   NHD Competition: https://www.nhd.org/national-contest NHD Winners: https://www.nhd.org/winners-44th-annual-national-history-day-contest   Articles and Posts Highlight from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host   http://ww1cc.org/dispatch    Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Doughboy Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Juliette Cowall Written by: Theo Mayer and David Kramer Interview Editing Mac Nelsen Tim Crowe Research and support: JL Michaud
July 7, 2019
Episode #130 Host - Theo Mayer 100 Years Ago This Week: Ike’s Big Road Trip - Host |@ 01:50 Remembering Veterans: Veterans History Project - Col Karen Lloyd USA (ret.) |@ 11:15 Spotlight On the media: Ernst Jünger Documentary - Elsa Minisini |@ 22:20 Articles & Posts - Weekly Dispatch - Host |@ 33:55 World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago This Week Ike’s Big Road Trip Sources Highway History, Federal Highway Administration, https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/interstate/history.cfm Pfeiffer, David A.,  “Ike’s Interstates at 50,” Prologue Magazine, The National Archives of the United States, https://www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/2006/summer/interstates.html Klein, Christopher, “The Epic Road Trip that Inspired the Interstate Highway System, https://www.history.com/news/the-epic-road-trip-that-inspired-the-interstate-highway-system Thompson, Helen, “How a Hellish Road Trip Revolutionized America’s Highways,” Smithsonian, https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/1919-ike-took-hellish-road-trip-across-us-180956284/ “1919 Transcontinental Motor Convoy,” https://www.dwightdeisenhower.com/368/1919-Transcontinental-Motor-Convoy Cook, Kevin L., “Ike’s Road Trip,” American History, https://www.historynet.com/ikes-road-trip.htm https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1919/07/01/issue.html World War I - NOW Remembering Veterans Veterans’ History Project - Gold Star Family Voices Act - Col. Karen Lloyd http://www.loc.gov/vets/ https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/commemorate/family-ties/stories-of-service/submit-a-story-of-service.html https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/commemorate/family-ties/wwi-genealogy-research-guide.html https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/6129-veterans-history-project-updates-collections-policy-and-scope-includes-gold-star-voices.html https://blogs.loc.gov/folklife/2016/11/new-director-appointed-to-lead-veterans-history-project/ https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/114/s3419 https://www.congress.gov/congressional-report/114th-congress/house-report/663 https://www.goldstarmoms.com/legislative-news.html Spotlight on the Media “The Red and The Gray” - Elsa Minisimi https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/articles-posts/6206-the-red-and-the-gray.html http://ww1cc.org/wwrite  https://www.britannica.com/biography/Ernst-Junger https://fidmarseille.org/en/personnalite/elsa-minisini/ Articles and Posts Highlight from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host http://ww1cc.org/dispatch     Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation The Doughboy Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Line Producer in Training: Juliette Cowall Written by: Theo Mayer and David Kramer Interview Editing Mac Nelsen Tim Crowe Research and support: JL Michaud
June 30, 2019
Highlights: 4th of July, 1919 Episode #129 Host - Theo Mayer 4th of July, 1919 - Host |@ 02:05 Extra Extra: The Treaty is signed - Mike Shuster |@ 08:40 The WWrite Blog - Dr. Jennifer Orth-Veillon |@ 14:00 Bladensburg Peace Cross - Host |@ 25:50 Articles & Posts - Host |@ 31:15----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago This Week First July 4th post- Armistice - Host Special Report by David Kramer “A Champion is Born,” Toledo Blade, June 26, 2019 https://www.toledoblade.com/a-e/monday-memories/2016/07/04/A-champion-is-born/stories/20160703203    “Plans Completed to Make Tomorrow ‘Greatest Fourth,’” Washington Herald, July 3, 1919 https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045433/1919-07-03/ed-1/seq-1/#date1=06%2F25%2F1919&index=2&date2=07%2F05%2F1919&searchType=advanced&language=&sequence=1&words=4+July+th&proxdistance=5&state=District+of+Columbia&rows=20&ortext=&proxtext=&phrasetext=July+4th&andtext=&dateFilterType=range&page=1    “All Ready, Folks, for a Victory 4th!,” The Seattle Star, https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87093407/1919-07-03/ed-1/seq-1/  The Great War Project EXTRA EXTRA The Germans Capitulate - Mike Shuster http://ww1cc.org/cn  http://greatwarproject.org/2019/06/16/extra-extra-the-germans-capitulate/ https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/weekly-sync-call/6347-ww1-centennial-news-episode-128-06-21-19.html World War I - NOW Spotlight on the Media Commemorating the WWrite Blog - Jennifer Orth-Veillon http://ww1cc.org/wwrite  https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/jennifer-orth-veillon-phd.html https://www.wrath-bearingtree.com/2018/11/an-interview-with-jennifer-orth-veillon-curator-of-the-wwi-centennial-blog-by-andria-williams/ Remembering Veterans Supreme Court Ruling on the Bladensburg “Peace Cross” Marimow, Ann E. and Ruane, Michael E., “A World War I Cross Under Siege, The Washington Post, September 21, 2018, https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/2018/local/maryland-peace-cross/ deVogue, Ariane and Stracqualursi, Veronica, “Supreme Court Rules ‘Peace Cross’ in Maryland Can Remain,” CNN https://www.cnn.com/2019/06/20/politics/supreme-court-maryland-world-war-i-memorial-cross/index.html  Articles and Posts Highlight from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host http://ww1cc.org/dispatch     Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation The Doughboy Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer and David Kramer Special segment host: Mike Shuster Interview Editing Mac Nelsen Tim Crowe Research and support: JL Michaud
June 22, 2019
Special EditionMaking Peace: Harder than Making War?  Host - Theo Mayer This special edition is dedicated to exploring the Paris Peace Negotiations and the resulting Treaty of Versailles. For our exploration, we are joined by an extraordinary panel of guests including: Military Historian, Sir Hew Strachan Professor of International History, Margaret MacMillan Woodrow Wilson Biographer, Professor Patricia O’Toole American History Author, Garrett Peck Citizen Historian and Artist, Katherine Akey Former NPR Correspondent and WWI blogger, Mike Shuster----more---- Sir Hew Strachan https://www.gresham.ac.uk/professors-and-speakers/hew-strachan/ https://www.asc.ox.ac.uk/person/67 Professor Margaret MacMillan http://www.margaretmacmillan.com https://www.theguardian.com/profile/margaret-macmillan https://www.history.ox.ac.uk/people/professor-margaret-macmillan https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-MacMillan/e/B000APOOI4 Professor Patricia O’Toole https://www.c-span.org/video/?445323-1/qa-patricia-otoole https://www.simonandschuster.com/authors/Patricia-OToole/1507953 https://www.wilsoncenter.org/person/patricia-otoole-0 Garret Peck https://twitter.com/garrettpeck?lang=en http://garrettpeck.com http://garrettpeck.com/books Katherine Akey https://www.katherineakey.com/about https://corcoran.gwu.edu/katherine-akey-lee https://twitter.com/katherine_akey?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor Mike Shuster http://greatwarproject.org/category/blog-2/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_Shuster https://www.npr.org/people/2101176/mike-shuster Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation The Doughboy Foundation   Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Special segment host: Mike Shuster Researcher and writing support: Dave Kramer JL Michaud
June 16, 2019
Highlights: Stars & Stripes Episode #127 Host - Theo Mayer Aftermath of WWI Perspective - Host | @ 02:25 Stars And Stripes Last WWI Issue - Host | @ 04:15 Insights into Stripes - Robert H. Rheid | @ 06:45 Preserving the Stripes’ Legacy - Laura Meyer & Sue Mayo | @ 10:05 Germany in Shock at Peace Treaty - Mike Shuster | @ 13:55 War Memoirs From WWI: “John Lucy” - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 18:15 WWI Genealogy Research Guide Update - Host | @ 23:50 American POWs in WWI - Col Greg Eanes, (USAF ret.) | @ 25:30 Mobile WWI Museum Update - Keith Colley | @ 32:20 Dispatch Highlights - Host | @ 40:15----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago This Week Aftermath of WWI Perspective - Host Stars And Stripes Last WWI Issue - Host Special Report by David Kramer Sources https://www.loc.gov/collections/stars-and-stripes/about-this-collection/   Mitgang, Herbert, “At War with the Stars & Stripes,” American Heritage, June 1971 https://www.americanheritage.com/war-stars-and-stripes   “Stars and Stripes - The Soldier’s Newspaper” https://www.armyheritage.org/75-information/soldier-stories/322-starsandstripes   Library of Congress, Stars and Stripes Final issue, June 13, 1919 https://www.loc.gov/item/20001931/1919-06-13/ed-1/   World War I Centennial Commission Podcast Episode #68, 4/20/2018 https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/weekly-sync-call/4369-ww1-centennial-news-episode-68-04-20-2018.html   Farley, Donna, “Stars and Stripes Turns 150,” Daily American Republic, November 11, 2011, https://www.semissourian.com/story/1783420.html   Insights into Stripes - Robert H. Rheid https://www.stripes.com/about#branches1-1   Preserving Paper’s Legacy - Laura Meyer & Sue Mayo https://www.starsandstripesmuseumlibrary.org https://www.visitmo.com/articles/the-stars-and-stripes-missouris-one-of-a-kind-museum https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ya4tqfsCTYs   The Great War Project The Germans in Shock - Mike Shuster http://greatwarproject.org/2019/06/09/the-germans-in-shock/ Historians Corner War Memoirs from WWI: John Lucy - Dr. Edward Lengel http://www.edwardlengel.com/an-irishman-finds-a-devil-in-the-drum-1-best-world-war-i-memoir/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ http://bit.ly/2tILSQI World War I - NOW Remembering Veterans National Stars and Stripes Museum & Library - Laura Meyer & Sue Mayo https://www.starsandstripesmuseumlibrary.org https://www.visitmo.com/articles/the-stars-and-stripes-missouris-one-of-a-kind-museum https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ya4tqfsCTYs Remembering Veterans US POWs in WW1 - Col. Greg Eanes (USAF Ret.) https://www.amazon.com/Captured-Not-Conquered-American-Experience/dp/1983523585 http://www.hsc.edu/greg-eanes Commemorating WWI Mobile WW1 Museum - Keith Colley http://www.ww1mobilemuseum.com http://www.ww1mobilemuseum.com/in-the-news.html http://nebula.wsimg.com/110482386f7535d269c7e2abe53cdfe7?AccessKeyId=A954D2A486751AD50D04&disposition=0&alloworigin=1 https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/1353-five-questions-for-keith-colley-proprietor-of-the-mobile-wwi-museum.html https://www.linkedin.com/in/keith-colley-77073512 Articles and Posts Highlight from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host http://ww1cc.org/dispatch     Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation The Doughboy Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Special Segment Writer: David Kramer Special segment host: Mike ShusterDr. Edward Lengel Interview Editing Mac Nelsen Tim Crowe Research and support: JL Michaud
June 8, 2019
Highlights: Teaching & Learning WWI Episode #126 Host - Theo Mayer Lafayette, Here We Go Again - Host | @ 02:15 Killing the Angel of Peace - Mike Shuster | @ 07:15 War Memoirs From WWI: “Siegfried Sassoon”  - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 11:30 Updates From The States: Hawaii - Col. Arthur Tulak (ret.) | @ 17:20 Education in 1919 - Host | @ 25:15 WWI Educator’s Tool Kits - Dr. Jennifer Zoebelein | @ 28:15 Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History - Ron Nash | @ 36:25----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago Lafayette, Here We Go Again - Host “The American Expeditionary Force,” Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/collections/stars-and-stripes/articles-and-essays/a-world-at-war/american-expeditionary-forces/ “American Soldiers Arrive in France,” http://www.eastsussexww1.org.uk/american-soldiers-arrive-france/ Skinner Jr., Harold A., “American Expeditionary Force,” https://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/american_expeditionary_forces D-Day Fact Sheet, National WWII Museum, https://www.nationalww2museum.org/sites/default/files/2019-03/D-Day-75-Fact-Sheet_0.pdf WWII Fast Facts, https://www.cnn.com/2013/07/09/world/world-war-ii-fast-facts/index.html A Brief History of the U.S. Army in World War II, https://history.army.mil/brochures/brief/overview.htm The Great War Project Killing the Angel of Peace - Mike Shuster http://greatwarproject.org/2019/06/02/american-troops-in-asia/ Historians Corner War Memoirs From WWI: “Siegfried Sassoon”  - Dr. Edward Lengel http://www.edwardlengel.com/siegfried-sassoons-memoirs-of-george-sherston-2-best-wwi-account/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ http://bit.ly/2tILSQI World War I - NOW Update From the States Hawaii and their WW1 Symposium Symposium https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/hawaii-wwi-centennial-events/eventdetail/69279/hawaii-wwi-symposium.html Call For Papers https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/6185-hawai-i-world-war-i-symposium-and-activities-may-26-28.html http://ww1cc.org/hawaii http://hawaiiworldwar1.org/col-ret-arthur-tulak-on-kssk/ http://hawaiiworldwar1.org/news/ https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/hawaii-wwi-centennial-home.html Education Education in 1919 - Host “National Assessment of Adult Literacy,” National Center for Education Statistics, https://nces.ed.gov/naal/lit_history.asp Roser, Max and Ortiz-Ospina, Esteban, “Literacy,” Our World in Data, https://ourworldindata.org/literacy Kaestle, Carl F., “History of Literacy and the History of Readers,” Review of Research in Education, Vol. 12, (1985), p. 11-53 https://www.jstor.org/stable/1167145?seq=3#metadata_info_tab_contents College Entrance Examination Board, “Examination Questions: 1916-1920,” https://archive.org/stream/englishgerman00collrich#page/n3/mode/2up “The 1910s education,” https://www.encyclopedia.com/social-sciences/culture-magazines/1910s-education-topics-news WWI Educator’s Tool Kits - Dr. Jennifer Zoebelein https://www.linkedin.com/in/jennifer-zoebelein-029535a0 Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History - Ron Nash https://www.linkedin.com/in/ron-nash-082b3920 https://twitter.com/ron_nash https://www.gilderlehrman.org/content/world-war-i https://www.gilderlehrman.org/about   Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation The Doughboy Foundation   Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Special segment host: Mike ShusterDr. Edward Lengel Researcher and writing support: Dave KramerJL Michaud
June 1, 2019
Highlights: The Centennial of Suffrage Episode #125 Host - Theo Mayer Making Peace: Who Will Save Armenia? - Mike Shuster | @ 03:00 War Memoirs From WWI: “Ernst Jünger”  - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 07:10 100 Years Ago: Women’s Suffrage, The Cliff Notes - Host | @ 11:50 Raising Money for the Memorial - Phil Mazzara | @ 19:40 Introducing the Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commission - Rebecca Kleefish | @ 28:40 Articles & Posts: Highlights from Dispatch - Host | @ 37:45----more---- World War I - THEN The Great War Project Who Will Save Armenia? - Mike Shuster http://greatwarproject.org/2019/05/26/who-will-save-armenia/ Historians Corner War Memoirs from WWI: Ernst Junger - Dr. Edward Lengel http://www.edwardlengel.com/ernst-jungers-storm-of-steel-3-best-wwi-memoir/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ http://bit.ly/2tILSQI 100 Years Ago This Week Women’s Suffrage, The Cliff Notes: Written by David Kramer, Host https://www.womenshistory.org/resources/general/woman-suffrage-movement https://history.house.gov/Exhibitions-and-Publications/WIC/Historical-Essays/No-Lady/Womens-Rights/ https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1919/02/11/97072282.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1919/06/05/97092194.html?pageNumber=1 https://www.archives.gov/federal-register/constitution World War I - NOW Commission News Raising Money for the Memorial - Phil Mazzara http://ww1cc.org/donate https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/5827-welcome-to-new-director-of-development-phil-mazzara.html https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/honor/national-wwi-memorial/memorial-fundraising.html Remembering Veterans Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commision - Rebecca Kleefisch https://www.womensvote100.org Articles and Posts Highlight from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host http://ww1cc.org/dispatch     Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation The Diana Davis Spencer Foundation The Richard Lounsbery Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Special segment host: Mike ShusterDr. Edward Lengel Interview Editing Mac Nelsen Tim Crowe Researcher and writing support: Dave KramerJL Michaud
May 27, 2019
Highlights: The Imperial Hubris of Mandates Episode #124 Host - Theo Mayer 100 Years ago: The Imperial Hubris of Mandates - Host | @ 01:55 The Fate of The Ottoman Empire - Mike Shuster | @ 09:45 War Memoirs From WWI: “Edmund Blunden”  - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 13:55 Commission News: Fleet Week Update - Host | @ 19:45 Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence - Dr. Kate Clark-Lemay | @ 21:10 Erie County WWI Remembrance -  Mary Jane Koenig | @ 28:40 Articles & Posts: Highlights from Dispatch - Host | @ 34:35----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago This Month The Imperial Hubris of Mandates - Host Written by Dave Kramer “Does the Peace that Ended World War I Haunt Us Today?” BBC http://www.bbc.co.uk/guides/zp3ncdm “The Establishment of the Mandates System, 1919-1925,” Journal of Contemporary History, 7/79 https://www.jstor.org/stable/260018?seq=4#metadata_info_tab_contents “The middle East and the West: World War I and Beyond,” NPR https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=3860950 Margaret MacMillan, Paris 1919, pp 381-426 New York Times, “Plan to Wipe Out Ottoman Empire,” March 3, 1919, p.3 https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1919/03/03/96288293.html?pageNumber=3 New York Times, “Smyrna Taken from Turkey,” May 16, 1919, p. 5 https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1919/05/17/118152468.html?pageNumber=5 History Today, “Greece and the First World War,” July 10, 2013 https://www.historytoday.com/greece-and-first-world-war The Great War The Fate of the Ottoman Empire  - Mike Shuster http://greatwarproject.org/2019/05/19/the-fate-of-the-ottoman-empire/ Historians Corner A Pastoralist at War: Edmund Blunden’s Undertones of War - Dr. Edward Lengel http://www.edwardlengel.com/a-pastoralist-at-war-edmund-blundens-undertones-of-war/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ http://bit.ly/2tILSQI World War I - NOW Commission News Fleet Week NYC Update - Host www.ww1cc.org/fleetweek https://twitter.com/WW1CC https://www.facebook.com/pg/ww1centennial/posts/ Events: Exhibition Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence  - Dr. Kate Clark-Lemay https://www.npg.si.edu/staff/kate-lemay https://www.npg.si.edu/exhibition/votes-for-women Remembering Veterans Doughboys Memorial in Erie, Pennsylvania - Mary Jane Koenig   https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/pennsylvania-ww1-related-locations/2333:donald-macdonald-plaque.html https://www.erienewsnow.com/story/39385654/erie-county-world-war-i-centennial-committee-working-on-new-memorial-plaque Articles and Posts Highlight from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host http://ww1cc.org/dispatch     Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation The General Motors Foundation Walmart   Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Special segment host: Mike ShusterDr. Edward Lengel Researcher and writing support: Dave Kramer JL Michaud
May 19, 2019
Highlights: Episode #123 Host - Theo Mayer Germany Agrees to Sign Peace Treaty - Mike Shuster | @ 02:15 100 Years Ago: The Treaty and the League as Viewed in America - Host | @ 06:50 War Memoirs From WWI: “Will Bird”  - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 13:10 Back Over There: Italian Immigrants Serving in WWI - Luca Angeli | @ 18:50 Fleet Week New York 2019: The Site, the Events and the Social Media - Host | @ 27:15 Living Historians from the Cutter Olympia - Laura Adie & Kevin Smith | @ 28:10 “The Hello Girls Musical” Releases Cast Album - Cara Reichel, Peter Mills & Ben Moss | @ 37:15 Articles & Posts: Highlights from Dispatch - Host | @ 46:50----more---- World War I - THEN The Great War Project EXTRA EXTRA, The Germans Sign- Mike Shuster http://greatwarproject.org/2019/05/12/extra-extra-the-germans-sign/ 100 Years Ago This Week The Treaty and the League as viewed in America: Written by Dave Kramer - Host https://timesmachine.nytimes.com   Historians Corner War Memoirs from WWI: Will Bird  - Dr. Edward Lengel http://www.edwardlengel.com/canadian-will-birds-ghosts-have-warm-hands-5-best-wwi-memoir/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ http://bit.ly/2tILSQI World War I - NOW Remembering Veterans Back Over There - Luca Angeli http://ww1cc.org/backoverthere http://backoverthere.com Commission News WWI Events at Fleet Week New York 2019 - Host http://ww1cc.org/fleetweek USS Olympia at Fleet Week - Laura Adie & Kevin Smith http://www.phillyseaport.org/olympia https://www.facebook.com/CruiserOlympia/posts/otd-on-march-11-2003-harold-d-gunnes-the-last-known-living-veteran-who-served-ab/2235927023133353/ Spotlight on the Media “The Hello Girls Musical” Releases Cast Album - Cara Reichel, Peter Mills & Ben Moss   Hello Girls Cast Album - Cara Reichel, Peter Mills & Ben Moss https://www.amazon.com/Hello-Girls-Original-Off-Broadway-Recording/dp/B07R21BFZ8?SubscriptionId=AKIAIA3UEVTLIG7AIKFA&tag=divadish&linkCode=xm2&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B07R21BFZ8 https://www.thehellogirlsmusical.com/ https://www.broadwayrecords.com/cds/the-hello-girls-original-off-broadway-cast-recording  https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/5557-the-new-hello-girls-musical-play-to-debut-in-nyc.html https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/02/theater/the-hello-girls-review.html http://www.playbill.com/article/an-exclusive-first-look-at-the-hello-girls-off-broadway www.prospecttheater.org https://vimeo.com/303850360/42b5dc3ee8 Articles and Posts Highlight from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host http://ww1cc.org/dispatch     Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation The Diana Davis Spencer Foundation The Richard Lounsbery Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Special segment host: Mike ShusterDr. Edward Lengel Interview Editing Mac Nelsen Tim Crowe Researcher and writing support: Dave KramerJL Michaud
May 13, 2019
Highlights: US Navy NC-4, first to fly Atlantic Episode #122 Host - Theo Mayer 100 years Ago: US Navy NC-4, first to fly Atlantic - Host | 02:06 Ultimatum to Germany: Sign or face renewed war - Mike Shuster | 16:35 War Memoirs from WWI: “Hervey Allen”  - Dr. Edward Lengel | 29:35 FREE WWI Genealogy Research Guide - Host | 26:00 Fleet Week New York 2019 - “Corky” Erie and Beth Baker | 27:25 Articles & Posts: Highlights from Dispatch - Host | 39:30----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago This Month US Navy NC-4, first to fly Atlantic - Host https://timesmachine.nytimes.com The Great War Ultimatum to Germany: Sign or face renewed war  - Mike Shuster http://greatwarproject.org/2019/05/05/cracks-in-the-allied-side/ Historians Corner A Doughboy’s March Towards the Flame: Hervey Allen - Dr. Edward Lengel http://www.edwardlengel.com/a-doughboys-march-toward-the-flame-6-best-wwi-memoir/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ http://bit.ly/2tILSQI World War I - NOW Commission News FREE WWI Genealogy Research Guide - Host http://ww1cc.org/guide Events Fleet Week New York 2019 - “Corky” Erie and Beth Baker http://ww1cc.org/fleetweek https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/6197 https://militarynews.com/app/fleetweeknewyork/events.html Articles and Posts Highlight from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host http://ww1cc.org/dispatch   Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation The General Motors Foundation Walmart   Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Special segment host: Mike ShusterDr. Edward Lengel Researcher and writing support: Dave Kramer JL Michaud
May 5, 2019
Highlights: A Battleship in Union Square Episode #121 Host - Theo Mayer 100 Years Ago This Week - Host | @ 02:00 Threat of Reimposed Blockade on Germany - Mike Shuster | @ 14:35 War Memoirs from WWI: ‘Jack’ Idriess  - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 18:35 Remembering Veterans: USS Recruit - Tom Frezza | @ 24:40 Events: AKC Museum of the Dog - Emily Brostek | @ 30:10 Education: “Who They Were” Project from Nashua, IA - Suzan Turner w/ Drew, Abby, Tyler, Jayne and Lucas | @ 35:25 Articles & Posts: Highlights from Dispatch - Host | @ 44:15----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago This Week The First Week of May, 1919 - Host https://timesmachine.nytimes.com The Great War Project Britain Threatens to Reimpose Blockade - Mike Shuster http://greatwarproject.org/2019/04/28/britain-threatens-to-reimpose-blockade/ Historians Corner War Memoirs from WWI: Jack Idriess  - Dr. Edward Lengel http://www.edwardlengel.com/an-australian-cavalrymans-desert-column-7-best-wwi-memoir/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ http://bit.ly/2tILSQI World War I - NOW Commission News / Remembering Veterans USS Recruit at Union Square - Thomas Frezza http://ww1cc.org/fleetweek https://eugeneleeslover.com/USS_Recruit.html https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FRzN22juBdg https://www.history.navy.mil/content/history/museums/nmusn.html https://www.instagram.com/sawyer_the_seadog/ Events AKC Museum of the Dog in Fleet Week - Emily Brostek http://ww1cc.org/fleetweek https://museumofthedog.org/events-and-education/calendar/stubby-salutes https://www.linkedin.com/in/emily-brostek-3b304a156?trk=prof-samename-picture https://museumofthedog.org/about/key-staff Education Iowan Students Make Prizewinning WW1 Video - Suzan Turner https://www.nhd.org//who-they-were?utm_campaign=national-history-day&utm_content=March+2019+Newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery https://www.nashua-plainfield.k12.ia.us https://iowaculture.gov/history/get-involved/history-awards/recent-excellence-history-award-winners https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/IACIO/bulletins/23f5527 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OU6G2j2iOII&feature=youtu.be Articles and Posts Highlight from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host http://ww1cc.org/dispatch     Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation The Diana Davis Spencer Foundation The Richard Lounsbery Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Special segment host: Mike ShusterDr. Edward Lengel Interview Editing Mac Nelsen Tim Crowe Researcher and writing support: Dave KramerJL Michaud
April 28, 2019
Highlights: Valor Medal Review Legislation Episode #120 Host - Theo Mayer April 1919 Popular Science Magazine - Host | @ 01:55 Reactions to Versailles Peace Treaty - Mike Shuster | @ 12:05 A Century in the Making: Memorial Update - Joe Weishaar | @ 17:05 WWI Valor Medals Review Legislation - Dr. Tim Westcott / Zach Austin | @ 25:45 Legless, Wingless Animals Serving in WWI - Leah Tams | @ 36:00 Dispatch Newsletter Highlight - Host | @ 41:55----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago This Month The Popular Science Headlines April, 1919 - Host https://books.google.com/books?id=7igDAAAAMBAJ&q=April+1919#v=snippet&q=April%201919&f=false The Great War Reactions to Versailles Peace Treaty  - Mike Shuster http://greatwarproject.org/2019/04/21/this-is-not-peace/ World War I - NOW 100 Years in the Making Memorial Update - Joe Weishaar http://ww1cc.org/memorial https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/6088-wwi-memorial-designer-joe-weishaar-to-share-war-stories.html https://honorscollege.uark.edu/engage/alumni/meet-the-alumni/joe-weishaar.php Remembering Veterans Valor Medal Review Legislation - Dr. Timothy Westcott & Zachary Austin https://www.military.com/daily-news/2018/10/09/experts-review-whether-racism-robbed-wwi-troops-medal-honor.html https://baltimorepostexaminer.com/world-war-i-medal-of-honor-review-urged-for-minority-servicemen/2018/10/10 http://gsr.park.edu https://www.facebook.com/George-S-Robb-Centre-for-the-Study-of-the-Great-War-1133039406843201/ https://www.park.edu/people/dr-timothy-westcott/ http://ww1cc.org/valor https://www.linkedin.com/in/zachary-austin-19829198 https://bit.ly/2GuVWEq https://bit.ly/2GuoOfX Animals in WW1 - Leah Tams https://americanhistory.si.edu/blog/how-did-animals-even-slugs-serve-world-war-i http://www.leahtams.org Articles and Posts Highlight from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host http://ww1cc.org/dispatch   Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation The General Motors Foundation Walmart   Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Special segment host: Mike Shuster Researcher and writing support: Dave Kramer JL Michaud
April 21, 2019
Highlights: The Sinking of the USS San Diego Episode #119 Host - Theo Mayer 100 Years Ago This Week - Host | @ 02:25 Germany Receives the Allied Dictates - Mike Shuster | @ 10:55 The Polar Bear Expedition - James Carl Nelson | @ 14:45 War Memoirs from WWI: Charles Carrington  - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 22:10 May 2, 2019 Memorial at Cypress Hills Nat. Cemetery - Alain Dupuis | @ 27:55 The Sinking of the USS San Diego - Dr. Alexis Catsambis | @ 32:30 Minnesotan Doughboys Remembered - Susi Adler | @ 41:25 New Education Newsletter - Host | @ 49:55 Highlights from the Dispatch - Host | @ 51:10----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago This Week Two story tracks from this week 100 years ago, Italy & Japan, 1919 - Host https://timesmachine.nytimes.com The Great War Project Germany receives the allied dictates - Mike Shuster http://greatwarproject.org/2019/04/14/an-undiplomatiic-german-performance/ Remembering Veterans The Polar Bear Expedition - James Nelson Carlson Book link: https://www.amazon.com/Polar-Bear-Expedition-Forgotten-1918-1919/dp/0062852779/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&linkCode=sl1&tag=smithsonianco-20&linkId=95b4c562125cf9405a552ce0206308e6&language=en_US https://www.amazon.com/James-Carl-Nelson/e/B00294I39A/ref=dp_byline_cont_book_1 Review: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/forgotten-doughboys-who-died-fighting-russian-civil-war-180971470/ New syllabus that includes polar bears in National Curriculum https://history.army.mil/html/bookshelves/resmat/wwi/prologue/default/prologue-sec01.html Historians Corner War Memoirs from WWI: Charles Carrington  - Dr. Edward Lengel http://www.edwardlengel.com/not-disillusioned-charles-carrington-8-best-world-war-i-memoir/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ http://bit.ly/2tILSQI World War I - NOW Commission News May 2, 2019 Memorial at Cypress Hills Nat. Cemetery - Alain Dupuis https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/6128-public-invited-to-special-wreath-ceremony-at-cypress-hills-national-cemetery-nyc.html https://frenchwarveterans.com/ Remembering Veterans The sinking of the USS San Diego - Dr. Alexis Catsambis Navy Commemorates the 100th Anniversary, https://www.public.navy.mil/surfor/lpd22/Pages/Navy-Commemorates-100th-Anniversary.aspx “We Finally know what sank the USS San Diego,” Smithsonian https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/we-finally-know-what-sank-uss-san-diego-during-world-war-i-180971035/ https://www.archaeological.org/lecturer/alexiscatsambis https://nautiluslive.org/people/alexis-catsambis https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0199336008/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_bibl_vppi_i0 Updates from The States Minnesotan Doughboys Remembered - Susi Adler https://www.facebook.com/groups/2070559592974501/ https://youtu.be/Y_Y74qRYSCo Education New Education Newsletter - Host https://www.theworldwar.org/education/archive#signup https://www.theworldwar.org/education/archive#past Articles and Posts Highlight from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host http://ww1cc.org/dispatch     Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation The Diana Davis Spencer Foundation The Richard Lounsbery Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Special segment host: Mike Shuster Dr. Edward Lengel Researcher and writing support: Dave Kramer JL Michaud
April 14, 2019
Highlights: American Music in WWI Episode #118 Host - Theo Mayer 100 Years Ago This Week - Host | @ 02:10 Peace Treaty Draft Goes To Print - Mike Shuster | @ 09:05 George Creel: Selling The War, Part 2 - Alan Axelrod | @ 12:55 War Memoirs from WWI: Florence Farmborough  - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 24:20 “Hello Girls” Congressional Gold Medal Act of 2019 - Senator Jon Tester  | @ 30:00 New Website: American Music in WWI - Joshua Villanueva | @ 36:05 Featured from the Dispatch - Host | @ 44:55----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago This Week The Headlines Second Week April, 1919 - Host https://timesmachine.nytimes.com The Great War Peace Treaty Draft Goes To Print - Mike Shuster http://greatwarproject.org/2019/04/07/the-shock-of-the-treaty/ Remembering Veterans George Creel: Selling The War, Part 2 - Alan Axelrod https://www.amazon.com/Alan-Axelrod/e/B001IQULA4 https://www.amazon.com/Selling-Great-War-American-Propaganda/dp/0230605036 Stories of Service War Memoirs from WWI: Florence Farmborough  - Dr. Edward Lengel http://www.edwardlengel.com/an-englishwomans-epic-russian-journey-9-best-war-memoir/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ http://bit.ly/2tILSQI   World War I - NOW WW1 Legislation “Hello Girls” Congressional Gold Medal Act of 2019 - Senator Jon Tester Senate bill 206 House bill 1953 https://www.tester.senate.gov/?p=biography https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/senate-bill/206/text?r=1&s=1 https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-bill/1953/text https://www.govtrack.us/congress/members/map Commission News New Website: American Music in WWI - Joshua Villanueva http://ww1cc.org/music https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/contributor-to-the-site.html Articles and Posts Highlight from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host http://ww1cc.org/dispatch   Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation The General Motors Foundation Walmart   Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Special segment host: Mike Shuster Dr. Edward Lengel Researcher and writing support: JL Michaud Dave Kramer
April 6, 2019
Highlights: George Creel, Selling The War Episode #117 Host - Theo Mayer 100 Years Ago This Week - Host | @ 02:10 The Monroe Doctrine - Host | @ 06:40 April at the Paris Peace Conference - Mike Shuster | @ 10:05 War Memoirs from WWI: “Those We Loved” I.L. Read  - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 14:00 George Creel: Selling The War, Part 1 - Alan Axelrod | @ 19:20 The Story of Helen Hagan - Yale News & Elizabeth Foxwell | @ 34:30 The Dispatch - Host | @ 43:50----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago This Week The Headlines First Week of April, 1919 - Host https://timesmachine.nytimes.com The Monroe Doctrine Reviewed - Host https://www.ourdocuments.gov/doc.php?flash=false&doc=23 From the National Archives https://history.state.gov/milestones/1801-1829/monroe United States State Department, The Office of the Historian “New Article in League Draft  Saves Monroe Doctrine,” New York Times, April 11, 1919, p.1 https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1919/04/11/issue.html The Great War April at the Paris Peace Conference - Mike Shuster http://greatwarproject.org/2019/03/31/frantic-effort-to-finish-the-treaty/ Stories of Service War Memoirs from WWI: “Those We Loved” I.L. Read  - Dr. Edward Lengel http://www.edwardlengel.com/a-british-soldiers-testament-to-those-we-loved-10-best-war-memoir/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ http://bit.ly/2tILSQI WWI Remembered George Creel: Selling America on WWI Part 1 - Alan Axelrod https://www.amazon.com/Alan-Axelrod/e/B001IQULA4 https://www.amazon.com/Selling-Great-War-American-Propaganda/dp/0230605036 World War I - NOW Historian’s Corner The Story of Helen Hagan - Yale News & Elizabeth Foxwell https://news.yale.edu/2017/04/07/yale-goes-war-helen-hagan https://music.yale.edu/2016/09/30/helen-hagans-grave-finally-marked-overdue-ceremony/ https://www.amazon.com/Their-Own-Words-Elizabeth-Foxwell/dp/0985910771/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=elizabeth+foxwell&qid=1554524445&s=gateway&sr=8-1 http://www.elizabethfoxwell.com/ Articles and Posts Highlight from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host http://ww1cc.org/dispatch   Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation The General Motors Foundation Walmart   Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Special segment host: Mike Shuster Dr. Edward Lengel Researcher and writing support: Dave Kramer JL Michaud
March 31, 2019
Highlights: Frank Buckles, The Last Doughboy! Episode #116 Host - Theo Mayer 100 Years Ago This Week - Host | @ 02:15 Colonial Self Determination? - Mike Shuster | @ 11:35 Revisit Wilson’s 14 points - Host | @ 15:50 Doris Kellogg, Mechanic, Nurse, & more - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 20:10 Congressional Gold Medal for Hello Girls? - Host | @ 26:00 Valor Medal Review Task Force - Dr. Westcott & Ashlyn Weber | @ 27:40 Frank Buckles stimulates legacy - Ken Buckles | @ 33:45 Big Prize - TransAtlantic Flight - Host | @ 40:50 Dispatch highlights - Host | @ 44:00----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago This Week The Headlines of Mid March, 1919 - Host https://timesmachine.nytimes.com The Great War Massacre in Korea - Mike Schuster http://greatwarproject.org/2019/03/24/massacre-in-korea/ Wilson’s 14 points https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/wilson-delivers-fourteen-points-speech Stories of Service Women Building Ford Trucks: Doris Kellogg in WW1- Dr. Edward Lengel http://www.edwardlengel.com/women-building-ford-trucks-doris-kellogg-in-world-war-i/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ http://bit.ly/2tILSQI World War I - NOW Commission News Congressional Gold Medal for Hello Girls - Host https://cleaver.house.gov/media-center/press-releases/congressman-cleaver-introduces-bipartisan-bill-to-award-congressional Valor Medal Review Task Force - Part II -Timothy Westcott & Ashlyn Weber https://www.military.com/daily-news/2018/10/09/experts-review-whether-racism-robbed-wwi-troops-medal-honor.html https://baltimorepostexaminer.com/world-war-i-medal-of-honor-review-urged-for-minority-servicemen/2018/10/10 https://www.facebook.com/parkuniversity/photos/a.10151868157907349/10156759996647349/?type=3&theater https://www.park.edu/people/dr-timothy-westcott/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/ashlyn-weber-66a063120 http://gsr.park.edu https://www.facebook.com/George-S-Robb-Centre-for-the-Study-of-the-Great-War-1133039406843201/ Remembering Veterans Ken Buckles on his Relative, Frank Woodruff Buckles http://www.rahusa.us/about/kenbuckles/ www.rahusa.us http://arlingtoncemetery.net/fwbuckles.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Buckles Articles and Posts Highlight from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host http://ww1cc.org/dispatch   Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation The General Motors Foundation Walmart   Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Special segment host: Mike Shuster Dr. Edward Lengel Researcher and writing support: JL Michaud Dave Kramer
March 23, 2019
Congressional Medals & Donuts Episode #115 Host - Theo Mayer 100 Years Ago This Week - Host | @ 02:10 Mandates? Colonies by Another Name - Mike Shuster | @ 11:05 Donuts & the YMCA Volunteers - Patri O’Gan | @ 15:00 Suffragette Turned WWI Gov. Agent - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 21:20 Valor Medal Review Task Force - Zachary Austin | @ 27:00 Congressional Gold Medal for the Hello Girls - Dr. Elizabeth Cobbs | @ 33:00 National Medal of Honor Day 3/25 - Host | @ 41:20 Dispatch Newsletter Highlights - Host | @ 43:55----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago This Week Third Week of March, 1919 - Host https://timesmachine.nytimes.com The Great War Project Mandates? Colonies by Another Name- Mike Schuster http://greatwarproject.org/2019/03/17/mandates-colonies-by-another-name/ Remembering Veterans Donuts & the YMCA Volunteers - Patri O’Gan http://americanhistory.si.edu/profile/1154 https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/donut-girls-wwi-helped-fill-soldiers-bellies-and-get-women-vote-180962864/ Stories of Service Suffragette Turned WWI Gov. Agent - Dr. Edward Lengel http://www.edwardlengel.com/from-womans-suffrage-leader-to-government-agent-in-world-war-i/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ http://bit.ly/2tILSQI World War I - NOW Commission News Valor Medal Review Task Force - Zachary Austin http://ww1cc.org/valor Remembering Veterans “Hello Girls” Congressional Gold Medal - Dr. Elizabeth Cobbs https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2019/03/04/these-women-were-denied-veteran-status-decades-congress-cant-overlook-them-again/?utm_term=.503bff7d7b82 https://www.amazon.com/Hello-Girls-Americas-First-Soldiers/dp/0674971477 http://elizabethcobbs.com/the-hello-girls/ https://www.npr.org/2017/04/06/522596006/the-hello-girls-chronicles-the-women-who-fought-for-america-and-for-recognition https://www.npr.org/2017/04/06/522596006/the-hello-girls-chronicles-the-women-who-fought-for-america-and-for-recognition https://the1a.org/shows/2017-07-12/americas-first-women-soldiers-had-to-fight-for-recognition-as-veterans National Medal of Honor Day 3/25 - Host https://history.army.mil/moh/worldwari.html https://www.history.navy.mil/our-collections/photography/numerical-list-of-images/nhhc-series/nh-series/NH-88000/NH-88004.html Articles and Posts Highlight from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host http://ww1cc.org/dispatch   Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation the Diana Davis Spencer Foundation The Richard Lounsbery Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Special segment host: Mike Shuster Dr. Edward Lengel Researcher and writing support: JL Michaud Dave Kramer
March 16, 2019
Highlights: The Great War / Great Depression Connection Episode #114 Host - Theo Mayer 100 Years Ago This Week - Host | @ 02:00 Imperialism at the Peace Conference - Mike Shuster | @ 10:55 The Great War and the Great Depression Connection - Prof. Maury Klein | @ 15:15 A Pioneering American Woman Doctor in WWI - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 22:30 No Seat at the Table: Ireland - Host | @ 26:55 “Official Bulletin” Back Online - Host | @ 30:05 Cantata: And Crimson Roses Once Again Be Fair - Alejandro Valdez & Joseph Turrin | @ 32:55 Winner: 2019 Canine Hero of the Year - Host | @ 41:15 Speaking WWI: Dog Fight | @ 42:35----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago This Week The Headlines of Mid March, 1919 - Host https://timesmachine.nytimes.com The Great War Imperialism at the Peace Conference - Mike Schuster http://greatwarproject.org/2019/03/10/peace-european-style/ 100 Years ago this Week The Great War and the Great Depression Connection - Prof. Maury Klein https://web.uri.edu/history/meet/maury-klein/ https://www.history.com/news/world-war-i-cause-great-depression?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery Stories of Service A Pioneering American Woman Doctor in WW1- Dr. Edward Lengel http://www.edwardlengel.com/a-pioneering-american-woman-doctor-in-world-war-i/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ http://bit.ly/2tILSQI No Seat at the Table: Ireland Francis Carroll, “The American Commission on Irish Independence and the Paris Peace Conference of 1919,” Irish Studies in International Affairs, Vo 2, No. 1 (1985) pp 103-118 New York Times, March 5, 1919https://timesmachine.nytimes.com https://www.irishcentral.com/roots/history/ireland-and-the-paris-peace-conference-how-sinn-fein-waged-a-diplomatic-war World War I - NOW “Official Bulletin” Back Online https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/educate/places/official-bulletin.html Spotlight on the Media Cantata: And Crimson Roses Be Fair Once Again - Alejandro Hernandez-Valdez & Joseph Turrin http://www.josephturrin.com/cantata_video.html http://www.josephturrin.com/bio.html https://www.alejandrohernandezvaldez.com Remembering Veterans Winner: 2019 Canine Hero of the Year FACEBOOK (for poll) https://www.facebook.com/pg/ww1centennial/posts/ RAGS https://americacomesalive.com/2015/08/27/rags-world-war-i-dog-hero/ https://www.k9history.com/WWI-rags.htm STUBBY https://www.historyextra.com/period/first-world-war/sergeant-stubby-richard-lanni-film-animated-war-dog-american-history/ https://amhistory.si.edu/militaryhistory/collection/object.asp?ID=15 Speaking WW1 Dogfight - Host https://www.etymonline.com/word/dogfight https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dogfight#cite_note-Dickson2014-4 https://www.history.com/news/6-famous-wwi-fighter-aces Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation The General Motors Foundation Walmart Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Special segment host: Mike Shuster Dr. Edward Lengel Researcher and writing support: JL Michaud Dave Kramer
March 9, 2019
Highlights - Women's Diverse Roles Episode #113 Host: Theo Mayer 100 Years Ago This Week - Host | @02:15 Getting to a League Of Nations Draft - Mike Shuster | @10:35 Being Hospitalized in France - Dr. Edward Lengel | @14:30 “Digital Technology and the Sculptor’s Art” Part 2 - Host | @20:50 Courtesy of the author: Traci Slatton K9 Veterans Day and Our Poll | @35:15 Women’s Diverse Roles in WWI - Elizabeth Foxwell | @37:15 Hello Girls Documentary Update - Jim Theres | @45:05----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago This Week The Headlines of Mid March, 1919 - Host https://timesmachine.nytimes.com The Great War League of Nations Takes Shape- Mike Schuster http://greatwarproject.org/2019/03/03/league-of-nations-takes-shape/ Stories of Service A Wounded Woman’s Escape from the War- Dr. Edward Lengel http://www.edwardlengel.com/a-wounded-woman-journalists-story-of-recovery/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ http://bit.ly/2tILSQI   World War I - NOW A Century in the Making “Digital Technology and the Sculptor’s Art” Part 2 - HostCourtesy of the author: Traci Slatton www.tracilslatton.com https://www.amazon.com/Traci-L.-Slatton/e/B001JRTKYU?ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1&qid=1551552276&sr=8-1 https://www.sabinhoward.com/WW1cc/ Remembering Veterans Rags & Stubby FACEBOOK (for poll) https://www.facebook.com/pg/ww1centennial/posts/ RAGS https://americacomesalive.com/2015/08/27/rags-world-war-i-dog-hero/ https://www.k9history.com/WWI-rags.htm STUBBY https://www.historyextra.com/period/first-world-war/sergeant-stubby-richard-lanni-film-animated-war-dog-american-history/ https://amhistory.si.edu/militaryhistory/collection/object.asp?ID=15 Remembering Veterans II In Their Own Words: American Women’s Work in the War - Elizabeth Foxwell https://americanwomeninwwi.wordpress.com/about/ http://elizabethfoxwell.com/Bio.html https://www.amazon.com/Their-Own-Words-American-Women-ebook/dp/B015OPIB56 Spotlight on the Media Hello Girls - Jim Theres https://www.military.com/off-duty/2018/02/12/hello-girls-documentary-celebrates-wwi-female-telephone-operators.html https://www.npr.org/2017/04/06/522596006/the-hello-girls-chronicles-the-women-who-fought-for-america-and-for-recognition https://www.militarytimes.com/veterans/2018/07/05/ignored-for-decades-wwi-heroines-could-be-recognized-with-congressional-gold-medal/ https://wptblog.org/2018/06/directors-cut-jim-theres-the-hello-girls/ Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation the Diana Davis Spencer Foundation The Richard Lounsbery Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Special segment host: Mike Shuster Dr. Edward Lengel Researcher and writing support: JL Michaud Dave Kramer
March 2, 2019
Highlights - The Sculptor’s Art Episode #112 Host: Theo Mayer 100 Years Ago This Week - Host | @02:10 Mission to Moscow - Mike Shuster | @09:35 A “Y” girl sets up a library - Dr. Edward Lengel | @13:20 Announcing WWI Themed “Fleet Week” in NYC - Host | @20:20 “Digital Technology and the Sculptor’s Art” Part 1 - Host | @21:10Courtesy of the author: Traci Slatton Historians Corner: Women’s Suffrage in the UK - Dr. Patricia Fara | @27:35 Remembering Veterans: Choctaw Code talkers in WWI - Sarah Sawyer | @34:55 Speaking WWI: Scrounge - Host | @42:50 Dispatch Newsletter Highlights - Host | @44:50----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago This Week The Headlines of Early March, 1919 - Host https://timesmachine.nytimes.com The Great War Mission to Moscow - Mike Schuster http://greatwarproject.org/2019/02/24/mission-to-moscow/ Stories of Service Books for Soldiers: A YMCA Library in Action, 1919 - Dr. Edward Lengel http://www.edwardlengel.com/books-for-soldiers-a-y-m-c-a-library-in-action-1919/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ http://bit.ly/2tILSQI   World War I - NOW Commission News Fleet Week 2019 WWI Theme Announcement https://rove.me/to/new-york/fleet-week-nyc A Century in the Making “Digital Technology and the Sculptor’s Art” Part 1 - Host | @21:10Courtesy of the author: Traci Slatton www.tracilslatton.com https://www.amazon.com/Traci-L.-Slatton/e/B001JRTKYU?ref=sr_ntt_srch_lnk_1&qid=1551552276&sr=8-1 https://www.sabinhoward.com/WW1cc/ Remembering Veterans Anumpa Warriors: Choctaw Code Talkers in WW1 - Sarah Elisabeth Sawyer https://www.sarahelisabethwrites.com/code-talkers https://www.facebook.com/SarahElisabethSawyer https://amzn.to/2XszwKD Historian’s Corner A Lab of One’s Own: Science & Suffrage in WW1 - Dr. Patricia Fara http://www.clare.cam.ac.uk/Fellows-and-Staff-Directory/pf10006/ https://global.oup.com/academic/product/a-lab-of-ones-own-9780198794981?cc=us&lang=en& Speaking WW1 Scrounge  - Host https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/scrounge https://notoneoffbritishisms.com/2018/11/13/scrounge/ Articles & Posts This Week in the Dispatch Newsletter - Host http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch   Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation the Diana Davis Spencer Foundation The Richard Lounsbery Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Special segment host: Mike Shuster Dr. Edward Lengel Researcher and writing support: JL Michaud Dave Kramer
February 24, 2019
Highlights Episode #111 Host: Theo Mayer In The Headlines This Week - Host | @02:10 War Caused Famine Spreads - Mike Shuster | @07:50 “Y” Girls Serving in War-Torn France - Dr. Edward Lengel | @12:05 100 Years in The Making - Pangolin Editions Foundry - Steve Maury | @18:40 Remembering Veterans - 369th Experience Band Concert - From Video | @25:55 Historians Corner - African American Nurses - Dr. Charissa Threat | @36:20 Speaking WWI - Barnstorming - Host | @44:10 Highlights from the Dispatch Newsletter - Host | @49:00 More....----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago This Week The Headlines of End-February, 1919 - Host https://timesmachine.nytimes.com   The Great War War Caused Famine Spreads - Mike Schuster http://greatwarproject.org/2019/02/10/an-assassins-bullet-fells-clemenseau/http://greatwarproject.org/2019/02/17/famine-spreads-in-europe/ Stories of Service “Y” Girls Work to Heal in War-Torn France - Dr. Edward Lengel http://www.edwardlengel.com/a-y-girls-work-of-healing-in-war-torn-france/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ http://bit.ly/2tILSQI   World War I - NOW 100 Years in the Making Pangolin Editions - Steve Maury http://www.pangolin-editions.com/ https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/honor/national-wwi-memorial.html   Remembering Veterans “369th Experience” Armistice Centennial Concert - From Video https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/369th-experience-gallery.html https://www.369experience.com/ https://vimeo.com/299910327   Historian’s Corner US Army Nurse Corps’ 18 African American Nurses - Dr. Charissa Threat http://net.lib.byu.edu/estu/wwi/comment/Scott/SCh27.htm https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/4046-honoring-african-american-women-who-served-in-the-army-nurse-corps-in-wwi.html https://www.chapman.edu/our-faculty/charissa-threat bit.ly/2ykxJ1z   Speaking WW Barnstorming  - Host http://online.wsj.com/ww1/barnstorming   Articles & Posts This Week in the Dispatch Newsletter - Host http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation The General Motors Foundation Walmart Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Special segment host: Mike Shuster Dr. Edward Lengel Researcher and writing support: JL Michaud Dave Kramer
February 17, 2019
Highlights - The League of Nations Episode #110 Host: Theo Mayer Wilson Explains The League of Nations - Host | @02:10 A Seat at the Table: Japan - Host | @14:55 Turmoil at the Conference - Mike Shuster | @18:45 Formation of the American Legion - David Rehbein | @23:25 James Reese Europe - Jason Moran | @30:05 Fort Des Moines & Black Medical Officer Training - Doug Fisher | @35:55 Speaking WWI: GI - Host | @43:10 Articles & Posts: The Dispatch - Host | @45:20----more---- World War I - THEN 100 Years Ago This Week Wilson Lays Out League of Nations - Host https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1919/02/15/issue.html   A Seat at the Table Japan - Host https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1919/02/15/issue.html -https://history.state.gov/milestones/1899-1913/japanese-relations Margaret MacMillan, Paris 1919 p. 316-321 The Great War Turmoil at the Conference - Mike Schuster http://greatwarproject.org/2019/02/10/an-assassins-bullet-fells-clemenseau/   World War I - NOW   Remembering Veterans Formation of the American Legion Legion - David Rehbein http://www.legion.org/centennial https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/3038-world-war-i-veteran-american-legion-founder-remembered-in-reno.html Historian’s Corner Fort Des Moines & Black Medical Officer Training - Doug Fisher https://www.amazon.com/African-American-Doctors-World-War/dp/1476663157 https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/the-overlooked-story-of-104-african-american-doctors-who-fought-in-world-war-i/2017/09/22/ff2fda1e-9e0a-11e7-9c8d-cf053ff30921_story.html Speaking WW GI (Government Issue)  - Host https://www.americanheritage.com/why-do-we-say-gi http://www.wordorigins.org/index.php/more/310/   This Week in the Dispatch Newsletter - Host http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation The Diana Davis Spencer Foundation United Technologies Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Special segment host: Mike Shuster Researchers: JL Michaud Dave Kramer
February 9, 2019
Highlights: Fort Des Moines, Iowa Episode #109 Host: Theo Mayer From a Civil War, to a World War and Beyond - Host | @02:20With Ambassador Carol Moseley Braun & Dan Dayton Wilson’s Push for a League of Nations - Mike Shuster | @10:35 First into Germany: Sgt. Roy Holtz Part 5 - Host | @14:40(Courtesy of Robert Laplander) The Neglected Disabled Doughboys - Dr. Edward Lengel | @23:10 A Century in the Making: Interpretive Elements - Dr. Libby O’Connell | @30:20 Remembering Veterans: Fort Des Moines, IA - Dr. Hal Chase | @35:50 Education e-Newsletter - Liesl Christman Agan | @43:20 Articles & Posts: Dispatch Highlights - Host | @47:15 ----more---- World War I - THEN From a Civil War to a World War and Beyond https://vimeo.com/296664693 https://youtu.be/jVPtxDS3o5U https://www.history.com/topics/american-civil-war/reconstruction The Great War Wilson’s push for League of Nations - Mike Schuster http://greatwarproject.org/2019/02/02/wilson-fights-for-a-league-of-nations// Special First into German: Sgt. Roy Holtz Part 5 - HostCourtesy of Rob Laplander http://www.ridingvintage.com/2012/12/war-machines-american-motorcycles-of-wwi.html https://www.thrillist.com/cars/history-of-u-s-military-motorcycles https://www.foxnews.com/auto/100-year-old-harley-davidson-returns-from-france-to-honor-american-wwi-vets https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/doughboy-mia-home.html http://www.findingthelostbattalion.com/p/about-robert-j-laplander.html   Stories of Service Disabled Doughboys Fight for Recognition - Dr. Edward Lengel http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/harder-than-the-war-disabled-doughboys-fight-for-recognition/ http://bit.ly/2tILSQI World War I - NOW A Century In The Making The Elements of the WWI Memorial Park - Dr. Libby O’Connell https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/honor/national-wwi-memorial.html   Historian’s Corner Fort Des Moines pt.1: First Black Officer Training Camp in the US - Dr. Hal Chase https://www.humanitiesiowa.org/hal-chase   Education WW1 Museum Education Newsletter - Liesl Christman   https://www.theworldwar.org https://www.theworldwar.org/education/archive https://www.linkedin.com/in/lieslchristman This Week in the Dispatch Newsletter - Host http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation The General Motors Foundation Walmart Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Short story provided by Robert Laplander Special segment hosts: Mike Shuster Dr. Edward Lengel Researchers: JL Michaud Dave Kramer
February 2, 2019
Highlights: WWI & the African American Community. Host: Theo Mayer The Effect of WWI on the African American Community - Dr. Jennifer Keene | @02:05 The Dynamics of the Paris Peace Negotiations - Mike Shuster | @10:10 First into Germany: Sgt. Roy Holtz Part 4 - Host | @14:30(Courtesy of Robert Laplander) The Story of Nurse Sarah Sand - Dr. Edward Lengel | @22:30 The Elements of the WWI Memorial Park - Dr. Libby O’Connell | @27:50 A Teacher on Teaching WWI - Michael Sandstrom | @36:50 “Speaking WWI”: Airport - Host | @45:45 “Articles & Posts”: Weekly Dispatch - Host | @48:00----more---- World War I - THEN Historian’s Corner The Effect of WWI on the African American Community - Dr. Jennifer Keene https://www.chapman.edu/our-faculty/jennifer-keene https://digitalcommons.chapman.edu/do/search/?q=author_lname%3A%22Keene%22%20AND%20author_fname%3A%22Jennifer%22&start=0&context=5695533&sort=date_desc&facet= The Great War The Dynamics of the Paris Peace Negotiations - Mike Schuster http://greatwarproject.org/2019/01/17/revolution-in-germany/ Special First into German: Sgt. Roy Holtz Part 4 - HostCourtesy of Rob Laplander http://www.ridingvintage.com/2012/12/war-machines-american-motorcycles-of-wwi.html https://www.thrillist.com/cars/history-of-u-s-military-motorcycles https://www.foxnews.com/auto/100-year-old-harley-davidson-returns-from-france-to-honor-american-wwi-vets https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/doughboy-mia-home.html http://www.findingthelostbattalion.com/p/about-robert-j-laplander.html Stories of Service A Nurse Faces War’s Legacy - Dr. Edward Lengel http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/a-nurse-faces-wars-legacy/ http://bit.ly/2tILSQI World War I - NOW Education A Teacher on Teaching WWI  - Michael Sandstrom https://www.nhd.org/about https://www.nhd.org/newsletter A Century In The Making The Elements of the WWI Memorial Park - Dr. Libby O’Connell https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/honor/national-wwi-memorial.html Speaking WW1: “Airport” - Host https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/wright-brothers-ohio-aviation-field/index.html     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerodrome#References https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airport http://www.tc.faa.gov/act4/insidethefence/2006/0102_16_bader.htm https://www.centennialofflight.net/essay/Government_Role/earliest_airports/POL9.htm https://books.google.com/books?id=0J12CQAAQBAJ&pg=PT65&lpg=PT65&dq=robert+woodhouse+airport&source=bl&ots=ezAlIln4pS&sig=ACfU3U1-iwQU00b0NJQiPg6zk_tfdND_jA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjbpvKU0P_fAhVMwFkKHZxdCAMQ6AEwA3oECAYQAQ#v=onepage&q=robert%20woodhouse%20airport&f=false https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-29612707     Articles and Posts This Week in the Dispatch Newsletter - Host http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch   Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Short story provided by Robert Laplander Special segment hosts: Mike Shuster Dr. Edward Lengel Researchers: JL Michaud Dave Kramer
January 26, 2019
Highlights: New Nations, New World. Episode #107 Host: Theo Mayer The News 100 Year Ago in the Official Bulletin - Host | @02:05 Tempestuous Voyage Home - Dr. Edward Lengel | @15:55 A Seat At The Table: Yugoslavia - Host | @19:25 Communist Revolution in Germany - Mike Shuster | @22:40 First into German: Sgt. Roy Holtz - Host | @26:40(Courtesy of Robert Laplander) The Next Step for the Sculpture - Sabin Howard | @34:10 National History Day WWI Education - Cathy Gorn | @41:45 Speaking WWI: Cup ‘O Joe - Host | @49:45 Hello Girls Musical Cast Album - Host | @51:35----more---- World War I - THEN The Headlines 100 Years Ago - Host https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/educate/places/official-bulletin.html Military Stories - Ed Lengel http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/an-american-balloon-companys-tempestuous-voyage-home/ http://bit.ly/2tILSQI The Great War - Mike Schuster http://greatwarproject.org/2019/01/17/revolution-in-germany/ Special: First Into Germany, Sgt. Roy Holtz Part 3. - Host By Rob Laplander http://www.ridingvintage.com/2012/12/war-machines-american-motorcycles-of-wwi.html https://www.thrillist.com/cars/history-of-u-s-military-motorcycles https://www.foxnews.com/auto/100-year-old-harley-davidson-returns-from-france-to-honor-american-wwi-vets https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/doughboy-mia-home.html http://www.findingthelostbattalion.com/p/about-robert-j-laplander.html World War I - NOW A Century in The Making - Sabin Howard http://www.pangolin-editions.com/departments http://www.sabinhoward.com/WW1cc/ www.ww1cc.org/memorial Education, National History Day: Memorializing the Fallen - Cathy Gorn https://www.nhd.org/about https://www.nhd.org/newsletter Speaking WW1: Cup o’ Joe - Host https://www.knowyourphrase.com/cup-of-joe https://www.rogersfamilyco.com/index.php/the-origins-of-a-cup-of-joe/   Spotlight on the Media - Hello Girls Musical Cast Album - Host https://www.knowyourphrase.com/cup-of-joe https://www.rogersfamilyco.com/index.php/the-origins-of-a-cup-of-joe/   Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Short story provided by Robert Laplander Special segment hosts: Mike Shuster Dr. Edward Lengel Researchers: JL Michaud Dave Kramer
January 19, 2019
Highlights: Welcome Home, it’s Prohibition! Episode #106 Host: Theo Mayer The Headlines 100 Years Ago - Host | @02:00 The 308th Regiment’s Journey Home - Dr. Edward Lengel | @12:00 Wilson Goes to Rome - Mike Shuster | @19:10 First Into Germany: SGT Roy Holtz - And he did it on a Harley - Host | @23:15(Courtesy of author Robert Laplander) A Century in the Making: The Winning Team Part 2 - Joe Weishaar & Sabin Howard | @30:50 Introducing Phil Mazzara - Host | @40:00 The Story of a Memorial Hunter - Bob Shay | @42:30----more---- World War I - THEN The Headlines 100 Years Ago https://timesmachine.nytimes.com (Paid access only) Military Stories - Ed Lengel http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/after-the-war-the-308th-regiments-long-journey-home/ The Great War - Mike Schuster http://greatwarproject.org/2019/01/01/wilson-in-rome-italy-in-turmoil/ Special: First Into Germany, Sgt. Roy Holtz Part 2. - Host By Robert Laplander http://www.ridingvintage.com/2012/12/war-machines-american-motorcycles-of-wwi.html https://www.thrillist.com/cars/history-of-u-s-military-motorcycles https://www.foxnews.com/auto/100-year-old-harley-davidson-returns-from-france-to-honor-american-wwi-vets https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/doughboy-mia-home.html http://www.findingthelostbattalion.com/p/about-robert-j-laplander.html World War I - NOW A Century in The Making - Joe Weishaar & Sabin Howard http://www.sabinhoward.com/WW1cc/ https://www.theepochtimes.com/the-next-step-in-a-soldiers-journey_2397769.html www.ww1cc.org/memorial Remembering Veterans: The Story of a Memorial Hunter - Bob Shay https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/memorial-hunters-club-about.html Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer Short story provided by Robert Laplander Special segment hosts: Mike ShusterDr. Edward Lengel Researchers: JL MichaudDave Kramer
January 12, 2019
Highlights: Looking ahead at 1919! Episode #105 Host: Theo Mayer 1919 Overview Roundtable - Dr. Edward Lengel, Katherine Akey, Host | @02:00 Wilson’s Great Challenge - Mike Shuster | @17:40 First into Germany: SGT Roy Holtz - And he did it on a Harley - Host | @22:00(Courtesy of author Robert Laplander) A Century in the Making: The Winning Team - Joe Weishaar & Sabin Howard | @29:00 “American Indians in WWI”: New Website - Erin Fehr | @39:30 New showings of Peter Jackson’s “They Shall Not Grow Old” - Host | @46:40 WWI in education: Memorializing The Fallen - Host | @49:00----more---- Wilson’s Great Challenge http://greatwarproject.org/2018/12/24/the-great-questions-emerge-who-won-the-war/ Harley Davidson in WWI http://www.ridingvintage.com/2012/12/war-machines-american-motorcycles-of-wwi.html https://www.thrillist.com/cars/history-of-u-s-military-motorcycles https://www.foxnews.com/auto/100-year-old-harley-davidson-returns-from-france-to-honor-american-wwi-vets https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/doughboy-mia-home.html http://www.findingthelostbattalion.com/p/about-robert-j-laplander.html “A Century in the Making” - National World War I Memorial in Washington D.C. www.ww1cc.org/memorial Remembering Veterans: New website https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/american-indians-in-ww1-centennial-home.html Spotlight on the Media: New Fathom Events showing https://www.fathomevents.com/events/they-shall-not-grow-old https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74h-o8dFU8E   WWI in education: Memorializing The Fallen https://www.nhd.org/memorializing-fallen https://www.nhd.org//   Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katherine Akey & Katalin Laszlo Written by: Theo Mayer & Katherine Akey Short story provided by Robert Laplander Special segment hosts: Mike Shuster Dr. Edward Lengel Researchers: JL Michaud Dave Kramer
January 5, 2019
Favorite Segments of 2018 - Part 2 Host: Theo Mayer Last week and this week, we have a two-episode special. We have pulled together some of our favorite stories and segments from 2018! They are presented in chronological order. Part 1 came out last week - the last week of 2018, and here is Part 2 published the first week of 2019. This episode includes: June 29, Episode #78How WWI Shaped the 20th Century with Dr. Jay Winter |@ 01:10 July 20, Episode #81A Two-for-One Combo…. with WWI War Tech and Speaking WWI both about photography! |@ 07:45 August 10, Episode #84Japan in WWI with Dr. Frederick Dickinson |@ 13:50 In the same episode #84,The 28th Division: Pennsylvania National Guard doughboys fight from Dr. Edward Lengel |@ 21:35 October 5, Episode #92The Lost Battalion - with Rob Laplander |@ 27:35 November 2, Episode #94Maneuverings: Both Military and Diplomatic with Mike Shuster |@ 34:20 November 11, Episode #98From the World War I Armistice Centennial Day Sacred Service - an excerpt: "The Last One Down: Henry Gunther", written by Matthew Naylor, underscored with "The Unanswered Question" by Aaron Copeland performed by the World War I Centennial Orchestra and read by Dr. Libby O’Connell |@ 38:05 December 14th, Episode #101Three Key impacts of WWI with historian, Sir Hew Strachan |@ 42:35 Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katherine Akey Written by: Theo Mayer & Katherine Akey Special segment hosts: Mike Shuster Dr. Edward Lengel Researchers: Eric Marr JL Michaud 2018 Production interns:
December 30, 2018
Favorite Segments of 2018 - Part 1 Episode #103 Host: Theo Mayer This New Year week, and next week, we have a two-episode special for you. We have pulled together some of our favorite stories and segments from 2018! They are presented in chronological order. Part 1 comes out this week - the last week of 2018, and Part 2 will publish next week - the first week of 2019. This episode includes: January 11,  Episode #54Looking ahead at 2018 & Wilson’s 14 points. |@ 01:10 Same week, Episode #54“A Century In The Making” with Sabin Howard |@ 05:15 March 2, Episode #61March 1917 preview roundtable with Dr. Edward Lengel, Katherine Akey and myself |@ 11:25 In the same episode #61, The fighting in Russia with Mike Shuster |@ 22:45 March 9, Episode #63Alvin Yorks Crisis of Conscience with Dr. Edward Lengel |@ 26:25 April 4 Episode #66War in The Sky - PTSD among the pilots with Mark Wilkins |@ 33:10 May 4  Episode #70The big influenza pandemic with Kenneth C. Davis  |@ 40:05 In the same show - Episode #70 - War in the Sky - the story of Eddie Rickenbacker |@ 47:20 Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation   Production: Executive Producer: Dan Dayton Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katherine Akey Written by: Theo Mayer & Katherine Akey Special segment hosts: Mike Shuster Dr. Edward Lengel Researchers: Eric Marr JL Michaud 2018 Production interns: (list coming)
December 22, 2018
2018 Holiday Music Special Host: Theo Mayer This is our 2018 Holiday music special. We have compiled a collection of WWI era holiday music. It includes popular Holiday music of the time including some German, French, British and Italian pieces and even a modern day rendition of I’ll be home for Christmas courtesy of the contemporary WWI musicians, Baritone John Brancy and pianist Peter Dugan.----more---- Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation Production: Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katherine Akey
December 15, 2018
Highlights: The Aftermath Part II Episode #101 Host: Theo Mayer Part II of a special 2-part series examining the immediate aftermath of the Armistice signing. Preview of coming attractions - Host | @00:35 Gold Star Mothers - Candy Martin  | @02:45 American Battle Monuments Commission - Mike Knapp | @10:35 Three Key impacts of WWI - Sir Hew Strachan | @18:00 The Cost of a Seat at the Table - Mike Shuster | @24:55 The effect of WWI on the United States - Professor Michael Carew | @28:55----more---- Gold Star Mothers https://www.goldstarmoms.com/ American Battle Monuments Commission https://www.abmc.gov/ https://www.abmc.gov/about-us/history Discussion with Sir Hew Strachan https://www.asc.ox.ac.uk/person/67 Great War Project http://greatwarproject.org/2018/12/02/the-cost-of-a-seat-at-the-peace-table/ The Impact of the First World War on US Policymakers https://www.amazon.com/Impact-First-World-U-S-Policymakers/dp/0739198920 Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation Production: Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katherine Akey Research: JL Michaud
December 8, 2018
Highlights: The Aftermath Part I Host: Theo MayerPart I of a special 2-part series examining the immediate aftermath of the Armistice signing. Preview of coming attractions - Host | @00:25 The immediate aftermath - Mike Shuster | @04:15 Commonwealth War Graves Commission - Dr. Glyn Prysor and Peter Francis | @07:50 War, wounds, pain and fear - Professor Joanna Burke | @18:00 Coming Home - Jonathan Casey | @26:40 Hello Girls the Musical - Cara Reichel and Peter Mills | @33:00 Peter Jackson’s “They Shall Not Grow Old” - Brent Burge | @42:10----more---- Great War Project http://greatwarproject.org/2018/11/25/first-allied-troops-cross-into-germany/ Commonwealth War Graves Commission https://shapingoursorrow.cwgc.org/ https://www.cwgc.org/ Trauma and Pain http://www.bbk.ac.uk/history/our-staff/academic-staff/joanna Coming Home: Americans Return https://www.theworldwar.org/explore/exhibitions/past-exhibitions/coming-home https://www.theworldwar.org Hello Girls: The Musical https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/5557-the-new-hello-girls-musical-play-to-debut-in-nyc.html https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/02/theater/the-hello-girls-review.html http://www.playbill.com/article/an-exclusive-first-look-at-the-hello-girls-off-broadway They Shall Not Grow Old https://www.fathomevents.com/events/they-shall-not-grow-old https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74h-o8dFU8E   Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation   Production: Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer & Co-writer: Katherine Akey Interview editing: Mac Nelsen and Tim Crowe Research: JL Michaud Intern: Rachel Hurt
November 24, 2018
Highlights: Thanksgiving Special Host: Theo Mayer What are we thankful for on this Thanksgiving? | @ 00:25 How to help build the National WWI Memorial in Washington DC | @ 02:45 Memorial Sculptor Sabin Howard on the sculpture design | @ 06:55 President Wilson’s 1918 Thanksgiving Proclamation | @ 10:50 Commission Executive Director Dan Dayton | @ 15:55 Commission Chairman Terry Hamby | @ 17:25----more---- This week we are asking our listeners to help us build the National WWI Memorial in Washington DC. We have a fundraising goal on the episode which people can help us achieve by: Texting the letters “WWI” to the number 91-999 - When you do that you will get a text right back that provides all the giving instructions. Text to Give: Text: “WWI” to 91-999 Memorial information ww1cc.org/memorial Thanksgiving Letters http://herolettersww1.blogspot.com/2009/11/365th-infantry-african-american-wwi_08.html?m=1 https://gazette665.com/2017/11/17/thanksgiving-1918-a-world-war-i-soldier-dreams-of-home/ MENU from AEF 2nd Aviation Instruction Center http://roadstothegreatwar-ww1.blogspot.com/2013/11/thanksgiving-day-1918.html DIARY ENTRY https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47dd-f2a2-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99 GREAT PHOTOS https://www.thedailymeal.com/eat/military-thanksgiving-home-front-front-lines-slideshow/slide-3 https://www.europeana.eu/portal/en/record/9200316/BibliographicResource_3000092752195.html FIRST INFLIGHT TGIVING MEAL https://cartas.typepad.com/main/2010/11/aviation-history-made-in-santa-barbara-loughead-brothers-.html Thanksgiving essay and poem in the NY Times, 11/28/1918 https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/11/28/97047132.html?pageNumber=16 Story about Thanksgiving dinners for troops in NYC, 1918 https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/11/28/issue.html   “Nice’s homes open to our men” https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/11/27/96866884.pdf     Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation   Production: Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katherine Akey Research: JL Michaud
November 17, 2018
Special: Sacred Service World War I Armistice Centennial,November 11, 2018 Episode #98 Host: Theo Mayer This special episode brings you the sound of World War I Armistice Day Sacred Service, a multi-denominational service honoring the Centennial of the WWI Armistice, from the WWI Centennial Commission in partnership with Washington National Cathedral. View the video at: ww1cc.org/sacredservice Download the Service program (a keepsake in its own right) at: https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/images/2018-ace/pdf/wwi_armistice_sacred-service_program_11_11_2018.pdf Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation   Production: Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katherine Akey
November 13, 2018
Highlights: The Run-up to the Armistice Host: Theo Mayer 100 Years Ago… The Run-up to the Armistice - Host | @02:10 Was America crucial to winning the war? - Prof. Geoffrey Wawro | @09:10 A reading of the Armistice - Host | @18:50 The 369th Experience - performance | @39:05----more---- Run-up to the Armistice Historian Corner Geoffrey Wawro Links:https://geoffreywawro.com/ http://time.com/5406235/everything-you-know-about-how-world-war-i-ended-is-wrong/ https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/2018/09/24/century-later-america-must-remember-lessons-one-its-biggest-blunders/?utm_term=.77025d34fb54 World War One Now 369th Experience Complete performance: https://vimeo.com/299910327 Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation   Production: Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katherine Akey Additional Scripting: Dr. Edward Lengel Interview editing: Mac Nelsen and Tim Crowe Research: JL Michaud Intern: Rachel Hurt
November 4, 2018
Highlights: November 1918 Overview Host: Theo Mayer Preview of podcast over the coming weeks | @00:20 November 1918 Overview - Dr. Edward Lengel, Katherine Akey, Theo Mayer  | @02:40 Maneuvering both military and diplomatic - Mike Shuster | @18:15 WWI WarTech: The Wristwatch - Host | @21:55 Commission News: The coming week of commemoration - Host | @24:30 Arlington County WWI Commemoration Task Force - Dr. Allison Finkelstein | @26:00 No Armistice from the flu - David Pietrusza | @34:45 100 Cities / 100 Memorials’ effect on Arizona - Neil Urban | @42:30 Speaking WWI: Foxhole - Host | @49:05 The Buzz: Social Media selections - Katherine Akey | @50:35----more---- World War One Then November 1918 Overview https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/November_1918 Great War Project http://greatwarproject.org/2018/10/28/take-the-war-to-german-territory/ WW1 War Tech https://www.amazon.com/Tommy-Doughboy-Fritz-Soldier-Slang/dp/144563 https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2015/05/history-wristwatch-apple-watch/391424/ https://www.nytimes.com/2013/10/23/fashion/wrist-watches-from-battlefield-to-fashion-accessory.html World War One Now Commission News http://ww1cc.org/YourAce http://ww1cc.org/bells http://ww1cc.org/film http://www.pritzkermilitary.org/events/special-events/wwicc-honor-and-remember/ Itunes app install link: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/bells-of-peace-wwi-armistice/id1436351331?ls=1&mt=8 Android app install link: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.ww1cc.bells Remembering Veterans https://commissions.arlingtonva.us/wwi/ https://www.arlnow.com/2018/06/27/arlington-historians-plan-event-to-mark-world-war-is-centennial/ Historian Corner https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/why-teddy-roosevelt-tried-bully-way-onto-wwi-battlefield-180962840/ https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/letters-unbearable-grief-theodore-roosevelt-death-son-180962743/ https://www.cdc.gov/features/1918-flu-pandemic/index.html https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/journal-plague-year-180965222/ 100Cities/100Memorials www.ww1cc.org/100memorials Articles and Posts http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html The Buzz https://www.facebook.com/hashtag/countdowntoveteransday?source=feed_text&__tn__=*NK-R https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/countdowntoveteransday/ https://twitter.com/search?q=countdowntoveteransday&src=typd https://deadline.com/2018/10/peter-jackson-warner-bros-wwi-documentary-they-shall-not-grow-old-toby-emmerich-carolyn-blackwood-blair-rich-1202491670/   Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation   Production: Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katherine Akey Additional Scripting: Dr. Edward Lengel Interview editing: Mac Nelsen and Tim Crowe Research: JL Michaud Intern: Rachel Hurt
October 28, 2018
Highlights: Preparing for Peace & War Host: Theo Mayer Preparing for Peace & War - Host | @01:50 The fighting and plans continue - Mike Shuster | @08:40 America Emerges: Brig. Gen. Hunter Liggett - Dr. Edward Lengel | @12:35 Live Streaming Armistice events - Host | @19:30 Events around the nation - Host | @21:35 Pvt. Roy W. Hamm Tribute Train - Ted Lemen | @23:15 “Hello Girl” Grace Banker - Carolyn Timbie | @28:40 Century of Sound - James Errington | @36:05 Speaking WWI: Nothing to write home about - Host | @44:25 WWI WarTech: Flexing the new arsenal - Host | @45:35 Articles & Posts: The Dispatch - Host | @47:35 The Buzz: Social Media Posts - Katherine Akey | @52:05----more---- World War One Then 100 Years Ago https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/27/97038083.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/27/97037709.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/27/97037727.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/22/97035038.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/22/97035035.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/24/97035944.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/24/97035955.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/25/97036317.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/25/97036325.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/26/97037366.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/26/97037389.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/21/97034775.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/27/97037948.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/23/97035631.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/svc/tmach/v1/refer?pdf=true&res=9805E7D91539E13ABC4C51DFB6678383609EDE Great War Project http://greatwarproject.org/2018/10/21/food-shortages-clogged-roads-hinder-allied-advance America emerges: Military Stories from WW1 http://www.edwardlengel.com/americas-finest-general-hunter-liggett-turns-the-tide/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ World War One Now Commission News http://ww1cc.org/YourAce http://ww1cc.org/bells http://ww1cc.org/film http://www.pritzkermilitary.org/events/special-events/wwicc-honor-and-remember/ Itunes app install link: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/bells-of-peace-wwi-armistice/id1436351331?ls=1&mt=8 Android app install link: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.ww1cc.bells Events https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFEpVCsdEtd1PG72ZbBHNrGkLIG6vZeX_ www.ww1cc.org/events http://www.MRYM.org https://www.facebook.com/railwaymuseum/ Remembering Veterans https://www.archives.gov/calendar/event/the-hello-girls https://www.military.com/off-duty/2018/02/12/hello-girls-documentary-celebrates-wwi-female-telephone-operators.html https://wptblog.org/2018/06/directors-cut-jim-theres-the-hello-girls/ Historian Corner https://centuriesofsound.wordpress.com/about/ Speaking https://www.dictionary.com/browse/nothing-to-write-home-about WW1 War Tech https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/26/97037464.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/21/97034826.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/22/97035088.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/23/97035418.pdf Articles and Posts http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html The Buzz https://www.wired.com/story/lidar-archaeology-world-war-1-ypres-salient-belgium/?mbid=social_facebook_aud_dev_kw_paid_transportation_laser-shooting-planes-uncover-the-horror-and-humanity-of-world-war-i&fbclid=IwAR1v8Xf6VMFTABdOC7iJMZA3p5YcacNpQluBgmPbFUrYGigMxfbuELTHQfY https://www.military.com/daily-news/2018/10/23/marine-iraq-vet-secures-corrected-headstone-great-uncle-killed-wwi.html?fbclid=IwAR1f3rTiNnHldr1KtnieRzsEzO0DIcpOQXDrZbxakLayk1lx5jTVFcEuPrg   Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation   Production: Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katherine Akey Additional Scripting: Dr. Edward Lengel Interview editing: Mac Nelsen and Tim Crowe Research: JL Michaud Intern: Rachel Hurt
October 21, 2018
Highlights: Liberation in Belgium Host: Theo Mayer Preface: Bells of Peace - Host | @00:20 100 Years Ago: Liberation in Belgium & refugees return - Host | @03:50 Insight into Germany - Mike Shuster | @08:45 America Emerges: 29th Division in the Valley of Death - Dr. Edward Lengel | @13:20 Commission News: Some upcoming events profiled - Host | @19:45 Belgian musicians in Nashville - Maestro Rik Ghesquiere | @24:10 Historian Corner: CMH & WWI, Part II - Dr. Brian Neumann | @31:10 More about pigeons: Revered & Reviled! - Andrew Blechman | @38:30 WWI WarTech: Seeing eye dogs - Host | @45:55 WWI Memorial in Dublin GA - Scott Thompson, Keith Smith & Buddy Adams | @49:00 Speaking WWI: Devil Dogs - Host | @56:15 Articles & Posts: Dispatch Newsletter | @58:10 Buzz: The Centennial in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @60:00----more---- Highlights: Liberation in Belgium Episode #94 Host: Theo Mayer   Preface: Bells of Peace - Host | @00:20 100 Years Ago: Liberation in Belgium & refugees return - Host | @03:50 Insight into Germany - Mike Shuster | @08:45 America Emerges: 29th Division in the Valley of Death - Dr. Edward Lengel | @13:20 Commission News: Some upcoming events profiled - Host | @19:45 Belgian musicians in Nashville - Maestro Rik Ghesquiere | @24:10 Historian Corner: CMH & WWI, Part II - Dr. Brian Neumann | @31:10 More about pigeons: Revered & Reviled! - Andrew Blechman | @38:30 WWI WarTech: Seeing eye dogs - Host | @45:55 WWI Memorial in Dublin GA - Scott Thompson, Keith Smith & Buddy Adams | @49:00 Speaking WWI: Devil Dogs - Host | @56:15 Articles & Posts: Dispatch Newsletter | @58:10 Buzz: The Centennial in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @60:00 World War One Then 100 Years Ago https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/16/97033394.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/17/97033931.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/18/97034182.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/18/97034244.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/19/97034486.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/20/98272990.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/20/98272987.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/20/98273033.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/20/98273203.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/20/98273362.pdf https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-28857769 https://www.wereldoorlog1418.nl/refugees/ https://www.bl.uk/world-war-one/articles/refugees-europe-on-the-move https://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/refugees https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/02619280802442613 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_occupation_of_Belgium_during_World_War_I http://www.cheminsdememoire.gouv.fr/en/1918-les-belges-la-reconquete-de-la-belgique Great War Project http://greatwarproject.org/2018/10/14/critical-situation-for-germany/ America emerges: Military Stories from WW1 http://www.edwardlengel.com/the-29th-divisions-new-jersey-doughboys-in-the-valley-of-death https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ World War One Now Commission News http://ww1cc.org/YourAce http://ww1cc.org/bells http://ww1cc.org/film http://www.pritzkermilitary.org/events/special-events/wwicc-honor-and-remember/ Itunes app install link: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/bells-of-peace-wwi-armistice/id1436351331?ls=1&mt=8 Android app install link: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.ww1cc.bells Events https://www.eventbrite.com/e/pershings-paths-of-glory-tickets-50712944783 https://conservancyonline.com/remembrance-event https://www.neworchestraofwashington.org/tickets/2018/11/10/end-of-the-war-to-end-all-wars Historian Corner https://history.army.mil/html/bookshelves/collect/wwi-cb.html https://www.facebook.com/armyhistory/videos/324903311612661/ http://www.andrewblechman.com/about/index.html https://www.amazon.com/Pigeons-Fascinating-Worlds-Revered-Reviled-ebook/dp/B006L76L6I/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1539608570&sr=8-1&keywords=blechman+pigeon 100Cities/100Memorials www.ww1cc.org/100cities https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/georgia-wwi-home/5490-the-courier-herald-never-too-late-to-say-thank-you-gentlemen.html Speaking https://www.aerosociety.com/media/4847/a-brief-history-of-flying-clothing.pdf WW1 War Tech https://www.igdf.org.uk/about-us/facts-and-figures/history-of-guide-dogs/ https://americacomesalive.com/2011/07/19/buddy-the-first-seeing-eye-dog/ http://www.seeingeye.org/about-us/history.html http://www.seeingeye.org/assets/pdfs/history/saturday-evening-post-article.pdf Reference: Military Medicine, Vol. 175. “History of Guide Dog Use By Veterans.” Mark Ostermeier, OD. 2010. Articles and Posts http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html The Buzz https://www.facebook.com/TheGreatWar191418/posts/1417705381695042 https://www.facebook.com/FlandersFields1418/posts/2851139458233092 https://www.history.com/news/spanish-flu-deaths-october-1918?fbclid=IwAR3Gh42AOLOW-zP5_qVEfDkygW38w0TQBRzYSw8ai8yUiFw2IGSqyVMDkJo Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation Production: Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katherine Akey Additional Scripting: Dr. Edward Lengel Interview editing: Mac Nelsen and Tim Crowe Research: JL Michaud Intern: Rachel Hurt
October 13, 2018
Highlights: Sgt. Alvin York Host: Theo Mayer Peace Explored & Rejected - Host | @01:55 Atrocities in Syria - Mike Shuster | @08:55 America Emerges: Sgt. Alvin York - Dr. Edward Lengel | @13:35 Commission News: The ACE schedule is published - Host | @21:20 Events: NY Transit Museum WWI Day - Kevin Fitzpatrick & Polly DesJarlais | @23:40 Remembering Veterans: Charles Edward Dilkes - Dr. Virginia Dilkes | @31:10 Speaking WWI: Teddy Bear Suit - Host | @38:25 Historian’s Corner: Baseball in WWI - Jim Leeke | @41:40 100C/100M: Springdale PA - Mayor Jo Bertoline & Patrick Murray | @48:10 Articles & Posts - Host | @55:10 Buzz: The Centennial in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @58:20----more----   World War One Then 100 Years Ago https://nyti.ms/2C0dzub https://nyti.ms/2CtilRK https://nyti.ms/2CsOhG6 https://nyti.ms/2CtE0JK https://nyti.ms/2CsJCUp https://nyti.ms/2CtFrrp https://nyti.ms/2CrI0KF https://nyti.ms/2BZNzib https://nyti.ms/2BZNURZ https://nyti.ms/2C0YJnc https://nyti.ms/2CsA7ES https://nyti.ms/2BWtPw6 https://nyti.ms/2BYSZdx https://nyti.ms/2BVm2i9 https://nyti.ms/2CtdmR8 https://nyti.ms/2CsoOMK https://nyti.ms/2CsZmqm https://nyti.ms/2CvMnUQ https://nyti.ms/2BYdtmt https://nyti.ms/2C1RlHQ https://nyti.ms/2CrsVsn https://nyti.ms/2C0ZL2y Great War Project http://greatwarproject.org/2018/10/07/horrible-massacre-in-syria/ America emerges: Military Stories from WW1 http://www.edwardlengel.com/alvin-yorks-tragic-glory/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ World War One Now Commission News http://ww1cc.org/YourAce http://ww1cc.org/bells http://ww1cc.org/film http://www.pritzkermilitary.org/events/special-events/wwicc-honor-and-remember/ Itunes app install link: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/bells-of-peace-wwi-armistice/id1436351331?ls=1&mt=8 Android app install link: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.ww1cc.bells Events http://wwi100nyc.org/event-calendar/#event=14301952http://wwi100nyc.org/event-calendar/#event=14301952 https://www.nytransitmuseum.org/ Remembering Veterans https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/nj-wwi-centennial-events/eventdetail/6717/remembering-world-war-i-through-the-eyes-of-a-wwi-veteran-charles-edward-dilkes.html https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/commemorate/family-ties/stories-of-service/2952-charles-edward-dilkes-sgt.html Speaking https://www.jstor.org/stable/pdf/3087941.pdf Historian Corner https://www.amazon.com/Dugouts-Trenches-Baseball-during-Great/dp/0803290721 http://www.aabaseball.org/ https://www.loc.gov/collections/stars-and-stripes/?sb=date https://twitter.com/ww1baseball?lang=en 100Cities/100Memorials www.ww1cc.org/100cities Articles and Posts http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html The Buzz https://www.facebook.com/ww100scotland/videos/vb.446555055492940/333587107394617/?type=2&theater https://www.ausa.org/news/ausa-publishes-graphic-novel-sgt-york https://www.ausa.org/york   Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation   Production: Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katherine Akey Additional Scripting: Dr. Edward Lengel Interview editing: Mac Nelsen and Tim Crowe Research: JL Michaud Intern: Rachel Hurt
October 7, 2018
Highlights: October 1918 Overview Host: Theo Mayer October 1918 Overview Roundtable - Dr.Edward Lengel & Katherine Akey | @03:55 Historians Corner: Lost Battalion - Ron Laplander | @20:00 Shifting sands and hard fighting - Mike Shuster | @26:40 Commission News: Honor & Remember in Chicago - Host | @31:24 Commission News: Bells of Peace update - Host | @32:15 State Profile: Georgia - Dr. Tom Jackson | @33:40 Remembering Veterans: Story of John Foster - Mark Foster | @41:10 US Army CMH WWI Website - Dr. Erik Villard | @47:20 Spotlight On The Media 1: Dr. Edward Lengel | @52:40 Spotlight On The Media 2: Lost Battalion Documentary - Mark Fastoso & John King | @55:20 WWI War Tech: Pigeons - Host | @60:00 Articles & Posts: Weekly Dispatch - Host | @65:05 The Buzz: Selections from Social Media - Katherine Akey | @67:45----more---- World War One Then Historian Corner with Rob Laplander https://www.amazon.com/Finding-Lost-Battalion-Legends-Americas/dp/1411676564 https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/doughboy-mia-home.html Great War Project http://greatwarproject.org/2018/09/30/generals-to-the-kaiser-the-war-cannot-go-on/ World War One Now Commission News http://ww1cc.org/YourAce http://ww1cc.org/bells http://ww1cc.org/film http://www.pritzkermilitary.org/events/special-events/wwicc-honor-and-remember/ Itunes app install link: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/bells-of-peace-wwi-armistice/id1436351331?ls=1&mt=8 Android app install link: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.ww1cc.bells Updates from the States www.ww1cc.org/georgia Remembering Veterans https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/commemorate/family-ties/stories-of-service/4382-john-chester-foster.html https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/commemorate/family-ties/stories-of-service.html https://www.amazon.com/World-Genealogy-Research-Guide-Non-Combatant/dp/1980916845 https://history.army.mil/html/bookshelves/resmat/wwi/prologue/default/index.html https://history.army.mil/index.html https://history.army.mil/html/bookshelves/collect/wwi-cb.html Spotlight in the Media https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IF7a-370JeE https://www.c-span.org/video/?450879-1/the-lost-battalion http://www.echofilmsproductions.com/the-lost-battalion.html WW1 War Tech https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/closing-the-pigeon-gap-68103438/ https://www.nytimes.com/2004/01/30/style/the-hallowed-history-of-the-carrier-pigeon.html https://www.pigeoncontrolresourcecentre.org/html/about-pigeons.html https://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/world-war-one/10566025/Honoured-the-WW1-pigeons-who-earned-their-wings.html http://www.andrewblechman.com/pigeons/cool_facts.html http://amhistory.si.edu/militaryhistory/collection/object.asp?ID=10 Articles and Posts http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html The Buzz https://www.armytimes.com/news/your-military/2018/09/28/40-world-war-i-soldiers-killed-on-same-day-in-1918-to-be-honored https://dmna.ny.gov/historic/reghist/wwi/infantry/27thInfDiv/27thInfDivMain.htm https://www.1418now.org.uk/commissions/new-film-peter-jackson/   Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation   Production: Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katherine Akey Interview editing: Mac Nelsen and Tim Crowe Research: JL Michaud Intern: Rachel Hurt
September 29, 2018
Highlights Wilson flips position on Women’s Suffrage | @01:55 The first day at the Meuse - Michael Shuster | @08:55 First person accounts from the 91st Wild West Division - Dr. Edward Lengel | @13:25 Archiving the Centennial for posterity | @20:30 Bells of Peace at St. Mary’s in Burlington, NJ | @23:10 The Bells of Peace APP is now available for download | @24:15 Tennessee in WWI - Michael Birdwell | @25:30 The story of Erwin Bleckley - Lt.-Col Doug Jacobs (Ret.) | @31:20 New book “Thunder in the Argonne” - Col. Douglas Mastriano (Ret.) | @37:55 Speaking & WWI War Tech mashup: Dog Tags | @44:30 Articles and Posts - Highlights from the Dispatch Newsletter | @48:15 The Buzz - The Centennial in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @51:00----more---- WWI THEN 100 Years Ago https://www.wilsoncenter.org/article/woodrow-wilson-and-the-womens-suffrage-movement-reflection https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/17/102833904.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/24/102837594.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/27/102838545.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/28/102839217.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/29/109330227.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/29/109330442.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/30/102839744.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/01/97029350.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/10/03/98271673.pdf Great War Project http://greatwarproject.org/2018/09/23/the-meuse-argonne-offensive-grinds-to-a-halt/ America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 http://www.edwardlengel.com/the-wild-west-division-in-the-meuse-argonne/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/portfolio/282/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ World War One Now Commission News http://ww1cc.org/YourAce http://ww1cc.org/bells http://ww1cc.org/film http://www.pritzkermilitary.org/events/special-events/wwicc-honor-and-remember/  Updates from the States https://tnsos.net/TSLA/GWC/ https://www.facebook.com/pages/Tennessee-Great-War-Commission/1560904157516730 Remembering Veterans https://www.ksn.com/news/local/veterans-look-to-honor-wichitan-killed-in-wwi/1292796854 Spotlight in the Media https://www.amazon.com/Thunder-Argonne-Americas-Greatest-Campaigns/dp/0813175550 http://roadstothegreatwar-ww1.blogspot.com/2018/03/thunder-in-argonne-reviewed-by-peter-l.html https://www.kentuckypress.com/live/title_detail.php?titleid=4777 WW1 War Tech and Speaking WW1 https://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=5470 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dog_tag#cite_note-12 Articles and Posts http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html The Buzz www.facebook.com/ww1centennial https://www.washingtonpost.com/history/2018/09/24/coast-guard-mark-th-anniversary-one-world-war-is-largest-us-naval-combat-losses https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/2018/09/24/century-later-america-must-remember-lessons-one-its-biggest-blunders   Sponsors: The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation   Production: Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katherine Akey Interview editing: Mac Nelsen and Tim Crowe Research: JL Michaud Intern: Rachel Hurt
September 22, 2018
Highlights: Financing War & Going Dry Activities on the many fronts - Mike Shuster | @04:20 Meuse-Argonne opening days - Dr. Edward Lengel | @08:25 Financing War & going dry | @15:20 Farewell to David Shuey  | @22:00 Update on Armistice Centennial Events in DC | @23:35 Kentucky in WWI: Filson Historical Society - Jana Meyer & Jim Pritchard | @24:55 Utah in WWI: Utah WWI Centennial Commission - Valerie Jacobson | @31:35 Spotlight on the Media: Documentary on German Air Service - John Heinsen | @37:40 WWI WarTech: Blood transfusions | @44:45 Speaking WWI: Cooties (reprise) | @47:35 Dispatch Highlights  | @49:10 Buzz - The centennial in social media - Katherine Akey | @51:50----more---- World War One Then Great War Project http://greatwarproject.org/2018/09/16/a-peace-feeler-from-austria-and-germany/ America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 http://www.edwardlengel.com/history-in-the-making-eyewitnesses-of-the-meuse-argonne/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/portfolio/282/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/   100 Years Ago https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/23/102837043.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/24/102837372.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/25/106216308.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/26/102837978.pdf   Prohibition https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/24/102837374.pdf   3rd Liberty Bond Drive - april 2018 https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/weekly-sync-call/4314-ww1-centennial-news-episode-67-04-13-2018.html   2nd Liberty Bond Drive - October 2017 https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/weekly-sync-call/3206-ww1-centennial-news-episode-40-10-04-2017.html   1st Liberty Bond Drive - June 2017 https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/weekly-sync-call/2603-ww1-centennial-news-episode-24-6-14-2017.html   World War One Now Commission News http://ww1cc.org/YourAce http://ww1cc.org/bells http://ww1cc.org/film Updates from the States https://filsonhistorical.org/ https://heritage.utah.gov/history/wwi www.ww1cc.org/utah   Spotlight in the Media https://www.facebook.com/WWIhistoryrediscovered/ WW1 War Tech https://www.popularmechanics.com/military/research/g1577/7-surprising-scientific-advances-that-came-out-of-world-war-i/ http://www.kumc.edu/wwi/essays-on-first-world-war-medicine/index-of-essays/medicine/blood-transfusion.html http://online.wsj.com/ww1/blood-transfusions Speaking WW1 tbd Articles and Posts http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html The Buzz www.facebook.com/ww1centennial https://twitter.com/WW1CC https://www.instagram.com/ww1cc http://ww1cc.org/international www.ww1cc.org/social   Sponsors: The US World War One Centennial Commission The Pritzker Military Museum & Library The Starr Foundation   Production: Producer & Host: Theo Mayer Line Producer: Katherine Akey Interview editing: Mac Nelsen and Tim Crowe Research: JL Michaud Intern: Rachel Hurt
September 16, 2018
Highlights: Saint Mihiel Offensive Episode Setup | @02:50 Saint Mihiel Overview - Mike Shuster | @03:50 Military Stories: Saint Mihiel - Dr. Edward Lengel | @07:25 War in the Sky: Saint Mihiel | @13:05 On the homefront: Headlines in the news | @15:35 Commission News: Bullet updates | @19:25 International events update - Dr. Monique Seefried | @24:35 Alabamians in WWI - Nimrod Frazier | @30:25 100 Cities / 100 Memorials: Jacksonville, FL - Michele Luthin & Percy Rosenbloom | @36:10 WWI WarTech: The tank | @44:15 Articles & Posts: Dispatch highlights | @49:25 Centennial Social Media selections - Katherine Akey | @52:10----more---- World War One Then Great War Project http://greatwarproject.org/2018/09/09/huge-american-presence-on-the-attack/ America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 http://www.edwardlengel.com/the-yanks-break-through-the-battle-of-st-mihiel-1918/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/portfolio/thunder-and-flames-americans-in-the-crucible-of-combat-1917-1918/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ 100 Years Ago and War in the Sky http://www.au.af.mil/au/awc/awcgate/ww1/stmihiel/stmihiel.htm https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/17/102833693.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/18/102834323.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/16/106216023.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/16/106216018.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/16/106216024.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/16/106216036.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/17/102833702.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/18/102834309.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/19/102834772.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/19/102834811.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/19/102834842.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/17/102833719.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/19/102834809.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/19/102834845.pdf World War One Now Commission News http://ww1cc.org/YourAce http://ww1cc.org/bells http://ww1cc.org/film International Report https://www.thisisalabama.org/2017/10/04/meet-nimrod-t-frazer-veteran-turned-businessman-whos-champion-alabama-history/ http://alabamaliving.coop/article/a-soldiers-story/ http://www.uapress.ua.edu/product/Send-the-Alabamians,6181.aspx https://www.montgomeryadvertiser.com/story/news/local/dispatch/2017/08/27/french-consul-general-moved-alabamas-own/606780001/   100 Cities/100 Memorials www.ww1cc.org/100cities WW1 War Tech http://www.firstworldwar.com/weaponry/tanks.htm https://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/tanks_and_tank_warfare https://www.pri.org/stories/2016-09-15/day-tanks-changed-war-forever http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/world-war-one/the-western-front-in-world-war-one/tanks-and-world-war-one/ Speaking WW1 https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/books/first/k/keegan-first.html https://www.weather.gov/media/zhu/ZHU_Training_Page/Miscellaneous/fronts/fronts.pdf Articles and Posts http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html The Buzz http://1418.aisne.com/a-la-une/les-projets-du-conseil-departemental/article/hommage-au-370e-regiment-d-afro-americains https://globalnews.ca/news/932833/griefs-geography-mapping-torontonians-killed-three-wars/ https://globalnews.ca/news/3852998/canada-poppy-map/
September 8, 2018
Highlights - September 1918 overview September 1918 Overview - Dr. Edward Lengel, Katherine Akey, Theo Mayer @| 01:55 American soldiers in Siberia - Mike Shuster @| 20:40 Commission News: Update on ACE and YourACE initiatives @| 25:05 Update from the States: New Jersey - Sara Cureton & Veronica Calder @| 27:00 Spotlight on the media: Football and WWI - Doug Bigelow @| 33:05 100C/100M: Fort Caswell Rifle Range - Ron & Dr. Norma Eckard @| 38:20 WW1 WarTech - Aircraft carrier @| 44:15 Speaking WW1 - “D-Day” @| 46:45 Dispatch Newsletter highlight @| 49:30 The Buzz - centennial social media picks - Katherine Akey @| 51:45----more---- World War One Then Great War Project http://greatwarproject.org/2018/09/02/wilson-sends-troops-to-wild-siberia/ World War One Now Commission News http://ww1cc.org/YourAce http://ww1cc.org/bells http://ww1cc.org/film Updates from the States http://ww1cc.org/newjersey Spotlight on the Media https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/4915-gridiron-on-the-great-lake.html https://www.amazon.com/Gridiron-Great-Lake-Doug-Bigelow/dp/198191420X 100 Cities/100 Memorials www.ww1cc.org/100cities www.caswellriflerange.com Education www.ww1cc.org/edu www.ww1cc.org/subscribe WW1 War Tech http://mentalfloss.com/article/31882/12-technological-advancements-world-war-i http://www.historyofwar.org/articles/weapons_HMS_Furious.html Speaking WW1 http://www.businessinsider.com/battle-of-st-mihiel-was-americas-first-d-day-2014-9 https://www.army.mil/e2/rv5_downloads/d-day/the-meaning-of-dday-fact.pdf https://www.britannica.com/event/Battle-of-Saint-Mihiel-1918 http://www.first.army.mil/content.aspx?ContentID=200 Articles and Posts http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html The Buzz https://www.irishcentral.com/news/irishvoice/irish-american-soldiers-wwi https://www.facebook.com/armyhistory/videos/324903311612661
September 1, 2018
Highlights: Labor Day 1918 Labor Day, Unions, Sedition, Bombs, the Babe and Butte  | @ 02:00 Surging forward on the Western Front - Mike Shuster  | @ 11:45 Bio Special: Great War Channel - Indy Neidell  | @ 15:55 Commission News: YourACE program launches  | @ 16:55 Michigan Commemorates WWI - Dennis Skupinski  | @ 22:50 Remembering WWI @ the Durham Museum - Jessica Brummer & Emma Sundberg  | @ 29:20 International Report: Gathering in Verdun  | @ 35:35 Education: Newsletter Issue #14 “Medicine & Shell Shock” comes out  | @ 37:00 WW1 WarTech: Thomas Splint  | @ 37:50 Speaking WW1: “Body Snatchers”  | @ 39:50 Articles & Posts: Dispatch Newsletter  | @ 41:35 The Buzz: Selected Centennial Social Media - Katherine Akey  | @ 44:00----more---- World War One Then 100 Years Ago https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/05/97024579.pdf https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/2708-cubs-red-sox-world-series-in-1918-key-in-u-s-love-affair-with-national-anthem.html https://postalmuseum.si.edu/behindthebadge/chicago-bombs.html https://www.iww.org/sv/history/resolutions/Convention_war_1916 https://www.marxists.org/history/usa/unions/iww/1918/0904-defensenews-chicagobomb.pdf http://time.com/4955623/history-national-anthem-sports-nfl http://www.baseball-almanac.com/ws/yr1918ws.shtml http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/baseball/ct-wrigley-field-national-anthem-20170703-story.html https://www.baseball-reference.com/bullpen/1918_World_Series https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_World_Series_champions https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Babe_Ruth#Boston_Red_Sox_(1914–1919)   Great War Project http://greatwarproject.org/2018/08/26/continuous-attacks-on-the-western-front/   World War One Now Commission News http://ww1cc.org/YourAce http://ww1cc.org/bells http://ww1cc.org/film Updates from the States www.ww1cc.org/michigan Remembering Veterans https://durhammuseum.org/exhibits-collections/current-exhibits/ International Report http://www.rep-am.com/life-arts/travel/2018/08/25/re-enactors-from-18-nations-gather-at-site-of-world-war-i-battle/ https://www.theeagle.com/news/world/volunteers-re-enact-world-war-i-encampment-in-verdun-france/image_988caf68-09c8-5e4b-8062-6dbb790108fa.html https://knx1070.radio.com/articles/ap-news/volunteers-re-enact-world-war-i-encampment-verdun-france https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/travel/100-years-later-returning-to-the-western-front-in-france/2018/08/23/84e7053a-9cd7-11e8-843b-36e177f3081c_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.f46e9f23f472 Education www.ww1cc.org/edu www.ww1cc.org/subscribe WW1 War Tech https://blog.nationalarchives.gov.uk/blog/thomas-splint/ Speaking WW1 Articles and Posts http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html The Buzz https://www.nytimes.com/2018/08/28/travel/the-52-places-traveler-ypres.html https://www.facebook.com/pg/Mémoire-Histoire-Aisne-608872762557987/photos/
August 26, 2018
Highlights Airplanes to end the war: Some say! | @ 02:05 Continued war just out of habit? - Mike Shuster | @ 13:10 Part 3: The 28th Division in Fismette - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 17:00 The American Legion and ACE - US WWI Commissioner Jack Monahan | @ 24:40 Video Game “11-11 Memories Retold” - Yoan Fanise | @ 30:00 19-year-old twin WWI reenactors - Seth & Garrett Moore | @ 37:45 WW1 War Tech: Observation Balloons | @ 43:45 Speaking WWI: Balloonatic | @ 47:00 Articles & Posts: From the Dispatch Newsletter | @ 48:05 The Buzz: Social Media Highlights - Katherine Akey | @ 50:45----more---- World War One Then 100 Years Ago https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/08/26/97021408.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/08/27/97021702.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/08/28/97022080.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/08/28/97022172.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/08/29/97022393.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/08/30/97022850.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/01/97023380.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/09/01/97023386.pdf http://centenaire.org/en/autour-de-la-grande-guerre/aviation/history-us-air-service-world-war-i http://www.theaerodrome.com/services/usa/index.php Great War Project http://greatwarproject.org/2018/08/19/planning-the-war-of-1919/ America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 http://www.edwardlengel.com/fiery-finale-doughboys-battle-to-the-death-at-fismette-1918/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/   World War One Now Commission News https://www.legion.org/convention http://ww1cc.org/YourAce Spotlight on the Media https://variety.com/2018/gaming/news/memories-retold-elijah-wood-1202834748/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x6cYeBO8zwc https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2sP6BYe2LE4 https://www.vg247.com/2018/04/25/11-11-memories-retold-is-a-new-story-driven-game-set-during-first-world-war/ Remembering Veterans http://doughboyduo.com WW1 War Tech https://www.engr.ncsu.edu/news/2017/05/26/above-the-battlefields-of-world-war-i/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observation_balloon https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_military_ballooning#World_War_I https://mashable.com/2016/03/02/wwi-balloons/#nGRfpJmxX8qR Speaking WW1 https://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2014/04/world-war-i-in-photos-aerial-warfare/507326/ https://www.jstor.org/stable/3087941?mag=doughboy-slang&seq=7#page_scan_tab_contents http://www.worldwar1.com/dbc/balloon43.htm Articles and Posts http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html The Buzz https://www.bfi.org.uk/news-opinion/news-bfi/announcements/lff-62-peter-jacksons-they-shall-not-grow-old https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=ePxpbDmykD4 https://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2018/05/28/608455970/in-russia-scant-traces-and-negative-memories-of-a-century-old-u-s-intervention?t=1534495208000
August 19, 2018
Highlights: 1.5 Million “Over There” 100 years ago: Ready to increase US forces to 4 million | @ 02:10 German perspective on the turn around - Mike Shuster | @ 12:25 Part 2: 28th division - the Pennsylvania Doughboys - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 16:30 Announcing resources for local Armistice Centennial Events - YourACE | @ 23:15 Spotlight on the media: The Hello Girls - Jim Theres | @ 29:50 Update from the States: Wyoming and Indian Doughboys - Douglas R. Cubbison | @ 37:00 WWI WarTech - Devil’s Rope | @ 44:45 Dispatch Newsletter Highlights | @ 47:50 BUZZ - Commemoration in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @ 49:55----more---- World War One Then 100 Years Ago https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/08/20/97019005.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/08/21/97019317.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/08/21/97019459.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/08/22/97019708.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/08/23/97020009.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/08/24/97020331.pdf https://blogs.loc.gov/loc/2016/09/world-war-i-conscription-laws/ https://www.swarthmore.edu/library/peace/conscientiousobjection/MilitaryClassifications.htm https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/07/27/102727379.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/22/102712419.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/08/10/97015719.pdf https://library.ccsu.edu/dighistFall16/exhibits/show/industry-ct-ww1/women-in-the-factories http://www.nber.org/chapters/c6304.pdf https://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/cwc/american-labor-in-the-20th-century.pdf http://teachersinstitute.yale.edu/curriculum/units/2002/3/02.03.09.x.html http://depts.washington.edu/labhist/strike/kim.shtml https://blogs.loc.gov/inside_adams/2017/10/labor-problems-under-war-conditions-women-in-the-workforce-in-wwi/ Great War Project http://greatwarproject.org/2018/08/12/huge-american-presence-on-western-front/ America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 The U.S. 28th Division engages the Germans in heavy street fighting for the towns of Fismes and Fismette. http://www.edwardlengel.com/stories-of-combat-1918-pennsylvanias-28th-division-in-fismette/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/   World War One Now Updates from the States https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/4727-warriors-in-khaki-wyoming-indian-doughboys-in-the-great-war.html Spotlight on the Media https://www.military.com/off-duty/2018/02/12/hello-girls-documentary-celebrates-wwi-female-telephone-operators.html https://www.npr.org/2017/04/06/522596006/the-hello-girls-chronicles-the-women-who-fought-for-america-and-for-recognition https://www.militarytimes.com/veterans/2018/07/05/ignored-for-decades-wwi-heroines-could-be-recognized-with-congressional-gold-medal/ WW1 War Tech https://militaryhistorynow.com/2014/01/08/barbed-wire-war-how-one-farmers-innovation-changed-the-battlefield/ http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_eye/2015/03/23/_99_invisible_roman_mars_the_history_of_barbed_wire.html https://www.nps.gov/home/planyourvisit/upload/Barbed%20Wire%20Brochure,%20final.pdf https://www.rushcounty.org/BarbedWireMuseum/BWhistory.htm Speaking WW1 https://archive.nytimes.com/www.nytimes.com/books/first/k/keegan-first.html https://www.weather.gov/media/zhu/ZHU_Training_Page/Miscellaneous/fronts/fronts.pdf Articles and Posts http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html The Buzz https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=558465584556136&id=259804527755578 https://www.facebook.com/theworldwar/posts/10156542633006241 http://www.kennedy-center.org/calendar/event/OTOSB?promotionno=304296
August 11, 2018
Highlights: Japan in WWI Japan in WWI - Dr. Frederick Dickinson | @02:15 Chaos on the Eastern Front - Mike Shuster | @10:05 The 28th Division: Pennsylvania National Guard doughboys fight - Dr. Edward Lengel | @13:50 Great War Channel three month retrospective - Indy Neidell | @20:05 Battle of Amiens Commemoration - Prince William, the Duke of Cambridge & others | @21:50 WW1 War Tech: Dazzle Camouflage | @24:40 Special Report: 1418NOW Dazzle Ship Series - Tamsin Dillon & Emma Enderby | @30:05 100 Cities / 100 Memorials: Iowa - Timothy Lane | @38:00 Speaking WWI: The Third Light | @43:50 Dispatch Newsletter: Highlights and Headlines | @45:05 The Buzz: The Commemoration in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @48:20----more---- World War One Then 100 Years Ago Dr. Frederick Dickinson, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania and Japan expert, joins the show to discuss that country’s pivotal role in the Great War.     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japan_during_World_War_I http://www.pbs.org/wnet/wideangle/uncategorized/japans-about-face-timeline-japanese-military-history/1168/ https://www.dancarlin.com/product/hardcore-history-62-supernova-in-the-east-i/ http://www.navyhistory.org/2014/11/world-war-i-centennial-symposium-the-thirst-is-real/ http://www.macarthurmemorial.org/DocumentCenter/View/1366/2014-WWI-Symposium-82814?bidId= http://www.history.upenn.edu/publications/2001/frederick-r-dickinson http://www.history.upenn.edu/publications/2013/frederick-r-dickinson https://www.dancarlin.com/product/hardcore-history-62-supernova-in-the-east-i/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WG_SzUVNo8I https://www.c-span.org/video/?322722-5/discussion-japan-world-war https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A3oSaG0WiD8 Great War Project The war enters a chaotic phrase across the world, as several foreign armies fight for territory in disintegrated Russia and German troops begin to surrender en masse in the West.   http://greatwarproject.org/2018/08/05/fighting-erupts-across-the-east/ America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 The U.S. 28th Division engages the Germans in heavy street fighting for the towns of Fismes and Fismette. http://www.edwardlengel.com/street-fighting-100-years-ago-28th-division-pennsylvania-national-guard/http://www.edwardlengel.com/portfolio/thunder-and-flames-americans-in-the-crucible-of-combat-1917-1918/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ The Great War Channel Watch the Great War Channel for a succinct summary of the events of May, June, and July 2018. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hb3a78Baxz8 World War One Now Commission News Commission staffers took part in commemoration events for the centennial of the Battle of Amiens in France. Visit our international page to catch up on all the action. www.ww1cc.org/international International Report Tamsin Dillon and Emma Enderby join the show to discuss the Dazzle Ship Series project. https://www.1418now.org.uk/commissions/dazzle-ship-series/ WW1 War Tech The subject of this week’s installment of War Tech is Dazzle Camouflage. http://www.bbc.co.uk/guides/zty8tfr https://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/submarines_and_submarine_warfare https://www.cnrs-scrn.org/northern_mariner/vol19/tnm_19_171-192.pdf https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dazzle_camouflage#cite_note-Newark74-1 http://www.shipcamouflage.com/2_5.htm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zDbq7y20wpw 100 Cities/100 Memorials Iowa WWI Centennial Committee Co-Chair Timothy Lane talks about Iowa in WWI, and two memorials in that state.     www.ww1cc.org/100cities Speaking WW1 Our phrase this week is “Third Light”, referring to the potentially deadly consequences of lighting a third cigarette in a trench. https://people.howstuffworks.com/why-is-it-bad-luck-to-light-three-cigarettes-with-one-match.htm https://www.historyextra.com/period/first-world-war/10-first-world-war-slang-words-we-still-use-today/ Articles and Posts The headlines from this week’s dispatch newsletter: Bells of Peace participation continues to grow, ‘Women in the Marines’, WW1 Centennial coin sets and silver medals from the US Mint, Purple Hearts and the First World War, and the story of doughboy Charles Benjamin Mead. http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html The Buzz On social media this week, the discussion mainly revolves around the Battle of Amiens and events commemorating it.   https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/commemorate/event-map-system/international-event-experience-page.html http://www.centenarynews.com/article/100-years-ago---battle-of-amiens--start-of-the-hundred-days
August 4, 2018
Highlights: August 1918 Overview August 1918 Preview Roundtable - Dr. Edward Lengel, Katherine Akey, Theo Mayer | @02:05 Great War Project Blog: Turning Point - Mike Shuster | @17:35 International Report 1: Commemorations in France | @21:55 International Report 2: The Moore Twins step up | @22:58 Remembering Veterans: Rechickenization of France - Tracy Robinson DAR | @25:00 Harley Davidson in WWI - Bill Jackson | @31:20 100 Cities / 100 Memorials: Dunmore, PA - Jim Davenport & Louise McLafferty | @37:05 Speaking WWI: Stormtrooper | @43:00 WWI WarTech: Stainless Steel | @45:45 Articles & Posts: Dispatch Newsletter | @48:50 The Buzz: Commemoration in social media - Katherine Akey | @52:55----more---- World War One Then August Roundtable Dr. Edward Lengel, Host Theo Mayer, and Katherine Akey discuss the key events and themes of August 1918, including the pivotal Battle of Amiens. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Amiens_(1918) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/August_1918 Great War Project As the Allied offensive barrels forward and German casualties mount, Berlin begins to recognize that the war is unwinnable. http://greatwarproject.org/2018/07/29/the-allied-offensive-gains-strength/ World War One Now Commission News Commemoration season kicks into high gear in Europe, with events and reenactments scheduled in Britain and France http://ww1cc.org/international http://www.centenarynews.com/article/battle-of-amiens-centenary-commemorations-in-france http://www.centenarynews.com/article/shropshire-remembers-wilfred-owen-august-november-2018 https://drive.google.com/file/d/1HvnP1_ymAKYYkTES2BFt3hcTh8cDGFdw/view https://www.facebook.com/armyhistory/videos/10156654988097853/ Remembering Veterans Tracy Robinson joins us from the Daughters of the American Revolution to discuss the contributions of the DAR during the Great War. www.dar.org/archives https://www.dar.org/archives/women-resilience-dar-service-world-war-i https://www.dar.org/sites/default/files/QuasquiFlashbackMJ15.pdf https://blog.dar.org/celebrate-125-monday-daughters-aid-war-recovery Historian Corner Bill Jackson, an archivist for Harley Davidson, joins us to tell the story of this iconic company and its motorcycles in the Great War. https://www.harley-davidson.com/us/en/museum/explore/archives.html http://www.ridingvintage.com/2012/12/war-machines-american-motorcycles-of-wwi.html https://www.thrillist.com/cars/history-of-u-s-military-motorcycles http://www.foxnews.com/auto/2018/06/29/100-year-old-harley-davidson-returns-from-france-to-honor-american-wwi-soldiers.html 100 Cities/100 Memorials Jim Davenport, past president of the Rotary Club of Dunmore and owner of Dunmore Properties, and Louise McLafferty, retired director of the YMCA, join us to promote the new WW1 memorial in Lackawanna County, PA.   www.ww1cc.org/100cities Speaking WW1 Our word for this week is Stormtrooper- no, George Lucas did not coin it! https://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/stormtrooper https://militaryhistorynow.com/2014/04/09/achtung-sturmtruppen-10-amazing-facts-about-the-germanys-ww1-stormtroopers/ http://www.starwars.com/news/from-world-war-to-star-wars-stormtroopers WW1 War Tech The subject for this week’s installment of War Tech is something we use everyday: Stainless Steel. http://online.wsj.com/ww1/stainless-steel http://www.portlandworks.co.uk/portland-works-and-the-invention-of-stainless-steel/ Articles and Posts The highlights of this week’s weekly dispatch include: the American Society of Landscape Architecture on the approval of the Memorial design, a new Suffragettes-themed walking tour in DC, Humphrey Bogart in WW1, honoring Choctaw veterans in OK, and Doughboy MIA Corporal Clarence Hawkins. Also, check out our official merchandise! http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html The Buzz Katherine Akey highlights our recent social media activity, including photos and articles of memorial dedications and re-dedications across America, and a WW1-themed Tuesday Trivia video from the US Army Center of Military History.   https://www.tapinto.net/towns/belmar-slash-lake-como/articles/video-belmars-treasured-doughboy-statue-is-welc https://www.facebook.com/ww1centennial/photos/a.290566277785344.1073741829.185589304949709/1041510199357611/?type=3&theater http://www.salina.com/news/20180531/solomon-veterans-memorial-to-be-dedicated-saturday https://www.facebook.com/armyhistory/videos/10156645173917853/?hc_ref=ARSmTaMW9TTbWFGwsQuxbCt6H6s1RRJhC79K5A5T-IqHPGBWDLJT7x05GyjHcChP37I
July 28, 2018
Highlights Ambulance: Episode #82 100 Years Ago: Ambulance | @02:15 American Field Service - Nicole Milano | @08:15 Great War Channel: Hemingway - Indy Neidell | @15:00 Great War Project: But Paris is safe - Mike Shuster | @16:05 America Emerges: Who’s fighting where - Dr. Edward Lengel | @19:50 Commission News: WWI Commemorative Stamp - Rebekah Wilson | @25:50 State Update: Michigan “Over There” event features the maquette | @33:30 Spotlight on the media: New book: Good War, Great Men - Andrew Capets | @34:35 100 Cities / 100 Memorials: Cape May, NJ - Kathleen Wyatt & Harry Bellangy | @39:30 Speaking WWI & WWI War Tech : Ambulance | @45:10 Articles & Posts: Weekly Dispatch Newsletter | @50:05 The Buzz - Centennial Social Media - Katherine Akey | @53:30----more---- World War One Then 100 Years Ago Long before the United States entered the war, the American Hospital of Paris and the American Field Service provided invaluable medical assistance to France. Nicole Milano, head archivist and historical publications editor for American Field Service Intercultural Programs, joins the show to discuss the contributions of the AFS in WW1. https://www.american-hospital.org/en/american-hospital-of-paris/about-us/our-history.html https://french.columbia.edu/events/american-paris-true-story-american-hospital-paris http://www.ourstory.info/ http://net.lib.byu.edu/estu/wwi/memoir/AFShist/AFS1a.htm https://afs.org/2017/08/21/a-new-exhibition-honors-afs-volunteer-efforts-during-wwi/ https://circulatingnow.nlm.nih.gov/2015/07/14/afs-and-american-volunteerism-in-world-war-i/   Great War Project In an exceptionally fierce phase of combat, the Americans and the French decisively repel the Germans and extinguish the threat to Paris. http://greatwarproject.org/2018/07/22/intimate-pictures-of-war-in-the-trenches/ America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 In the intense fighting for Croix Rouge (Red Cross) Farm, the U.S. 42nd “Rainbow” Division proves its mettle, and a young Douglas MacArthur is rewarded with a promotion.   http://www.edwardlengel.com/portfolio/thunder-and-flames-americans-in-the-crucible-of-combat-1917-1918/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/enter-douglas-macarthur-the-rainbow-division-at-croix-rouge-farm-1918/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ World War One Now Commission News We’re thrilled to announce that a U.S. Postal Service Stamp to honor WW1 veterans is now available! Rebekah Wilson, a former Commission staffer, joins to us to share the story of how the Stamp came to be. https://about.usps.com/news/national-releases/2018/pr18_ma042.htm https://store.usps.com/store/product/buy-stamps/wwi-turning-the-tide-S_477404 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KV3js_2YYfk  Updates from the States The World War I Maquette, the 1/6th scale model of the National Memorial to be built in Pershing Park, will be featured in an upcoming WW1 event, “Over Here”, in Grass Lake, Michigan. www.ww1cc.org/memorial https://www.facebook.com/events/1670421929715475/ https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/michigan-in-ww1-events/eventdetail/51369/over-here-a-michigan-world-war-1-centennial-event.html Spotlight on the Media Author Andrew Capet joins the show to discuss his new WW1 book: Good War, Great Men. https://www.amazon.com/Good-War-Great-Men-Battalion/dp/0692116478/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8 http://www.kean.edu/libertyhall/events/wwilecture-sept27 https://313thmachinegun.blogspot.com/ https://www.facebook.com/313mgbn/ 100 Cities/100 Memorials Kathleen C. Wyatt, the Administrator and Secretary of the Greater Cape May Historical Society, and Harry Bellangy, President and Historian of the Society, come on the show discuss World War I commemoration in Cape May, New Jersey.   www.ww1cc.org/100cities Speaking WW1/WW1 War Tech This week, Speaking WW1 and WW1 Tech share the same topic: the Ambulance.   http://history.amedd.army.mil/booksdocs/HistoryofUSArmyMSC/chapter2.html   http://www.vlib.us/medical/ambulnce/ambulnce.htm   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_mv__ap4yE&feature=youtu.be  (start around 2 minutes) http://www.philly.com/philly/blogs/public_health/World-War-I-debut-of-the-motorized-ambulance.html   http://www.trauma.org/archive/history/prehospital.html#larrey01   https://books.google.com/books?id=LFSVxO98ugAC&printsec=frontcover#v=onepage&q&f=false   https://blogs.loc.gov/folklife/2014/07/pull-over-its-an-emergency-world-war-i-ambulance-drivers/   Articles and Posts This week’s Dispatch Newsletter headlines: the Washington Memorial Chapel at Valley Forge joins our Bells of Peace initiative, the story of Harry Truman in WW1, the USS San Diego, F. Scott Fitzgerald on the WWrite Blog, and the latest Story of Service installment.   http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html The Buzz Katherine Akey highlights our recent social media activity, including a Verdun 16 story about American cemeteries and the repatriation of fallen American troops after the war, and a video on Facebook about American Ace Eddie Rickenbacker from PBS. https://verdun1916.eu/?p=7073 https://www.facebook.com/AmericanExperiencePBS/videos/10156582873049122
July 21, 2018
Highlights: Picture This! 100 Years Ago: From state militias to a huge standing army | @02:15 Great War Project: Gas by railroad - Mike Shuster | @11:55 America Emerges: Battle of Soisson - Dr. Edward Lengel | @15:50 Commission News: CFA Reviews Nat. WWI Memorial project | @22:25 Update from the States: Exhibit in Helena Arkansas - Drew Ulrich | @25:20 Spotlight on the Media: Waldo Pierce Goes to War - Corine Reiss | @30:30 100 Cities / 100 Memorials: Yuma Arizona - Mayor Nichols & John Courtis | @35:25 WWI WarTech: Imaging in WWI | @41:45 Speaking WWI: Snapshot | @46:30 Articles & Posts: Weekly Dispatch | @48:00 Commemoration in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @50:40----more---- World War One Then 100 Years Ago This week, we take stock of the American military’s rapid transformation from a state-based, decentralized system, to the massive national war machine that helps defeat the German empire. https://www.sunypress.edu/pdf/61348.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1917/07/10/96254109.pdf https://books.google.com/books?id=sNYc6alAb4IC&pg=PA12&lpg=PA12&dq=%22militia+act+of+1903%22+national+guard+federalized+funding&source=bl&ots=H5vIX8Y5os&sig=c60BYCbirq2hanPz00nMTtzvGjA&hl=en&sa=X&ei=rybUUZiVFrTJ0gGZ1YHwDg&ved=0CEwQ6AEwBTgK#v=onepage&q=%22militia%20act%20of%201903%22%20national%20guard%20federalized%20funding&f=false Great War Project The Allies pioneer a new method of gas warfare, resulting in “a threatening cloud… as we had never before witnessed.” http://greatwarproject.org/2018/07/15/a-new-method-of-gas-warfare/ America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 The U.S. First and Second divisions participate in a major assault against the Germans, aiming to capture the high ground south of Soissons. http://www.edwardlengel.com/portfolio/thunder-and-flames-americans-in-the-crucible-of-combat-1917-1918/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/battle-of-soissons-1st-and-2nd-divisions-july-18-1918/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ World War One Now Commission News On July 19th, the Commission of Fine Arts met in Washington D.C. to approve the design of the National World War I Memorial.   www.ww1cc.org/memorial Updates from the States Drew Ulrich, the Curator of the Delta Cultural Center in Arkansas, joins us to discuss a new exhibit honoring the men and women of Arkansas who served in the Great War. http://www.deltaculturalcenter.com/exhibits/over-here-and-there Spotlight on the Media Corine Reis, a public historian from France, makes her second appearance on the show to discuss her magnificent World War I Blog: Waldo Peirce Goes to War. https://waldopeircegoestowar.tumblr.com/ 100 Cities/100 Memorials City of Yuma (Arizona) Mayor Douglas J. Nicholls and Yuma County Chamber of Commerce Executive Director John Courtis join the show to talk about their city’s Armed Forces Memorial Park.    www.ww1cc.org/100cities Speaking WW1 This week on Speaking WW1, our word is “snapshot”, which describes the quick action of firing a gun from a trench or taking a photo. https://www.amazon.com/Tommy-Doughboy-Fritz-Soldier-Slang/dp/144563 7839/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1508848013&sr=8-1&keywords=tommy+doughboy+fritz https://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/photography https://books.google.com/books?id=e1uOAgAAQBAJ&pg=PA82&lpg=PA82&dq=snapshot+word+origin&source=bl&ots=lbRMBtv72g&sig=0z6RxsEwfHGJrS79B1ivAL5GoKI&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjs3Nijnr7XAhWH0iYKHcyvC-M4ChDoAQgoMAA#v=onepage&q=snapshot%20word%20origin&f=false WW1 Tech For WW1 Tech, we examine the various ways that photography impacted the Great War, from aerial reconnaissance to the U.S. Signal Corps to personal cameras on the front.   https://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/photography https://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/06/30/photos-world-war-i-images-museums-battle-great-war/ https://rememberingwwi.villanova.edu/photography/ https://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/world-war-one/inside-first-world-war/part-eight/10742060/aerial-photography-world-war-one.html http://ww1centenary.oucs.ox.ac.uk/memoryofwar/staged-photography-and-photography-as-a-stage/ https://www.theatlantic.com/projects/world-war-i-in-photos/ Articles and Posts The headlines for this week’s dispatch newsletter: a bipartisan effort on Capitol Hill to honor the “Hello Girls”, pilot and actor “Wild Bill”, a story about Native American veterans, and featured Doughboy Corporal Edward Graham. Also, check out our official merchandise, including the Navy Blue Doughboy polo shirt! http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html The Buzz Katherine Akey highlights our recent social media activity, including a video on Facebook from the National Museum of the Marine Corps. Be sure to engage with the Commission on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, and check out our podcast-specific twitter account! Links below:   https://www.facebook.com/USMCMuseum/videos/10155904338792880 https://www.facebook.com/ww1centennial/ https://www.instagram.com/ww1cc/?hl=en https://twitter.com/WW1CC https://twitter.com/theww1podcast
July 14, 2018
Highlights Our Friends in France: Episode #80 100 Years Ago: Why America Celebrated Bastille Day | @02:05 War In The Sky: Quentin Roosevelt falls | @10:05 America Emerges: Marne and more - Dr. Edward Lengel | @12:15 Great War Project: Writing WWI - Mike Shuster | @18:40 Commission News: $1.8M education partnership | @23:30 Remembering Vets: Finding your WWI Ancestors - Debra Dubek | @25:15 Stories of Service: Archiving those Stories of Service | @34:05 100 Cities / 100 Memorials: Saugerties NY - Bill Payne, Vince Buono & Lisa Polay | @36:20 Speaking WWI: “Alleyman” | @43:50 WWI War Tech: Minenwerfer and Trench Mortars | @45:55 Dispatch: Newsletter highlights | @48:15 The Buzz: Selected Social Media - Katherine Akey | @51:05----more---- World War One Then 100 Years Ago the Franco-American relationship is our theme for this week’s history segment. We are going to take a look at how we honored --- and frustrated each other -- and we thought we might even set our centennial time machine to take a little deeper dive and touch on our relationship where it started  -- At very birth of our nation as we explore Franco American relations 100 years ago this week and more… https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/07/15/102721314.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/07/15/102721328.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/07/16/102722235.pdf War in the Sky Theodore Roosevelt’s beloved youngest son, Quentin, is shot down behind enemy lines and presumed dead. https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/07/18/102723502.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/07/19/102724244.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/svc/tmach/v1/refer?pdf=true&res=9B01E5DB143EE433A2575AC1A9619C946996D6CF https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/07/20/98269287.pdf America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 Despite less-than-ideal circumstances, the Doughboys manage to stymie a strong German offensive, and the US 3rd Division earns its nickname: the Rock of the Marne.   http://www.edwardlengel.com/portfolio/thunder-and-flames-americans-in-the-crucible-of-combat-1917-1918/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/turning-point-the-rock-of-the-marne-july-1918/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ The Great War Project Famous American literary figures, including Ernest Hemingway, are participating in the war in a variety of locations and capacities. Meanwhile, bolstered by one million American troops, the “Allies are seizing the initiative.” http://greatwarproject.org/2018/07/08/hemingway-in-italy-dos-passos-in-france/ World War One Now Commission News This past Friday, July 13, The US WWI Centennial Commission announced a new $1.8 million WWI education program that brings together National History Day, the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, and the National WWI Museum & Memorial. https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news.html Remembering Veterans Debra Dudek, an military genealogy research expert, joins the show to discuss her work and provide research advice to our audience. https://www.amazon.com/World-Genealogy-Research-Guide-Non-Combatant/dp/1980916845 Stories of Service If YOU have information about your ancestor’s service in WW1, you can submit it to a permanent national archive on our website! Host Theo Mayer explains. ww1cc.org/stories - for submittal https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/commemorate/family-ties/stories-of-service.html - for exploring the stories https://www.rollofhonor.org/ww1/ - for connecting the story to service profiles 100 Cities/100 Memorials These week on 100 Cities/100 Memorials, Saugerties, New York, residents Bill Payne, Vince Buono and Lisa Polay join the show to talk about the WWI Centennial Room at American Legion Post 72.      www.ww1cc.org/100cities Speaking WW1 This week on Speaking WW1, our word is “Alleyman”, an American nickname for the Germans derived from French. https://www.amazon.com/Tommy-Doughboy-Fritz-Soldier-Slang/dp/1445637839 http://public.oed.com/the-oed-today/recent-updates-to-the-oed/previous-updates/june-2014-update/release-notes-the-language-of-world-war-i/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=33&v=fX-nRlVw5Io WW1 Tech The subject of this installment of WW1 Tech is the Mortar, an ancient weapon that comes of age during the Great War. http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/645160.pdf http://www.firstworldwar.com/weaponry/mortars.htm https://www.militaryfactory.com/smallarms/detail.asp?smallarms_id=650 https://www.militaryfactory.com/smallarms/detail.asp?smallarms_id=651 https://www.britannica.com/technology/artillery/Mortars#ref520761 http://www.worldwar1.com/dbc/smortar.htm https://www.britannica.com/technology/mortar-weapon http://www.landships.info/landships/artillery_articles/7_58cm_minenwerfer.html Articles and Posts The headlines from this week’s Dispatch newsletter: Doughboy 4th of July celebrations overseas, a new video from the American Battle Monuments Commission, “100 Years of Mateship” between the US and Australia, a WWI article from the Virginian-Pilot Newspaper, and remembering Private Lee G. Winslow. Also, check out our official merchandise!   http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html The Buzz Katherine Akey highlights our recent social media activity, including videos from French reenactment groups on Facebook, and a new seven-part video series on WW1 from the US Army Center of Military History, also on Facebook.   https://www.facebook.com/charle.robac/posts/2099055857028921 https://www.79thmemorygroup.com/ https://www.facebook.com/trainsettraction/ https://www.facebook.com/armyhistory/posts/10156598516337853
July 7, 2018
Highlights: July 1918 Overview 100 Years ago: July 1918 overview - Theo Mayer, Katherine Akey & Dr. Edward Lengel | @02:10 Great War Project: Changing Landscape of the War - Mike Shuster | @18:15 Commission News: Armistice Centennial Participation App | @22:25 Remembering Veterans: Doughboy MIA - Rob Laplander | @ 23:35 Spotlight on the Media: Lost Voices - Michael Collins and Martin King | @31:05 Speaking WW1: Zero Hour | @36:20 100 Cities / 100 Memorials: Patton and the US Tank Corps Project - Karlen Morris & Sgt. Phil Wilburn | @ 38:05 WW1 Tech: Trench Club | @43:30 Articles & Posts from the Weekly Dispatch Newsletter | @45:35 The Buzz: The Centennial in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @48:20----more---- World War One Then 100 Years Ago: Roundtable Dr. Ed Lengel, Katherine Akey, and Theo Mayer preview the key developments and themes of July 1918. The Great War Project On the Italian Front, the Allies utilize airpower to stymie an Austrian offensive. On the Western Front, as Americans continue to prove their mettle in crucial battles, Pershing becomes convinced that America must “assume the initiative” if the Allies are to win the war.   http://greatwarproject.org/2018/07/01/summer-1918-key-battles-in-italy-and-france/ World War One Now Commission News   www.ww1cc.org/bells Remembering Veterans Rob Laplander, Managing Director of Doughboy MIA, joins us to talk about ongoing efforts to research the fate and service of missing WW1 soldiers. www.ww1cc.org/mia https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/doughboy-mia-home.html https://militaryhistorynow.com/2016/03/09/the-lost-doughboys-the-hunt-continues-for-american-mias-from-ww1/ Spotlight on the Media Authors Michael Collins and Martin King discuss their new book, The Lost Voices: The Untold Stories of America's World War I Veterans and Their Families, which looks at WW1 through the eyes of Americans who witnessed it. https://www.amazon.com/Lost-Voices-Americas-Veterans-Families/dp/1493031643 Speaking WW1 This week on Speaking WW1, our phrase is ‘Zero-hour’, the precise start time of an operation. http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/413123#eid321052091 https://www.laphamsquarterly.org/roundtable/zero-hour 100 Cities/100 Memorials Karlen Morris and Phil Wilburn join the show to discuss the Patton and the U.S. Tank Corps Monument, located in Fort Knox, Kentucky. www.ww1cc.org/100cities https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/3004-four-questions-for-karlen-morris.html https://usabot.ecwid.com/#!/Donation-Monument-Fort-Knox-Patton-Joins-the-US-Tank-Corps/p/83940729/category=5426372 https://19seriesclothing.com/ WW1 Tech For WW1 Tech, we take a look at the crude but effective Trench Club. https://owlcation.com/humanities/WW1-Trench-Weapons-The-Trench-Club-and-Trench-Knife https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/30003757 https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/30001746 https://www.wearethemighty.com/articles/the-6-most-terrifying-weapons-of-world-war-i Articles and Posts The headlines from this week’s Dispatch newsletter: Fighting Father Duffy Remembered, Historic fireboat in NYC turned into Floating Work of WWI-inspired Art, Navy Cross Nurses: Inspiring Heroism During the Influenza Epidemic of 1918, Warriors in Khaki: Wyoming Indian Doughboys who served in World War I, and  this week’s Story of Service featuring Emmett George Hoyt. Also, check out our official merchandise!   http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html The Buzz Katherine Akey highlights our recent social media activity, including two popular articles on Facebook about the short-lived WW1 Victory Arch in NYC (the Daily Beast) and a deadly fire at a New York munitions plant (Syracuse.com). https://www.thedailybeast.com/the-world-war-one-victory-arch-demolished-in-a-new-york-minute https://www.syracuse.com/vintage/2018/06/one_hundred_years_later_remembering_the_split_rock_disaster.html
June 30, 2018
Highlights: 4th of July, 1918 100 Years ago: 4th of July, 1918 | @02:00 Great War Project: Chaos at all ends - Mike Shuster | @12:05 America Emerges: Capturing Vaux - Dr. Edward Lengel | @16:15 Commission News: Bells of Peace - Betsy Anderson | @20:55 Historian Corner: WWI Shaping the 20th Century - Dr. Jay Winter | @27:00 State Update: CT WWI History Project - Christine Pittsley | @33:30 100 Cities / 100 Memorials: Governors Island - Kevin Fitzpatrick & Maj. Jared Nichols | @39:05 Speaking WWI: War Effort | @46:25 Articles & Posts from the Weekly Dispatch Newsletter | @47:45 The Buzz: The Centennial in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @49:55----more---- World War One Then 100 Years Ago President Wilson and others speak of America’s lofty virtues, the contribution of immigrant soldiers, and a desire for a new, free, rules-based international order while celebrating the fourth of July at Mount Vernon. In Paris, the French hold their own massive celebration, as the European allies express their gratitude to the Americans. Meanwhile, the US Navy continues to grow in ships and manpower. https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/23/102712800.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/23/102712799.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/23/102712854.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/24/102713653.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/25/102713961.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/25/102713963.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/27/102714713.pdf https://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/naval_warfare_usa   The Great War Project Historian Mike Shuster details the events of this week in 1918. The war enters a new phase characterized by chaos on all fronts. In the west, “it is now open warfare”, according to a soldier's diary, with rapid movement of men and vehicles as the Allies try to press their advantage over Germany. In the east, German troops continue to grab territory from the disintegrated Russian Empire. And in the United States, prominent socialist Eugene Debs is sentenced to 10 years in prison for speaking out against the war.    http://greatwarproject.org/2018/06/24/a-provocative-anti-war-speech/   America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 Dr. Edward Lengel takes us through the U.S. 2nd Division’s July 1st assault on the German-held town of Vaux, a critical victory for the still-developing outfit. http://www.edwardlengel.com/portfolio/thunder-and-flames-americans-in-the-crucible-of-combat-1917-1918/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/army-brigade-action-capture-vaux-1918/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/   Great War Channel Check out our friends at the Great War Channel, who just released a special episode on the Harlem Hellfighters. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q4dirfiokh0   World War One Now Commission News The Commission’s own Betsy Anderson joins us to discuss Bells of Peace, a program that encourages the tolling of Bells at 11 am, on November 11th, 2018, to commemorate the Armistice.   www.ww1cc.org/bells   Historians Corner Dr. Jay Winter, a renowned historian, speaks with Theo Mayer about the impact of WW1 on historical memory. http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-morrison-winter-20140625-column.html http://www.dw.com/en/world-war-i-created-new-culture-of-mourning/a-17233945 https://www.amazon.com/Remembering-War-between-History-Century/dp/0300110685   Updates from the States Christine Pittsley discusses the Connecticut State Library’s “Remembering WWI Project”, which engages local communities to shed light on Connecticut’s WW1 history.   https://www.neh.gov/humanities/2017/summer/statement/connecticut-remembers-world-war-i-through-letters-diaries-and-other-personal-possessions http://www.wfsb.com/story/35851072/families-meet-to-share-history-of-loved-ones-in-world-war-i https://apnews.com/afcf1bea88b44bf0bdc6cc9ca20f1551 https://ctstatelibrary.org/remembering-world-war-one-2/ http://ctinworldwar1.org/digitization-days/   100 Cities/100 Memorials Kevin Fitzpatrick, a New York City-based author and program director for that city’s World War I Centennial Committee, and Major Jared Nichols, an active-duty army officer, discuss the ongoing memorial restorations on Governor’s Island. www.ww1cc.org/100cities http://governorsislandguide.com/?p=951 http://eastcoastdoughboys.com/governors-island-2018/   Speaking WW1 This week on Speaking WW1, our phrase is “War Effort”, meaning the collective struggle of an entire nation to defeat the enemy.   http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/225589#eid15332372   Articles and Posts This week’s highlights from the Dispatch: award winning WW1 themed student projects, remembering Quentin Roosevelt, a new book about the only U-Boat attack on U.S. soil, WWrite blog, Story of Service, and our official merchandise. http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch   The Buzz Katherine Akey highlights our recent social media activity, including an article about efforts to get WW1 memorials and cemeteries recognized as UNESCO World Heritage Sites, footage of post-war Paris on Facebook, and a restored WW1-era Harley Davidson in action on Instagram. https://www.stripes.com/news/europe/france-belgium-seek-unesco-recognition-for-wwi-memorials-1.534494 https://www.facebook.com/musiquefranco/videos/10207775402411127/?hc_ref=ARTuww1xobGk6c34jEPEK4sFp6jN4OGx_RDy3T7oJ5hWRMwi2YMO1CfbbwzKYhcRmB0 https://www.instagram.com/operationtwinlinks/
June 24, 2018
Highlights Howard Schultz on the National WWI Memorial - Episode #77 The battle on the Italian Front: Piave | @01:45 Germany low on resources and morale - Mike Shuster | @06:30 The untold story of Hill 204 - Dr. Edward Lengel | @10:20 SPECIAL: Howard Schultz on the National WWI Memorial | @16:10 Historian Corner: President Teddy Roosevelt - David Pietrusza | @36:55 Speaking WWI: Tailspin | @43:40 WWI War Tech: Ice City | @45:15 Buzz: WWI in social media - Katherine Akey | @48:20----more---- Podcast Notes World War One Then 100 Years Ago: The White War and the Battle of the Piave While the Western Front is undoubtedly the Great War’s most famous theatre of combat, the Italian Front is equally deserving of our attention. Austria-Hungary and Italy fought a brutal campaign in the rugged Dolomite Mountains for three years, with neither side gaining the upper hand until 1918.  Ultimately, Italy and the Allies decisively defeat Austria-Hungary, spelling the end for a once-powerful empire.       https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/battle-of-the-piave-river http://historycollection.co/today-history-topic-battle-piave-ww-1917 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Battle_of_the_Piave_River https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/20/106215159.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/17/102710908.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/17/102710897.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/17/102710900.pdf The Great War Project Historian Mike Shuster from the Great War Project blog details the events of this week in 1918. German resolve wanes as the American army grows in both size and confidence, threatening Germany “like a thundercloud.” Although still capable of taking ground from the Allies, the weary, starved German troops face a recharged, replenished, and well-fed foe. An eventual Allied victory seems inevitable.   http://greatwarproject.org/2018/06/17/on-western-front-now-a-flood-of-americans/ America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 While the heroism of the US Marine Corps tends to dominate the narrative of Belleau Wood, the US Army also played a strategically vital role in the battle. Dr. Edward Lengel joins us to explain how the US 30th Infantry regiment effectively collaborated with a French unit to capture Hill 204 from the Germans.     http://www.edwardlengel.com/portfolio/thunder-and-flames-americans-in-the-crucible-of-combat-1917-1918/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/u-s-army-belleau-wood-untold-story-hill-204/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ War in the Sky This week 100 years ago, a group of American aviators took part in an Italian bombing raid on an Austro-Hungarian railway station.   http://ww1cc.org/warinthesky https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/22/102712432.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/20/106215160.pdf Great War Channel Check out our friends at the Great War Channel for a fascinating video about German submarine attacks on the American coast.   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h7pnogIeCIQ   World War One Now Historians Corner Historian David Pietrusza discusses Theodore Roosevelt and his role in the First World War, from his early and outspoken support of U.S. involvement to the enormous price his family paid on the battlefield.     https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/why-teddy-roosevelt-tried-bully-way-onto-wwi-battlefield-180962840/ https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-institution/letters-unbearable-grief-theodore-roosevelt-death-son-180962743/ https://www.nps.gov/articles/the-bull-moose-in-winter-theodore-roosevelt-and-world-war-i.htm https://www.amazon.com/TRs-Last-War-Theodore-Roosevelt/dp/1493028871   Speaking WW1 This week on Speaking WW1- where we explore words and phrases that are rooted in WW1- our word is Tailspin, meaning an uncontrollable descent.   http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/197114 https://blog.oxforddictionaries.com/2014/06/13/oed-ww1-timeline/ WW1 War Tech For WW1 War Tech, this week we take a look at the “Ice City”- a network of tunnels carved out of a glacier by the Austro-Hungarians.   http://www.museomarmoladagrandeguerra.com/en/the-museum/the-ice-city/ http://www.geography.unibe.ch/unibe/portal/fak_naturwis/e_geowiss/c_igeogr/content/e3 9624/e39625/e39626/e496602/e508175/december1916_ger.pdf The Buzz Katherine Akey highlights our recent social media activity, including an article from PBS about The Great War documentary, a magazine feature on National WW1 Memorial Sculptor Sabin Howard, and a series of images from the Italian Front on our instagram page.    https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/goldman-prelude-red-scare-espionage-and-sedition-acts https://whitehotmagazine.com/articles/contemporary-sculpture-with-astounding-piece/3980 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oTn5aTy38lk&t=494s https://www.instagram.com/ww1cc/
June 16, 2018
Highlights The Battle of Belleau Wood - Mike Shuster | @02:15 June 11 Breakthrough at Belleau Wood - Dr. Edward Lengel | @06:00 The birth of the modern US Marine Corps - Alan Axelrod | @10:05 War in The sky: The Ace who ran Pan Am | @16:45 Historian Corner: The Dept. of State in WWI - Thomas Faith | @18:25 100 Cities / 100 Memorials: San Francisco - Ken Maley | @25:55 Speaking WWI: Boot Camp | @32:00 WWI War Tech: Submarine | @34:00 Articles & Posts: Weekly Dispatch Highlights | @37:50 Social Media - Katherine Akey | @43:50----more---- We invite you to use our full interactive transcript at our podcast website: ww1cc.org/cn meanwhile, below you will find links to our guests and our research.  World War One Then The Great War Project Historian Mike Shuster’s discusses the events of this week in 1918, including the all-important Battle of Belleau Wood, a disastrous outbreak of Spanish Flu in the German ranks, and the dawn of Allied numerical superiority on the Western front. The latter two developments force the German command to make a difficult strategic choice.    http://greatwarproject.org/2018/06/10/belleau-wood-crucial-test-for-the-americans/ America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 Dr. Ed Lengel explores the battlefield events 100 years ago this week, filling in the details with direct accounts as we witness the fierce fighting determination of the 2nd Brigade’s Marine division- which took the Germans by surprise. http://www.edwardlengel.com/portfolio/thunder-and-flames-americans-in-the-crucible-of-combat-1917-1918/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/forgotten-heroes-marine-breakthrough-belleau-wood-1918/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ 100 Years Ago: Belleau Wood The Battle of Belleau Wood became the crucible that transformed the United States Marine Corps, from a small force that primarily served on ships to a highly respected land combat outfit. At this late stage of the conflict, the stakes could not have been higher for either the Germans or the Allies. Author Alan Axelrod describes this ferocious, consequential battle that changed the course of the war and U.S. military history.     https://www.amazon.com/Alan-Axelrod/e/B001IQULA4 https://www.abmc.gov/cemeteries-memorials/europe/belleau-wood War in the Sky 100 years ago this week, Douglas Campbell, the first US trained Air Ace, scores his sixth and final aerial victory. While Campbell duels the Germans above Europe, Capt. John Alcock and Lt. Arthur Whitten Brown make the first non-stop transatlantic flight. http://ww1cc.org/warinthesky https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Campbell_(aviator)   World War One Now Historians Corner Remembering Veterans: State Dept Tom Faith, an in-house historian at the State Department, illuminates the pivotal role that the State Department played during the war, from the beginning of the conflict  through the Treaty of Versailles. He also discusses the impact of the war on American diplomacy and foreign policy, and the diplomatic implications of illegal poison gas use by the belligerent powers.   https://www.press.uillinois.edu/wordpress/qa-with-behind-the-gas-mask-author-thomas-faith/ https://militaryhistorynow.com/2015/11/16/doughboys-and-gas-american-chemical-weapons-in-world-war-one/ https://history.state.gov/departmenthistory/wwi https://history.state.gov/milestones/1914-1920/wwi https://history.state.gov/historicaldocuments/frus1917-72PubDip 100 Cities/100 Memorials San Francisco War Memorial Building and Opera House Ken Maley, coordinator of the San Francisco Armistice Centennial Commemoration, discusses Centennial Commemoration in San Francisco, a city with a strong link to the First World War. Additionally, other restorations are underway in the Bay Area, including memorials in San Francisco, Berkeley, and Carmel. www.ww1cc.org/100cities http://alwmcsf.org/world_war_one/ www.alwmcsf.org/ww1/1914-war-begins-in-europe www.alwmcsf.org/ww1/1915-1916-swaying-american-opinion www.alwmcsf.org/ww1/1917-america-enters-the-world-war www.alwmcsf.org/ww1/american-women-in-the-war/ www.alwmcsf.org/ww1/1917-1918-america-funds-its-war www.alwmcsf.org/ww1/industrial-scale-slaughter www.alwmcsf.org/ww1/1918-armistice-ends-world-war www.alwmcsf.org/ww1/memorial-to-all-who-served Speaking WW1 Boot Camp This week on Speaking WW1 -- where we explore words and phrases that are rooted in World War One -- Our phrase this week is “boot camp”, the slang term for military training camp. https://www.jstor.org/stable/3087941?mag=doughboy-slang&seq=7#page_scan_tab_contents http://www.worldwidewords.org/qa/qa-boo4.htm WW1 War Tech Submarine For WW1 War Tech, this week we take a look at the U-Boat -- one of the most notorious battle machines to debut in the Great War.   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U-boat https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Submarine_warfare#World_War_I https://www.warhistoryonline.com/guest-bloggers/the-dakota-hunter-nippons-2nd-attack-plan-on-x.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Sea_Mine_Barrage https://www.militaryfactory.com/ships/ww1-submarines.asp https://mashable.com/2015/09/18/german-u-boat/#zM4hW0tivuqR http://www.bbc.co.uk/guides/zq3q2hv Articles and Posts The headlines from this week’s Dispatch newsletter include stories about digitized WWI Newspapers at the Library of Congress, memorial poppies planted at the National Museum of the Marine Corps, a new exhibition at the Los Altos History Museum, a new WWI book by author Nancy Cramer, early investigations of PTSD, MIA doughboy 1st Lt. Leonard Charles Aitken, and an incredible photograph book by past podcast guest Jeff Lowdermilk. http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html The Buzz Katherine Akey highlights our recent social media activity, including posts about ongoing archaeological efforts in France and Flanders, a promotional video for Traces of War, and an article from the Telegraph about the bizarre inventions of WWI.   https://www.facebook.com/FlandersFields1418/posts/2603190469694660 https://www.facebook.com/FlandersFields1418/videos/2603065473040493/?hc_ref=ARRCrG55c5X9WQeQLPEOaa6sIfW0xET-0FsWgyqZa7CFhbEot4vxAzLP4uqsi-F5CV4 http://www.inflandersfields.be/en/traces-of-war-wwi-archaeology https://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/world-war-one/11937199/Secrets-of-World-War-I-Papier-mache-heads-ponies-dressed-as-zebras-and-fluorescent-sea-lions.html
June 9, 2018
Highlights: War Comes to U.S. Shore! 100 Years Ago This Week: German U-boats on the Eastern seaboard | @01:30 War In The Sky: First American Ace | @07:30 A million men in France - Mike Shuster | @`12:30 Machine gunners at Chateau Thierry - Dr. Edward Lengel | @16:45 Commission Armistice Centennial Plans - Meredith Carr | @21:10 CBS News Radio at Pershing Park - Chas Henry | @27:15 WWI at the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum - Dr. Peter Jakab | @29:50 New Mexico in WWI - Jeff Laudermilk | @36:10 100C /100M: Hawaii’s Memorial Natatorium - Donna Ching | @43:00 Centennial in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @51:25----more---- Opening Welcome to World War 1 centennial News - episode #75 - It’s about WW1 THEN - what was happening 100 years ago this week  - and it’s about WW1 NOW - news and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. This week: Mike Schuster updates us on the fighting fronts around the world Ed Lengel tells the story of the machine gunners at Chateau Thierry Meredith Carr gives us a preview of commemorative events planned for the upcoming centennial of the Armistice Dr. Peter Jakab [jay-cub] introduces us to the WW1 programming at the National Air and Space Museum Jeff Lowdermilk joins us fromthe New Mexico WW1 Centennial Commission Donna Ching shares the 100 cities/100 memorials project in Honolulu Katherine Akey highlights the commemoration of world war one in social media And a whole lot more on WW1 Centennial News -- a weekly podcast brought to you by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and the Starr foundation. I’m Theo Mayer - the Chief Technologist for the Commission and your host. Welcome to the show. [MUSIC] Preface [MUSIC TRANSITION] As we screened the stories running 100 years ago this week, in the NY times and the Official Bulletin, the government’s War Gazette - a major US domestic theme took front and center. The germans were trying to bring the war to our shore! U-boats were cruising off our eastern seaboard, threatening our merchant shipping and sinking ships. Though the loss of life was minimum, the psychological effects were powerful… and the media was speaking to it. With that as a setup, we are going to jump into our Centennial TIme Machine and go back 100 years ago this week in the War that changed the world! [SOUND EFFECT] [TRANSITION] World War One THEN 100 Years Ago [SOUND EFFECT] From the front page of the Official Bulletin - published by George Creel’s Committee for Public Information... Dateline:  Monday, June 3, 1918 Headline: three American ships sunk off New Jersey coast by enemy submarines Crews are rescued And the stories reads: Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels authorizes the following statement: The Navy department has been informed that three American schooners have been sunk off this coast by enemy submarines. The secretary’s statement closed with: “The Navy department is taking the necessary steps to safeguard the shipping along the coast.” The next day in the Bulletin [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline Tuesday, June 4, 1918 Headline: Navy announces - now five US ships sunk by submarines off Atlantic Coast One life known lost Steamship Carolina not heard from since reported under fire of U-boat Sunday afternoon. Oil tanker among the vessels reported lost. Later in the same issue of the Bulletin there is a first person account of the attack. It is an account of how these attacks went throughout the week - Headline: Steamer Bristol chased by submarine after picking up Schooner Cole's crew; latter saw the second steamship sunk And the story reads: the captain of the Bristol reported: "on June 2 at 4:30 PM, I cited a lifeboat with 11 men, the crew of the American schooner Edward H Cole, The Cole having been sunk by a submarine at 3:30 PM about 50 miles south east of Barnegat light." "the crew of the Cole say the submarine was about 200 feet long and was armed with two 6 inch guns. About 3 PM the Cole sighted the submarine on the starboard bow about 2000 yards away. He circled around and came up their port side. The submarine commander told the  captain and crew to get in their boats, saying that he was going to sink the vessel. He then came aboard and examined the ships papers, and at the same time gave the captain 7 1/2 minutes to leave the ship. About 15 minutes after the crew got away from the Cole it sank. Four bombs had been placed on the vessel, two on each side, and some were placed about the deck. The submarine stayed until the crew rowed to the northwest." One hour later, when we were about 4 miles from the submarine, another steamship appeared close up to the submarine, which fired five times before she altered her course". On Wednesday another front page story in the bulletin [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline Wednesday, June 5, 1918 Headline: US destroyers stops U-boat attack on French steamer Off Maryland coast Warship also takes on board man from the Edward Bayard, bombed and sinking. Another story in the same issue  lists 11 US ships reported to navy as sunk by submarines… The article goes on to read off the names of the ships the smallest of which was a 436 tons, schooner and the largest a steamship at 7200 tons. From the NY times: [SOUND EFFECT] Headline: TEXEL sunk, 36 survivors landed Former Dutch steamer attacked by a U-boat 60 miles from the city Fired without warning Shrapnel rained on deck, men reach Atlantic City lighthouse in small boats And the story reads: 36 survivors of the steamer TEXEL, a former Dutch ship which recently had been operated by the United States shipping board, was sunk without warning, 60 miles off New York Harbor, Sunday afternoon at 4:21 p.m., The crew landed at a nearby lighthouse, just before midnight. A cargo of 42,000 tons of sugar, valued at $20 a ton was lost. The total loss was more than $2 million. The stories go on throughout the week and beyond with many articles providing first hand accounts of the attacks - many times, in attacking the unarmed merchant ships, the U-boats would fire warnings from guns, come aboard, examine papers, get the crews to abandon ship and blow them up with bombs rather than wasting torpedoes. If the ships were armed or fought back - the submarines would stand off and torpedo them. The general loss of life was not large, but the disruption to shipping in our eastern seaboard was profound. We have posted a lot of our research links for you in the podcast notes. The most compelling are the many first person accounts of the attacks -   as the Germans bring the war to our shore -- 100 years ago this week in the war that changed the world. Other naval stories https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/06/102706915.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/07/102707289.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/04/102706133.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/06/102706933.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/05/102706533.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/04/102706131.pdf   https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/03/102705767.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/02/102704868.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/02/102704910.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/03/102705842.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/03/102705878.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/04/102706134.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/04/102706129.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/04/102706151.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/04/102706155.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/04/102706158.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/05/102706538.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/05/102706559.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/05/102706536.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/07/102707292.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/07/102707298.pdf   Fighting Front https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/02/102704870.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/02/102704865.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/02/102704860.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/02/102704879.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/03/102705775.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/03/102705771.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/03/102705775.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/03/102705780.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/04/102706126.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/05/102706529.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/07/102707272.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/06/102706968.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/06/102706910.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/06/102706903.pdf [MUSIC TRANSITION] War in the Sky This week for the War in the Sky 100 years ago, we can easily stay on the theme of the war at our shore with two stories and then we head overseas to pick up the action there. [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline June 5 1918 Headline: City lights out in  air raid test Aviators make observations preliminary to possible darkening of the streets. Anti aircraft guns ready System of siren signals arranged to warn people of danger from the skies And the story reads: Electric signs and all lights, except street lamps and lights in dwellings, were out in the city last night in compliance with orders issued by police Commissioner and at the suggestion of the war Department, as a precaution against a possible attack by aircraft from a German submarine. While the probability of raids by aircraft from submarines is not considered to be great, officers of the Army and Navy urged that every precaution be taken. In spite of the difficulties attending such an operation, to assemble an airplane on a submarine and launch it for a raid is held to be far from impossible. [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline June 3, 1918 Headline: Aero club  wants more aviators to hunt U-boats here And the story reads Extension of the airplane mail service is to give long distance flight training to American aviators to fit them for seeking out submarines which now have appeared off the coast and for bombing German cities, This  was urged by the post office department today by a committee from the Aero club of America. They said that they had been informed by the military authorities that there were plenty of training planes and that the war Department was more than willing to cooperate with the postal authorities in extending the air Mail service. Meanwhile from the war in the skies over Europe: [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline June 2 1918 Headline: Campbell first Ace of America California pilot honored as well as two others who flew with Lafayette corps. Campbell Downs a fifth adversary And the story reads: The first American trained Ace has arrived. This morning Lieut. Douglas Campbell, of California, brought down his fifth Bausch plane in a fight back of our lines. Besides Campbell, America has two other cases, maj. William Thaw and Capt. Peterson, but both Thaw and Peterson got their training in the Lafayette escadrille. Campbell on the other hand, never trained with any other outfit than the Americans, and never did any air fighting before he arrived on the American front a few weeks ago. Campbell is the son of the chief astronomer of the lick Observatory, near Pasadena California. He joined the American air service after the United States entered the war and came to France and began practice flying last fall. He is 22 years old. He is the first to get the credit of being a Simon pure American Ace. In a final story from the NY times we have a front line correspondent story about the allied air superiority in France. Dateline June 7, 1918 Headline: air superiority rewon Allied bombers operate with impunity on the French battlefront   "In the valley of the Savierre, our bombardment squadrons threw more than 17 tons of bombs on enemy troop concentrations." Says last nights communiqué. The New York Times correspondent today visited one of the finest aviation groups in the French army and learn a first-hand story of that exploit. In the early afternoon, the airmen were informed that a large number of Germans were assembling in the valley of the Savierre, a little river whose course is almost parallel with the front. Owing to the configuration of the ground they were sheltered from the fire of artillery and it was evident that they intended to reinforce the German move westward into the forest of Viller-cotterets. A first squadron of Bomb planes were sent out. Then a second... At first, no Germans were visible, then circling low, the air men discovered the enemy hiding in the horseshoe woods on the Eastern side of the valley. Again the German battalions were subjected to a terrible bombardment amidst trees that gave no protection. Before the decimated units could reform the first squadron had returned with a new load and once more the wood was filled with the roar of explosion. No human morale could stand such triple strain. In vain, the German officers tried to reform their panic stricken men. When the French infantry counter attacked they had an easy victory over the weakened forces that had made the advance. And those are some of the stories -- 100 years ago this week From the war in the sky! https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/07/102707275.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/04/102706151.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/02/102704861.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/05/102706536.pdf [SOUND EFFECT] Great War Project Let’s move on to the great war project with Mike Shuster, former NPR correspondent and curator for the Great War project blog. Mike, your post this week includes a very interesting and relatively unknown skirmish near the village of Montsec - when the US forces get thrown off a hill there for one night and the germans use that for propaganda that the American’s can’t fight. Of course that turns out quite incorrect, but things are far from rosy at this point, aren’t they Mike! That’s true Theo! The headlines this week read... [thanks Theo - The headlines read] [MIKE POST] Mike Shuster, curator for the Great War Project blog. The link to his post is in the podcast notes LINK: http://greatwarproject.org/2018/06/03/a-million-americans-now-in-france/ America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 Now for - America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI with Dr. Edward Lengel. The Americans turn out to be fierce fighters -- despite all initial uncertainty coming from their French and British allies - and of course the German propaganda that these are not fighters.  Ed’s here to tell us about how one division, the 3rd, proved their worth in battle -- Ed? [ED LENGEL] [MUSIC TRANSITION] Dr. Edward Lengel is an American military historian, author, and our segment host for America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI. There are links in the podcast notes to Ed’s post and his web sites as an author.   Links:http://www.edwardlengel.com/chateau-thierry-american-machine-gunners-action-1918/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ [SOUND EFFECT] World War One NOW And that’s what was happening 100 Years ago this week  - It is time to fast forward into the present with WW1 Centennial News NOW - [SOUND EFFECT] This part of the podcast focuses on NOW and how we are commemorating the centennial of WWI! https://militaryhistorynow.com/2018/05/27/the-war-that-changed-the-world-americas-ww1-centennial-commission-gears-up-for-a-summer-of-commemorations/ Commission News Armistice Events in 2018 with Meredith Carr With the centennial of the Armistice, only 6 months away, the US WW1 Centennial Commission is preparing for a national commemoration of this very significant moment, November 11, 2018. Of course “Armistice Day” has evolved into Veterans day, but this year, it is is marked with very special significance as the centennial of the END of WWI!   Meredith Carr, the Deputy Director of the US WW1 Centennial Commission is heading up the initiative of what will happen on November 11th and we thought it would be great to have her come on the show and give us a heads up on what we can expect, both in Washington DC and around the nation… indeed maybe around the world! Meredith! Welcome to the podcast. [greetings/welcome] Meredith - I gotta go for a little insider info for the audience - Way back in 2013, Meredith used to “host” a weekly conference call for various organizations planning the WWI centennial - and that very same call evolved into this podcast! So welcome home Meredith! [comment] Let’s talk through some of the events the Commission has planned to commemorate the end of WW1 on November 11th this year-- Can you start by telling us about the event at Washington’s National cathedral? You’ve got another program that EVERYONE around the country can participate in - a bell tolling - can you tell us about that? I know it is early - and plans are just coming together and we will be having you on again over the coming months but is there anything else you can tell us about today? [Pershing park activities in planning] Meredith - thank you for joining us and giving a preview of coming attraction for the upcoming centennial of the WWI armistice. [thanks/goodbyes] Follow the links in the podcast notes to learn more about upcoming WW1 commemoration events across the country. Links: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/ http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/participate/state-organizations/state-websites/others-pending.html http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/commemorate/event-map-system.html A Century In The Making A Century in the Making is our on-going narrative about the National World War One Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington DC. This week, CBS News radio is running a story where host  Chas Henry - Himself a retired US Marine Corps Captain - did an extended interview for CBS Eye On Veterans with Commissioner Edwin Fountain, and memorial designer Joe Weishaar recorded AT pershing park. The segment will air Saturday June 9th between 6-8 pm Eastern and again Sunday June 10th between 2 and 4pm Eastern.  You’ll find the interview around 34 minutes into the show and it runs for nearly 25 minutes - an interesting perspective on the Memorial not to be missed. Here is a brief introduction with Host  Chas Henry. [RUN CLIP] Events Events and Programs at the National Air and Space Museum For this week’s commemoration events section - we are very pleased to welcome Dr. Peter Jakab, chief curator at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC-- Welcome, Dr. Jakab! [welcomes/greetings] Dr. Jakab - Let me start by asking you about curation - WW1 is this incredibly important moment for flight technology -- with many planes and materials from the era lost to time! How do you approach this very complex period in aviation history? The National Air and Space Museum is hosting this wonderful exhibit called “Artist Soldiers” -- It is a great exhibit - and not particularly about flight - so how did this show end up at the National Air and Space Museum? You have an upcoming MUSICAL event called, "The Yanks Are Coming:" The Songs of World War I Could you tell us about it? Does the museum have any specific activities planned for the Armistice centennial this November? Katherine noted that the Museum has great ways for people who are not in Washington to enjoy your content - could you tell our audience a bit about how they can enjoy the museum in other ways? Dr. Jakab - Thank you so much for all the great focus you are bringing to the centennial of WWI and for coming on the podcast to tell us about it! [thank you/goodbyes] Dr. Peter Jakab is the chief curator at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC. Learn more about the museum and its WW1 programs and exhibitions at the links in the podcast notes. Links:https://airandspace.si.edu/events/yanks-are-coming-songs-world-war-i https://airandspace.si.edu/exhibitions/artist-soldiers https://airandspace.si.edu/exhibitions/pre-1920-aviation https://airandspace.si.edu/exhibitions/legend-memory-and-great-war-air Updates from the States New Mexico This week in Updates from the States -- we’re headed to a state we don’t automatically associate with WWI --- Pershing, and Pancho Via - yes - but WWI - not so much… It’s New Mexico, the Land of Enchantment! To tell us about New Mexico and WWI is Jeff Lowdermilk, deputy chairman of the New Mexico WW1 Centennial Commission Jeff - welcome to the podcast! [greetings/welcome]   Jeff -- let me start with your state and WWI - You were just 2 years old with WWI broke out! what was New Mexico like 100 years ago, and how did it participate in the war effort? Jeff.. The New Mexico WWI commission was only recently established… Can you tell us about that? What kinds of programs are the Commission planning? Well, you just recently launched the New Mexico state website at ww1cc.org/nm or ww1cc.org/newmexico - all one word - lower case -- what can people expect to find there? Jeff: As a side note - briefly - because we are almost out of time, you recently published a book; Honoring The Doughboys: Following My Grandfather’s WWI Diary, where you retraced you Grandfather journey in europe. Can you give us an overview? Where is the book available? [thanks/goodbyes] The New Mexico in WWI website can be found at ww1cc.org/newmexico - all one word - all lower case… Jeff Lowdermilk is an author and the deputy chairman of the New Mexico WW1 Centennial Commission.  Learn more about the New Mexico WW1 Centennial Commission by going to their website or by following the links in the podcast notes. Link: www.ww1cc.org/newmexico http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/4567-five-questions-for-jeff-lowdermilk.html 100 Cities / 100 Memorials Hawaii Moving on to our 100 Cities / 100 Memorials segment about the $200,000 matching grant challenge to rescue and focus on our local WWI memorials. This week we are crossing the Pacific to Honolulu Hawaii! Now Hawaii has been in the news for week with the volcano eruptions on the Big Island - which is not, for those of you who have not been lucky enough to go there - where the capital of Honolulu is located. Hawaii was also in the news 100 years ago this week, when on June 4th, 1918 the secretary of War announced with a headline that read: HAWAIIAN NATIONAL GUARDS ADD 3,200 MEN TO ARMY Now Hawaii was not even a state yet, but a force of 3,200 men were to be added to the Army from a proclamation by President Wilson placing the Hawaiian National Guard in service Now they were not planning to send this force to France - but rather to relieve forces that the US army had stationed there - freeing them up  for deployment. According to the article in the Official Bulletin - That Hawaiian force was  genuinely cosmopolitan with native Hawaiians, Americans, Filipinos, Chinese-Americans, Japanese - Americans and more… After the war - Hawaii dedicated a large swimming venue as a WWI memorial - it is called the Natatorium - and here to tell us about the venue, its restoration and its designation as a WWI Centennial Memorial is Donna Ching, Vice chairman of Hawaii's World War I centennial task force. She is also vice president of the Friends of the Natatorium, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the preservation of the ocean pool known as Hawaii's 'living war memorial' Donna, Welcome to the Podcast! You know, I think most people have never thought about Hawaii and WWI - But there are really a surprising numbers of connections…  underestimate Hawaii's role in WW1 - by how much would you say? Donna, can you start by telling us the history of Hawaii “Living Memorial”? QUESTION: I hear…. that you have big plans for the armistice centennial coming up on 11/11. QUESTION: Thank you Donna, for talking with us and sharing the story of Hawaii incredible living memorial! There has been a big fight going between preserving and tearing down this really beautiful venue - how’s that going? Your 100 Cities / 100 Memorials grant application was in large part built around informing your community about the importance of the venue -  rather than for restoration directly. Has the designation as a National WWI Centennial Memorial helped? What’s next for the project? Donna - It’s a great story - About Hawaii, about the centennial, about the armistice and for me - most important about passion for local heritage driven by WWI - thanks for sharing it with us! [goodbyes/thank you] Donna L. Ching, Vice chairman of Hawaii's World War I centennial task force . Learn more about the 100 Cities/100 Memorials program by following the link in the podcast notes. Links: www.ww1cc.org/100cities The Buzz And that brings us to the buzz - the centennial of WW1 this week in social media with Katherine Akey - Katherine, what did you pick? Exhibits, Posters and More I want to share a couple great resources and exhibits this week! In the fall, we let you know about the Department of Homeland Security's WWI Poster Series, which highlights the historic roles of the DHS components -- to include Immigration & Naturalization Service, Customs & Border Protection, Secret Service, Coast Guard, and legacy agencies. Well, the folks at DHS have now published these great poster files on their website -- so that the public can easily access them! They’re a wonderful, free educational resource -- check them out at the link in the podcast notes. Additionally, there’s a new exhibit open at the Library of Virginia in the state’s capital, Richmond. The exhibit “"True Sons of Freedom" explores the stories of Virginia's African American soldiers who served during World War I -- and will be on view to the public through November 9, 2018. I’ve included a link to the exhibit’s website as well as to a video tour of the exhibit in the podcast notes. The exhibit’s website is a great resource for anyone who can’t quite make it to Richmond -- it include profiles of dozens of Virginian men who served. Finally -- this week included June 6th, well known as the anniversary of the WW2 landings at Normandy, D-Day. But June also marks the anniversary of some of the most bloody and intense fighting American soldiers have ever faced -- the fighting at Belleau Wood. The battle forged the modern day Marine Corps -- and you can, and should, read the article recently put out in the Washington Post and included in the podcast notes -- it highlights the fighting from 100 years ago and contextualizes its importance to the modern day. That’s it for this week in the Buzz. Link:https://www.uscis.gov/history-and-genealogy/our-history/world-war-i-centennial-commemorative-poster-series https://www.facebook.com/LibraryofVA/videos/10155505095947227/?hc_ref=ARSOicdS9Bv7HrYGe-RfUptXbIhmIpH4aJfhdl0W2mZaBr_cGrLnGos2AlwORMfTbSw http://truesons.virginiamemory.com/ https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/retropolis/wp/2018/05/31/the-battle-of-belleau-wood-was-bloody-deadly-and-forgotten-but-it-forged-a-new-marine-corps/ Outro And that wraps up episode #75 of WW1 Centennial News. Thank you so much for joining us. We also want to thank our guests... Mike Shuster, Curator for the great war project blog Dr. Edward Lengel, Military historian and author Meredith Carr, Deputy Director of the WW1 Centennial Commission Dr. Peter Jakab, Chief Curator at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC Jeff Lowdermilk, deputy chairman of the New Mexico WW1 Centennial Commission Donna Ching, vice president of the Friends of the Natatorium Katherine Akey, WWI Photography specialist and line producer for the podcast Many thanks to Mac Nelsen our hard working sound editor I’m Theo Mayer your host. The US World War One Centennial Commission was created by Congress to honor, commemorate and educate about WW1. Our programs are to-- inspire a national conversation and awareness about WW1; Including this podcast! We are bringing the lessons of the 100 years ago into today's classrooms; We are helping to restore WW1 memorials in communities of all sizes across our country; and of course we are building America’s National WW1 Memorial in Washington DC. We want to thank commission’s founding sponsor the Pritzker Military Museum and Library as well as the Starr foundation for their support. The podcast can be found on our website at ww1cc.org/cn  - now with our new interactive transcript feature for students, teachers, bloggers, reporters and writers. You can also access the WW1 Centennial News podcast on  iTunes, Google Play, TuneIn, Podbean, Stitcher - Radio on Demand, Spotify, using your smart speaker.. By saying “Play W W One Centennial News Podcast” - and now also available on Youtube - just search for our WW1 Centennial youtube channel. Our twitter and instagram handles are both @ww1cc and we are on facebook @ww1centennial. Thank you for joining us. And don’t forget to share the stories you are hearing here today about the war that changed the world! [music] Hey - in closing we just want to welcome all our new summer interns at the US WWI Centennial Commission. Hey Gunny - we haven’t heard from you you in a long time - I hear you want to welcome the interns. That’s right you maggot - OK Intern’s listen up! Welcome to WWI Centennial BOOT CAMP - I don’t wanna see any of you trying to spit polish your tennis shoes - Got it? Dismmised So long!
June 2, 2018
Highlights: June 1918 Overview June 1918 Overview roundtable - Dr. Edward Lengel, Katherine Akey, Theo Mayer | @01:35 Not all quiet on the western front - Mike Shuster | @15:30 National Memorial Day Parade | @19:55 369th Experience Memorial Weekend concerts | @22:05 East Indians in WW1 - Tanveer Kalo | @25:35 Belgian Children’s “Thank You” - Nancy Heingartner | @32:15 100C/100M in Bismarck, ND - Susan Wefald | @39:25 Speaking WW1: Cantonment | @44:50 WW1 War Tech: FlammenWerfer | @46:15 Dispatch Newsletter Highlights | @48:45 The Buzz: Social Media - Katherine Akey | @51:40----more---- Welcome to World War 1 centennial News - episode #74 - It’s about WW1 THEN - what was happening 100 years ago this week  - and it’s about WW1 NOW - news and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. This week: Dr. Edward Lengel, Katherine Akey and I sit down for our June 1918 preview roundtable Mike Schuster updates us on the fact that it is NOT all quiet on the Western Front Tanveer Kalo tells us about American immigrants from East Indians and their WWI experience Nancy Heingartner shares the story of her great-grandfather, the US Consul in Liege, Belgium in WW1 Susan Wefald [wee-fald] tells us about the 100 Cities/100 Memorials project in Bismarck, North Dakota Katherine Akey with the commemoration of world war one in social media And a whole lot more on WW1 Centennial News -- a weekly podcast brought to you by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and the Starr foundation. I’m Theo Mayer - the Chief Technologist for the Commission and your host. Welcome to the show. [MUSIC] Preface The first week of every month, we invite you to our preview roundtable where Dr. Ed lengel, Katherine Akey and I talk about the upcoming month and the key events that happened 100 years ago.  The question on the table as we sat down was, “ what WERE the big stories and themes in June 1918… What follows is our conversation. [MUSIC TRANSITION] [TRANSITION] World War One THEN June 1918 Roundtable [Ed Lengel, Katherine Akey, Theo Mayer take an overview of June 1918] [MUSIC TRANSITION] Great War Project Let’s move on to the great war project with Mike Shuster, former NPR correspondent and curator for the Great War project blog. Mike - in your post this week you talk about Pershing telling the Allies that the American Forces would not really be ready till the end of the year - maybe not until 1919 - which totally freaks everyone out. The French are quite certain that they cannot last till then, aren’t they Mike? [MIKE POST] Mike Shuster, curator for the Great War Project blog. The link to his post is in the podcast notes LINK: http://greatwarproject.org/2018/05/27/americans-not-ready-until-1919/ [SOUND EFFECT] World War One NOW And that’s what was happening 100 Years ago  - It is time to fast forward into the present with WW1 Centennial News NOW - [SOUND EFFECT] This part of the podcast focuses on NOW and how we are commemorating the centennial of WWI Commission News Memorial Day Follow Up: This past weekend we celebrated Memorial Day -- and WWI commemorations were front and center in communities all across the country. The Commission had a pretty busy weekend as well! First of all we had a float to commemorate the centennial of WWI in the National Memorial Day parade in Washington, DC. Besides being joined by  a number of very cool WW1-era trucks and vehicles, General John J. Pershing himself -- and a bunch of reenactors - We also introduced America’s National WWI Memorial -- asking crowds - “Did you know that every major war of the 20th century has a Memorial in the Nation’s capitol except WWI?” The unbelieving shock at this revelation was pretty universal. Everyone assumes that there is one! But there’s not [video clip of anchors] [SOUND EFFECT] Now New York City always has quite a Memorial Day - Besides their own parade, the Navy coming to town for the much beloved Fleet week - this year the Commission was instrumental in sponsoring a very special event for the occasion. The musicians of the 369th Experience brought turn-of-the-century ragtime and Jazz onto the decks of the USS Intrepid at the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum at  Manhattan’s Pier 86. Carrying on the legacy of the famous Harlem Hellfighters Regimental band, the 369th Experience pulled together talented modern-day musicians from  HBCU’s - Historically black colleges and universities, all around the country. The musicians competed to participate in this 369th regimental band tribute -- and a number of amazing and amazed young men came to New York for a truly memorable experience! [Video clip from PIX 11 News] We collected the social media posts about the 369th Regiment, regimental band and the Memorial day concerts from everywhere, and put them in a special gallery at ww1cc.org/369th or follow the various links in the podcast notes to learn more. Links: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/369th-experience-gallery.html http://pix11.com/2018/05/28/young-jazz-musicians-recreate-music-of-harlem-hellfighters/ www.IntrepidMuseum.org https://www.369experience.com/ http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/369th-experience.html Remembering Veterans East Indian Americans in WW1 with Tanveer Kalo This week For Remembering Veterans -- We want to end the month of May-- which is Asian Pacific American Heritage Month-- with a focus on Indian American immigrants in WW1. Our guest for this segment has an unusual background in his WWI expertise… He has become one of the leading “ Go To Guys” when it comes to indian participation in WWI.  He just graduated as the Ronald E. McNair Scholar from St. Lawrence University - but before that - he was an intern at our own World War One Centennial Commission. His name is Tanveer Kalo, Tanveer, thank you for joining us! [greetings] [Tanveer-- it is so exciting to see an intern from the commission continuing their passion fanned to flame by that experience. Can you tell us the story of of your intern experience and how it shaped this interest of yours in the Indian American experience of a hundred years ago?] [When you interned, you helped the noted journalist Suruchi Mohan put together one of our publishing partner site called Vande Mataram and dedicated to the Indian American experience.] [The site features the story of the “Hindoo” conspiracy -- can give us an overview of the incident?] [You recently wrote up a profile on Dr. Bhagat Singh Thind -- who was he, and why did you choose to focus on his story?] [Tanveer… What’s next on your horizon?] [Tanveer - we are all very proud and excited about your growing work and recognition in this area. Thank you so much for coming in and speaking with us today!] [goodbyes/thanks] Tanveer Kalo just graduated as the Ronald E. McNair Scholar from St. Lawrence University and a former WW1 Centennial Commission Intern. Read his articles and learn more about Indian American service in WW1 at the links in the podcast notes. Links:http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/strange-nexus-indians-germans-the-great-trial.html http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/4310-re-discovering-the-unknown-world-war-i-s-south-asian-soldiers-in-the-us-military.html http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/indians-who-served.html Special Remembering WWI Belgian Children’s Project In a special Remembering WWI segment -- we’re going to hear about a very touching and heartfelt tribute made by Belgian refugee children from one hundred years ago. For this, we are joined by Nancy Heingartner, the Assistant Director for Outreach at the University of Wisconsin  Madison's Institute for Regional and International Studies. Nancy also happens to be the great-granddaughter of Alexander Heingartner, the U.S. Consul in liege, Belgium, in 1915. Her discoveries in a family attic has gifted her with a very special collection of letters sent to Alexander Heingartner -- letters of thanks -- from Belgian school children 100 years ago. Nancy - welcome to the podcast! [greetings/welcome] [Nancy, could you start off by telling us a bit about your great-grandfather? Was he in Belgium when the war broke out?] [The children writing him letters were thanking him for the support and provisions given to them by the Commission for Relief in Belgium -- Now that was the organization that was led by a young engineer and mining consultant named Herbert Hoover - what is that Commission, and how was your Great-Grandfather involved in it?] [Tell us about the letters! We’re audio only, but we hear that they are really delicate and beautiful objects.] [What are your plans for the letters now?] [thanks/goodbyes] Nancy Heingartner is the Assistant Director for Outreach at the University of Wisconsin, Madison's Institute for Regional and International Studies. Learn more about her discoveries by following the links in the podcast notes. Link: https://www.facebook.com/usembassybelgium/photos/a.119544323109.103769.39878083109/10153509217488110/?type=3&theater https://hoover.archives.gov/exhibits/years-compassion-1914-1923 https://www.hoover.org/events/glory-and-gratitude-united-states https://airandspace.si.edu/events/world-war-i-legacy-letters-and-belgian-war-lace 100 Cities / 100 Memorials World War Memorial Building - Bismarck, ND Moving on to our 100 Cities / 100 Memorials segment about the $200,000 matching grant challenge to rescue and focus on our local WWI memorials. This week we’re profiling a project from Bismarck, North Dakota - it is the capital city of North Dakota located on the bluffs of the Missouri River.. With us to tell us more about the World War Memorial Building project is Susan Wefald, vice chair of the North Dakota World War I Centennial Committee, an active volunteer, and a retired elected state official. Susan, Welcome to the Podcast! [Susan, your project involves a WWI memorial building rather than a statue or a monument. What made your community decide to build a WWI memorial building in 1929?] [In its early years, the building housed the state legislature for a time, how did that come about?] [Susan, you have clearly been the spearhead for a lobby restoration efforts, how did you get involved.] [Has there been any community reaction to the site being selected as a WWI Centennial Memorial site?] [What stage is the work at?] [Do you plan a rededication?] Thank you Susan for coming in and telling us about the project. [goodbyes/thank you] Susan Wefald is vice chair of the North Dakota World War I Centennial Committee. Learn more about the 100 Cities/100 Memorials program by following the link in the podcast notes. Links: www.ww1cc.org/100cities Speaking WW1 Welcome to our weekly feature “Speaking World War 1” -- Where we explore the words & phrases that are rooted in the war  --- After April 6th of last year, we started talking about the Cantonments that the US government was building all around the country to train our millions of new recruits. Everybody got the idea that Cantonments were big ol’ training camps from the context we used it in  - All the historians. and military experts around me were using the word like it was something I should have known - but you know, when I started asking around, who the heck uses the term Cantonment on a regular basis!? Seriously - turn out that the word cantonment comes from a 16th century middle french term for a corner or angle - which leads to an area - then a section of land - then a segment of a region - By 1917, Cantonment was the name for a permanent military camp or garrisons -- and for World War One the US built some 30 of these camps to accommodate the training for our new army. Cantonment -  but a pretty esoteric term for my money!  - this week’s word for Speaking WWI Next week we are going to look at the word Boot Camp - which also shows up at this time, and unlike Cantonment - it sticks around and is popular  today! Links: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cantonment [SOUND EFFECT] WW1 War Tech Flammenwerfer Now for WW1 War Tech -- This week we’re looking at one of the truly horrific ww1 weapons - tweaked up by the Germans and called - Der FlammenWerfer - which quite literally translated as the flame thrower.  100 years ago as the Americans entered the fray at Cantigny, French flamethrower troops were part of the offensive forces used against the Germans. Now The idea of the flamethrower goes WAY back… to the 5th century BC, with some of the earliest working examples dating back to the Byzantine era --- by the 1st century AD hand-pumped flamethrowers on board ships were being used and known as Greek Fire. The more contemporary version of the weapon was developed in the early 1900s by the German inventor Richard Fiedler. There were two types, the Kleinflammenwerfer and the Grossflammenwerfer, which appropriate to very  literal nature of the german language means the small flame thrower and big flame thrower. The small ones were one-man portable backpack devices and the large ones were three-man, big hose, big pressure, long throw monsters. Although it was initially placed into the German arsenal in 1911, the flamethrower wasn’t used extensively until the summer of 1915. The shock, fear and terror caused by the cascading sheets of fire led to quite a panic among the defenders. It really is a horribly grizzly weapon! And like so many other devastations of  WWI, the Allies quickly began developing their own flame throwing machines. Meanwhile, flamethrower operators typically do not live very long. The first threat is not from the enemy but from potential fatal malfunctions of the weapon -- after all, with the portable ones, you were essentially carrying around an explosive backpack with a lit fuse. - with the big ones - well it’s just sort of nutty to squirt huge quantities of flammable liquids out a nozzle and then light it on fire…   Enemy gunfire is a pretty big threat too  - You know that nicely lit-up guy with the flame stick -- well he’s just a natural target to shoot at first. The Flammenwerfer - another horrific WWI weapon and this week’s subject for WWI War Tech  -- Learn more at the links in the podcast notes. Link:http://www.firstworldwar.com/weaponry/flamethrowers.htm https://mashable.com/2016/02/04/wwi-flamethrowers/#r9GQDQ6KUqq7 Articles and Posts For Articles and posts -- here are some of the highlights from our weekly Dispatch newsletter. [DING] Headline: In DC Memorial Day Parade, heir to the Pie Man from Georgetown recalls efforts which provided ‘Dough for the Doughboys’ Writer Anthony Hayes, in  the Baltimore Post Examiner tells the amazing World War I history behind the quaint pie truck-- a black Model T box truck – replete with it’s creamy-white “Connecticut – Copperthite Pie Company” WWI logo. [DING] Headline: POLITICO article offers in-depth look at current status of new national World War I Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, DC POLITICO published a broad-ranging and insightful article on May 28 that takes a hard look at the obstacles facing  progress of the new national World War I Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, DC, and the opportunities which may emerge from moving forward on the project in the coming months. [DING] Headline: Lowdermilk book aims to "shine the light of awareness" of WWI for next generation Upon receiving the diary of his grandfather, a World War I veteran, writer and photographer Jeffrey Lowdermilk was inspired to honor his grandfather’s memory by taking the same journey across Europe. mLearn about his book, Honoring The Doughboys: Following My Grandfather’s WWI Diary. [DING] Headline: "There But Not There" silhouettes honor WWI fallen, and support military charities A new nationwide campaign to commemorate the centennial of World War One and raise funds for military charities was launched across the United States this week -- read the article titled…  There But Not There [DING] Headline: This week in the WWrite Blog: I Never Saw Him Drowning: Great-Uncle Charlie and the Great War Philip Metres tells the story of his Great-Uncle Charlie, his veteran father, and of his own exploration of war through writing and poetry. [DING] Finally, our  selection from our Official online Centennial Merchandise store -   this week, it’s centennial key tag, inscribed with -  nothing can stop these men! Inspired by an original World War One poster, this key tag features the dramatic image of a bayonet advance on the enemy, with the United States flag in the upper corner. You can get it at in our official Merchandise store by following the links in our weekly newsletter the Dispatch… Subscribe by going to ww1cc.org/subscribe or follow the link in the podcast notes Link: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch The Buzz And that brings us to the buzz - the centennial of WW1 this week in social media with Katherine Akey - Katherine, what did you pick? Memorial Day Stories and More We have so many photo albums, links and articles to share with everyone from Memorial Day weekend! In the podcast links you’ll find photos and reports from the American Battle Monuments Commission and the US Army Center of Military History -- both of whom participated in the Grand Opening ceremony of the new Visitors Center at the American Monument in Chateau-Thierry, France on Sunday May 27th. You’ll also find links to videos of the Memorial Day commemorations at the Lafayette Escadrille Memorial and of WW1 Centennial Commissioner Monique Seefried speaking from the fields of the Meuse Argonne. There’s also an article from NPR about the temporary Poppy memorial set up on the National Mall over the weekend -- 645,000 synthetic flowers — one for each American killed in an international conflict since the start of World War I — pressed against acrylic panels and backlit. Finally -- the team behind the film Sgt Stubby: An American Hero have teamed up with the American Legion to bring the film to communities across the country! Fun Academy Motion Pictures is offering American Legion posts nationwide opportunities to screen the critically acclaimed animated film beginning Memorial Day weekend and continuing through Veterans Day with the help of veterans-outreach nonprofit VetFlicks.org. Read more about it, and how to organize a screening in your local American Legion Post, by following the link in the podcast notes. That’s it for this week in the Buzz. Link:https://www.facebook.com/100ansUSenHauteMarne/posts/1780423115382053 https://www.facebook.com/armyhistory/posts/10156495210877853 https://www.facebook.com/HQUSAFE/videos/10156442806307020/?hc_ref=ARTUh_hefefiOubK-738wZeip6G9XIN5T7Qefh2TDJsAj-Gc0ykJwwc7bgYc0EmiBfw https://www.facebook.com/pg/abmcpage/photos/?tab=album&album_id=1919925101359525 https://www.facebook.com/armyhistory/videos/10156495401912853/?hc_ref=ARRhGVsBtjxBa9_pZMMq663_RS8rvAZ0hs57B7zYaGHKkQqnRCf3Ge1zk84hdqwcKHQ https://www.facebook.com/NPR/posts/10156950318706756 https://www.legion.org/honor/242035/sgt-stubby-american-hero-screenings-offered-american-legion-posts Outro And that wraps up the last week of May for WW1 Centennial News. Thank you so much for joining us. We also want to thank our guests... Mike Shuster, Curator for the great war project blog Dr. Edward Lengel, Military historian and author Tanveer Kalo , a quickly developing expert on indians in WW1 and a former Centennial Commission Intern Nancy Heingartner, educator and custodian of a great century old collection of thank you letters from Belgian students Susan Wefald,  vice chair of the North Dakota World War I Centennial Committee Katherine Akey, WWI Photography specialist and line producer for the podcast Many thanks to Mac Nelsen our hard working sound editor who makes us all sound like we never make mistakes --- And of course I never do! I’m Theo Mayer your host. The US World War One Centennial Commission was created by Congress to honor, commemorate and educate about WW1. Our programs are to-- inspire a national conversation and awareness about WW1; Including this podcast! We are bringing the lessons of the 100 years ago into today's classrooms; We are helping to restore WW1 memorials in communities of all sizes across our country; and of course we are building America’s National WW1 Memorial in Washington DC. We want to thank commission’s founding sponsor the Pritzker Military Museum and Library as well as the Starr foundation for their support. The podcast can be found on our website at ww1cc.org/cn  - now with our new interactive transcript feature for students, teachers, bloggers, reporters and writers. You can also access the WW1 Centennial News podcast on  iTunes, Google Play, TuneIn, Podbean, Stitcher - Radio on Demand, Spotify, using your smart speaker.. By saying “Play W W One Centennial News Podcast” - and now also available on Youtube - just search for our WW1 Centennial youtube channel. Our twitter and instagram handles are both @ww1cc and we are on facebook @ww1centennial. Thank you for joining us. And don’t forget to share the stories you are hearing here today about the war that changed the world! [music] In closing, We have a discovered fact that is very strange but true… Did you know that there are over 26,000 people in the united states that tend to use the word “cantonment” multiple times a week, and have for decades - Yup - and they all live near pensacola, Florida in, you guessed it - the only town in the US called cantonment. So long!
May 26, 2018
Highlights 100 years ago this week: Drafting the young and the “idlers” | @01:15 War in the Sky: From Signal Corps to US Army Air Service | @07:40 Cantigny: AEF on the offensive - Mike Shuster & Dr. Edward Lengel | @11:15 Great War Channel: The Fightin-est Marine - Indy Neidell | @17:15 369th Experience in NYC memorial weekend | @18:25 The Moralist: New Woodrow Wilson Book - Prof. Patricia O’Toole | @21:15 Update from the States: Artillery, dissenters and shells - Michael Hitt | @27:15 Remembering Vets: PTSD and Trauma - Dr. Jason Crouthamel | @32:45 Speaking WWI: Some onomatopoeia -Whizzband, Crump and Dud | @39:35 WW1 War Tech: The bicycle in WW1 | @41:15 Weekly Dispatch: Article highlights from the newsletter | @44:25 The Buzz: Commemoration in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @46:25----more---- Opening Welcome to World War 1 centennial News - episode #73 - It’s about WW1 THEN - what was happening 100 years ago this week  - and it’s about WW1 NOW - news and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. This week: Mike Schuster and Dr Edward Lengel fill us in on the action at Cantigny Patricia O’Toole tells us about her book The Moralist: Woodrow Wilson and the World He Made Michael Hitt updates us on the great state of Georgia in the war Dr. Jason Crouthamel shares his expertise on PTSD, Trauma and WW1 Katherine Akey with the commemoration of world war one in social media All on WW1 Centennial News -- a weekly podcast brought to you by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and the Starr foundation. I’m Theo Mayer - the Chief Technologist for the Commission and your host. Welcome to the show. [MUSIC] Preface Although we know that the fighting in WWI is going to end this coming November - 100 years ago this week, the world did not! The United States continues on it’s war effort, changing industry, society and nearly every aspect of life in the country. This includes continuing to draft young men into the military service. With that in mind, let’s jump into our Centennial Time Machine and go back 100 years to see what’s leading in the news this week 100 years ago in the War that Changed the World! [MUSIC TRANSITION] [SOUND EFFECT] [TRANSITION] World War One THEN 100 Year Ago This Week [SOUND EFFECT From the pages of the Official Bulletin - the government’s war gazette - published by George Creel and the Committee on Public information - our government propaganda ministry, this week the headlines are full renewed vigor for pushing the war effort forward! I want to stop and give you a note we have not mentioned for many weeks: The US WWI Centennial Commission is republishing this amazing primary source of information on what the US Government was thinking, saying and promoting 100 years ago. We re-publish a  new issue, every day on the centennial of its original publication date… So if you want to read the governments daily newspaper (except Sunday of course), go to ww1cc.org/bulletin and you can follow the war effort in a wholly unique and very interesting way. [SOUND EFFECT] DATELINE: Tuesday, May 21, 1918 Today the headline of the Official Bulletin reads: President, in opening Red Cross campaign, calls German peace approaches insincere; no limit on size of Army going to France! In the story President Woodrow Wilson says: Quote: There are two duties with which we are face to face. The first duty is to win the war, and the second duty, that goes hand in hand with it, is to win it greatly and worthily, showing the real quality of not only our power, but the real quality of our purpose and of ourselves. Of course, the first duty, the duty that we must keep in the foreground of all of our thoughts until it is accomplished, is to win the war. I have heard gentleman recently say that we must get 5 million men ready. I ask, why limited to 5 million? He continues with: We are not diverted from the grim purpose of winning the war by any insincere approaches upon the subject of peace. I can say with a clear conscience that I have tested those imitations, and have found them insincere. The president goes on to describe the full commitment and focus of the nation to carry out our mission. All this prefaces a proclamation the President will make the very next day - setting up a new call to arms to young men who have turned 21, and to all men who are not engaged directly in the war effort as you are about to hear. [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline, Tuesday, May 21, 1918 The headline reads: President’s proclamation fixing June 5 as date for registering young men who have reached the age of 21 during the past year Only persons exempt are the officers and enlisted men in naval and military service The  proclamation includes: It is resolved by the Senate and House representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled that during the present emergency all male persons, citizens of the United States, and all male persons residing in the United States, who have, since the fifth day of June 1917, and on or before the day set for the registration, attained the age of 21 years, shall be subject to registration in accordance with the regulations to be prescribed by the President, stating the time and place of such registration. It shall be the duty of all such persons, except such persons as are exempt from registration, to present themselves for and submit to registration under the provisions of set act approved May 18, 1917. The guy in charge of pulling off this new draft registration is the Provost Marshall - a General Enoch Herbert Crowder from Missouri. He seemed determined not to let anything slip by as the next article illustrates: [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline Thursday, May 23, 1918 A headline in the New York Times reads: Work or fight, warning to all on draft rolls Gen. Crowder issues sweeping order aimed at idlers and those in non-useful pursuits. Goes into effect on July 1 Includes gamblers, waiters, service, store clerks, elevator men, and those with no occupation. Maybe blow to baseball. In the article it reads: Idlers, unemployed and those of draft age not engaged in a central or useful employment will be rounded up for military service unless they apply themselves at some sort of labor that will dovetail into the plans of the administration for winning the war. All such youths of draft age we'll either have to serve in the army or work. There is resistance to the draft around the nation, but for the most part, the young men of America join up, and loyally help the war effort in the best way they can - and they are put on notice…  100 years ago this week. in the war that changed the world. See the May 20 to may 24 issues of the official bulletin at ww1cc.org/bulletin and see other links in the podcast notes. [MUSIC TRANSITION] War in the Sky Also - One hundred years ago this week, the war in the sky takes a turn for America, not on the battlefields of europe but in the halls of administration back home. [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline May 20, 1918 A headline of The New York Times reads: Wilson recasts aviation service Takes all control of operations and production away from signal core President acts under the Overman law to bring about improvements in the situation Pres. Wilson today took what he regards as definitive action towards the improvement of the Army aircraft program when he issued a presidential order stripping the chief signal corps officer of the Army, Major Gen. George O. Squier, of every function pertaining to aircraft and aviation. The functions were transferred to two new offices, Bureau of military aeronautics and The bureau of aircraft production Created directly under the Secretary of War. “The signal Corps”, said Sec. Baker this afternoon, “will now have only to do with signals, and nothing to do with any phase of the production or use of aircraft.” The order gives Brigadier General William Kenley all of the property pertaining to the use of aircraft and all money in connection therewith. This development essentially creates the US Army Air Corps. Our regular listeners may remember from our March 9,  episode #62 - how the Signal Corps, one of the real technology innovators  was also the founding pioneer in the use of aircraft for the military… Here is a clip from Episode #62 [change sound EQ] By the turn of the century the US Army Signal Corps had taken on a leadership role not just with visual signalling but also with the telegraph, telephone, cable communications, meteorology, combat photography and had even sprouted an aeronautical and aviation section. Nearly a decade before American Forces engaged the enemy, the wright brothers made test flights of the army’s first airplane built to Signal Corps’ specifications. Tests appropriately performed at Fort Myers. Army aviation stayed with the Signal Corps until May of 1918, when the Aviation Section of the Signal Corps is transformed by President Wilson’s  Executive order, into the Army Air Service - the forerunner of the United States Air Force.   Well, that moment in May of 1918 is now… driven partially by the previous “scandals” about the effectiveness of US investment in its airplane development, production and training, and partially by the fact the aircraft - once seen primarily as reconnaissance devices are taking on a strategic offensive warcraft role - now put under the US Army Air Service and later to become the US Air Force. A transition that takes a major turn this week 100 years ago in the war in the sky.See the podcast notes for a simple 50 year timeline showing how the use of aircraft evolved from 1907 to September 1947 when the US Air Force is established as a separate branch of the US Armed Forces. Timeline: Aeronautical Division, Signal Corps (1 August 1907 – 18 July 1914) Aviation Section, Signal Corps (18 July 1914 – 20 May 1918) Division of Military Aeronautics (20 May 1918 – 24 May 1918) Air Service, U.S. Army (24 May 1918 – 2 July 1926) U.S. Army Air Corps (2 July 1926 – 20 June 1941)* U.S. Army Air Forces (20 June 1941 – 17 September 1947) US Air Force - established as a separate branch on September 18, 1947 http://www.worldwar1.com/dbc/airserv1.htm https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_United_States_Air_Force#World_War_I_and_between_wars https://media.defense.gov/2010/Oct/13/2001329759/-1/-1/0/AFD-101013-008.pdf NYTimes Air Service Articles https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/05/21/102703124.pdf Battle of Cantigny This week, 100 years ago in the war on the Western Front-- the American forces attack for the first time at Cantigny, in France. Both Mike Shuster and Ed Lengel tell us the story of the battle, a first test of American mettle-- but they each explore the event using different sources. So this week, we are going to blend the together the Great War Project with Mike Shuster - and America Emerges with Dr. Edward Lengel into a single story about the battle of Cantigny. [MIKE SHUSTER] [ED LENGEL] Mike Shuster, is a former NPR correspondent and curator for the Great War Project blog and Dr. Edward Lengel is an American military historian, author, and our segment host for America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI. There are links in the podcast notes to both their sites. LINK - Mike Shuster: http://greatwarproject.org/2018/05/20/pounded-to-hell-and-gone/ LINK - Dr. Edward Lengel http://www.edwardlengel.com/assault-cantigny-1918-u-s-army-comes-age/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ Updates on fighting front in the NY Times https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/05/21/102703093.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/05/22/102703392.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/05/21/102703022.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/05/21/102703024.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/05/21/102703021.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/05/23/102703788.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/05/24/102704171.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/05/24/102704174.pdf The Great War Channel This week the Great War Channel on Youtube released a wonderful bio episode on the US Marine Corps’ legendary Dan Daly - the recipient of two Medals of Honor and probably deserving of more. The episode is called: The Fightin-est Marine - Dan Daly: [RUN CLIP - INDY NEIDELL] To see the whole clip, search for  “the great war” on youtube or follow the link in the podcast notes! Link:https://www.youtube.com/user/TheGreatWar World War One NOW And that’s the news from 100 Years ago this week  - so now let’s fast forward into the present with WW1 Centennial News NOW - [SOUND EFFECT] This part of the podcast focuses on NOW and how we are commemorating the centennial of WWI! Commission News 369th Experience in NYC This week in Commission News -- we want to highlight a special Memorial Day centennial event happening in New York City! It’s the 369th Experience -- Three musical performances depicting the African American and Puerto Rican experience in World War I through the eyes and ears of the 369th U.S. Infantry Regimental band. Named by their German enemies as the HellFighters, the “Harlem Hellfighters", the 369th regiment was formed out of the volunteer 15th New York National Guard. While they were “Over There” fought heroically and ferociously in the trenches of France - under french command - through some of the most brutal combat, in some of the most important battles, of the entire war. Their story is a powerful one as they faced staunch racism during training, in a segregated military and sadly- after their exemplary performance as American Soldiers…. on their return home from the war. The 369th famously had as part of their unit a regimental military band -- made up of some of the most influential & talented musicians of their day. The military band became legendary for their unique sound, and their warm reception by the people of the war-torn regions “over there” -- under the care of band leader, Major James Reese Europe,they introduced French listeners to American jazz, and ushered in the Jazz Age in europe. Carrying on their legacy, the 369th Experience pulls together talented modern-day musicians from colleges around the country. They competed to participate in a 369th tribute - which will perform and highlight the original band’s music This Memorial Day Weekend. The U.S. World War One Centennial Commission is proud to sponsor the performances by the 369th EXPERIENCE  at the USS Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum Complex in New York. The concerts are free and are sure to be awesome! If you are in the big apple this memorial day weekend - perhaps attending fleet week - Performances are schedule for Sunday, May 27th, at 1:00 pm and on Monday at 1:30pm & 3:30 pm at the USS Intrepid. There are reference links in the podcast notes and we will be doing a follow up story next week to tell you how it went. Links: www.IntrepidMuseum.org https://www.369experience.com/ http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/369th-experience.html Spotlight on the Media Book: The Moralist For this week’s Spotlight on the Media -- we are turning our attention back onto the President of the United States during World War One, Woodrow Wilson. We’re joined by Professor Patricia O’Toole, a biographer and professor emerita in the School of the Arts at Columbia University and author of three acclaimed biographies including her new book: The Moralist: Woodrow Wilson and the World He Made Welcome to the podcast! [welcome/greetings] [Patricia - let we start with an overview question - Woodrow Wilson doesn't  always show up on the list of the most important presidents in US history - Do you think he was? And why?] [When you call Wilson “the moralist” -- what do you mean?] [He was also one of the few “professional” ] [Wilson seems like a bundle of contrasting ideas -  He campaigns with - He keep us out of war” - but then leads the nation to war. He wants America to fight for freedom and liberty - but he nationalized industries, gags dissent and attacks freedom of speech...so the question is - How do all these contrasting ideas reconcile?] [This is a man who had a huge effect on the nation and indeed on the world - what would you say his most remarkable achievement was as a President?] [President Wilson is, of course, an ongoing key character on this podcast, what else should we understand about Wilson --- to help us keep it all --- and him in context?] [thank you/goodbyes] Professor Patricia O’Toole is a biographer and professor emerita in the School of the Arts at Columbia University. We have links for you in the podcast notes to learn more about her biographies including The Moralist: Woodrow Wilson and the World He Made. Links: http://www.simonandschuster.com/books/The-Moralist/Patricia-OToole/9780743298094 http://www.simonandschuster.com/authors/Patricia-OToole/1507953 Updates from the States Marietta Museum and Georgia in WW1 For our Updates from the States -- this week we head down to Georgia, where a passionate citizen historian, author, veteran and retired police officer Michael Hitt has become something of a Georgia-in-WW1 expert. Welcome, Michael! [greetings/welcomes] [Michael -- to start us off, you mentioned to us that there are two incidents - forgotten incidents in Georgia from WWI - could you outline them about them?] [You recently made a shocking -- and potentially dangerous -- discovery at a local Museum. Would happened?] [You know similar stories have come up from the UK, and France. If you are a museum curator - is there a procedure you should follow with military artifacts?] [Michael - thank you for coming in and telling us about Georgia in WWI and some of the commemorative events.] [goodbyes/thank you] Michael Hitt is a citizen historian, author, veteran and retired police officer of 34 years. Links:www.michaelhitt.com Remembering Veterans PTSD and Trauma in WW1 and Today Moving to Remembering Veterans -- May is Mental Health Awareness Month, so we wanted to take a look into the history of PTSD and trauma both in WW1 and after. With us to help us navigate the topic is Dr. Jason Crouthamel, Professor of History at Grand Valley State University in Allendale, Michigan and co-editor with Peter Leese of the book Psychological Trauma and the Legacy of the First World War. Welcome, Dr. Crouthamel! [greetings/welcome] [“shell shock” was coined during WW1-- how was it perceived and dealt with during the war?] [Was PTSD recognized before WW1?] [What about WW1 changed the way trauma is understood and handled by the medical community and by society at large?] [Jumping off your book’s title-- what IS the legacy of the first world war when it comes to psychological trauma?] [goodbyes/thank you] Dr. Crouthamel is a Professor of History at Grand Valley State University in Allendale, Michigan. Learn more about him and his numerous books by visiting the link in the podcast notes. We’ve also included links where you can learn more about PTSD and Veterans’ health. links:https://www.gvsu.edu/history/jason-crouthamel-58.htm https://www.ptsd.va.gov/public/ptsd-overview/basics/how-common-is-ptsd.asp https://maketheconnection.net/conditions/ptsd https://www.vets.gov/disability-benefits/conditions/ptsd/ https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/ptsd-civil-wars-hidden-legacy-180953652/ Speaking WW1 Welcome to our weekly feature “Speaking World War 1” -- Where we explore the words & phrases that are rooted in the war  --- An onomatopoeia is defined as a word that phonetically imitates, resembles or suggests the sound that it describes, like buzz or hissss. And that leads into our Speaking WW1 words for this week. Whizzzbang! Crrrrump! And DUD. These onomatopoeia, each for different munitions -- their nicknames reflecting the noise that they made as they soared through the air towards the trenches. Whizzbangs were small, fast moving shells -- crumps were high explosives. And DUDS -- well, they were duds! Before the war, Duds were clothes -- and indeed we sometimes still use that meaning today! But during the war, as munitions and artillery earned nicknames for their sound and their appearance, the word “dud” referred to a shell that failed to explode, supposedly derived from the ‘thud’ sound the shell would make when it hit the ground. Shells could bury themselves feet deep into the soft muddy earth of the western front if they failed to go off-- and as many as one in every three shells fired did not detonate! In the Ypres Salient alone an estimated 300 million projectiles from World War I were duds, and most of them have not yet been recovered. DUD - we hope they stay that way - and this week’s word for speaking WW1. There are links for you in the podcast notes. Links: https://wordsinwartime.wordpress.com/2015/02/05/watching-language-change-in-ww1-on-being-a-dud/ [SOUND EFFECT] WW1 War Tech Bike Month This week for WW1 War Tech -- May is bike month! So as the saying goes, they rode into WWI on horses and came out riding tanks and planes --- -- but they also rode a lot of bicycles. For their combination of speed and efficiency there isn’t much that can beat the modern bicycle. Experiments were carried out in the late 19th century to determine the possible role of bicycles and cycling within the military, primarily because a soldier on a bike can carry more equipment and travel longer distances than a soldier marching. The US Army experimentally mounted infantry on bicycles in 1897 and had them complete a 1,900 mile journey across the plains and the Midwest. The Army’s evaluation found that the bicycle lacked the ability to carry heavier weapons -- It could not replace the horse’s ability to carry heavier artillery broken down into pack loads. And so for the US military - bicycle units were not promoted.   However, despite not having a bike mounted infantry, the United States took a large number, perhaps over twenty thousand, bicycles to Europe with the AEF - the American Expeditionary Force. The signal corps used bikes to deliver messenger pigeons to units and to monitor telephone and telegraph lines. By 1918, each unit had some 40 bikes at its disposal, mostly used to transmit messages. The military police also used bicycles, patrolling roads and managing traffic control stations behind the front. Many of the european military bike mounted groups wielded foldable bikes that they could carry on their backs to cross more difficult terrain. The bikes even came in handy for a more modern use -- they could be turned into man-powered generators for bringing electricity to the trenches. Bikes did not, however, make or break military power during the war -- they had many uses, but could not give an army an advantage the way tanks, planes and artillery could. Many of the proposed uses for bicycles -- carrying machine guns, transporting the wounded, scouting the front lines -- were impractical given the realities of Trench Warfare. The bikes at the front also proved an outlet for fun and distraction. Motorcycle and Bicycle Illustrated, a contemporary magazine, frequently reported on bike antics in the AEF-- Their March 1919 issue reported that the first AEF bicycle race occurred on George Washington’s Birthday, February 22nd, 1919, at Bar-sur-Aube, France.  The winner was Private Vandermeeren of First Army Headquarters, a Belgian immigrant and a former Belgian Champion cyclist. Bicycles -- this week’s World War One War Tech. Check out the links in the podcast notes to learn more and to see some of the bike mounted infantry in action. Links:  https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.$b16269;view=1up;seq=7 Motorcycle and Bicycle Illustrated March 27, 1919  https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=nyp.33433069061855;view=1up;seq=11 The United States Army in the World War 1917-1919, Organization of the AEF. 1948 https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015051411091;view=1up;seq=5 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle_infantry https://ww1ieper1917.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/bike-electric1.jpg http://historythings.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/bicycle-ambulance-WW1.jpg4_.jpg https://c1.thejournal.ie/media/2014/06/wwi-tour-de-france-390x285.jpg https://cyclehistory.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/iwmcyclist14.jpg https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/00/Indian_bicycle_troops_Somme_1916_IWM_Q_3983.jpg https://i.pinimg.com/originals/3a/0b/1b/3a0b1b235f1e21641f52e47b02584dd4.jpg https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5b/HJB10_%E2%80%93_Radfahr-Kompanie.jpg/300px-HJB10_%E2%80%93_Radfahr-Kompanie.jpg https://oldbike.files.wordpress.com/2008/08/soldierbike.jpg Articles and Posts For Articles and posts -- here are some of the highlights from our weekly Dispatch newsletter. [DING] Headline: The New Yorker magazine interviews Sabin Howard about national WWI Memorial at Pershing Park in DC In an article titled "There’s No First World War Memorial on the National Mall?"  The New Yorker Magazine travels to Sabin Howard's Tribeca studio to see the sculptural maquette and get the inside story on the creative process for the national World War I Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, DC. [DING] Headline: Pennsylvania WWI Symposium at US Army History and Education Center Read about a the recent WW1 Symposium in Pennsylvania, which the commission’s Volunteer Coordinator Betsy Anderson attended [DING] Headline: Proceedings due soon from "LaFayette U.S. voilà!" academic conference in Paris The French Society of Cincinnati and the Sorbonne University organized an international history conference , "LaFayette U.S. voilà!: The American Engagement in France, 1917-1918" back in November, 2017 in Paris. The conference proceedings are soon to be published, and you can read more about them in this article.   [DING] Headline: Fred Meyers - our featured Story of Service Read about Fred Meyers, a farmer from South Dakota who served on the Western front 100 years ago this month. [DING] Finally, our  selection from our Official online Centennial Merchandise store -   this week, it’s our Canvas and Leather Tote-- You can show your American pride while carrying this Made in the USA dark khaki tote. Plenty of room for keys, wallet, tablet and documents. And those are some of the headlines this week from the Dispatch Newsletter Subscribe by going to ww1cc.org/subscribe or follow the links in the podcast notes Link: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch The Buzz And that brings us to the buzz - the centennial of WW1 this week in social media with Katherine Akey - Katherine, what did you pick? The Great War Returns to PBS and Commemorative Stamps Hey Theo -- Just two short announcements this week: first off, the PBS special  “The Great War” is going to re-air! So, if you missed it when it first came out last year, or if you’re like me and you just like rewatching good documentaries, you’re in luck. The three part series will come back to PBS stations everywhere on June 19th; the show can also be streamed online if you’re a subscribed member to your local PBS station, and you can visit the show’s website in the podcast links to watch hours of supplemental, free content. Second and last this week, the USPS has put out a preview of it’s upcoming specialty stamps for 2018 -- including a special World War One commemorative stamp. This Forever Stamp shows a doughboy, gripping the American flag as barbed wire and biplanes loom over his shoulder. The stamp is called “Turning the Tide” and pays tribute to the sacrifice of American soldiers and millions of supporters on the homefront during World War I. Other 2018 stamps include pioneering astronaut Sally Ride, everyone’s favorite neighbor Mister Rogers, and a showcase of bioluminescent life, among others. Check them all out by following the link in the podcast notes. That’s it for this week in the Buzz. Link:http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/great-war/ https://about.usps.com/news/national-releases/2017/pr17_079.htm [SOUND EFFECT] Outro And that wraps up this  week in May for WW1 Centennial News. Thank you for listening. We also want to thank our guests... Mike Shuster, Curator for the great war project blog Dr. Edward Lengel, Military historian and author Patricia O’Toole biographer and professor emerita in the School of the Arts at Columbia University Michael Hitt, citizen historian, author, veteran and retired police officer Dr. Jason Crouthamel, Professor of History at Grand Valley State University in Allendale, Michigan Katherine Akey, WWI Photography specialist and line producer for the podcast Many thanks to Mac Nelsen our sound editor and to Eric Marr for his great input and research assistance...   And I’m Theo Mayer your host. The US World War One Centennial Commission was created by Congress to honor, commemorate and educate about WW1. Our programs are to-- inspire a national conversation and awareness about WW1; Including this podcast! We are bringing the lessons of the 100 years ago into today's classrooms; We are helping to restore WW1 memorials in communities of all sizes across our country; and of course we are building America’s National WW1 Memorial in Washington DC. We want to thank commission’s founding sponsor the Pritzker Military Museum and Library as well as the Starr foundation for their support. The podcast can be found on our website at ww1cc.org/cn  - now with our new interactive transcript feature for students, teachers, bloggers, reporters and writers. You can also access the WW1 Centennial News podcast on  iTunes, Google Play, TuneIn, Podbean, Stitcher - Radio on Demand, Spotify, using your smart speaker.. By saying “Play W W One Centennial News Podcast” - and now also available on Youtube - just search for our WW1 Centennial youtube channel. Our twitter and instagram handles are both @ww1cc and we are on facebook @ww1centennial. Thank you for joining us. And don’t forget to share the stories you are hearing here today about the war that changed the world! [music] No closing joke this week - but a puzzle - What do you think is the plural of Onomatopoeia So long!
May 18, 2018
Highlights: Submarine Chasers of WWI The 1918 Sedition Act | @01:35 Darkest before the dawn - Mike Shuster | @07:45 America Emerges - Dr. Edward Lengel | @11:445 Memorial Day Parade | @15:50 Hunters of the Steel Sharks - Todd Woofenden | @17:05 Remembering Major Raoul Lufbery - Raoul Lubery III | @24:40 Centenary News website - Peter Alhadeff & Patrick Gregory | @31:20 Speaking WWI - “I’m in a flap” | @38:15 Highlights of the Dispatch Newsletter | @39:30 The Buzz: The commemoration in social Media - Katherine Akey | @41:45----more---- Opening Welcome to World War 1 centennial News - episode #72 - It’s about WW1 THEN - what was happening 100 years ago this week  - and it’s about WW1 NOW - news and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. This week: Mike Schuster, from the great war project blog tells us about the on-going German aggression, the allies desperation and Pershing’s plan to provide CERTAIN troops to be commanded Directly by the allied forces. Dr. Edward Lengel with a story about American troops that land in the UK. Todd Woofenden introduces us about the US Navy’s submarine chasers Tanveer Kalo helps us commemorate Asian Pacific Heritage Month Raoul Lufbery III tells us about a recent event in Connecticut commemorating his great-uncle, Raoul Lufbery Peter Alhadeff (AL-adeff) and Patrick Gregory join us from the WWI website “Centenary News” Katherine Akey with the commemoration of world war one in social media All on WW1 Centennial News -- a weekly podcast brought to you by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and the Starr foundation. I’m Theo Mayer - the Chief Technologist for the Commission and your host. Welcome to the show. [MUSIC] Preface The United States constitutional Bill of rights was passed and adopted on December 15, 1791 This included the first amendment which reads: Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances 126 years later, in 1917, under the pressures of entering WW1 - this constitutional right of the American people came under attack in profound ways. It began in June of 1917 with the passage of the Espionage Act, prohibiting any American from saying or doing anything to undermine the war effort, with the threat of 20 years in prison, a $10,000 fine, or both  .   4 months later, in October 1917, congress followed up with the “Trading with the Enemy Act “, which empowered the government to confiscate the property of any person who engages in trade or any other form of financial transaction with an enemy nation during wartime. Overall, about $500 million worth of property was seized by the federal government in World War I from german immigrants and companies with ties to enemy nations, an amount equal to the entire federal budget before the War. But the most onerous attack on the first amendment was coming. With that as background let's jump into our Centennial Time Machine and roll back 100 years ago this week to learn more about the new Sedition Act! [MUSIC TRANSITION] [SOUND EFFECT] [TRANSITION] World War One THEN 100 Year Ago This Week [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline: May 21, 1918 A tiny obscure 4 line article appears in the New York times with the headline: President Signs Sedition Bill The entire article reads: President Wilson today signed the Sedition bill, giving the government wide powers to punish disloyal acts and utterances. Let me read that again… “Giving the government wide powers to punish disloyal acts and utterances.” That sounds downright unconstitutional… and if I had said that in May of 1918, I could have been prosecuted, fined $10,000 (the equivalent of $180,000 today) and imprisoned for up to 30 years! Though President Wilson and Congress regarded the Sedition Act as crucial in order to stifle the spread of dissent within the country in that time of war, modern legal scholars consider the act as contrary to the letter and spirit of the U.S. Constitution, namely to the First Amendment of the Bill of Rights. A part of the act also allowed the Postmaster General to refuse to deliver mail that met those same standards for punishable speech or opinion effectively blocking the mail dissemination of dissenting newspapers, pamphlets and flyers. It was directly applied to trying to control the socialist leaning organized labor movement, and one of the most famous prosecutions under the Sedition Act during World War I was that of Eugene V. Debs, a pacifist labor organizer and founder of the International Workers of the World (the IWW) who had run for president in 1900 as a Social Democrat and in 1904, 1908 and 1912 on the Socialist Party of America ticket. After delivering an anti-war speech in June 1918 in Canton, Ohio, Debs was arrested, tried and sentenced to 10 years in prison under the Sedition Act. Debs appealed the decision, and the case eventually reached the U.S. Supreme Court, in January of 1919. In March of 1919, 101 years ago this month the court ruled Debs had acted with the intention of obstructing the war effort and upheld his conviction. In the decision, Chief Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes referred to the earlier landmark case of Schenck v. United States (1919), when Charles Schenck, also a Socialist, had been found guilty under the Espionage Act after distributing a flyer urging recently drafted men to oppose the U.S. conscription policy. In this decision, Holmes maintained that freedom of speech and press could be constrained in certain instances, and that The question in every case is whether the words used are used in such circumstances and are of such a nature as to create a clear and present danger ---  which will bring about the substantive evils that Congress has a right to prevent.   Eugene Debs’ sentence was commuted a few years later in 1921 when the Sedition Act was repealed by Congress. Major portions of the Espionage Act remain part of United States law to the present day, although the crime of sedition was largely eliminated by a famous libel case  in 1964, which determined that the press’s criticism of public officials was protected speech under the First Amendment — unless a plaintiff could prove that the statements were made maliciously or with reckless disregard for the truth—. Your right to free speech.. A very precious right and one that was effectively legislated against 100 years ago this week, in the war that changed the world! We have links in the podcast notes a BUNCH of articles from the NY times where the espionage, trading with the enemy and sedition acts were applied. NYTIMES Sedition Articles: https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/05/22/102703485.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/05/08/102699810.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/08/13/97017110.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/05/13/102701408.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/07/102707634.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/11/102708351.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/11/102708489.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/28/102715535.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/07/01/102715561.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/07/06/102717028.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/07/16/102722083.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/05/31/118143506.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/06/07/102707383.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/05/14/102701611.pdf Links on Sedition Act: https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/u-s-congress-passes-sedition-act https://www.politico.com/story/2012/05/congress-passes-the-sedition-act-may-16-1918-076336 https://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/social_conflict_and_control_protest_and_repression_usa http://cdn.loc.gov/service/ll/uscode/uscode1940-00505/uscode1940-005050a002/uscode1940-005050a002.pdf https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/us-confiscated-half-billion-dollars-private-property-during-wwi-180952144/ https://prologue.blogs.archives.gov/2017/06/15/defining-a-spy-the-espionage-act/ https://www.thirteen.org/wnet/supremecourt/capitalism/sources_document1.html https://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/labour_movements_trade_unions_and_strikes_usa https://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/features/wilson-eugene-debs/ https://www.oyez.org/cases/1900-1940/249us211 http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-eugene-debs-socialist-bernie-sanders-per-flashback-0131-20160127-column.html [MUSIC TRANSITION] Great War Project It’s time for Mike Shuster, former NPR correspondent and curator for the Great War Project Blog. Mike, your post points out that the Germans are far from out of the fight and the allied troops are very near collapse - While Pershing, standing fast on his determination not to put American troop under British and French command turns out not to apply to all troops equally. You point to a palpable Allied desperation - It seems like, on the western front it truly is darkest before the coming dawn. [thanks Theo - The headlines read] [MIKE POST] Mike Shuster curator for the Great War Project blog. The link to the blog and the post -- are in the podcast notes. LINK: http://greatwarproject.org/2018/05/13/another-german-attack-on-the-western-front/ [SOUND EFFECT] America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 Now for - America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI with Dr. Edward Lengel. Not all the troops landed in France - Many of them arrived “Over There” in England including a yet unknown hero-to-be… As you will hear in Ed’s story. [ED LENGEL] [MUSIC TRANSITION] Dr. Edward Lengel is an American military historian, author, and our segment host for America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI. There are links in the podcast notes to Ed’s post and his web sites as an author.   Links:http://www.edwardlengel.com/100-years-ago-alvin-c-york-arrives-great-britain/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ The Great War Channel From the Great War Channel on Youtube -  videos about WWI 100 years ago this week, and from a more european perspective --- New episodes this week include: The Ostende Raid and the Peace of Bucharest Another episode is Marie Curie in WW1 and Who Killed the Red Baron Finally Evolution of French Infantry during World War One See their videos by searching for “the great war” on youtube or following the link in the podcast notes! Link:https://www.youtube.com/user/TheGreatWar World War One NOW That’s the news from 100 Years ago this week  - It is time to fast forward into the present with WW1 Centennial News NOW - [SOUND EFFECT] This part of the podcast focuses on NOW and how we are commemorating the centennial of WWI! Commission News Memorial Day Parade in DC This week in Commission News -- The National Memorial Day Parade in Wshington DC is coming up on Monday, May 28th! The parade will be huge -- including marching bands, flags, celebrities, veterans of all ages, 300,000 cheering visitors, and TV cameras that will broadcast the parade across the country. This year, the parade will feature a special tribute to the American veterans of World War I, including several World War I-era military vehicles -- and for the first time ever -- a parade float to emphasise the centennial of WWI and America’s National WWI Memorial, which the Commission is building in Washington DC. Commission volunteers will walking the parade and giving out free packets of Poppy seeds as a symbol of remembrance and sacrifice of those who served in WWI. This parade is our nation’s largest Memorial Day event, drawing hundreds of thousands of spectators to the National Mall to pay tribute to those who serve and have served. Read more about the 2018 National Memorial Day Parade at the link in the podcast notes.   Links: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/4441-centennial-commission-to-be-represented-in-2018-national-memorial-day-parade.html Spotlight on the Media Submarine Chasers[AUDIO CLIP] That was a 1918 radio style dramatization of a submarine attack on a US ship - from a cylinder recording we found. For a more contemporary take, and for this week’s Spotlight on the Media -- we are going to learn more about the US Submarine Chasers of World War One. Joining us is Todd A. Woofenden, editor of The Subchaser Archives website and author of the book Hunters of the Steel Sharks: The Submarine Chasers of WWI. Great book title, Todd! Welcome to the podcast! [welcome/greetings] Todd-- the submarine warfare conducted by the Germans helped push America over the brink and into war -- so, once we were in, how did the US respond to the continuing submarine threat? The fleet set out to chase the submarines was pretty unique -- Why did we pick small, wooden vessels for the job? WWI was all about new tech…. What was the TECH side of chasing and attacking submarines? What should we remember about this endeavor - and what did it lead to in the future? [thank you/goodbyes]   Todd A. Woofenden is the editor of The Subchaser Archives website and author of the book Hunters of the Steel Sharks: The Submarine Chasers of WWI. We have links for you in the podcast notes to learn more and how to get a copy of the book for yourself! Links: https://www.subchaser.org/ https://www.signallightbooks.com/hunters Events Lufbery Memorial This week we want to feature a commemoration event that took place recently in Wallingford Connecticut -- the event honored the centennial of the combat death of French  American pilot Raoul Lufbery, the 8th pilot to join the Lafayette Escadrille. Lufbery went on to command the 94th Aero Squadron when the Escadrille was disbanded in 1918, and was an Ace three times over. He was killed in an aerial dogfight over Maron, France 100 years ago this week on May 19, 1918 -- Here to tell us about his life and the commemoration in Connecticut is his great-nephew, Raoul Lufbery III. Raoul, welcome to the podcast! [greetings/welcome] Raoul, what a wonderful namesake you carry - Raoul Lufbery was quite a colorful character -- please tell us about your great-uncle -- - what’s his story? The commemoration took place in Wallingford, Connecticut -- how was it? why was it held there? what did it include? Raoul, you’ve worked on compiling and editing a couple of photo albums about your great uncle -- can you tell us about them? Raoul - Thank you for joining us! [goodbye/thanks] Raoul Lufbery III is the great-nephew of WW1 Ace and Lafayette Escadrille member Major Raoul Lufbery. Learn more about the recent commemoration of his life, and about his service in the war, by following the links in the notes. links:https://connecticuthistory.org/world-war-i-flying-ace-raoul-lufbery/ https://www.nationalaviation.org/our-enshrinees/lufbery-gervais-raoul/ http://www.theaerodrome.com/aces/usa/lufbery.php International Report Centenary News This week in our International Report -- we’re going back across the pond as we’re joined by the creators of a wonderful web site “Centenary News”. it’s a super centralized resource for all things WW1 --  filled with news, articles, events listings, book reviews and more -- Joining us to tell us more are Peter Alhadeff (AL-adeff) ,  Editor for Centenary News, and Patrick Gregory, former BBC news editor, contributor to Centenary News and co-editor & author of the book ‘An American on the Western Front’. Gentlemen - thank you so much for joining us! [welcome/greetings] Let me start by saying that your site is really wonderful. It very broad in perspective and a wonderful resource - especially for our listeners. Peter, how did Centenary News start? Who is behind it? As kindred public history projects - and with WWI being and epic and vast story - how do YOU manage your editorial calendar and choices for what you publish and what you don’t? What are your most popular articles and stories? Patrick-- you’re interest, and expertise, is focused on the American experience of the war. How did you come to that topic of interest -- and has there been a tendency to neglect or downplay the role America played in WW1 from the European point of view?   The Armistice is coming up in November, Versaille the following June - what are Centenary News plans for coverage as the fighting stops?   I really want to encourage our listeners to stop by your site at www.centenarynews.com. If you listen to this podcast - you’ll like the site. Gentlemen - Thank you so much for joining us today! [thanks/goodbyes] Peter Alhadeff (AL-adeff) is the Editor for the Centenary News web  site, and Patrick Gregory is a former BBC news editor, contributor to Centenary News Visit the site at www.centenarynews.com or by following the links in the podcast notes. Link:http://www.centenarynews.com/ Speaking WW1 Welcome to our weekly feature “Speaking World War 1” -- Where we explore the words & phrases that are rooted in the war  --- If you can face chaos, uncertainty and drama without succumbing to panic or anxiety -- you might be described as unflappable -- marked by assurance and self-control. Though unflappable doesn’t enter the English lexicon until the 1950s, it is derived from a WWI era phrase, “to be in a flap”. Usually defined as “to be worried”, the phrase “to be in a flap” has its origins in the Royal Navy around 1916. Taken from the frantic flapping birds would perform as they attempted to fly, the phrase spread among the ground troops as well. And there was a lot to be in a flap about during the war -- constant artillery barrages, snipers taking shots round the clock, poor food and living conditions -- the phrase probably got a lot of use in the trenches. “To be in a flap” and Unflappable - this week’s phrases for speaking WW1. There are links for you in the podcast notes. Links: http://mentalfloss.com/article/58233/21-slang-terms-world-war-i http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/4tN7cVtY2VY2sbGtX6z9Df3/12-words-from-100-years-ago-we-love-to-use-today [SOUND EFFECT] Articles and Posts For Articles and posts -- here are some of the highlights from our weekly Dispatch newsletter. [DING] Headline: Lost and found World War I medal returned to veteran's family in NJ This is an update on the recently found WW1 medal in New Jersey -- it’s original owner’s family has been found and the medal has been returned! [DING] Headline: Maryland World War I Chapel Keeping Faith in Troubled Times Read about a local community commemorative event in Odenton, Maryland -- On June 3, 2018 the public is invited to an outdoor concert and dedication of a WWI Centennial Monument at Epiphany Chapel & Church House in Odenton, MD. In 1918 the Chapel was a home-away-from-home for soldiers and included “reinforcements to the Chaplains of the colored regiments.” [DING] Headline: Annual 'In Flanders Fields' Memorial Commemorative Event in New York City For a major metro event, read about the upcoming commemoration in New York City. General Delegate of the Government of Flanders to the United States will be hosting the Annual In 'Flanders Fields' Memorial event on May 24, 10am, featuring the East Coast Doughboys Honor Guard. [DING] Headline: Harriett Louise Carfrae - our featured Story of Service Read about Harriett Louise Cafrae, a nurse who served in World War 1 with the Red Cross. [DING] Finally, our  selection from our Official online Centennial Merchandise store -   this week, it’s our U.S. Army “Doughboy” Window Decal -- An easy and inexpensive way to let the world know that it’s the centennial of WWI! Featuring the iconic Doughboy silhouette flanked by barbed wire so prevalent during WWI, you can proudly display this poignant reminder of the sacrifices made by U.S. soldiers.  Hey, it’s only 4 bucks and a great add on item when you’re getting other merchandise! And those are some of the headlines this week from the Dispatch Newsletter Subscribe by going to ww1cc.org/subscribe or follow the links in the podcast notes Link: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch The Buzz And that brings us to the buzz - the centennial of WW1 this week in social media with Katherine Akey - Katherine, what did you pick? Mothers Day and the Harlem Hellfighters Hi Theo -- Last weekend was Mother’s Day -- a holiday dear to doughboys in europe a hundred years ago as much as it is to us today. This week we shared an article from historian and WW1 Centennial Commission Historical Advisor Mitchell Yockelson published in the New York Times. The article entitled “Dear Mom, the War’s Going Great” surveys Mother’s Day correspondances during war time, from General Pershing down to the humblest of doughboys. The Army promoted what it called Mothers Letters, joined in a campaign by the YMCA and Red Cross. Read the article at the link in the podcast notes.   Finally -- this week was the centennial of a harrowing incident that helped establish the reputation of the Harlem Hellfighters. On the night of May 15, 1918, Pvt. Henry Johnson and Needham Roberts, members of the all-black 369th Infantry Regiment, found themselves fighting for their lives against 20 German Soldiers out in front of their unit's trench line. Johnson fired the three rounds in his French-made rifle, tossed all his hand grenades and then grabbed his Army-issue bolo knife and started stabbing.   Both survived the incident -- and Johnson earned himself the nickname Black Death for his ferocious stand. The question of whether the African American unit would fight as well as any other was answered by his actions in the darkness of May 15th. Read more about the intense engagement, and the Hellfighters’ subsequent struggles upon returning to civilian life, by following the link in the podcast notes. That’s it for this week in the Buzz. Link:https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/12/opinion/sunday/dear-mom-the-wars-going-great.html https://www.army.mil/article/204920/ny_national_guardsman_henry_johnson_fought_for_his_life_with_a_knife_on_may_15_1918 Outro And that wraps up this  week in May for WW1 Centennial News. Thank you for listening. We also want to thank our guests...   Mike Shuster, Curator for the great war project blog Dr. Edward Lengel, Military historian and author Todd Woofenden, editor of The Subchaser Archives website and author of the book Hunters of the Steel Sharks: The Submarine Chasers of WWI. Tanveer Kalo, graduating Ronald E. McNair Scholar from St. Lawrence University and a former WW1 Centennial Commission Intern Raoul Lufbery III, great-nephew of WW1 Ace Major Raoul Lufbery Peter Alhadeff (AL-adeff) and Patrick Gregory join us from the website Centenary News Katherine Akey, WWI Photography specialist and line producer for the podcast Many thanks to Mac Nelsen our sound editor and to Eric Marr for his great input and research assistance...   A small retraction from last week.. We mistakenly referred to the  co-founder of the Boy Scouts of America as Ernest Thomas Seton [see-ton] rather than Ernest Thompson Seton [see-ton] And I am neither Thomas, nor Thompson - I am Theo- Theo Mayer - your host.   The US World War One Centennial Commission was created by Congress to honor, commemorate and educate about WW1. Our programs are to-- inspire a national conversation and awareness about WW1; Including this podcast! We are bringing the lessons of the 100 years ago into today's classrooms; We are helping to restore WW1 memorials in communities of all sizes across our country; and of course we are building America’s National WW1 Memorial in Washington DC. We want to thank commission’s founding sponsor the Pritzker Military Museum and Library as well as the Starr foundation for their support. The podcast can be found on our website at ww1cc.org/cn  - now with our new interactive transcript feature for students, teachers and sharing. Just a note to listeners, the transcript publishes about 2 days after the show. You can also access the WW1 Centennial News podcast on  iTunes, Google Play, TuneIn, Podbean, Stitcher - Radio on Demand, Spotify, using your smart speaker.. By saying “Play W W One Centennial News Podcast” - and now also available on Youtube - just search for our WW1 Centennial youtube channel. Our twitter and instagram handles are both @ww1cc and we are on facebook @ww1centennial. Thank you for joining us. And don’t forget to share the stories you are hearing here today about the war that changed the world! [music] So long!
May 12, 2018
Highlights The sculptor and the airplane industry: Gutzon Borglum | @01:40 General compromise - Mike Shuster | @09:15 Marshall’s plan for Cantigny - Dr. Edward Lengel | @13:15 James Reese Europe Tribute Concert - Ron Wasserman | @18:50 WWI Carnegie Council Fellowship program - Dr. Reed Bonadonna | @25:35 A granddaughter's history of the Boy Scouts - Dr. Julie Seton | @31:35 14-18 NOW: UK Centenary Art Commission - Jenny Waldman | @38:00 Speaking WWI: Cup ‘a Joe | @46:05 Dispatch Newsletter: highlights | @47:50 The Centennial in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @49:35----more---- Opening Welcome to World War 1 centennial News - episode #71 - It’s about WW1 THEN - what was happening 100 years ago this week  - and it’s about WW1 NOW - news and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. This week: Mike Schuster, from the great war project blog tells us about General Pershing’s “compromise”, unpopular with the French and British command Ed Lengel with the story about the man who plans the Attack on Cantigny Ron Wasserman tells us about the upcoming James Reese Europe musical tribute in New York Dr. Reed Bonadonna introduces us to the WWI fellowship program from the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs Dr. Julie Seton shares a history of the Boy Scouts Jenny Waldman joins us from the UK to tell us about the  amazing WW1 public arts projects from 14-18 NOW organization Katherine Akey with the commemoration of world war one in social media All on WW1 Centennial News -- a weekly podcast brought to you by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and the Starr foundation. I’m Theo Mayer - the Chief Technologist for the Commission and your host. Welcome to the show. [MUSIC] Preface In July of 1917, shortly after America enters the war, congress passes a massive $640,000,000 aviation bill which is signed into law by President Woodrow Wilson. That is over $13.5 Billion in 2018 dollars and at the time it is one of the largest appropriation for a single idea that the country has ever made - It passes congress with little or  no objection - This is in no small part - because there are so many advocates that believe this incredible new technology of flying machines can be pivotal in the war. In support of the idea, famed airplane pioneer Orville Wright declares: “When my brother and I built and flew the first man-carrying machine, we thought that we were introducing into the world an invention which would make further wars…  practically impossible since both sides know exactly what the other is doing. “ Orville reasons further: "If the allies' armies are equipped with such a number of airplanes as to keep the enemy planes entirely back of the line, so that they are unable to direct gunfire or to observe the movement of the allied troops— in other words, if the enemy's eyes can be put out — it will be possible to end the war. “ With that as background let's jump into our Centennial Time Machine and roll back 100 years ago this week to see how the US is doing in realizing that idea... [MUSIC TRANSITION] [SOUND EFFECT] World War One THEN 100 Year Ago This Week It is the second week of May, 1918. The pages of the Official Bulletin, the government's war gazette, the newspaper, the New York Times and the magazine Aerial age Weekly are all filled with a story of scandal involving the US aircraft manufacturing industry. Charges of waste, incompetence, malfeasance and graft are being bandied about. And one of the more interesting parts is that a key character leading the charges against the government's Aircraft production board and the airplane manufacturers is none other than Gutzon Borglum. Who the heck is Gutzon Borglum? You may ask.. Well, he is the sculptor who is going to become famous for a little sculpture he will do between 1927 and 1941 in South Dakota where he will sculpt four heads into the crags of a mountain called Rushmore… But in May of 1918, already an established sculptor - he is busy accusing the US Airplane industry of incompetence! [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline: May 6, 1918 A headline in the NY times reads: Wilson orders Borglum aircraft charges sifted And the story reads: The demand for an investigation of allegations of graft in connection with the production of military aircraft was heeded by Pres. Wilson today when he decided to turn the whole matter over to Atty. Gen. Gregory, who was instructed to make a thorough investigation of the "wholesale charges" in regard to the production of aircraft. The charges were made by sculptor Gutzon Borglum. Another sensational feature was added to the case tonight when it became known that Maj. General George O Squier Chief signal Officer of the Army, who was accused by Mr. Borglum of hampering the work of investigation undertaken by the latter, had countered the accusations with a request for a military court of inquiry. The story is the big buzz in all the national news and aeroplane industry media. And as we started to explore it, it gets ever more strange - Clearly something is up because, the US has spent an incredible fortune and only delivered 5,000 planes - mostly trainers not fighters - what’s up with senate investigation?  The justice department probe? The President’s statements? The army’s court of inquiry? What are the roots of this nearly frenetic situations??? Well… Let’s take a little closer look at our buddy the sculptor Gutzon Borglum - seriously! He is actually the center of the story! In a biography on him that we found - and we have the link for you in the podcast notes, here is what we learn. Borglum makes drawings for a new plane he called the “fish”. His idea is rejected by the government's Aircraft production board,  that is in charge of approving plane design for govt money -- Borglum notes many, many other designers get rejected too. Apparently, he thinks of a way to capitalize on the airplane manufacturing chaos -- So he complains through some Washington contacts that he has,  about the terrible wastage going on with all with that money earmarked for plane design and building in the US. The bad buzz reaches all the way to President Wilson and in Autumn 1917-- BORGLUM himself runs an investigation and submits a report to the government on the lack of airplane production. Now… Apparently Borglum postures that he has been given full govt authority to do this investigation -- but actually he hasn’t.  He just seems to be running on self-appointed bravado and posturing as if he DOES have officially sanctioned authority. Now President Wilson actually corrects him in the spring -- but damage has already been done to many, many aeronautical companies who have been dragged through the mud very publicly. This week in 1918, on May 10th-- it comes to light that Borglum, in fact,  is using his influence with the president to get contracts for himself and a new company -- for which he is a silent partner. The scheme, apparently is that he is managing to discredit company after company with the govt’s blessing-- leaving HIS company to pick up contracts in the aftermath. Even as this comes to light, Borglum “stonewalls” all of the accusations and accused his detractors as purveyors of “fake news” and of being liars and just continues his attacks on other aeronautical companies. A lot of reorganization takes place in the wake of this controversy - and probes and official investigations will continue  -- but we wondered -- what ever became of Borglum!? He continues to be shaker, mover and influencer all the way… here are some highlights In 1918, he was one of the drafters of the Czechoslovakian  declaration of independence (despite being an american by birth to Danish immigrants), he continues to make sculptures and memorials, famously sculpting an amazing and striking work called “The Aviator” which sits on   the University of Virginia campus, of course he gets permission and funding to carve up an entire mountain at Mount Rushmore creating a historic and iconic work of public art. He also happens to be a very high ranking member of the KKK, a Freemason, and an organizer of the Armory Show in New York. Gutzon Borglum - an genuinely amazing and fascinating character --- banging on a hornets nest in aeroplane manufacturing industry 100 years ago this week - In the war that changed the world! Aerial Age weekly https://books.google.com/books?id=GpJMAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA490&lpg=PA490&dq=gutzon+borglum+aircraft+manufacturing&source=bl&ots=06w8Xcz_qU&sig=g9EwA4S3_ofnZQZq3Ecs391tqnA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjr3qCr2PfaAhVE4mMKHbQ3DZQQ6AEISjAD#v=onepage&q=gutzon%20borglum%20aircraft%20manufacturing&f=false Book excerpt on Borglum: https://books.google.com/books?id=9y8cBQAAQBAJ&pg=PA76&lpg=PA76&dq=gutzon+borglum+airplanes&source=bl&ots=cEvEjx-DYI&sig=CiuaEx_6hlFRoeuDkdRZLmfErAY&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjY-fXvu_jaAhUHk1kKHdNqDYg4ChDoAQhAMAQ#v=onepage&q=gutzon%20borglum%20airplanes&f=false   NYTimes Articles: https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/05/07/102699430.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/05/08/102699763.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/05/08/102699805.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/05/08/102699806.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/05/10/102700511.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/05/11/102700842.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/05/12/98263681.pdf [MUSIC TRANSITION] Great War Project Moving across the Atlantic to “Over There”, Mike Shuster, former NPR correspondent and curator for the Great War Project blog takes a look at General Pershing’s “compromise” with the French and British command, mutiny among the Austrians and Armenian nationalist fighters - An interesting post Mike! [MIKE POST] Mike Shuster from the Great War Project blog. The links to Mike Shuster’s Great War Project blog and the post -- are in the podcast notes. LINK: http://greatwarproject.org/2018/05/06/compromise-of-the-allies/ [SOUND EFFECT] America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 Welcome to our segment - America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI with Dr. Edward Lengel. Many of you may have  heard of the “Marshall Plan”, This was a major $13 billion strategic initiative to help western europe rebuilt after WWII… Well the architect and namesake of that monumental strategy was just a young, but brilliant officer in WWI, developing his strategic chops, as Ed story this week shows. [ED LENGEL] [MUSIC TRANSITION] To be continued…. Dr. Edward Lengel is an American military historian, author, and our segment host for America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI. There are links in the podcast notes to Ed’s post and his web sites as an author.   Links:http://www.edwardlengel.com/george-c-marshall-plans-attack-cantigny-may-1918/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ The Great War Channel From the Great War Channel on Youtube -  videos about WWI 100 years ago this week, and from a more european perspective --- New episodes this week include: Pershing Under Pressure-- the End of La Lys Our Trip to Turkey Recap The Western Front Awakens -- Peace in the East See their videos by searching for “the great war” on youtube or following the link in the podcast notes! Link:https://www.youtube.com/user/TheGreatWar World War One NOW That’s the news from 100 Years ago this week  - It is time to fast forward into the present with WW1 Centennial News NOW - [SOUND EFFECT] This part of the podcast focuses on NOW and how we are commemorating the centennial of WWI! Spotlight on the Media James Reese Europe 100th Anniversary Tribute Event Music: Castle House Rag and One Step, by James Reese Europe from the CD “Take a Bow” by the New York Jazzharmonic Trad-Jazz Sextet. That clip was from Castle House Rag and One Step composed by James Reese Europe who is the subject of our spotlight on the media with an  upcoming James Reese Europe 100th Anniversary Tribute concert. Who is James Reese Europe? Well, his Library of Congress biography opens with a quote from Eubie Blake, another famed American composer, lyricist, and jazz man: "James Reese Europe was our benefactor and inspiration. Even more, he was the Martin Luther King of music." Europe earned this praise by being an unflagging innovator not only in his compositions and orchestrations, but in his organizational ability and leadership. One of America's greatest musicians, he progressed from strength to strength but was pointlessly cut down at what seemed like the pinnacle of his career.” Well that is just a setup up - To tell us about the man, and the Tribute concert, which will take place on June 8th, 2018, in New York City is Ron Wasserman, artistic director for the New York Jazzharmonic. Welcome, Ron! [welcome/greetings] [Ron-- our intro to Mr. Europe was sort of a tease - can you tell us about the man please?] [OK.. Now about the tribute - where is it, what is it and if we are lucky enough to be in NY to attend - what will we experience?] [How did this come about?] [Ron: Any closing thoughts about the legacy of the Harlem Hellfighters on music?] [thank you/goodbyes] Ron Wasserman is the artistic director for the New York Jazzharmonic. The tribute concert is co-sponsored by the New York Jazzharmonic, the NYC Veterans Alliance, and the National WWI Centennial Commission. We have links for you in the podcast notes! Links:www.symphonyspace.org/event/10003 http://www.nyjazzharmonic.org/index.html Remembering Veterans Carnegie Council WW1 Fellowship Program This week For Remembering Veterans -- We have invited Dr. Reed Bonadonna to join us. Dr. Bonadonna, Ph.D. and a retired US Marine Corps Colonel, is a Senior Fellow with the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs. He is managing their project, "The Living Legacy of the First World War”. We were very proud of and excited for her, when our own Katherine Akey announced that she was one of the nine recipients selected for a fellowship under the project        Reed! Welcome to the Podcast. [greetings] [To start -- What’s the program and what’s its goal?  ] [Reed - Can you tell us about some of the fellowship projects?] [When the fellowships are done - what happens to the work?] [I know the program is still in mid-stride - but what do think it will show us about the Living Legacy of WW1 is today?] [Thank you so much for coming in and speaking with us today!] [goodbyes/thanks] Dr. Reed Bonadonna is a Senior Fellow with the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs and the manager for their   "The Living Legacy of the First World War” project. Learn more about the program and the nine fellows’ projects by following ==--the links in the podcast notes. Links:https://www.carnegiecouncil.org/programs/WWI Education Dr Seton boy scouts history Let’s talk about the early days of scouting and WWI - Joining us is Dr. Julie Seton , granddaughter of Ernest Thompson Seton who was a co-founder of the Boy Scouts of America and other youth organizations in the early 1900's. She is an expert on Scouting's early history as well as her grandfather's life as a naturalist, artist and, at one time, an internationally acclaimed literary figure, and she recently edited and published his autobiography, Trail of an Artist-Naturalist: The Autobiography of Ernest Thompson Seton Welcome, Julie! [greetings/welcome] [Julie - The history of the boy scouts -  actually begin in England with Lord Baden-Powell in the early 1900s, but your grandfather is also said to have influenced him - can you tell us the story?] [So when the the Boy Scouts of America officially organize? [if it did not come up in the previous question] [It’s a little off-topic but I wanted to ask… I read a fascinating account about your great grandfather - who apparently decided to present your grandfather with a bill for the entire cost of raising him, including the doctor’s cost for his birth….  and that Ernest actually paid him - Is that myth?] [Back to the subject at hand - by the time America enters WWI, scouting is still very young but President Wilson gives the young men a specific charter and roll in the war effort - can you tell us about that?] [Katherine and I were talking about this - if the Boy Scouts of America was formed in 1910 - and aimed at adolescents - the very first scouts would have likely served in WWI -  did any of them become notables? ] [Current scouting -- we’ve seen several eagle scouts with memorial restoration efforts-- ] [goodbye/thanks] Dr. Julie Seton is the granddaughter of Ernest Thompson Seton and an expert on Scouting's early history. Learn more about the history of the Boy Scouts, and current Eagle Scout WW1 projects, by following the links in the podcast notes. links:http://etSetoninstitute.org/ http://www.worldscoutingmuseum.org/WWI.shtml https://everydaylivesinwar.herts.ac.uk/2015/07/stories-of-the-scouts-in-first-world-war/ https://www.scouting.org/programs/cub-scouts/leaders/about/history/ http://www.nesa.org/site/c.9oIFJMPsGgIWF/b.9535063/k.E891/Eagle_Project_Ideas.htm https://www.wvgazettemail.com/news/remains-of-wwi-medal-of-honor-recipient-to-be-laid/article_998bc7ec-cf78-51e5-a294-550a2a2004ac.html International Report 1418 now As we have been looking at WW1 Centennial News Now, one of the things that has struck us about the centennial commemoration of WWI,  is that it tends to focus a part of itself - not just on academic, military and historical remembrance but also on art, public works of art and artists. This first struck me when we reported on some commemoration efforts by our friends and counterparts in New Zealand.   Of course, there is our OWN major work of pubic art, the wwI memorial sculpture by Sabin Howard - but truly notable in all this is the United Kingdom’s centennial support of 14-18 NOW, their WWI Centenary Art Commission, implementing a five-year program of arts experiences intended to connect people with the First World War-- To tell us about it, we’re joined from the UK by Jenny Waldman, the director of the program. Jenny, welcome to the podcast! [welcome/greetings] [Jenny, can you tell us a bit about how 14-18 NOW came about? ] [You have, and are doing some great project - can you tell us about some of them? ] [In the lead in, I mentioned that commemorating something like WWI through art experiences was not immediately obvious to me - but it seems like a very important part of the puzzle. Could you help our audience understand why?] [Jenny - we want to keep reporting on your efforts - especially those projects that are now coming “over here”. What can we look forward to? [if these things did not already get covered]] [Jenny Waldman thank you so much for joining us today!] [thanks/goodbyes] Jenny Waldman is the director of 14-18 NOW. Learn more about the organization and the many many wonderful projects by following the link in the podcast notes. Link:https://www.1418now.org.uk/about/ Speaking WW1 Welcome to our weekly feature “Speaking World War 1” -- Where we explore the words & phrases that are rooted in the war  --- Waking up to a steaming cup of coffee is a universal pleasure. It’s warm, it’s fortifying, and it can help you make it into and  through your day -- That warm drink is sometimes referred to as a Cup o’ Joe… and of course we wondered where that phrase came from? In fact, this nickname for coffee has rather murky origins, with several theories being put forward. And one of the most common legends is that the ‘Joe’ in the phrase refers to Josephus Daniels, the American Secretary of the Navy during World War I. Daniels was an ardent prohibitionist, and as such he banned the consumption of alcohol on Navy ships well before Prohibition or even America’s declaration of war-- It was General Order 99 issued on June 1, 1914 that ended the shipboard toddy of rum for the sailors. So our swabbies were forced to indulge in other beverages, particularly coffee-- which led the men to to refer to  a serving of coffee as a ‘cup of joe’. There is some doubt in the truth of this myth -- since alcohol was already hard to come by onboard vessels for ordinary sailors, General Order 99 had little impact on their lives. It’s possible that the name ‘Joe’ denoted an ordinary everyday man, reflecting the rise in coffee consumption at the turn of the 20th century-- but we like the josephus myth. A cup of joe - this week’s phrase for speaking WW1. There are links for you in the podcast notes. Links: https://www.knowyourphrase.com/cup-of-joe https://www.rogersfamilyco.com/index.php/the-origins-of-a-cup-of-joe/ [SOUND EFFECT] Articles and Posts Highlights from the Dispatch Newsletter For Articles and posts -- here are some of the highlights from our weekly Dispatch newsletter. [DING] Headline: Islay Ceremonies Remember US War Dead Read about the commemorations that took place last Friday in Scotland to remember the 700 people who died in two separate WW1 disasters off the coast of the Isle of Islay [DING] Headline: The CDC hosts 1918 Influenza Pandemic Commemoration If our interview with author Kenneth C. Davis last week piqued your interest in the flu of 1918, read this article about the CDC’s commemoration of the disease that ripped through the world population 100 years ago. [DING] Headline: Who was Alan Seeger… and Why did french President Macron mention him to congress? Find the answer by reading the article by Commission Intern Nicole Renna. [DING] Headline: Everard Bullis Sr - our featured Story of Service Read about Everard Bullis Sr, a Marine who saw action at Belleau Wood, St. Mihiel and Champagne. [DING] Finally, our  selection from our Official online Centennial Merchandise store -   this week, it’s our Custom Silk Tie -- great for college grads and  and for dads for father’s day.The red silk tie features World War One era aircraft and the official logo of the Centennial Commission on the back. And those are some of the headlines this week from the Dispatch Newsletter Subscribe to the whole thing by going to ww1cc.org/subscribe or follow the links in the podcast notes Link: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch https://www.archives.gov/citizen-archivist/missions The Buzz And that brings us to the buzz - the centennial of WW1 this week in social media with Katherine Akey - Katherine, what did you pick? Lewis Hine Hi Theo -- We shared on Facebook this week what I think is one of the most interesting photography articles from The Atlantic-- the article “100 Years Ago: France in the Final Year of World War I” is a series of 35 photographs from American Photographer Lewis Hine. Hine had a long and tumultuous career; he was well known after working for the National Child Labor Committee, photographing children at work in coal mines, factories and farms all across the country. His images of children as young as four, their faces smeared with dirt and soot, machinery towering over them, are incredibly poignant. And as the War continued to rage in 1918 -- he traveled to Europe to photograph the American Red Cross relief programs. The photographs were also intended to drum up support for the Red Cross and to appeal to the American populace back home. The images include portraits of young French orphans, lone survivors standing amongst the rubble of flattened frontline towns, Doughboys fishing in a river outside the Chateau de Blois and exhausted wounded soldiers convalescing at Red Cross Hospitals across France. They have Hine’s recognizable haunting quality -- and are seriously beautiful. See them all at the link in the podcast notes. That’s it for this week in the Buzz. Link:https://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2018/05/100-years-ago-france-in-the-final-year-of-world-war-i/559454 Outro And that wraps up the second  week of May for WW1 Centennial News. Thank you for listening. We also want to thank our guests... Mike Shuster, Curator for the great war project blog Dr. Edward Lengel, Military historian and author Ron Wasserman, artistic director of the New York Jazzharmonic Dr. Reed Bonadonna, retired US Marine Corps Colonel and Senior Fellow with the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs Dr. Julie Seton, Boy Scout historical expert Jenny Waldman, director of 14-18 NOW Katherine Akey, WWI Photography specialist, line producer for the podcast and fellowship awardee for Dr. Bonadonna’s program Many thanks to Mac Nelsen our sound editor and to Eric Marr for his great input and research assistance...  This week we say goodbye to our intern John Morreale - who’s finishing up his semester at the George Washington University. John, you were a great contributor to the show. Good luck and thank you from us and the audience! And I am Theo Mayer - your host. The US World War One Centennial Commission was created by Congress to honor, commemorate and educate about WW1. Our programs are to-- inspire a national conversation and awareness about WW1; Including this podcast! We are bringing the lessons of the 100 years ago into today's classrooms; We are helping to restore WW1 memorials in communities of all sizes across our country; and of course we are building America’s National WW1 Memorial in Washington DC. We want to thank commission’s founding sponsor the Pritzker Military Museum and Library as well as the Starr foundation for their support. The podcast can be found on our website at ww1cc.org/cn  - now with our new interactive transcript feature for students, teachers and sharing. Just a note to listeners, the transcript publishes about 2 days after the show. You can also access the WW1 Centennial News podcast on  iTunes, Google Play, TuneIn, Podbean, Stitcher - Radio on Demand, Spotify or using your smart speaker.. Just say “Play W W One Centennial News Podcast” - and now also available on Youtube search for our WW1 Centennial channel. Our twitter and instagram handles are both @ww1cc and we are on facebook @ww1centennial. Thank you for joining us. And don’t forget to share the stories you are hearing here today about the war that changed the world! [music] Voice 1: Hey Mac - gimme a slice a pie and a cup o’ joe.. Hmmm I wonder why it’s called a cup o’ joe? Voice 2 Mac: You’ll just hafta listen to that WW1 Centennial News Podcast to find out  - bub - So long!
May 5, 2018
Highlights May 1918 Preview Roundtable - Ed Lengel, Katherine Akey, Theo Mayer | 02:50 General Rumblings - Mike Shuster | 18:00 War In The Sky - Eddie Rickenbacker | 21:45 Documentary: “Blackjack Pershing: Love and War” - Prof. Barney McCoy | 25:55 The big influenza pandemic - Kenneth C. Davis | 32:15 WW1 War Tech - Fed billions, killed millions: The tragic story of Fritz Haber | 39:25 100 Cities / 100 Memorials from Brownwood, Texas - Dr. Steve Kelly | 44:15 Speaking WW1: Binge | 50:00 Articles and Posts: Highlights from the Weekly Dispatch | 51:50 The Commemoration in Social Media - Katherine Akey | 54:15----more---- Opening Welcome to World War 1 centennial News - episode #70 - It’s about WW1 THEN - what was happening 100 years ago this week  - and it’s about WW1 NOW - news and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. This week: Dr. Edward Lengel, Katherine Akey and I sit down for our May 1918 preview roundtable Mike Schuster, from the great war project blog with a story of conflict within the Allied forces. Author Kenneth C. Davis shares the story of influenza in 1918 Professor Barney McCoy gives us insight into the upcoming documentary, Blackjack Pershing: Love and War Dr. Steve Kelly with the 100 Cities / 100 Memorial project from Brownwood, Texas. Katherine Akey with the commemoration of world war one in social media And lots more... on WW1 Centennial News -- a weekly podcast brought to you by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and the Starr foundation. I’m Theo Mayer - the Chief Technologist for the Commission and your host. Welcome to the show. [MUSIC] Preface Before we get going today, I wanted to tell you about some great new features for the WW1 Centennial News Podcast. First of all, you can now listen to the latest episodes of WW1 Centennial News on YouTube -  if you happen to prefer listening that way!   And something I think is really exciting and useful when you go to our podcast web site at ww1cc.org/CN (Charlie Nancy). When you click the “read more” of the episode, just below the highlights you will find the full and accurate transcript of the show - interactively linked to an audio player. With it, you can scan OR search --- the text of the transcript and wherever you double click - the audio will play. Or if you are listening and want to copy and paste a segment of the transcript for you newsletter, school report or blog, just pause and scan down the scranscript, The section you were hearing is highlighted in blue. This very cool, new interactive transcript technology has been provided by a great little startup called Jotengine… and we have added it to make our podcast even more useful for students, teachers and everyone who wants to share the story of the war the changed the world. World War One THEN 100 Year Ago This Week Roundtable with Katherine, Theo and Ed [SOUND EFFECT] Alright... The first week of every month, we invite you to our preview roundtable where Dr. Ed lengel, Katherine Akey and I had talk about the coming month and the key events that happened 100 years ago.  The question on the table as we sat down was, “ what WERE the big stories and themes in May 1918… What follows is our conversation. [roundtable - see transcript for details] [SOUND EFFECT] Great War Project So that is an overview for the coming month - but now let’s join Mike Shuster - Former NPR corresponded and curator for the Great War Project blog as he explored another key battle that plays out on the Western Front… The battle between the Allied Generals and American General John J. Pershing. They did not see eye-to-eye at all… and Black-Jack Pershing was not going to waver from his belief about how the US army needed to engage. It sound like it was more than just a little contentious Mike!   [MIKE POST] Mike Shuster from the Great War Project blog. The links to Mike Shuster’s Great War Project blog and the post -- are in the podcast notes. LINK: http://greatwarproject.org/2018/04/29/the-allies-quarrel/ [SOUND EFFECT]   War in the Sky America's Top-Scoring Ace Scores his First Victory It is a changing of the guard,  for the War in the Skies over Europe 100 years ago this April and May. In April 1918, Germany’s Manfred von Richthofen falls, and in May America’s Raoul Lufbery. One of the new names that rises among these ashes is that of a Columbus Ohio native every bit as much of a flamboyant character as the early fliers. Before joining the service, he was a famed race car driver who set a land speed record at Daytona of 134 miles per hour - a tough guy, technically too old to be accepted into flight school, and a guy who claimed he was afraid of heights - His name was  Eddie Rickenbacker… Born the oldest son of 5 siblings 1890  -- young Eddie had to step up to become the major family breadwinner, quitting school at only 12 years old, when his father died in a construction accident. A tough beginning for what would turn out to be quite a guy! Having developed a passion for the new technology of the internal combustion engine - by 16 he had landed a job with a race car driver named Lee Frayer, who liked the scrawny, scrappy kid - and let him ride in major races as his mechanic. By 1912 - the young 22 year old was driving his own races and winning! and crashing! and surviving! When war broke out in 1917, Rickenbaker volunteered - but at 27 years old -- was already too old to get accepted to flight school - something the speed demon really wanted to do! Because he had a reputatioh as a race car driver - he was enlisted as a sergeant and sailed for Europe as a driver. There is a lot of lore that he drove John J. Pershing, but that is generally disputed. However, he DID get an assignment to drive Billy Mitchel's flashy twin -six -cylinder packard and talked himself into flight school through the boss! His WWI flying exploits are legendary and the kid from Ohio came home a national hero But that was just the beginning of a colorful life for a scrappy and scrawny kid, turned Ace of Aces, airline President, famed raft suvivor of a plane ditching in the Pacific, potential presidential candidate - who lived large in living color..,, and finally died in 1973 at the age 83 having launched his career as a WWI fighter pilot in the war in sky one hundred years ago this week. Link:http://www.firstworldwar.com/bio/rickenbacker.htm http://www.historynet.com/captain-eddie-rickenbacker-americas-world-war-i-ace-of-aces.htm http://acepilots.com/wwi/us_rickenbacker.html The Great War Channel For videos about WWI 100 years ago this week, and from a more european perspective --- check out our friends at  the Great War Channel on Youtube. New episodes this week include: The first tank-on-tank battle in history -- Tank crew training and more German tank prototypes Plus…. The Finnish Jägers in World War 1 See their videos by searching for “the great war” on youtube or following the link in the podcast notes! Link:https://www.youtube.com/user/TheGreatWar World War One NOW Alright  - It is time to fast forward into the present with WW1 Centennial News NOW - [MUSIC TRANSITION] This part of the podcast isn’t the past --- It focuses on NOW and how we are commemorating the centennial of WWI! [SOUND EFFECT] Commission News Belleau Wood Tree -- Missing but will return This week in Commission News -- We heard, with great distress that the lovely Oak sapling from Belleau Wood,  that had been planted by President’s Macron and Trump on the white house lawn last week - had mysteriously GONE MISSING~!! One day it was there - the next - it wasn’t! Much to our relief, the mystery was resolved quickly. It turns out that the tree - which has made it’s journey from Europe with Macron had to be put into temporary quarantine - a typical procedure for living agricultural goods imported from overseas. It’ll be put back to its original spot as soon as it get out of detention! We put a link to the story in the podcast notes! Link: https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/mystery-solved-why-trump-macron-friendship-tree-vanished/ar-AAwxbt3?OCID=ansmsnnews11 Spotlight on the Media Blackjack Pershing: Love and War We have a spotlight on the media for you! The spotlight is on US General of the Armies, the American Expeditionary Forces commander General John J. Pershing. [RUN AUDIO CLIP FROM TRAILER] That clip is from a new documentary “Black Jack Pershing: Love and War” - and today -- we’re joined by the film’s producer -  Barney McCoy professor of journalism at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Welcome, Barney! [welcome/greetings] [Barney-- I understand your film looks is not just about Pershing the General but also Pershing the man, who also suffered and endured great personal tragedy and heartbreak in his life. Can you give us an overview of the story in the film?] [Now, you made this documentary by incorporating hundreds of U.S. Army Signal Corps photographs and films from the National Archives -- what was the research process like? And did you come across anything surprising as you were poking around the archives?] [How did you get involved in this film? How did it happen?] [A very important question… When and where can people see the film?] [thank you/goodbyes] Barney McCoy is professor of journalism at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the producer of “Black Jack Pershing: Love and War”. We’ve included links to the film’s trailer, website and upcoming screenings in the podcast notes! Links:https://www.archives.gov/calendar/event/black-jack-pershing-love-and-war https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ru3DzGSwdeE https://jjpershing.com/ Remembering Veterans The Influenza of 1918 This week For Remembering Veterans -- we’re turning our attention away from the battlefield and looking at a phenomenon that took more lives than the bullets or shells. With us to explore the story of the Flu pandemic 100 years ago, is Kenneth C. Davis, bestselling author of the  “Don’t Know Much About” book series. In fact, during our editorial meeting, when we were discussing the interview our intern, John enthused that these books were on his shelf as he was growing up… Well, Kenneth’s new book is coming out on May 15th and it is called:  More Deadly Than War: The Hidden History of the Spanish Flu and the First World War .. a fascinating subject by a wonderful writer! Kenneth! Welcome to the Podcast. [greetings] [Ken- Let’s start with the name of this flu pandemic - Patient Zero was not from Spain were they?] [How big and bad was it? I have heard a lot of varying numbers but whatever they are, the scale staggers the imagination!] [We have a global war - we have a global pandemic - how do the dots connect? ] [Ken - what made this particular flu so especially deadly?] [Well, a quick follow up on that - and Katherine our line producer asked about this - with so many advanced in medicine in this particular moment in history - why did medicine not get ahead of this one?] [Do you think this deadly global event still echoes today? ] [Thank you so much for coming in and speaking with us today!] [goodbyes/thanks] Kenneth C. Davis is the bestselling author of the Don’t Know Much About Book series. Don’t miss his upcoming -  More Deadly Than War: The Hidden History of the Spanish Flu and the First World War available at your favorite bookseller May 15th! We have put links to his work and upcoming events in the podcast notes. Links: www.dontknowmuch.com http://dontknowmuch.com/books/more-deadly-than-war/ http://www.pritzkermilitary.org/whats_on/pritzker-military-presents/kenneth-davis-more-deadly-war/ https://www.amazon.com/More-Deadly-Than-War-History/dp/1250145120/ref=sr_1_6 WW1 War Tech Fritz Haber For WW1 War Tech -- we are going to tell you the amazing and tragic story of a WW1 era technologist, the German chemist Fritz Haber! Fritz Haber is one of the most underappreciated actors of World War I whose discoveries spanned from the life giving to the life taking. He was celebrated with Nobel Prize for developing chemical fertilizers -- and equally vilified for another invention, chlorine gas. Tragically one of his most vocal critics was his wife, Clara, who was not only an ardent pacifist but an accomplished chemist herself. The invention of what is known as the “Haber Process” was the result of wartime necessities. Even before World War I, German military strategists recognized the potential of a total British naval blockade on their country, which would do tremendous damage to their ability to import the materials required to manufacture weapons. One particularly vulnerable commodity were the nitrates imported from South America, used in the development of ammonia for explosives. Haber discovered a new method of creating ammonia by combining nitrogen and hydrogen gases. Since ammonia is also used as a fertilizer, the Haber Process allowed for the mass production of agricultural fertilizers, transforming agriculture both inside and outside Germany. Much of the reason behind why the world is able to support a population of more than seven billion is the use of these  fertilizers, which all have their roots in the Haber Process. And for his method of creating artificial ammonia, Haber was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1918. But as we said, another of Haber’s invention would come to overshadow this incredible discovery. When World War I finally broke out in 1914, the quick victory expected by many military generals soon became a slow, bloody struggle to shift the frontlines only a few miles either way. The German High Command quickly realized they needed a new, fearsome weapon to break the stalemate. It was the strongly patriotic Haber who came up with the solution: by combining the ammonia he extracted from the air with chlorine, he could produce a gas that would asphyxiate all who encountered it-- Haber was on hand personally when his Chlorine Gas was first released by the German military at the Second Battle of Ypres.  Over 5,000 men, not recognizing this new weapon’s true danger, were quickly overcome, and were found by their fellow soldiers with their faces turned black and shirts torn open in a desperate search for air. Germany’s use of poison gas at Ypres would set a precedent for an unprecedented tactic, one that would scar many men for a lifetime after the war ended. People around the world were horrified by Harber’s new, deadly invention, but among the most repelled was Haber’s own wife, Clara. At a party celebrating his promotion to Captain as a result of his work in poison gas nine days after the test at Ypres, Clara directly confronted her husband, calling him morally bankrupt and his efforts monstrous. Haber ignored her. Later that night, no longer able to stand her marriage, Clara shot herself in the garden with her husband’s pistol. Haber left the next day to supervise another gas attack on the Western Front, leaving his young son to grieve alone. After the war ended in Germany’s defeat, a brokenhearted Haber would try to single handedly pay back the burdensome war reparations by inventing a process to distill dissolved gold floating in the ocean, an ultimately unsuccessful endeavour. There is a final,  tragic and ironic twist on Haber’s legacy… during WWII - When the Nazi regime was looking for ways to best murder their many classes of undesirables, they came upon one of Haber’s products, a pesticide called Zyklon. The Nazi authorities used this chemical to gas millions of innocent victims in the Holocaust, including the Jewish German Haber’s own friends and family. Fritz Haber, a brilliant man whose fertilizer invention have fed billions, who’s weaponized inventions killed million, whose wife shot herself in protest and whose family and friends were finally gassed in concentration camps with his own invention… an epic, tragic and another amazing story of the war that changed the world and this week’s WWI War Tech. We have links for you in the podcast notes. Links:https://www.popularmechanics.com/military/research/g1577/7-surprising-scientific-advances-that-came-out-of-world-war-i/ http://www.chm.bris.ac.uk/~paulmay/haber/haber.htm https://www.sciencehistory.org/historical-profile/fritz-haber https://www.britannica.com/topic/Gymnasium-German-school https://www.britannica.com/biography/Fritz-Haber https://medium.com/the-mission/the-tragedy-of-fritz-haber-the-monster-who-fed-the-world-ec19a9834f74 https://jwa.org/encyclopedia/article/immerwahr-clara 100 Cities 100 Memorials Brownwood Texas This week for our 100 Cities / 100 Memorials segment ---  the $200,000 matching grant challenge to rescue and focus on our local WWI memorials --- We are updating one of the very first projects we profiled on the podcast - From even before the first round of submissions were closed.   Joining us again for an update on the 100 Cities / 100 Memorials project from Brownwood Texas is Dr. Steve Kelly, the immediate past president of the Central Texas Veterans Memorial - Steve welcome back to the show. [Greetings and Welcome] [Steve - The last time we spoke your project was just a candidate, but it has since been designated an official WW1 Centennial Memorial - Congratulations…] [For your project you moved your WWI memorial from behind a bush at an old, closed high school to a new memorial site at your local American Legion post 196… Can you tell us a bit more about that?] [As I recall from the last time we spoke, you have both a commemoration and an educational component to you project - how did you do that?] [Steve - What stage is the whole project at now and do you have rededication plans?] [Thank you for coming on and giving us an update on your project from Brown County Texas!] [Thanks/goodbye] Dr. Steve Kelly is the immediate past president of the Central Texas Veterans Memorial in Brownwood, Texas. Learn more about the 100 Cities/100 Memorials program by following the links in the podcast notes or by going to ww1cc.org/100Memorials Link: www.ww1cc.org/100cities Speaking WW1 Binge Welcome to our weekly feature “Speaking World War 1” -- Where we explore the words & phrases that are rooted in the war  --- Let’s start by thinking… Obsessive, Compulsive Consumption…. I heard a great analysis of our modern media times recently. It talked about the fact that in our new age, we no longer have “stop cues” for media consumption. You don’t read the paper, you take in an endless stream of news feeds and tweets. You don’t watch a TV show, you find yourself awake on the couch at 3am with just 2 episodes left to finish the fourth season of The Office -- and you’re not alone! Without “stop cues” the analysis went on, we are media binging all the time.. And that brings us to our Speaking WW1 word for this week…. BINGE. And who would you have thought that that phrase made its way to the 21st century by way of the trenches? Binge was originally a “Northern English” term meaning to over-indulge. The word first appeared in printed form in 1854, with a clearly alcohol-related connotation. And a connotation that may have carried forward for many of our listener to their college years with Binge Drinking! The term remained regional to Northern England until World War 1, when it spread through the english speaking forces and became standardized in the English lexicon. It also started being used to describe the obsessive compulsive, consumption of food.  Which led to the description of an eating disorder called binge & purge… So now it’s meaning has expanded to include any number of new categories: food, drink, media, entertainment and… well many others! Binge-- obsessive, compulsive, consumption - and this week’s words for speaking WW1. There are links for you in the podcast notes. Links:https://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/binge-drinking.html http://www.dictionary.com/browse/binge http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/4tN7cVtY2VY2sbGtX6z9Df3/12-words-from-100-years-ago-we-love-to-use-today [SOUND EFFECT] Articles and Posts Weekly Dispatch Newsletter Highlights   For Articles and posts -- here are some of the highlights from our weekly Dispatch newsletter which you can subscribe to at ww1cc.org/subscribe or through the podcast notes. [DING] Headline: Two WWI nurses led the way for women in today’s Wisconsin National Guard Read the story of two women serving as Army nurses in World War I pioneering the opportunity for women to serve in every duty position in the Wisconsin National Guard. [DING] Headline: NARA is getting WWI Army Division records online - with citizen help! The National Archives Records Administration also know as NARA Is getting Citizen Archivists to help make these records more accessible. If you’d like to help NARA transcribe these historic handwritten records - You CAN! There’s a link in the podcast notes for you to get started. [DING] The studio that brought you 'Wallace and Grommit' is creating an emotional World War I game Read more about the new videogame 11-11: Memories Retold, a narrative adventure about two World War I soldiers who meet under the "most unlikely of circumstances." [DING] Headline: Doughboy MIA for week of April 30 Read about Pvt. Charles H. Holland, a native of Mississippi and member of the 2nd Division-- 9th Infantry--Company L-- Charles was  wounded in action during the battle of Soissons--- he was carried off to a field hospital and never seen nor heard from again. [DING] Finally, our  selection from our Official online Centennial Merchandise store -   this week, with Memorial Day coming up - it’s your last chance to order our small, 8" X 12" WWI Centennial flags for Memorial Day. This is the year to display the memorial ground flags honoring your local fallen doughboys! You’ll be doing  "Double Honors", because a portion of the proceeds from the sale of this item goes to building America's National World War I Memorial at Pershing Park, in Washington DC. And those are some of the headlines this week from the Dispatch Newsletter Check the links in the podcast notes Link: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch https://www.archives.gov/citizen-archivist/missions The Buzz The Commemoration in Social Media And that brings us to the buzz - the centennial of WW1 this week in social media with Katherine Akey - Katherine, what did you pick? Motorcycles, Mail and the Military Times Hi Theo -- We shared a video this week on Facebook from one of the Commission’s Commemorative partners, the French Centenaire 14-18 -- it shows the project undertaken by two frenchmen to restore an American doughboy’s Harley-Davidson-- which they are now bringing to, and driving across America. The motorbike would have been used to carry messages behind the lines, and less than a thousand are thought to have made it to today. Watch the video and read an article about the project at the link in the podcast notes -- we’ve also included a link to the frenchmen’s facebook page so you can follow their journey as they ride the bike across the US! Also on facebook this week -- we shared a photograph of a humble receipt from the Harry S. Truman Library and Museum. This week 100 years ago, the future president was a Captain in the Army, commanding a battery of field artillery on the western front. And-- his birthday was coming up! So his loving wife Bess ordered him a fruit cake, having it shipped to his 129th field artillery in France. The receipt shows her purchase from the Jones Store Company in Kansas City, Missouri -- likely a fruit cake would survive the journey, and we hope he enjoyed it on his birthday on May 8th, 1918. And if you’re wondering -- it cost a whopping total of $1.40, equivalent to about $25 now, to buy and send the birthday treat. See the receipt yourself at the link in the notes. Finally this week, I wanted to point you towards a very thoughtful opinion piece from the Military Times website -- May is Mental Health Awareness Month, a subject that has been deeply important to the success and wellbeing of our armed service members throughout history. The article is entitled “A century after ‘shell shock,’ struggle to address post-combat trauma continues” -- and it opens up questions about our understanding of PTSD, and our relatively recent acceptance of trauma as a significant and common affliction. Read more about how WW1 changed our understanding and treatment of Shell Shock and PTSD at the link in the podcast notes -- we’ll have guests on later this month to continue to address the topic. That’s it for this week in the Buzz. Link:https://france3-regions.francetvinfo.fr/pays-de-la-loire/loire-atlantique/nantes/centenaire-14-18-harley-armee-americaine-repart-nantes-us-1467347.html www.facebook.com/operationtwinlinks https://www.facebook.com/TrumanPresidentialLibrary/posts/10155390413860770 https://www.militarytimes.com/military-honor/world-war-i/2017/04/19/a-century-after-shell-shock-struggle-to-address-post-combat-trauma-continues/ [SOUND EFFECT] Outro And that wraps up the first week of May for WW1 Centennial News. Thank you for listening. We also want to thank our guests... Dr. Edward Lengel, Military historian and author Mike Shuster, Curator for the great war project blog Kenneth C. Davis, author and historian Barney McCoy, professor of journalism at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Dr. Steve Kelly with the 100 Cities / 100 Memorial project from Brownwood, Texas. Katherine Akey, WWI Photography specialist and the line producer for the podcast Many thanks to Mac Nelsen our sound editor as well as John Morreale our intern and Eric Marr for their great research assistance... And I am Theo Mayer - your host. [MUSIC and under] The US World War One Centennial Commission was created by Congress to honor, commemorate and educate about WW1. Our programs are to-- inspire a national conversation and awareness about WW1; Including this podcast! We are bringing the lessons of the 100 years ago into today's classrooms; We are helping to restore WW1 memorials in communities of all sizes across our country; and of course we are building America’s National WW1 Memorial in Washington DC. We want to thank commission’s founding sponsor the Pritzker Military Museum and Library as well as the Starr foundation for their support.   The podcast can be found on our website at ww1cc.org/cn  - now with our new interactive transcript feature for students, teachers and sharing. Or search WW1 Centennial News on  iTunes, Google Play, TuneIn, Podbean, Stitcher - Radio on Demand, Spotify or using your smart speaker.. Just say “Play W W One Centennial News Podcast” - and now also available on Youtube at WW1 Centennial. Our twitter and instagram handles are both @ww1cc and we are on facebook @ww1centennial. Thank you for joining us. And don’t forget to share the stories you are hearing here today about the war that changed the world! [music] Talk about binging - I just got a note from a listeners - who has decided to listening to all of 1917 from our WW1 Centennial news podcast, eating a pizza with every episode, washed down with a six pack.. that sounds awful and I’m just kidding! So long!
April 28, 2018
Highlights US Telephone in WWI - Dr. Sheldon Hochheiser, AT&T | @02:25 The tide begins to turn - Mike Shuster | @10:10 The “Sweetheart of the doughboys” - Edward Lengel | @14:25 The Women’s Land Army - Elaine Weiss | @22:55 Anzac Day - Group Captain Peter Davis & Commander Peter Kempster | @30:30 100 Cities / 100 Memorials: Granite, OK - Phil Neighbors & Perry Hutchison | @37:40 Speaking WW1: Kiwi & Aussie | @44:25 WW1 War Tech: Geophone | @45:35 Dispatch Newsletter Headlines | @47:20 WWI Centennial in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @50:05----more---- Opening Welcome to World War 1 centennial News - episode #69 - It’s about WW1 THEN - what was happening 100 years ago this week  - and it’s about WW1 NOW - news and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. This week: Dr. Sheldon Hochheiser tells us about an iconic American company and its role in the war -- AT&T. Mike Schuster, from the great war project blog updates us on German morale as Operation Georgette comes to a close. Dr. Edward Lengel with the story of Elsie Janis, the “sweetheart of the doughboys” Elaine Weiss introduces us to the Farmerettes, the women’s land army Group Captain Peter Davis and Commander Peter Kempster on the Australian and New Zealander commemorations for ANZAC day Phil Neighbors and Perry Hutchison with the 100 Cities / 100 Memorial project from Granite, Oklahoma. Katherine Akey with the commemoration of world war one in social media And lots more... on WW1 Centennial News -- a weekly podcast brought to you by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and the Starr foundation. I’m Theo Mayer - the Chief Technologist for the Commission and your host. Welcome to the show. [MUSIC] Preface Today we are going to explore the US telephone system during the war -- and unlike most nations where the phone systems are typically government owned --- The US Telephone system has always been privately owned - well, not always - for 1 year during WWI -  the US government took over the nation’s telephone system… but perhaps most amazing of all - a year later, after the war, the US government privatized it again! With that as a setup, let’s jump into our centennial time machine and look at the America’s telephone story 100 years ago - in the war that changed the world! [SOUND EFFECT] [TRANSITION] World War One THEN 100 Year Ago This Week   It is the summer of 1918 and the House Committee on Interstate Commerce is holding hearings about a government take over of the nation’s privately held telephone system. Only three witnesses are called to testify - Albert Berleson - The Postmaster General, Newton Baker, the secretary of war and Josephus Daniels, the secretary of the Navy. These three men, eventually backup up by President Wilson -  are pushing for the takeover of the phone system - citing among other things - national security concerns including the protections from spies using this incredibly powerful technology that is rapidly spreading across the land. Most remarkably ---  that representatives of the phone company are NOT asked to participate in the discussion. Well, to help us tell this amazing story, we invited Dr. Sheldon Hochheiser, the corporate Historian from AT&T to join us on the show. AT&T During the War Welcome, Dr. Hochheiser! [greetings/welcome] [Dr. Hochheiser - from an AT&T historical perspective - what was the story here?] [Were the company executives on record about this? What did they say? How did this nationalization actually work? The government suddenly declared that they owned the phone lines, but operations continued to be run by AT&T? Or were they? ] [What happened as a result of the postmaster General’s involvement?] [The most interesting part of all this FOR ME -  is that control was returned to AT&T again as the war ended. How did that happen?] [During the war, how did telephone facilities rise to meet wartime needs? ] [Dr, Hochheiser - We just got in a question from our Live audience. Frank Krone wants to know what happened to AT&T’s chief technologist John Carty - after the war?] [How did this 1-year event help shape AT&T as a company?] [goodbye/thanks] Dr. Sheldon Hochheiser is the corporate historian at AT&T. Learn more about the company and its WW1 history at the links in the podcast notes. Links: https://scholarship.law.upenn.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?referer=https://www.google.com/&httpsredir=1&article=1466&context=faculty_scholarship https://www.warhistoryonline.com/war-articles/inventions-flourished-due-wwi.html http://soldiers.dodlive.mil/2014/03/world-war-is-hello-girls-paving-the-way-for-women-in-the-u-s-army/ https://www.corp.att.com/history/history1.html [MUSIC TRANSITION] Great War Project It is time for Mike Shuster -- former NPR correspondent and curator for the Great War project Blog….   Mike: Your post this week indicates a turning point for the Spring Offensive. As Ed Lengel pointed out previously in our roundtables, the German goal was to split the French and the British armies and drive the british to the ports and off the mainland. But it looks like that plan has failed! What is going on Mike? [MIKE POST] Mike Shuster from the Great War Project blog. The links to Mike Shuster’s Great War Project blog and the post -- are in the podcast notes. LINK: http://greatwarproject.org/2018/04/22/german-morale-is-flagging/ [SOUND EFFECT] America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 Welcome to our segment - America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI with Dr. Edward Lengel. Ed: Mike Shuster pretty much covered the fighting front here at the end of April - - but your story this week offers us a wonderful and completely different perspective on the events in Europe and a very, very special person - The “Sweetheart of the Doughboys” -  Singer and entertainer Elsie Janis. What is her story Ed? [ED LENGEL] [MUSIC TRANSITION] Dr. Edward Lengel is an American military historian, author, and our segment host for America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI. There are links in the podcast notes to Ed’s post and his web sites as an author.   Links:http://www.edwardlengel.com/elsie-janis-becomes-sweetheart-doughboys-1918/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ The Great War Channel For videos about WWI 100 years ago this week, and from a more european perspective --- check out our friends at  the Great War Channel on Youtube. New episodes this week include: Knocking out the Hejaz Railway Another of the very popular “Out of the Trenches” episodes where host Indy Neidel takes questions from the audience And finally Felix Graf Von Luckner -- Who did what in WW1? See their videos by searching for “the great war” on youtube or following the link in the podcast notes! Link:https://www.youtube.com/user/TheGreatWar World War One NOW Alright  - It is time to fast forward into the present with WW1 Centennial News NOW - [SOUND EFFECT] This part of the podcast isn’t the past --- It focuses on NOW and how we are commemorating the centennial of WWI! Commission News Gift from French President recalls WWI USMC heroics in Battle of Belleau Wood This week in Commission news-- we were excited to see that French President Emmanuel Macron brought a special gift to the White House during his visit to Washington -- one that bears great World War I significance: it was a European Sessile Oak sapling from the Belleau Wood in France.   Presidents Trump and Macron - ceremonial shovels in hand - planted the commemorative tree on the White house lawn. The Battle of Belleau Wood is one of the most important American engagements of World War One -- it was the first major battle for the US Marines during the conflict and is still viewed as a seminal moment in Marine Corps history. Fighting alongside British and French troops, America suffered more than 9,700 casualties. You can read more about this meaningful and symbolic gift, and see pictures of the ceremonial planting at the White House, by following the links in the podcast notes. link:https://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/4376-special-gift-from-the-president-of-france-recalls-american-wwi-heroics.html Remembering Veterans Farmerettes and Suffrage with author Elaine Weiss This week For Remembering Veterans -- As we have pointed out before --- there are actually more veterans of WWI than just the soldiers and sailors - As the men headed off to training camps and to Europe - The women of America needed to pick up the role of their missing men -- Especially when it came to feeding the nation. And that is the story of the “Farmerettes and the Women’s Land Army”. With us to explore that story is Elaine Weiss, journalist and author of multiple books including Fruits of Victory: The Woman’s Land Army in the Great War --- as well as The Woman’s Hour: The Great Fight to Win the Vote. Welcome to the podcast, Elaine! [greetings] [Elaine-- Feeding the nation AND sending desperately needed food to our allies was strategically critical - how did American Womanhood stand up to that task?] [Where did the idea to create a Women’s Land Army come from? ] [How did the Women’s Land Army experience play into the suffrage movement? Were the Farmerettes paid for their work? Equal pay for equal work?] [What was the reception the women received -- both on the ground, by the farmers, the public, and the government?] [What became of the farmerettes once the war ended… especially when the men came home?] [Did the legacy of these women set a precedent when the second world war came around? ] [How about their influence on the women in the workforce today?] [goodbyes/thanks] Elaine Weiss is an award winning journalist and author of multiple books, including the recently published The Woman’s Hour: The Great Fight to Win the Vote from Viking Books. Read a rave review of her new book, and learn more about her work by following the links in the podcast notes. Links:http://elaineweiss.com/ https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/18/books/review/womans-hour-elaine-weiss.html Events NC State University This week from our WWI  centennial events registers at ww1cc.org/events -- there is a great one at North Carolina State University, on May 1st! Back in Episode #64, we spoke to Thomas Skolnicki [SKOAL-nick-ee], the Landscape Architect for the University -- retired US navy Rear Admiral -- Benny Suggs, the director of NC State's Alumni Association  and US Air Force Veteran, World War One Centennial Commissioner Jerry Hester -- All three men are NC State University Alumni, and all involved in the school’s 100 Cities, 100 memorials project. They told us about the restoration of the school’s belltower -- and about this upcoming rededication event. The event will include a full military ceremony with a 21-gun salute and a flyover of F-15s from the 4th Fighter Wing stationed at  Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, in Goldsboro, NC. It’s an opportunity for all to learn about the sacrifices made by NC State students and the commitment that the school has made since its inception to military service and leadership. Nearly 2,000 students and alumni served in WWI, and the Bell Tower includes the names of the 34 who died in that service. So if you’re in the area -- be sure to check it out! We have links for further details in the podcast notes. Link:https://news.ncsu.edu/2018/04/belltower-event-commemorates-end-of-wwi/ https://www.alumni.ncsu.edu/s/1209/16/interior.aspx?sid=1209&pgid=6092&gid=1001&cid=9908&ecid=9908&post_id=0 International Report In our International Report-- This past Wednesday, April 25th is a day of special remembrance that has its roots in World War One- It is known as ANZAC day which stands for Australian and New Zealand Army Corps, whose soldiers are known as Anzacs. and here to tell us more about the past, present and future of ANZAC day are Group Captain Peter Davis of the Australian Defense Staff and Commander Peter Kempster of the New Zealand Defense Force. Gentlemen, welcome to the podcast [greetings/welcome]   [So what’s the story of ANZAC day? What’s the origin?] [How is ANZAC day celebrated in Australia and New Zealand? And does the commemoration differ between the two nations?] [[This is the last centennial year-- what were commemorations like on Anzac day this year?] [I think many people may be familiar with the ANZAC’s involvement at Gallipoli-- but that engagement was over by 1916. Where did the forces deploy to after that?] [Personally, what does ANZAC day mean for you?] [thanks/goodbye] Group Captain Peter Davis is the Assistant Defense Attache and Chief of Staff of the Australian Defense Staff at the US Australian Embassy and Commander Peter Kempster is the New Zealand Naval Attache to the US for the New Zealand Defense Force. Learn more about ANZAC day and the centennial organizations of both countries by following the links in the podcast notes. Link: https://www.awm.gov.au/index.php/about/our-work/projects/centenary-projects http://www.anzaccentenary.gov.au/ http://www.defence.gov.au/events/centenaryofanzac/ProgramOfEvents.asp https://ww100.govt.nz/ https://mch.govt.nz/what-we-do/our-projects/current/first-world-war-centenary-projects 100 Cities 100 Memorials This week for our 100 Cities / 100 Memorials segment ---  the $200,000 matching grant challenge to rescue and focus on our local WWI memorials ---we are going to profile the World War I Memorial project from Granite, Oklahoma. With us tell us about Granite, Greer County and their inspiring WWI story are Phil Neighbors, pastor of the Valley  Baptist church and a native son of Granite, and Perry Hutchison, retired Army Colonel and former professor at the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth Officer Training School. Gentlemen, welcome to the podcast [greetings/welcome] [Phil: In your grant application you describe Granite, Oklahoma as a small community of heroes - that’s an intriguing opening line! What did you mean?] [Phil: American Legion Post 121 in Mangum Oklahoma is placing a new monument in the World War 1 Memorial Park in Granite. Can you tell us a little about those specifics please? [Well, Phil - As I we talked off line, there is another Oklahoma 100 Cities / 100 Memorials awardee from Towson, Oklahoma. So this is interesting - It seems that Oklahoma has a big WWI story to tell  - but doesn’t seem to have a WWI centennial organization or Website - maybe this will help stimulate something to come together!] [Phil: Thank you for bringing us the story of the heroes from your corner of the country. It’s been great to have you on!] [thanks/goodbye] Phil Neighbors is pastor of the Valley  Baptist church and a native son of Granite, Oklahoma and Perry Hutchison, retired Army Colonel and former professor at the Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth Officer Training School Learn more about the 100 Cities/100 Memorials program by following the links in the podcast notes or by going to ww1cc.org/100Memorials Link: www.ww1cc.org/100cities Speaking WW1 It’s time for our weekly feature “Speaking World War 1” -- Where we explore the words & phrases that are rooted in the war  --- We are sticking with our ANZAC theme... New Zealand, as were all the Dominion nations of the British Empire, was thrown into World War 1 by Britain’s own declaration of war on August 4, 1914. When the New Zealanders arrived in Europe - Their uniforms were emblazoned with badges, emblems, and insignias of Kiwis - and NO… It’s not an egg-shaped fuzzy fruit - It’s the big, flightless and quite unique national bird of New Zealand! And one of our two Speaking WWI Words this week - these soldiers were instantly nicknames the Kiwis! As for the Australians, Also a dominion nation - their WWI soldierly nickname and that stuck ever since is our second Speaking WWI word this week - Aussies. Kind of obvious - and you know it -- but I’ll bet you didn’t know that the nickname came from WWI! Kiwis and Aussies-- nicknames earned during the war that helped cement these two great nations and their identities -- and this week’s words for speaking WW1. Links:https://ww100.govt.nz/where-britain-goes-we-go https://nzhistory.govt.nz/war/first-world-war-overview/introduction#ft1 http://mentalfloss.com/article/58233/21-slang-terms-world-war-i http://slll.cass.anu.edu.au/centres/andc/annotated-glossary/a http://online.wsj.com/ww1/australia-new-zealand-founding-myths [SOUND EFFECT] WW1 War Tech Geophone For WW1 War Tech -- this week we are headed underground to learn about yet a sonic invention of necessity. Within just a few months of the first construction of a trench, the tangle of an estimated 25,000 miles of trenches spread from the English channel to the Swiss border. The only way to attack the enemy was through a costly offensive in No Man’s Land, or… and I did not know this….  underground via a system of tunnels. This method of offensive mining quickly became standard in some areas. And so… a device that could detect an enemies’ digging patterns would prove immensely valuable. It was a Professor Jean Perrin of the Sorbonne University in Paris, who provided just that type of device with his invention of the geophone in 1915. It was basically a specialized stethoscope like device -- that could amplify sound traveling underground --- sort of an earth sonar, enabling a skilled listener to detect the distance and location of German tunnels. Some imaginative soldiers operating geophones under ground would often interpret strange things from the noises they picked up - one report from a New Zealand Tunneling Company describes how one listener swore he had heard a horse eating oats, which the author noted could only have been true if the horse had been a prehistoric fossil! The report went on to detail the exhausting process of piecing out all the sounds a geophone operator could hear while underground, and determining which ones were harmless and which ones signified hostile activities. This underground duty QUOTE “strained body, brain, and nerve” like no other. Because of these pressures, tunnelers often received up to four times as much pay as soldiers on the surface. And, by and large, their work paid off: it was British tunnelers blew up 19 mines simultaneously at Messines in June 2017, killing approximately 10,000 German troops and creating the most powerful man-made explosion prior to Hiroshima. The geophone-- the subject of this week’s WW1 War Tech. We have put links in the podcast notes to learn more\ Links: http://ww1centenary.oucs.ox.ac.uk/space-into-place/the-war-underground-an-overview/ https://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/world-war-one/inside-first-world-war/part-eight/10741888/world-war-one-weaponry.html https://nzhistory.govt.nz/media/photo/listening-with-a-geophone   Articles and Posts For Articles and posts -- here are the highlighted features from our weekly dispatch newsletter. [DING] Headline: Building a World War I tank in the garage Read an interview with two of our friends who have a pretty unique weekend project. They are building a WWI tank in a garage. Actually, we should say that they are building another WWI tank in a garage -- they already completed one, earlier last year! [DING] Headline: Pennsylvania WWI Centennial Committee sets World War I History Symposium at the U.S. Army History & Education Center Read about this exciting symposium event -- which will feature four unique and engaging presentations by retired U.S. Army Major Kurt Sellers, retired U.S. Army Lieutenant Colonel John D. Shepard, author Gloria J. House, and genealogist and historic researcher Barbara Selletti. [DING] Headline: WWrite blog: In a Lonely Forest This week’s WWrite blog post features one writer’s quest to uncover the story of WW1 era lyricist, Josef Rust. [DING] Headline: Story of World War I Choctaw Code Talkers told at Reims event in France Read about a special April event in Reims, France where the story of the Choctaw code talkers was presented to the local audience. [DING] Headline: Help sought to return World War I medal unearthed in N.J. woods to vet's family A metal detector recently unearthed a WW1 service medal -- read about its discovery and the efforts to return it to its original owner’s family. [DING] Headline: The story of Otho Bradford Place This week’s featured Doughboy MIA is 2nd Lt. Otho Bradford Place, a native of Bremen Indiana who died in battle during an attack along the Agron River. [DING] Headline: Official WWI Centennial Merchandise Finally, our  selection from our Official online Centennial Merchandise store -  this week, it’s the Centennial Commemorative Pin! Proudly Wearing the WWI 100 Years lapel pin is a fantastic way to start a conversation. The question, what’s that? Can lead to great discussions about the centennial, the commemoration and WWI. Wear the pin and let the world know it’s the centennial!   And those are the headlines this week from the Dispatch Newsletter Sign up for the Weekly Dispatch newsletter at ww1cc.org/subscribe check the archive at ww1cc.org/dispatch or follow the link in the podcast notes. Link: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch   The Buzz And that brings us to the buzz - the centennial of WW1 this week in social media with Katherine Akey - Katherine, what did you pick? Trench Art and Commemoration Follow Up   Hi Theo -- This past week had a lot of commemorative events happen -- and we’ve shared images and video from them on our Facebook page that you can see in the podcast notes. Events included the dawn ANZAC ceremony at the Korean War Memorial in DC  and in NYC’s Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial Plaza-- French President Macron participating in a wreath laying ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier -- and commemoration of the Battle of Seicheprey in Connecticut. You can also see some great images of ANZACs in the field  on our Instagram at ww1cc -- including a photo of some aussies camped out at the foot of the Great Pyramids with their mascot Kangaroo! Also shared on our Facebook page this week was a historic video from ECPAD, a French archive of historical defense audiovisual material. The video shows soldiers, and prisoners of war, fashioning various objects from leftover military equipment, like spent shells, shrapnel, and broken pallets. These Trench Artists create vases, buckets, decorative mementos, toys, pipes, and musical instruments from the detritus of the war around them -- and also repair clothing and boots, recycle old wax into new candles, and more. You can watch these improvisational artisans working by following the link in the podcast notes. That’s it for this week in the Buzz. Link:https://www.facebook.com/ww1centennial/photos/pcb.967365740105391/967365683438730/?type=3&theater https://www.facebook.com/wwi100nyc/posts/1623102094475370 https://www.instagram.com/ww1cc/ https://www.facebook.com/ArlingtonNationalCemetery/posts/10157322536098976 https://www.facebook.com/CTinWorldWar1/posts/1666362546743273 https://www.facebook.com/laurentnice/videos/10213046223568254/ Outro And that wraps up the last week of April for WW1 Centennial News. Thank you for listening. We also want to thank our guests... Dr. Sheldon Hochheiser, corporate historian at AT&T Mike Shuster, Curator for the great war project blog Dr. Edward Lengel, Military historian and author Elaine Weiss, journalist and author Group Captain Peter Davis of the Australian Defense Staff and Commander Peter Kempster of the New Zealand Defense Force. Phil Neighbors, and Perry Hutchison, from the 100 Cities / 100 Memorials project in Granite OK Katherine Akey, WWI Photography specialist and the line producer for the podcast Many thanks to Mac Nelsen our sound editor as well as John Morreale our intern and Eric Marr for their great research assistance... And I am Theo Mayer - your host. The US World War One Centennial Commission was created by Congress to honor, commemorate and educate about WW1. Our programs are to-- inspire a national conversation and awareness about WW1; Including this podcast! We are bringing the lessons of the 100 years ago into today's classrooms; We are helping to restore WW1 memorials in communities of all sizes across our country; and of course we are building America’s National WW1 Memorial in Washington DC.   We want to thank commission’s founding sponsor the Pritzker Military Museum and Library as well as the Starr foundation for their support. The podcast can be found on our website at ww1cc.org/cn   Or search WW1 Centennial News on  iTunes, Google Play, TuneIn, Podbean, Stitcher - Radio on Demand, Spotify or using your smart speaker.. Just say “Play W W One Centennial News Podcast”. Our twitter and instagram handles are both @ww1cc and we are on facebook @ww1centennial. Thank you for joining us. And don’t forget to share the stories you are hearing here today about the war that changed the world! [music] So, you know how we always do a closing joke - typically about our speaking WWI word. Well, when I researching jokes about ANZAKS - here is what came up in Google. An unwritten law in Australia and New Zealand is “Don’t make jokes about the Anzacs.” You can make jokes about almost anything except the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps That’s pretty funny! So long!
April 21, 2018
Highlights - War in The Sky The Mystery of the USS Cyclops | @ 02:40 Submarine Stories | @ 04:55 Learning to command on the front - Mike Shuster | @ 07:20 The 2nd Division: Army and Marines - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 11:40 War In The Sky: Including the Red Baron goes down | @ 17:00 Midway Village reenactment - Dave Fornell | @ 20:25 Stars & Stripes newspaper - Robert H. Rheid | @ 27:25 "The Great Forgotten" Play - Karen & Kacie Devaney | @ 34:00 Speaking WWI: Pillbox | @ 39:25 Education Newsletter: Issue #12 | @ 41:05 WWI War Tech: Interrupter Gear | @ 42:05 Dispatch Newsletter: Headline Highlights | @ 44:30 The Centennial Buzz in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @ 47:05----more---- Opening Welcome to World War 1 centennial News - episode #68 - It’s about WW1 THEN - what was happening 100 years ago this week  - and it’s about WW1 NOW - news and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. This week our guests include: Mike Shuster, from the great war project blog. Mike updates us on the American Expeditionary Forces as their inexperienced officers struggle with the challenges of  battle command. Dr. Edward Lengel with the story of the 2nd Division as they enter combat at Maizey Dave Fornell shares the experience of organizing the largest WW1 reenactment event in the country Robert H. Reid tells us about the Stars and Stripes and how it was revived for troop morale in WWI Kacie and Karen Devaney with, The Great Forgotten: A stage play about WW1 Nurses - Not just during the war but after and continuing through the roaring 20’s Katherine Akey with the commemoration of world war one in social media   All this and more... on WW1 Centennial News -- a weekly podcast brought to you by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and the Starr foundation. I’m Theo Mayer - the Chief Technologist for the Commission and your host. Welcome to the show. [MUSIC] Preface This week’s focus is on the War in The Sky. You’ll learn about some new action up there, the death of one of the most prominent aces of the era, new educational materials arriving this week for teachers about the WWI air war, and a story about the tech that kept pilots from shooting off their propellers as they engaged the enemy. But first… as we jump into our centennial time machine and go back 100 years this week - we are going to start --   not in the sky but with a mysterious story about the war on the seas and also Germany’s claims about the success of their u-boats! [SOUND EFFECT] [TRANSITION] World War One THEN 100 Year Ago This Week It’s the middle of April 1918 and in the pages of the Official Bulletin, the government’s daily war gazette, published for President Wilson by George Creel, his propaganda chief --  this week we find articles of a missing ship - A big one ! [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline: Monday April 15, 1918 The headline in the bulletin  reads: Naval Collier Cyclops Overdue Since March 13 at Atlantic Port; Left West Indies. Personnel on Board Consisted of 15 Officers, 221 Men of Crew, and 57 Passengers - Searched for, by Radio and Ships, But No Trace is to Be Found. An the story reads: The U. S. S. Cyclops, a navy collier of 19,000 tons displacement, loaded with a cargo of manganese, is overdue at an Atlantic port. She last reported at one of the West Indian Islands on March 4, and since her departure from that port no trace of her nor any information concerning her has been obtained. Radio calls to the Cyclops from all possible points have been made and vessels sent to search for her along her probable route and areas in which she might be - all with no success. Weather Has Not Been Bad. A Collier is a Coal Carrier and The Cyclops is a massive one. She is 540 feet long and 65 feet wide. It is so big it is often referred to as a “floating coal mine,” The ship should have been docked in the waters off Baltimore after she  was sent to Brazil to pick up a load of manganese. Now, manganese is pretty valuable stuff right now. It is a mineral of great strategic importance to the war and used in the production of both iron and steel. In fact the lack of this mineral is a major problem facing the German steel makers and iron makers and the Cyclops had just picked up a 12,000 ton load of it. Nothing from the ship will be found. No wreckage, oil slicks or debris. Not even a distress call. And speculation will rage throughout history, leading to wild theories involving everything from a mutiny and a secret sale to the Germans, sinking by U-boats near Puerto Rico and even giant skids dragging her under. The mystery of the USS Cyclop will span a century without resolution.   There is also news this week about the war UNDER the sea [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline: Tuesday, APRIL 16, 1918 The headline in the NY Times reads: CREW OF U-85 HERE ARE PRISONERS - THIRTY-EIGHT GERMANS CAPTURED BY DESTROYER FANNING, TO BE INTERNED IN GEORGIA Captain Lieutenant Amberger, the German commander of the craft, which was sunk last november heads the party. And the story reads: Franklin D. Roosevelt acting Secretary of the Navy has given out tonight the names of the German prisoner of the submarine u-38. When the craft was wrecked by a depth bomb dropped by the Destroyer Fanning, on November 17 last, the crew of the Fanning picked up several life buoys which bore on one side the word "kaiser" and on the other the word "Got". The prisoners were taken to an English port and turned over to British authorities. By agreement between the British, the US Navy and the US Army the prisoners are being taken to Camp McPherson near Atlanta Georgia. Meanwhile another article this week presents the claims of the German Commander of the Navy that U-boats are winning the war on the sea. [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline: Amsterdam - April 18, 1918 A  headline in the NY Times reads: CAPELLE ASSERTS U-BOATS IS WINNING Tells Reichstag Three to Six times as Many Ships Are Sunk as Are Built. AMERICAN DESTROYERS FAIL CONVOYS ALSO A FAILURE And the story reads: Vice Admiral Von Capelle, German Minister of the Navy, discussing submarine warefare before the main Committee of the Reichstag delcared that the new U-Boat construction exceeded the losses and that the effectiveness of the submarines had increased. The Minister declared that the American Destroyers, "Which had been so much talked about" had failed in their objective. Admiral von Capelle described as a base lie the statement made by Sir Eric Geddes, First lord of the British admiralty, that German U-boat crews were unwilling to put to sea and that claims by British statesmen that there had been extraordinarily big losses of U-boats were grealy exagerated. Claims of fake news from the war on the seas 100 years ago this week!   USS Cyclops and UBoat News https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/16/102690731.pdf   https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/15/98261516.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/16/102690586.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/18/98262008.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/19/102691763.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/19/102691804.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/19/102691823.pdf https://timesmachinenytimes.com/svc/tmach/v1/refer?pdf=true&res=9806E4DE1F3FE433A25754C1A9629C946996D6CF   Contemporary Cyclops news: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2018/03/14/more-than-100-years-later-great-mystery-vanished-uss-cyclops-remains-unsolved.html http://www.navyhistory.org/2013/06/unanswered-loss-uss-cyclops-march-1918/ http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/baltimore-city/bs-md-uss-cyclops-20180312-story.html   Fighting in France: https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/15/98261538.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/15/98261525.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/16/102690556.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/16/102690562.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/17/102691147.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/17/102691155.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/18/98261912.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/18/98261915.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/18/98261916.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/19/102691733.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/19/102691736.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/20/102692321.pdf [MUSIC TRANSITION] Great War Project Now moving to the story on land and in the trenches and fields of the western front, It is time for Mike Shuster -- former NPR correspondent and curator for the Great War project Blog…. Mike: Your post last week ended on a note of the American troops moving to the front and Ed Lengel followed with the hard lessons the Yankee division received as they engaged in Seicheprey. This week, you continue with the incredible challenges the Americans face - not from the courage or spirit of the fighting men, but from the lack of experience of the American field commanders - few of whom have had any actual battle command and they are facing the desperate fierceness of the enemy. What is the next chapter of the story Mike? [MIKE POST] Mike Shuster from the Great War Project blog. The links to Mike Shuster’s Great War Project blog are in the podcast notes. LINK: http://greatwarproject.org/2018/04/15/more-americans-reach-the-battlefieldunprepared/ [SOUND EFFECT] America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 Welcome to our segment - America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI with Dr. Edward Lengel. This week, Ed introduces us to the 2nd Division - a mix of army and Marine brigades, interesting leadership, and a destiny to play key roles in the upcoming battles of the war. These are army soldiers and marines learning to fight an enemy determined to understand them, devastate them and destroy them… but this time the doughboys turn the tables.. Of course we, the audience, already know the outcome of the war. The American eventually figure it out and prevail… but the lessons continue to hurt! [ED LENGEL] [MUSIC TRANSITION] Dr. Edward Lengel is an American military historian, author, and our segment host for America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI. There are links in the podcast notes to Ed’s post and his web sites as an author.   Links:http://www.edwardlengel.com/2nd-division-goes-army-first-combat-maizey-1918/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ War in the Sky Ok… Now we are moving to the War in the Sky -- it’s mid-April of 1918 and America’s newly minted US Army Air Corps has joined the fighting front above the trenches. This week - 100 years ago -- Two U.S. Army Air corps pilots of the First Aero Squadron shoot down two enemy German planes over the Allied Squadron Aerodome in France. The encounter as lightning fast; just six minutes after the front line signaled that German airplanes were crossing the American trenches and heading towards the aerodome,  Lieutenant A.S. Winslow of Chicago and Lieutenant Douglas Campbell of California had brought two enemy aviators down. It was the first U.S. Army Air corps dogfight in history. One of the German planes was set on fire, and the other was knocked out but landed pretty much undamaged -- and their German pilots taken prisoner.   Both American aviators eventually received the Croix de Guerre, and Lt. Campbell, went on to shoot down five enemy aircraft, making him the first U.S. flying ace. As the Americans rose to the challenge this week, the great Red Baron fell. On April 21st, German ace Manfred von Richthofen, a living legend called the "Red Baron" and "ace of aces," was shot down and killed in aerial combat. By the time of his death, he had accrued 80 victories. Credit for his kill was given at the time to Canadian Captain Roy Brown.  During the fateful scrap, the Red Baron's cousin Lt. Wolfram von Richthofen was being fired upon when the Red Baron flew to his rescue and fired on the attacker, saving Wolfram's life. Richthofen pursued the enemy across the Somme where he was spotted and briefly attacked by a Camel piloted by Canadian Captain Roy Brown. At the time, it seems a single bullet hit Richthofen in the chest, causing a quick death. But-- who exactly killed the Red Baron is up for debate. Current evidence is that he was killed by ground fire from Australian troops -- but there are many theories. No matter who was the one to take him down, RIchthofen left behind a legacy of true aerial mastery and terror. His victory total will not be exceeded until June 1941. Link: https://www.upi.com/Archives/1918/04/14/American-flyers-down-pair/9481523634159/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manfred_von_Richthofen#Death https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=mdp.39015075629603;view=1up;seq=46 The Great War Channel For videos about WWI 100 years ago this week, check out our friends at  the Great War Channel on Youtube. New episodes this week include: The Battle of La Lys -- Operation Georgette Stalin in WW1 -- Scottish Home Rule -- Out of the Trenches Storm of Steel -- Author and Officer Ernst Jünger See their videos by searching for “the great war” on youtube or following the link in the podcast notes! Link:https://www.youtube.com/user/TheGreatWar World War One NOW Alright  - It is time to fast forward into the present with WW1 Centennial News NOW - [SOUND EFFECT] This part of the podcast focuses on NOW and how we are commemorating the centennial of WWI! Remembering Veterans Midway Village Reenactment For  Remembering Veterans -- We are going to do a follow up on the big reenactor event in Rockford Illinois we told you about a couple of weeks ago. The Midway Village Museum is a 137 acre living history park, and the host of the 6th annual Great War event, that featured over 225 re-enactors portraying soldiers and civilians from the United States and Europe. It’s the nation’s largest public WW1 re-enactment -- and a massive undertaking! If you were there - you had a blast - if you weren’t there - we will point you to great pictures and videos - AND… we have invited Dave Fornell, the reenactor coordinator for the event and member of the Illinois WWI Centennial Commission to tell us the story. Welcome, Dave! [greetings] [Dave -- there are three things I’d like to touch on today… The event and the experience of attending it -- Reenactors and the reenactor community at large And third - future plans] [Let’s start with the 6th Annual Great war event - how did it go! How many people showed up and what kind of comments did you get?] [So Dave - I am personally totally fascinated by the reenactor phenomena --- here is my chance to ask about it.. So…. you are a WWI reenactor - Why? ] [Are you only WWI?  I mean… do reenactors specialize in a specific historical period? - or is it more of a chronic avocation - Are reenactors organized? By historical period or by regional area? And based on a conversation I had with Katherine about this - what about women in this community?] [Finally - are there plans for a 2019 Midway Village Great War event?] [goodbyes/thanks] Dave Fornell is the re-enactor coordinator for the Midway Village Museum WWI reenactment and a member of the Illinois WWI Centennial Commission. Learn more about the Commission and the Midway Village Museum at the links in the podcast notes. Links:http://www.midwayvillage.com/ http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/illinois-wwi-centennial-home.html Spotlight in the Media Stars and Stripes 100 years ago, in February 1918, a new weekly publication found its way into the hands of Doughboys now arriving in France in ever greater numbers: The Stars and Stripes newspaper. Although the classic periodical was originally produced by Union Soldiers in the Civil War, when they found an abandoned printing press - they only ran 6 one-page issues at the time. The publication was revived for World War 1, produced by an all-military staff and aimed directly at the doughboys of the American Expeditionary Forces. Stars and Stripes is filled with cartoons and articles by and for doughboys, making light of everything from living covered in lice in the trenches to struggling to communicate with their new “Francai”  comrades. We reported on the relaunch in Episode #59 and ever since, we have been looking forward to the opportunity of inviting someone from the paper to come on the show and tell us more about it. So I am especially excited to welcome Robert H. Reid, senior managing editor of the Stars and Stripes newspaper. Robert - so nice to have you on the show! [welcome/greetings] [OK - first of all - Robert for our listeners - We need a context - could you briefly frame up what the Stars and stripes paper is? ] [When we saw in our research that the paper had re-emerged for the doughboys arriving in france --- we quickly started to read through issues - and what struck me immediately was the humor… tongue in cheek, irreverent, good natured, and wry -- How did that happen!? Was that planned or just what happened?] [Clearly the AEF decided they wanted this…. Do we know how the papers ROLE was framed by the command in 1918? Did it have a mission statement?] [Full disclosure - I grew up with the paper and the people who made it in post WWII Germany. We lived as Americans near frankfurt in the early 50’s and my mom wrote for the paper…. So here we are today in the THIRD generation of the paper’s life - What is the Stars and Stripes today?] [goodbyes/thank you] Robert Reid is the senior managing editor of Stars and Stripes. You can learn more about the paper, and see archival copies at the Library of Congress, by following the links in the podcast notes. link:https://www.loc.gov/collections/stars-and-stripes/?sb=date https://www.stripes.com/ The Great Forgotten To wrap up Spotlight in the Media this week -- we’re turning the focus back onto the service of women in the war with the play The Great Forgotten. Set during WWI and through the Roaring Twenties, the play follows two sisters --- American nurses in France during WW1, and their adjustment to a whole new world after the end of the conflict. This segment actually kicks off a conversation that will become ever more important on the podcast… looking at the profound post-war experience in America With us to tell us about their original production are mother-daughter playwriting team Karen and Kacie Devaney. Welcome! [welcome/greetings} [Kacie -- the play was initially your idea, and you ended up getting your mother involved. Tell us about that? ] [Karen -- The two main characters embody the experience of so many women who served in the war -- Did you base the characters on real individuals?] [Back to you Kacie -- This is obviously a real passion project for you -- why do you think the stories of these women in, and after, WW1 matter so much?] [A quick one phrase answer from each of you… In a phrase - what was the biggest realization for you personally in doing this project?] [In closing - are you going to be performing the play again soon?] [goodbyes/thank you] Karen and Kacie Devaney are a mother daughter playwriting team. Learn more about their play The Great Forgotten by following the links in the podcast notes. link:https://www.facebook.com/Thegreatforgotten/ https://twitter.com/KarinDevaney https://twitter.com/Kaciedevaney Speaking WW1 Now let’s head into our weekly feature “Speaking World War 1” -- Where we explore the words & phrases that are rooted in the war  --- The war torn landscape of Belgium and the Western Front is often described as being nearly featureless-- mud, shell holes, stumps and a tangle of trenches. But one feature stood out -- and was a highly coveted tactical position. Low, grey structures dotting the muddy landscape-- the Germans began constructing these steel-reinforced concrete bunkers in order to enhance their defenses against British artillery on the Hindenburg Line. With walls and ceilings several feet thick, the bunkers could easily withstand all but the highest caliber shells, and were often obscured with debris to prevent detection. They were built most often in the Ypres salient, where a high rainfall and water table made trenches an near-impossibility. As the British and Commonwealth troops stared out at these little buildings in the moon like world of Flanders-- they noted their similarity to the small medicine boxes carried by civilians -- earning the structures the name of “pillbox” - which is our speaking world war I word this week. Nowadays, according to the Department of Defense - the word defines small, low fortified outpost that houses machine guns and anti-tank weapons… or that thing you carry your meds and vitamins in! Pillboxes -- created by the Germans, and named by the British-- and this week’s word for speaking WW1. Links:https://www.historyextra.com/period/first-world-war/10-first-world-war-slang-words-we-still-use-today/ https://www.awm.gov.au/articles/blog/pillbox-fighting-in-the-ypres-salient https://www.militaryfactory.com/dictionary/military-terms-defined.asp?term_id=4092 [SOUND EFFECT] Education In Education news this week -- The latest WW1 education newsletter just came out! Issue #12 is “Air War and Weapons Technology” and features articles on the development of aerial warfare and the incredible technological boom that accompanied and supported it. This issue includes resources for teaching about the history of unmanned drones; the life and service of the only African American member of the Lafayette Escadrille, Eugene Bullard; the role of zeppelins in the war; and the changing military technology of the war. The newsletter is published by the National WW1 Museum and Memorial in partnership with the WW1 Centennial Commission. Go to our new education website at ww1cc.org/ e d u where you can sign up for the education newsletters and connect with the commission education program - or follow the link in the podcast notes. Link: www.ww1cc.org/edu WW1 War Tech Interrupter Gear This week for WW1 War Tech -- we’re headed back into the Sky to take a look at a technological development that helped usher in the age of the aerial dogfighting. Early in the war, planes were used exclusively for observation -- but to get clear images of the enemy lines, you had to fly “low and slow” and in a fairly straight line, which left you pretty easy pickings  if an enemy plane with a gun came along. This started an arms race in the sky as each side tried to outgun the other --- in order to protect their observation planes. The first attempt to mount a machine gun on an airplane, ended after the nose-heavy prototype crashed on its first experimental flight. Some guns were mounted and shot over the wings, and “pusher planes” with their props behind the pilot were developed, allowing for them to shoot ahead of themselves without hitting the blades of the propellers. Dutch aircraft designer Anthony Fokker came up with the ultimate answer for the Germans! His mechanism, referred to as the interrupter gear, connected the firing of the machine gun to the turning of the propeller, allowing the bullets to pass through the brief gaps in between the blades. Yet despite the tests on both the ground and the air proving his design worked, German generals remained skeptical. They demanded that Fokker fly into the air and shoot down an enemy plane himself. He did as he was told, and although a French plane soon came within his sights, he found himself unable to pull the trigger. Fokker returned to Douai flying field to vocalize his refusal, demanding that someone else test the plane instead. And so the famous Lieutenant Oswald Boelcke was the first pilot to successfully use the interrupter gear, making his first kill on August 1, 1915. German planes would continue to dominate the skies, a phenomenon known as the ‘Fokker Scourge’, until mid-1916. The interrupter gear-- a technological marvel that brought air combat into the future-- and the subject of this week’s WW1 War Tech. We have put links in the podcast notes to learn more including a link a video from the YoutUbe channel The Slow Mo Guys where you can watch an interrupter gear operate in very, very slow motion. Links: http://www.firstworldwar.com/airwar/earlyfighters.htm          http://www.firstworldwar.com/airwar/deflectorgear.htm          http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/fokker.htm          https://www.uh.edu/engines/epi1369.htm https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysB-SH19WRQ Articles and Posts For Articles and posts -- we are going to continue with the idea we launched last week of highlighting the features of the weekly dispatch newsletter.  So here we go. [DING] VMI and VA Commission present WWI Commemorative Symposium April 27th Conference attendees will hear from national and regional experts, who will explore the political and military leadership of World War I, the experiences of the soldiers and generals on the front, and the role that Virginians played in the Great War. . [DING] Treasure trove of Army Major Amos J. Peaslee and the first Diplomatic Courier Service Major Peaslee’s led the first ever Diplomatic Courier Service during WW1 -- and now his personal documents and artifacts related to the Diplomatic Courier Service, including a personal engraved copy of the Treaty of Versailles, are on their way to the State Department. [DING] "until very recently, we had forgotten a tremendously important aspect of the U.S. experience that eventually changed this country forever." Read the essay by scholar Keith Gandel as he explores the literature of WW1 -- and what we can learn from it today. [DING] Very small ships make very large impact Read about the U.S. Navy Submarine Chasers in WWI -- on the cutting edge of anti-submarine warfare. [DING] Robert Frost: A poet for whom life and war were trials by existence The WWrite blog  this week focuses on the iconic American poet Robert Frost and his insight into connections between war and the human condition. [DING] Finally, our selection from our Official Centennial Merchandise store - Lest We Forget: The Great War is available through our store. The book features nearly 350 high-quality images, an introduction by Sir Hew Strachan and text by historian Michael W. Robbins. Importantly, when you get this visual remembrance of the "War that Changed The World"  - a full ½ of the proceeds go to building the Memorial! Sign up for the Weekly Dispatch newsletter at ww1cc.org/subscribe check the archive at ww1cc.org/dispatch or follow the link in the podcast notes. Link: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch The Buzz And that brings us to the buzz - the centennial of WW1 this week in social media with Katherine Akey - Katherine, what did you pick? Famous Fighters, the Friends of Jenny and Barbara Bush Hi Theo -- Last week we talked a lot about the Liberty Loans-- and during the third loan drive, celebrities were drafted to help hype the program as they traveled across the country, including the movie stars Douglas Fairbanks, Mary Pickford and Charlie Chaplin. But they aren’t the only darlings of the silver screen that helped the war effort -- and this week on our Facebook page at facebook.com/ww1centennial-- we shared photographs and draft registrations cards of two other familiar faces. Buster Keaton, known to the army by his given name, Joseph, was assigned to the 40th Division, 159th Infantry-- a division that did not wholly see battle but did serve on the Western Front. There’s also Walt Disney-- who was just 16 years old when he joined the American Red Cross and arrived in France as a paramedic, serving near Neufchateau. You can see photos of them by following the links in the podcast notes. Two more nods from the Buzz-- this week, the Friends of Jenny, a historical aviation restoration group, shared an album of images updating  us on the progress of one of their major restoration projects -- their Curtiss Jenny rebuild is receiving its new engine! Check it out at the link in the notes, and follow their facebook page as the project continues to pick up speed. Finally this week, the nation was sad to hear  of the passing of former First Lady, Barbara Bush. But you may not know that she was the daughter of a World War One Veteran-- her father, Marvin Pierce, enlisted in the US Army Reserves in 1918, was promoted to Lieutenant and served as an Engineering Corps officer in France from September 1918 to May 1919. Our thoughts are with her family and loved ones, and you can read more about her long and storied life at the links in the podcast notes. That’s it for this week in the Buzz. Link:https://www.facebook.com/lesamericainsdegondrecourt/posts/590840027940871 https://www.facebook.com/DedicatedDoughboy/posts/1047277248744614 https://www.facebook.com/friendsofjenny/posts/819085468278037 https://www.stripes.com/news/us/former-first-lady-barbara-bush-dies-at-age-92-1.522583 https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/17/opinion/barbara-bush-a-first-lady-without-apologies.html Outro And that is our episode this third week of April. Thank you for listening to WW1 Centennial News. We also want to thank our guests... Mike Shuster, Curator for the great war project blog Dr. Edward Lengel, Military historian and author Dave Fornell, re-enactor coordinator and member of the Illinois WWI Centennial Commission. Robert H. Reid, senior managing editor of the Stars and Stripes newspaper Karen and Kacie Devaney, playwrights Katherine Akey, WWI Photography specialist and the line producer for the podcast Many thanks to the newest member of our team - Mac Nelsen our sound editor--- a shout out to our researchers John Morreale and Eric Marr... And I am Theo Mayer - your host.   The US World War One Centennial Commission was created by Congress to honor, commemorate and educate about WW1. Our programs are to-- inspire a national conversation and awareness about WW1; Including this podcast! We are bringing the lessons of the 100 years ago into today's classrooms; We are helping to restore WW1 memorials in communities of all sizes across our country; and of course we are building America’s National WW1 Memorial in Washington DC.   We want to thank commission’s founding sponsor the Pritzker Military Museum and Library as well as the Starr foundation for their support.   The podcast can be found on our website at ww1cc.org/cn   Or search WW1 Centennial News on  iTunes, Google Play, TuneIn, Podbean, Stitcher - Radio on Demand, Spotify or using your smart speaker.. Just say “Play W W One Centennial News Podcast”. Our twitter and instagram handles are both @ww1cc and we are on facebook @ww1centennial. Thank you for joining us. And don’t forget to share the stories you are hearing here today about the war that changed the world! [music] Legend of Snoopy and the Red Baron From all of us and Snoopy - So long!
April 14, 2018
Highlights Financing WWI - Reaching for the stars | 01:55 The 369th hits the front lines | 08:30 The British Struggle continues - Mike Shuster | 10:40 The Yankee Division learns at seicheprey - Dr. Edward Lengel | 15:10 A century In the Making - The maquettes get busy | 21:00 “Lest We forget: The Great War” - Kenneth Clarke & Michael Robbins | 25:05 How to teach about WWI - Dr. Ian Isherwood | 32:30 Speaking WWI - Pilates | 38:25 100 Cities / 100 Memorial in Jackson, TN - Dr. Alice-Catherine Carls | 40:25 WWI War Tech - Carrel-Dakin Antiseptic | 45:55 The Weekly Dispatch Newsletter overview | 47:50 The Centennial In Social Media - Katherine Akey | 50:25----more---- Opening Welcome to World War 1 centennial News - episode #67 - It’s about WW1 THEN - what was happening 100 years ago this week  - and it’s about WW1 NOW - news and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. This week our guests include: Mike Shuster, from the great war project blog updates us on what the UK Forces are up against both on the front and in recruitment Dr. Edward Lengel with the story of the US Yankee Division as they enter serious battle. Kenneth Clarke and Michael Robbins introduce a pictorial book, a perfect souvenir of the centennial from the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and the US WW1 Centennial Commission -  Lest We Forget: The Great War Dr. Ian Isherwood shares his experience in creating a WW1 educational programme structured around a soldier’s letters Dr. Alice-Catherine Carls, the project instigator for  the 100 Cities/100 Memorials project from Jackson, Tennessee and the local research the project spawned Katherine Akey keeps us in Tennessee with a social media post about a great commemoration event. All this and more... on WW1 Centennial News -- a weekly podcast brought to you by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and the Starr foundation. I’m Theo Mayer - the Chief Technologist for the Commission and your host. Welcome to the show. [MUSIC] Preface Just one year after the declaration of war, 100 years ago, it is time for the third Liberty Loan drive to raise money to pay for the war effort. Let me put the Liberty Loan drive into perspective for you. In early 20th century thinking, Woodrow Wilson’s government was completely clear that the war would be financed by money raised specifically for it. And a majority of that money was to come from the American People - ordinary citizens. By contrast, today in our late 20th /early  21st century, money for our wars and military expenditures are financed from a big boiling cauldron called the national debt. Today the average American Citizen feel little or no real connection with or responsibility for our military expenditures.    Not so in 1917 and 1918. In those two years, during four Bond drives, twenty million individuals purchase Liberty War bonds. 20 million investors is pretty impressive given that there were only twenty-four million households in America at the time. More than 17 billion dollars are raised. In addition, taxes are collected to the sum of 8.8 billion dollars… in short, $26 billion dollars is gathered to finance the fight in WWI. Now that’s in 1918 dollars. Today that equates to nearly ½ a TRILLION dollars raised in bonds, largely from citizen, specifically for a purpose. With that as background, let’s jump into our centennial time machine a take a look at the national fundraising effort and a whole lot more 100 years ago this week in the war that changed the world. World War One THEN 100 Year Ago This Week On April 6th 1918 - President Wilson makes a speech to launch the third Liberty Bond Campaign. Here is his declaration as reported in the pages of the Official Bulletin - The government’s war Gazette published by Wilson’s propaganda chief George Creel. [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline: SATURDAY, APRIL 6, 1918 The headline Reads: The President delivered the following address at Baltimore to-night on the occasion of the opening of the Third Liberty Loan Campaign: “Fellow Citizens: This is the anniversary of our acceptance of Germany's challenge to fight for our right to live and be free, and for the sacred rights of free men everywhere. The Nation is awake. There is no need to call to it. We know what the war must cost, our utmost sacrifice, the lives of our fittest men and, if need be, all that we possess. The loan we are met to discuss is one of the least parts of what we are called upon to give and to do, though in itself imperative. The people of the whole country are alive to the necessity of it, and are ready to lend to the utmost, even where it involves a sharp skimping and daily sacrifice to lend out of meagre earnings. They will look with reprobation and contempt upon those who can and will not, upon those who demand a higher rate of interest, upon those who think of it as a mere com-. mercial transaction. I have not come, therefore, to urge the loan. I have come only to give you, if I can, a more vivid conception of what it is for.” The president goes on to explain the situation on the ground in europe and the dire need for America as a nation to take a stand, take a lead and defend all that the nation holds dear. And so kicks off the third Liberty bond campaign. A few days later the Official Bulletin reports on the Cabinet’s Liberty Bond appeal Dateline: TUESDAY, APRIL 9, 1918 The Headline reads: CABINET MEMBERS APPEAL TO ALL TRUE AMERICANS TO SUPPORT WITH THEIR DOLLARS OUR GALLANT FIGHTERS IN THE FIELD; BUY LIBERTY BONDS, THEY ASK, IN PROOF OF YOUR PATRIOTISM The article goes on with a number of cabinet members presenting their appeal of the importance and patriotic imperative for buying bond.. But my favorite part comes at the end of the full page article with a subheadline of: [SOUND EFFECT] WHAT LIBERTY BONDS WILL BUY. The article reads: Eighteen thousand dollars invested- in Liberty bonds will equip an infantry battalion with rifles. Fifty thousand dollars will construct a base hospital with 500 beds, or equip an infantry brigade with pistols. One hundred thousand dollars will buy five combat airplanes, or pistols, rifles. and half a million rounds of ammunition for an infantry regiment. Just like today - contributors to a cause want to know exactly what their contribution is buying! These guys know exactly what they are are doing! In another smart move, presumably pulled off by George Creel - the campaign cleverly recruits four of the most popular movie stars of the day and puts them on the road to help raise money. The headline reads: LIBERTY LOAN SPEAKING TOURS FOR FOUR MOTION PICTURE STARS And the story opens with: Today we are announcing The itineraries of Charles Chaplin, Douglas Fairbanks, Mary Pickford, and Marguerite Clark for their speaking tours during the forthcoming Liberty loan campaign! And the article continues with the schedule of appearances by the stars. Then on Saturday April 13th 1918, just one week after launching the campaign, the headline in the official bulletin reads TOTAL SALES OF LIBERTY BONDS AS REPORTED TO THE TREASURY, PASS THE HALF BILLION MARK AS SCORES OF TOWNS EXCEED QUOTAS It’s a big week on the home front - raising money 100 years ago, for America’s participation in a war that changed  the world! Links: https://www.federalreservehistory.org/essays/liberty_bonds http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/educate/places/official-bulletin/2381-ww1-official-bulletin-volume-1-issue-4-may-14-1917.html http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/educate/places/official-bulletin/2497-ww1-official-bulletin-volume-1-issue-31-june-15-1917.html https://muse.jhu.edu/article/639845 http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/educate/places/official-bulletin/2850-ww1-official-bulletin-volume-1-issue-121-october-1-1917.html https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/04/102979322.pdf Liberty Loan articles from Times: https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/04/102979322.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/04/102979339.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/05/102687136.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/06/102687648.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/12/98261150.pdf Americans needed by allies as action on front continues. https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/02/102685967.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/08/317376142.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/10/102690083.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/12/98261154.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/01/102685527.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/02/102685966.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/04/03/102686544.pdf And it is also a very big week on the fighting front! Here is a story that is not covered in the government press - and doesn’t really pop up in the popular press either - But 100 years ago this week, The 369th US Infantry Regiment goes to the front lines to fight --- but with the French! - on April 8th 1918 the 369th is amalgamated into French Army. But wait a minute….. - Didn’t General Pershing insist on keeping the American Expeditionary Forces together as a distinct American fighting force.   Well yea - he did - but Pershing’s insistence on keeping all American forces together didn’t extend to the black troops in the segregated US Army.   Among them were the 15th New York National Guard Regiment, redesignated the 369th Infantry Regiment but better known as the Harlem Rattler or the Harlem Hellfighters.   Now Pershing presumably didn’t have any problems with black soldiers per se, but the question of how to use black troops in the front lines, where they’d have to rely on the full cooperation of white units on either side, was really gnarly. The online blog “today in World War 1,  posted a quote from Hamilton Fish - a New Yorker, who served as one of the regiment’s white officers: Quote: The French were crying out for U.S. regiments to go into the French Army.  So I guess Pershing figured he could kill two birds with one stone–solve the problem on what to do with us and give something to Foch.  From then on we spent our entire service in the French Army. Oh officially we were still the 369th U.S. Infantry, but to all intent and purposes we were francais. The post goes on with a quote from Noble Sissle, who served in the regiment’s famous band: We were fully equipped with French rifles and French helmets.  Our wagons, our rations, our machine guns and everything pertaining to the equipment of the regiment for trench warfare was supplied by the French Army. The 369th went on to serve with great distinction spending more time on the front line that any other US forces… with a fierceness and bravery that never gave ground to the enemy. A proud combat service started 100 years ago this week, in the war the changed the world... http://today-in-wwi.tumblr.com/post/172746986523/369th-us-infantry-regiment-begins-front-line [MUSIC TRANSITION] Great War Project Continuing to explore the story on the front, we are going to go to Mike Shuster former NPR correspondent and curator for the Great War project Blog…. Mike: Your post this week speaks to what can only be thought of as moment of total desperation for the British lines… It has just been exactly two years since they brutally put down Ireland’s Easter Uprising - Now they are trying to conscript them - They are not having much luck drafting more Canadian either - General Haig puts out his out his inspirational “Backs To The Wall” Order - and at this very moment of do or die - Well… you story this week closes on a note of hope. Fill it in for us Mike… [Mike Shuster] Mike Shuster from the Great War Project blog. LINK: http://greatwarproject.org/2018/04/08/allies-face-resistance-in-own-ranks/ [SOUND EFFECT] America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 And one last story from the front for our segment -  America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI with Dr. Edward Lengel. As Mike indicated, this is the time when the American infantry does arrive on the front… The boys are fresh, healthy and eager when compared to their battle weary allies. They’re also green. The Germans want to -- Maybe they NEED TO discredit them. The school of combat is now is session for the Americans. And the lessons begin 100 years ago this week in Seicheprey - lessons for all sides. And Ed is here to tell you the story: [Ed Lengel] [MUSIC TRANSITION] Dr. Edward Lengel is an American military historian, author, and our segment host for America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI. There are links in the podcast notes to Ed’s post and his web sites as an author.   Links:http://www.edwardlengel.com/combat-seicheprey-yankee-division-100-years-ago/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ The Great War Channel For videos about WWI 100 years ago this week, check out our friends at  the Great War Channel on Youtube. New episodes this week include: Operation Michael Runs out of Breath France before WW1 -- La belle epoque? See their videos by searching for “the great war” on youtube or following the link in the podcast notes! Link:https://www.youtube.com/user/TheGreatWar World War One NOW Alright  - It is time to fast forward into the present with WW1 Centennial News NOW - [SOUND EFFECT] This part of the podcast focuses on NOW and how we are commemorating the centennial of WWI! A Century in the Making The Maquette and it’s Travels We have an update for our segment: A century in the making - America’s WW1 Memorial in Washington DC. As our regular listeners know, we are building a national WWI Memorial at Pershing Park in the nation’s capital. It’s a big project. And It’s been a long time coming. We spoke with sculptor Sabin Howard back in episodes #54 and #55 about a new process. Sabin combined advanced 3D printing technology at the WETA Workshop in New Zealand with traditional classic sculpture techniques to create a 10’ miniature draft the sculptural centerpiece for the memorial. The result is called a maquette. We made two of them to show America and to help us raise money for this strictly publicly funded memorial. One maquette was on display at the Visitor's Center in the Tennessee Bicentennial Mall, in downtown Nashville --- right in front of the state capital. It was quite a hit at the Tennessee Great War Commission's event this last Saturday, where it was featured as part of the presentation from Terry Hamby - the WW1 Centennial Commission Chairman. Both Maquettes are being prepped for a busy schedule of showings at special events and fundraisers around the country. We will keep you updated as the schedule evolves… Katherine - You went to a fundraiser on wednesday and got your first look at the sculpture that is called “A soldier’s Journey” - what was your first reaction? [Katherine’s reaction to seeing the Maquette] Learn more about the memorial and follow the incredible journey of a project that has been a century in the making - Go to ww1cc.org/memorial or follow the link in the podcast notes Link:http://ww1cc.org/memorial Remembering Veterans Lest We Forget: Book and Exhibition And while we are speaking about the Memorial - we have a brand new way for you to help build America’s WWI Memorial in Washington DC and at the same time, get yourself a very special, colorful, inspiring and lasting souvenir of the centennial! This week marks the release of a new visual pictorial table book called  “Lest We Forget: The Great War” - The book is dedicated to the centennial and produced by The Pritzker Military Museum and Library along with the WW1 Centennial commission - When you get this visual remembrance  - a full ½ of the proceeds go building the Memorial! With us to tell us more about “Lest We Forget” which also has a companion exhibit in Chicago at the Pritzker - are Kenneth Clarke, Former President and CEO of the Pritzker Military Museum and Library, and Michael Robbins, historian. Ken was the executive and creative director for the book and exhibition and Michael was writer for the text. Welcome, Gentlemen! [greetings/welcome] [Ken, can you give us an overview of the project and the concept?] [Insert questions if it fits] Ken there are nearly 350 images in this book -- how did you select them?] [Michael -- you were the writer on the project - What story are you telling and how do the words and the pictures interact?] [Ken -- Sir Hugh Strachan (STRAWN) - who has been on the show - did an introduction for the book. What was his emphasis?] [Ken -- In closing - Who is this book for?] The book is available in bookstores nationwide, but the easiest place to get it is in the commission’s Merchandise shop. Look under Commemorate at ww1cc.org and we have link to the commission's shop in the podcast notes .. Thank  you both for coming on the podcast and introducing us to this beautiful “must get” souvenir of the Centennial! [goodbyes/thank you] Kenneth Clarke and Michael Robbins the creative director and writer for the Lest We Forget: The Great War - available through the links in the podcast notes. Link: https://shop.worldwar1centennial.org/merchandise-gifts-awards?product_id=188 https://www.pritzkermilitary.org/store/pmml-merchandise/lest-we-forget-michael-robbins/ https://www.pritzkermilitary.org/whats_on/video-rucksack/lest-we-forget-exhibit-opening-remarks/ Education Teaching WWI - A great approach Now for our Education segment -- A story of a teacher and his approach to teaching WWI! Collections of soldier’s letters and diaries from the war continue to be discovered and rediscovered one hundred years after they were first written. As we have learned from a number of museum curators, they offer an amazing opportunity to help understand this event in history as they bring in  a first person point of view. Today, we’re joined by Dr. Ian Isherwood, Visiting Assistant Professor at Gettysburg College in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania who is doing exactly that. Welcome, Dr. Isherwood! [greetings/welcome] [Dr. Isherwood-- you’ve been using Wartime letters from Lieutenant Colonel Jack Peirs, a British Soldier as the foundation for teaching history to your students. For context, can you tell us briefly about the soldier, and how you came across his letters?] [Did you build up a following? ] [At the commission we are really interested in the techniques for teaching this subject - What advice do you have for others who may want to undertake an educational programme like this?] [Would this work for younger student educators?] [we've found that the first person POV gives you insight you cant get from just plain facts... do you find that to be true?] [You’re also personally working on a new, upcoming book -- can you tell us a little about it?] [goodbyes/thank you] Dr. Ian Isherwood is a Visiting Assistant Professor and the Chairperson of Civil War Era Studies at Gettysburg College in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. We put links for his Jack Peirs website and twitter accounts in the podcast notes. links:http://www.gettysburg.edu/academics/history/research/jackpiers.dot https://twitter.com/jackpeirs http://cupola.gettysburg.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1116&context=ghj http://jackpeirs.org/ https://www.instagram.com/jackpeirs/?hl=en Speaking WW1 Now let’s head into our weekly feature “Speaking World War 1” -- Where we explore the words & phrases that are rooted in the war  --- It’s a health fad with real benefits, a gym class pretty much anyone can benefit from -- It’s very popular -- It’s very Hep -- and I’ll bet you had no idea it was from WWI - No.. not Zoomba   Nope… Not kickboxing... Uh uh definitely NOT P90X… It’s our Speaking WWI word this week - Pilates! Pilates is named for its inventor, Joseph Hubertus Pilates, who created it in Great Britain during WW1. Pilates, Interestingly was born a German citizen. He was a frail and sickly child who took to exercise for both his health and self-defense against bullies. He eventually grew into an accomplished boxer and martial artist, and traveled to England in 1912 to find work, picking up a job as a circus performer. When the war broke out, he was arrested as an enemy alien and interned on the Isle of Man. It was there that he came up with his method of mental and physical exertion, which he called “Contrology”, as a way to encourage his fellow inmates to stay healthy. Many prisoners were bedridden, and so Pilates invented a makeshift resistance-training machine out of springs and straps taken from the beds and attached to the foot and headboards. This use of resistance loads would later become a staple of the Pilates method. After the end of the war, Pilates emigrated to the US and settled in New York, where he and his wife, Clara, founded the first Body Contrology Studio in 1925. And of course that was the foundation for the trendy “new” exercise method -- known far and wide as Pilates. Pilates -- created by a German citizen prisoner in wartime -- and this week’s word for speaking WW1. Links:http://online.wsj.com/ww1/pilates [SOUND EFFECT] 100 Cities 100 Memorials World War I Memorial Fountain - Jackson, TN This week for our 100 Cities / 100 Memorials segment ---  the $200,000 matching grant challenge to rescue and focus on our local WWI memorials --- It looks like this is Tennessee week - because We  are going to profile the World War I Memorial Fountain project from Madison County in Jackson, Tennessee. With us tell us about the project is Dr. Alice-Catherine Carls, the Tom Elam Distinguished Professor of History at the University of Tennessee at Martin, and member of the Tennessee Great War Commission.   Welcome Dr. Carls! [greetings] [Dr. Carls - your WWI Memorial honors both the women on the homefront in Tennessee and the men on the fighting front in France. That’s a really interesting approach… could you tell us more about that?] [It is very unique for a WWI memorial to honor both the homefront and the warefront. [Your project has a large research and community historical society component to it could you tell us about that?] [Have you been promoting the project locally? What has the community response been?] [MAYBE QUESTION: The memorial was designed as a fountain - but has been dry for a long time - I know in your grant application you hadn’t yet decided if you were going to get the fountain replumed - I have worked with water features before - It’s very tricky. Where is that idea at now?] [Are you planning a rededication this year?] Dr. Carls - thank you for leading this project on behalf of your community and on behalf of the men and women of your county who served both here and abroad in WWI [goodbyes/thank you] Dr. Alice-Catherine Carls, Professor of History at the University of Tennessee, and a member of the Tennessee Great War Commission. Learn more about the 100 Cities/100 Memorials program and about West Tennessee in WW1 by following the links in the podcast notes or by going to ww1cc.org/100Memorials Link: www.ww1cc.org/100cities http://www.utm.edu/worldwars/ [SOUND EFFECT] WW1 War Tech Carrel-Dakin Method This week for WW1 War Tech -- another technology that saved lives instead of taking them. In the early months of the war, amputations for wounded soldiers were at the same high levels as those of the civil war. In other words - very high! But by late 1915 that rate dropped dramatically! So, what happened? Well… That year, a French physician, Théodore Tuffier, testified to the Academy of Medicine that 70% of amputations weren’t because of the initial injury, but because of a later infection. As we have mentioned on the podcast before the mud-filled and deeply unsanitary conditions of trench warfare were a happy home for the bacteria that cause Gangrene. The antiseptics of the 19th century were inadequate. But two men: French doctor Alexis Carrel and British biochemist Henry Dakin came together under the cloud of war to combine their two discoveries to create one very effective method of disinfecting wounds. Dakin created a solution of sodium hypochlorite that managed to kill any bacteria in a wound, but didn’t damage the flesh surrounding it. Meanwhile Dr. Carrel developed a strategy of opening and thoroughly draining wounds. Put together, the Carrel-Dakin method proved the most effective antiseptic treatment to that date, and the procedure quickly spread into use all across Europe, saving an untold number of limbs from amputation. The Carrel-Dakin method-- an incredible leap forward in the treatment of field wounds -- and the subject of this week’s WW1 War Tech. We have put links in the podcast notes to learn more including a link to the commission’s website on medicine in WWI at ww1cc.org/medicine Link:  https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2017/02/world-war-i-medicine/517656/       https://www.rtbf.be/ww1/topics/detail_the-carrel-dakin-method?id=8356084 http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/injuries-in-world-war-i.html Articles and Posts For Articles and posts -- we are going to continue with the idea we launched last week of highlighting the features of the weekly dispatch newsletter.  So here we go. [DING] Final fifty “WWI Centennial Memorials” announced in wrap-up of competition phase of 100 Cities / 100 Memorials Also learn about -- the Memorial Hunters Club, a crowd-sourced effort to create a comprehensive national register of WWI memorials. [DING] "The film needed really really brilliant nuanced, convincing performances" The interview from this podcast with director Saul Dibb, about the motion picture a Journey’s End - now in wide release -  has been turned into a print article on the website. [DING] "It was a sad but poignant tale." Two lifelong friends, Now octogenarians , have produced a documentary film about one of their uncle’s service in WW. [DING] Pennsylvania oil and World War I Remember how important coal was during WW1? Supplement that knowledge by reading about the role of Pennsylvania Oil during the war. [DING] 'Over Here' in Michigan, High School Athletes Gave to World War I Effort Michigan’s high school athletes helped fill the labor shortage created as millions of men shipped overseas. [DING] Break of Day - Poet Isaac Rosenberg The WWrite blog  features the WWI poetry of British soldier, Isaac Rosenberg, who died on Easter Sunday, 1918 - and who was also mentioned by Mike Shuster in last week’s podcast. [DING] The story of Donald Chapman This week’s featured Story of Service submitted by his grand niece Tish Wells [DING] Official WWI Centennial Merchandise Finally, this week’s selection from our Official on line Centennial Merchandise store - an authentic classic green US Army woolen blanket from woolrich inc. the oldest continuously operating woolen mill in the US and suppliers of army blankets 100 years ago. Sign up for the Weekly Dispatch newsletter at ww1cc.org/subscribe check the archive at ww1cc.org/dispatch or follow the link in the podcast notes. Link: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch The Buzz And that brings us to the buzz - the centennial of WW1 this week in social media with Katherine Akey - Katherine, what did you pick? Tennessee Living History and WW1 Literature Hi Theo -- As we commemorate 101 years since joining the First World War -- incredible events are beginning to take place across the country to remember those who served. Over the last weekend, Tennessee held a massive living history event in Nashville -- the very event that the Maquette recently appeared at! The Tennessee State Park System hosted the event, which included reproduction trenches, encampments and field kitchens, WW1 era aircraft and many reenactors -- including Suffragettes and Salvation Army doughnut lassies handing out freshly made treats. There was also a large group of reenactors representing the African American troops of Tennessee -- wearing the iconic French Adrian Helmet that was distributed to the troops amalgamated with French units -- and the whole weekend event was capped off with a period baseball game. We shared an article as well as an album of photos from the event on Facebook this week -- you can find links to those in the podcast notes. Lastly for the week -- we shared an article that instigated some spirited debate on our facebook page: a list of what the author considers 13 essential books on the American Expeditionary Forces. The list is a great starting place for anyone wanting to delve deeper into this chapter in American history -- but be sure to check the link to the facebook post to see all the recommendations made by our community -- there were many! That’s it for this week in the Buzz. Link:https://ebonydoughboys.org/ https://www.facebook.com/pg/tennesseephotographs/photos/?tab=album&album_id=2123040067916331 https://www.newschannel5.com/news/wwi-soldiers-honored-in-100th-anniversary-event https://taskandpurpose.com/american-expeditionary-force-books/ https://www.facebook.com/ww1centennial/posts/956863547822277   Outro And that is the second week of April for WW1 Centennial News. Thank you for listening. We also want to thank our guests... Mike Shuster, Curator for the great war project blog Dr. Edward Lengel, Military historian and author Ken Clarke -- and Michael Robbins creative director and writer for the new souvenir of the Centennial book - Lest we Forget Dr. Ian Isherwood, historian and WWI educator Dr. Alice-Catherine Carls, WWI Researcher and member of the Tennessee Great War Commission Katherine Akey, WWI Photography specialist and the line producer for the podcast Many thanks to the newest member of our team - Mac Nelsen our intrepid sound editor--- a shout out to our intern John Morreale for his  great research assistance... And I am Theo Mayer - your host. The US World War One Centennial Commission was created by Congress to honor, commemorate and educate about WW1. Our programs are to-- inspire a national conversation and awareness about WW1; Including this podcast! We are bringing the lessons of the 100 years ago into today's classrooms; We are helping to restore WW1 memorials in communities of all sizes across our country; and of course we are building America’s National WW1 Memorial in Washington DC. We want to thank commission’s founding sponsor the Pritzker Military Museum and Library as well as the Starr foundation for their support. The podcast can be found on our website at ww1cc.org/cn   Or search WW1 Centennial News on  iTunes, Google Play, TuneIn, Podbean, Stitcher - Radio on Demand, Spotify or using your smart speaker.. Just say “Play W W One Centennial News Podcast”. Our twitter and instagram handles are both @ww1cc and we are on facebook @ww1centennial. Thank you for joining us. And don’t forget to share the stories you are hearing here today about the war that changed the world! [music] Welcome to Beverly Hills Pilates - The newest trend in sophisticated exercise! NO it’s not --- It’s from WW1 So long!
April 6, 2018
Highlights April 1918 Preview Roundtable - Dr. Edward Lengel & Katherine Akey | @ 02:50 Spring Offensive on Easter - Mike Shuster | @ 14:50 War in The Sky - Pilots and PTSD - Mark Wilkins | @ 18:30 Basketball in WWI - Dr. Lindsay Krasnoff | @ 27:05 100 Cities / 100 Memorials - Round#2 awardees announced | @ 32:50 Speaking WWI - “over the top” | @ 36:05 WWI War Tech - The Paris Guns | @ 37:15 Dispatch 4/3/18 highlights | @ 39:20 Centennial Social Media - Katherine Akey | @ 41:00----more---- Opening Welcome to World War 1 centennial News - episode #66 - It’s about WW1  THEN - what was happening 100 years ago this week - and it’s about WW1 NOW - news and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. Today is April 6th, 2018. 101 years ago on April 6th 1917,  the United States declares war on Germany which starts us on a path that will change our nation, our people our industry, and our position in the world forever. [clip from April 6th Event] On this one year anniversary: Dr. Edward Lengel, Katherine Akey and I sit down for our April 1918 preview roundtable Mike Shuster, from the great war project blog updates us on the German Spring Offensive Mark Wilkins introduces us to WW1 pilots and PTSD Dr. Lindsay Krasnoff tells us about basketball in WW1 Katherine Akey brings a story from the WW1 commemoration in social media Plus a lot more... on WW1 Centennial News -- a weekly podcast brought to you by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and the Starr foundation. I’m Theo Mayer - the Chief Technologist for the Commission and your host. Welcome to the show. [MUSIC] Preface Several months ago during a podcast editorial planning session for an upcoming month, it occurred to us that our planning roundtable might be something our audience would enjoy listening to… We tried it - you liked it - and now we do it! So here is the conversation Dr. Ed lengel, Katherine Akey and I had earlier this week… The question on the table was: “so what are the big stories and themes in April 1918…  in the War the Changed the World? [MUSIC TRANSITION] World War One THEN Preview Roundtable: April 1918 Dr. Edward Lengel, Katherine Akey, Theo Mayer [Closing Sting] Great War Project Next, we are going to go to Mike Shuster former NPR correspondent and curator for the Great War project Blog…. Mike: Your post is a perfect introduction to the month of April as you dive right into the situation on the ground… for Easter Sunday, April 2nd 1918. What was happening on the front?   [MIKE POST]   Mike Shuster from the Great War Project blog. LINK: http://greatwarproject.org/2018/04/01/german-offensive-stalls/ [SOUND EFFECT] War in the Sky PTSD and Flying in ww1 This week for the War in the Sky -- we’re turning inwards with a look at the psychological challenges for those “daring and do” warriors in the sky during World War 1. Joining us is Mark Wilkins, historian, writer, museum professional, and lecturer. Mark is the author of the recently published article in the Smithsonian’s Air and Space magazine called “The Dark Side of Glory: An early glimpse of PTSD in the letters of World War I aces.” Welcome, Mark! [greetings] [Mark -- To start with - how did you get the trove of letters you used for your research?] [How many letters did you go through to start your research?] [OK.. In WWI malady was equated with physical issues, but your article deals with the psychological stresses of the pilot’s experience. Just a year prior they were executing trench soldier with shell shock on charges of cowardice. How did that play out for the pilots?] [Look - the stress for these aces makes a lot of sense… To be an Ace you need to fly a lot of missions. The mortality rate of your buddies is off the charts… and unlike foot soldiers - you don’t have the courage of the guys on your left and right to bolster you.. This is a white knuckle, cold sweat, daily solo experience… sounds like traumatic stress is inevitable.. How common was this?] [What did the men - and what did the command do about this? ] [So after immersing yourself in this aspect of the war in the sky - what is your biggest take away?] [We just had a great question come in from our live audience - Frank Krone wants to know: Did Richthoven - Germany’s Red Baron appear to suffer from PTSD] [You have an upcoming book -- tell us about it -- When is it coming out?] [Before we wrap up - last December we had filmmaker Darroch Greer on the show about his upcoming The Lafayette Escadrille documentary. Was is your involvement with the project?] [thanks/goodbyes] Mark Wilkins is a historian, writer, museum professional, and historical aeronautics expert. You can read his article in the Air Space Magazine, and learn more about his work from the links in the podcast notes. Link:https://www.airspacemag.com/military-aviation/world-war-i-pilot-ptsd-180967710/#0VKtyZX7JLXCy3JU.01 http://thelafayetteescadrille.org/ http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/4084-four-questions-for-mark-wilkins.html The Great War Channel For videos about WWI 100 years ago this week, check out our friends at  the Great War Channel on Youtube. New episodes this week include: German Armoured Cars in WW1 The Neutral Ally - Norway in WW1 See their videos by searching for “the great war” on youtube or following the link in the podcast notes! Link:https://www.youtube.com/user/TheGreatWar World War One NOW Alright  - It is time to fast forward into the present with WW1 Centennial News NOW - [SOUND EFFECT] This part of the podcast focuses on NOW and how we are commemorating the centennial of WWI! Remembering Veterans Re-enactment For  Remembering Veterans -- a small village hosts a big event this weekend! The Midway Village Museum is a 137 acre living history park located near Rockford, Illinois. This weekend, the Victorian village will host the 6th annual Great War event, featuring over 225 re-enactors portraying soldiers and civilians from the United States and Europe. Visitors will have the opportunity to enter encampments, tour a reproduction 150 yard trench system, and watch large-scale narrated battle reenactments. It is the nation’s largest public World War One reenactment -- and we’ll get to speak with some of the event’s organizers right here on the podcast in a couple of weeks to hear how it went. For now, especially if you are in the region - visit the link in the podcast notes for a full list of scheduled events at Midway Village Museum near rockford Illinois . Link: http://www.midwayvillage.com/ Basketball in WW1 Also this week for remembering veterans -- something I did not know much about --- from the world of sports a century ago. Now, I’ve got clear images in my mind of baseball in the era - I also see leather helmets and pig skin warrior on the football grid-iron -- but today we’re going to be looking at another great American institution that - as it turns out - that made a big splash in France during the WWI -- basketball! To tell us about it, we’re joined by Dr. Lindsay Sarah Krasnoff, a historian, sports writer, consultant, and author. Her website says: Historical Insights COMMUNICATING GLOBALLY -- Sports - Diplomacy & Storytelling Lindsay! Sounds like you fit right in here. Welcome to the podcast! [greetings] [Lindsay For our non-basketball experts - Like me - could you start us off with a brief history of basketball? When did it first develop, and how widespread was the sport in America circa 1918?] [Did the Americans bring hoops to France or were they already playing?] [If Doughboys and the YMCA helped reignite French interest in basketball, was it only in France that this occurred?] [You’re working on a new book about basketball in France -- how popular is the sport there now?] [goodbyes] Dr. Lindsay Sarah Krasnoff is a historian, sports writer, consultant, and author of several books. Learn more about her and her writing by following the links in the podcast notes. Link: https://www.lindsaysarahkrasnoff.com/ https://rowman.com/ISBN/9780739175095/The-Making-of-Les-Bleus-Sport-in-France-1958-2010# https://twitter.com/lempika7 100 Cities 100 Memorials Update on Round 2 For 100 Cities / 100 Memorials - Today on the anniversary of America’s declaration of war in 1917, the final 50 awardees have been announced. Here is a section from the press release: CHICAGO, IL, April 5 – On the eve of the 101st  Anniversary of the United States entering World War 1, the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission and the Pritzker Military Museum and Library announced today the final 50 WW1 Memorials to be awarded grants and honored with the official national designation as "WW1 Centennial Memorials". All 100 memorials, in all 100 cities have now been designated including such national landmarks as: Chicago’s "Soldier Field", LA’s "Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum", San Francisco’s “War Memorial Veterans Building and Opera House”, Honolulu’s "Natatorium" and Washington, D.C.’s “National World War I Memorial at Pershing Park”. In addition, many smaller local community projects are being recognized such as: Scranton Pennsylvania’s “Col. Frank Duffy Memorial Bridge and Park”, Cape May, New Jersey’s "Soldier and Sailors Monument", Ocean Springs, Mississippi’s "Emile Ladnier WWI Memorial," and North Carolina's NC State University “Memorial Belltower”, to name just a few. The newly-designated memorials are in 37 different states and each will receive a $2,000 matching grant, towards the restoration, conservation and maintenance of these local historical treasures. Here is John Schwan the Interim President and CEO of the Pritzker Military Museum and Library from the livestream announcement. [insert clip] THEO: So this has been a nearly two year effort to get the 100 memorials designated… But this is not the end of the program - for example, we are going to continue to profile the project on the podcast, we are going to accelerate our Memorial Hunters program to identify and create a national register of WWI memorials around the nation. We are going to continue to encourage and support communities around the country to commemorate their local WWI heroes through their memorials that are all over America - many hidden in plain sight! As Dan Dayton, Executive Director of the U.S. World War One Centennial Commission noted in the press release: "I am impressed by the community involvement that has sprung from this project. By focusing on restoring these community treasures, local cities, veterans groups, historical society and citizens have come together to remember the community’s heritage - and that was really a key goal of the program." See a searchable listing of all 100 cities and memorials at ww1cc.org/100Memorials or follow the link in the podcast notes. Link:www.ww1cc.org/100Memorials [SOUND EFFECT] Speaking WW1 Here is our weekly feature “Speaking World War 1” - Where we explore the words & phrases that are rooted in the war  --- When you encounter something that is exaggerated, major, melodramatic, big, HUGE -- ahhh maybe too much!? --  we sometimes describe it as being “over the top”. Which is our Speaking WW1 phrase this week. During WWI, as the soldiers sat in the muddy trenches in anxious anticipation…  preparing to take the offensive… that dramatic moment when the whistles blew - and the men climbed up and over the berms of the trench, rushing out into no-man’s land facing the enemy, shells, gas and machine gun fire, well that was known as… you guessed it - “going over the top”. At the time it was a literal, physical description of what you did - but - appropriately remains in our lexicon today as something seriously radical. “Over the top” - something you might toss off lightly about someone or something - but a phrase with a very heavy history - and this week’s phrase for speaking WW1. Links:https://www.thoughtco.com/going-over-the-top-2361017 [SOUND EFFECT] WW1 War Tech Paris Gun This week for WW1 War Tech -- we turn our attention back to late March and early April of 1918. Paris is under attack as behemoth canon shells -- some weighing as much as 230 pounds fall on the city, killing dozens, creating panic and initially confusing city officials. Where were the guns? The Paris Guns as they came to be known, were sitting 80 miles away, and were responsible. This German supergun was not meant for the battlefield. It was specifically designed to terrorize and demoralize civilian populations. It was so massive that it could only be moved around by rail.. It was created by extending a 380 mm naval gun barrel to a length of 112 feet. that and 550 Lbs of gunpowder gave the beasts their extreme firing range. Ed Lengel mentioned that en route to their target,  the shells literally arced into earth’s stratosphere 24 miles up -- up there, there is almost no atmospheric drag - again increasing the range. The weapon began its assault on Paris late March in 1918, continuing periodically for over three months, until early August. The panic and fear that spread after the initial attacks was short lived and the terror weapon never proved to be much of a threat to French strategy or the population’s morale. Nevertheless, the Paris Guns proved to be a domestic propaganda hit in Germany, as the ability to strike the French capital directly did much to stem the public’s anxiety over the course of the war. The Paris Gun -- It was an engineering marvel -- and it was a terror weapon aimed at Parisians one hundred years ago-- and it is the subject of this week’s WW1 War Tech. Learn more, and see images of the mobile monsters, at the links in the notes. Link: https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/24/121603152.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/30/102683655.pdf https://www.britannica.com/technology/Paris-Gun https://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/paris_guns https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/paris-hit-by-shells-from-new-german-gun Articles and Posts For Articles and posts -- We are going to try something new this week. Many of the new posts are featured in our weekly Dispatch Newsletter… so we are going to give you the highlights from the Dispatch as an overview. [DING] A feature in Politico outlines how president Trump’s parade this year, which looks like it is going to fall on or near Veteran’s Day may have special WW1 meaning. It’s an interesting article and an interesting read. [DING] News about Sgt Stubby -- a follow up on the film’s recent premiere, a street fair honoring the pup in his hometown of Hartford, Connecticut, and a new Sgt Stubby statue planned in Middleton, Connecticut. [DING] Test yourself on your WW1 knowledge by taking a quiz from the National Archives, [DING] Check out a new illustrated battlefield travel guide. [DING] Read a bittersweet story about easter in 1918, [DING] A new exhibition highlights Anglo-American relations during the war -- on view in Bath, England. [DING] Doughboy MIA features Private Edwin C. Kitterman of New Middletown, Indiana [DING] and this week’s featured Story of Service is that of Private Wayne Minor, an Illinois native who was killed in action just three hours before armistice. Sign up for the Weekly Dispatch newsletter at ww1cc.org/subscribe check the archive at ww1cc.org/dispatch or follow the link in the podcast notes.   Link: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html http://www.ww1cc.org/dispatch The Buzz And that brings us to the buzz - the centennial of WW1 this week in social media with Katherine Akey - Katherine, what did you pick? New Jersey Ordinance Hi Theo -- A really interesting article popped up on Facebook this week about ordnance from WW1 that continues to surface and pose a threat -- but not in Europe, right here on the east coast of the United States! Listeners may be familiar with the Zone Rouge -- a 460 square mile area of France centered around Verdun that has been determined to be too physically and environmentally damaged for human habitation as a direct result of the Great War. There is even an entire department in France, the Département du Déminage or department of de-mining, that has been tasked with safely disposing of ordinance from the world wars. Since its establishment in 1946, more than 630 members of that force have been killed in the line of duty. We have no such force here in the US -- so when seven rifle grenades from WW1 were discovered recently on the coast of New Jersey, explosives experts had to be called in to safely dispose of the munitions. So, how did these grenades end up in New Jersey? It turns out, disposing of unneeded munitions by dumping them into the sea was a commonplace practice -- as recently as 1970. As a result, there are an estimated millions of tons of potentially explosive ordinance on the seafloor -- and every once in a while, some makes its way onto shore. Read more about the Zone Rouge and the intermittent discovery of World War weapons on American shores by visiting the links in the podcast notes. That’s it for this week in the Buzz. Link:https://www.popularmechanics.com/military/weapons/a19641774/a-century-after-wwi-the-weapons-of-old-wars-keep-turning-up-on-beaches/ https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2015/08/13/the-bombs-beneath-us-unexploded-ordnance-linger-long-after-wars-are-over/?utm_term=.924447a3268d https://www.nationalgeographic.org/news/red-zone/   Outro And that is the first week of April for WW1 Centennial News. Thank you for listening. We also want to thank our guests... Dr. Edward Lengel, Military historian and author Mike Shuster, Curator for the great war project blog Mark Wilkins, historian, writer, museum professional, and lecturer Dr. Lindsay Krasnoff, historian, sports writer, consultant, and author Katherine Akey, the commission’s social media director and line producer for the podcast A shout out to our intern John Morreale for his  great research assistance. And I am Theo Mayer - your host. The US World War One Centennial Commission was created by Congress to honor, commemorate and educate about WW1. Our programs are to-- inspire a national conversation and awareness about WW1; Including this podcast! We are bringing the lessons of the 100 years ago into today's classrooms; We are helping to restore WW1 memorials in communities of all sizes across our country; and of course we are building America’s National WW1 Memorial in Washington DC. We want to thank commission’s founding sponsor the Pritzker Military Museum and Library as well as the Starr foundation for their support. The podcast can be found on our website at ww1cc.org/cn   Or search WW1 Centennial News on  iTunes, Google Play, TuneIn, Podbean, Stitcher - Radio on Demand, Spotify or using your smart speaker.. Just say “Play W W One Centennial News Podcast”. Our twitter and instagram handles are both @ww1cc and we are on facebook @ww1centennial. Thank you for joining us. And don’t forget to share the stories you are hearing here today about the war that changed the world! [music] You know ginormous canon that was shooting at Paris - well - man - that was really over the top! [Big boom] So long!
March 31, 2018
Highlights - Draftees Ship Out Update on the Spring Offensive - Mike Shuster | @02:25 America Emerges: The Draftees Ship Out - Edward Lengel | @06:20 Don’t send the boys “Dainties” by parcel post! | @11:40 Remembering Veterans: The Women’s Overseas Service League - Cathleen Cordova | @16:45 Updates from the States: Idaho Commission - K.C.Piccard and Frank Krone | @21:55 Spotlight in the Media: Sgt. Stubby Premiere | @27:35 100C/100M: Glen Carbon IL - Linda Sinco | @32:45 100C/100M: Appleton, WI - Alexander Schultz | @38:35 Speaking WW1: Tommy | @44:45 WW1 War Tech: The Little Curie | @46:20 The Dispatch Newsletter | @48:05 The Buzz - The Centennial in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @49:25----more---- Opening Welcome to World War 1 centennial News - episode #65 - It’s about WW1 THEN - what was happening 100 years ago this week  - and it’s about WW1 NOW - news and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. Today is March 30th, 2018 and our guests for this week include: Mike Shuster, from the great war project checking in on the progress of the German Spring Offensive - Operation Michael Dr. Edward Lengel with a story of New York City’s Doughboys as they set sail for Europe Cathleen Cordova shares the history of the Women’s Overseas Service League K.C.Piccard and Frank Krone are here to tell us about the Idaho WW1 Centennial Commission Linda Sinco shares the 100 Cities/100 Memorials project at Glen Carbon, Illinois Alexander Schultz with the 100 Cities/100 memorials project in Appleton, Wisconsin Katherine Akey with the WW1 commemoration in social media   And that is our lineup of guest for WW1 Centennial News -- a weekly podcast brought to you by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and the Starr foundation. I’m Theo Mayer - the Chief Technologist for the Commission and your host. Welcome to the show. [MUSIC] Preface 100 years ago this week, the fate and future, that would be determined by WWI hangs somewhat by a thread. In this episode, we want to give you a sense of what was happening on the ground in Europe, explore the push to get our troops across the Atlantic, and see how the war effort is affecting life and policy here stateside… A year after entering the fray - America is definitely in the thick of it! With that as a setup, let’s jump into our Centennial Time Machine and roll back 100 years to - to witness a crucial moment,  in the War that Changed the World! World War One THEN 100 Year Ago This Week Great War Project We are going to open our look back 100 years ago this week, with Mike Shuster former NPR correspondent and curator for the Great War project Blog…. Mike: Your post is a powerful update on the front line action, this last week of May, 1918. The Allies are trying desperately to cope with Germany’s “total commitment” onslaught - By the week’s-end it turns out that maybe the Kaiser’s claim of total victory, last week,  may have been a bit premature. It’s not over yet. Looking forward to your report, Mike… Thank you Theo - This week the headline read…. [MIKE POST] Mike Shuster from the Great War Project blog. LINK: http://greatwarproject.org/2018/03/25/in-german-spring-offensive-crisis-on-both-sides/ America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 We are going to follow with America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI with Dr. Edward Lengel. Ed:  As Mike just told us… getting our boys shipped out and on the ground in France is crucial… and your story this week focused on what that was like state -side… Many troops and individual soldiers that would play important roles in the upcoming battles are heading “over there”. What’s the story Ed: [ED LENGEL] [MUSIC TRANSITION] Dr. Edward Lengel is an American military historian, author, and our segment host for America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI. There are links in the podcast notes to Ed’s post.   Links:http://www.edwardlengel.com/one-hundred-years-ago-new-york-city-bids-farewell-doughboys/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ On the Homefront [SOUND EFFECT] On the homefront, there are a number of articles this week reflecting our conversation from Last week, with the Smithsonian National Postal Museum’s Lynn Heidelbaugh, about the massive amount of mail going out to the troops - especially parcel post - so much so - that the War department begins the week by expressing concern, and ends the week by listing a whole stack of items banned from being sent to our boys “Over There”. [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline: Monday March 25, 1918 A Headline in the Official Bulletin Reads Parcel Post to France Being Crowded With the Dainties Purchasable There at Prices Lower Than the Cost Here And the story reads: What are you sending by parcel post to the boys in France? asks the department. If it is cookies, candies, or canned goods, bear in mind that the soldiers of the American Expeditionary Forces can purchase these things at the Y. M. C. A. recreation centers, or canteens in France, as cheaply as they can be had here. And the article goes on the make an economic argument not to send these items. Two days later [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline: Wednesday March 27, 1918 A Headline in the Official Bulletin Reads SHIPMENTS OF PARCELS TO SOLDIERS IN FRANCE TO BE LIMITED TO THOSE REQUESTED BY MEN The article goes on to explain: the postmasters throughout the country are instructed to receive no parcel-post shipments for delivery to members of the American Expeditionary Forces abroad unless the articles offered have been requested by the individual to whom they are to be shipped and approved by his regimental or higher commander. In the same issue another headline reads Prices at Which Our Soldiers in France May Purchase Those .Little Dainties You Are Sending Them by Mail And once again, the article details the price of razors, cigarettes, even malted milk balls. Although seemingly redundant - anyone interested in a great primary source on prices of basic item in 1918 - this article is a treaure trove of detail. You can access each issue of the Official Bulletin on the Commission’s website at ww1cc.org/bulletin - each issue is re-published on the centennial anniversary of its original publish date. This article is on Page 7 of the wednesday March 27th issue. The week continues with more cajoling about not sending our boys loving care packages from home, AND by the end of the week - the War Department gets unambiguous and definitive! Dateline: Saturday, March 30, 1918 A Headline in the Official Bulletin on Page 7 reads WAR DEPARTMENT STATEMENT ON SHIPMENT OF POST PARCELS TO U. S. SOLDIERS IN FRANCE The War Department has issued the following statement regarding the restrictions of the shipment of parcels to officers and soldiers in France. On account of the well-known shortage in shipping it is necessary' to limit shipments to France to things which are absolutely essential for the fighting efficiency of our forces in France. In other words, we must strip for action. It his been found that the shipments of parcels to individual officers and soldiers has assumed enormous proportions now averaging 250 tons a week, and by reason of their bulkiness displacing a great amount of important Army freight on commercial liners and transports. And that’s the end of Aunt Ethel's home-made cookies and Momma’s canned peaches for our doughboys in France 100 years ago this week in the war that changed the world! [SOUND EFFECT] The Great War Channel As we have mentioned before, we are very happy that you listen to our audio podcast, but If you’d like to see videos about WWI 100 years ago this week,  we suggest our friends at the Great War Channel on Youtube, Hosted by Indy Neidell. New videos this week include: Conscientious Objectors -- Water -- Wastage German WW1 Prototype Tanks of 1918 Backs to the Wall -- All Eyes on Amiens See their videos by searching for “the great war” on youtube or following the link in the podcast notes! Link:https://www.youtube.com/user/TheGreatWar World War One NOW It is time to fast forward into the present with WW1 Centennial News NOW - [SOUND EFFECT] This part of the podcast isn’t about the past - it is about NOW and how we are commemorating the centennial of WWI! Remembering Veterans Women's Overseas Service League This week for remembering veterans and for our last article focused on Women’s History Month we want to introduce you to the Women’s Overseas Service League.  As the name implies, the League was founded by American women who had served overseas during World War One. With us to help us understand the WOSL, their heritage, mission and constituency we are joined by Cathleen Cordova, the Past National President of the WOSL. Welcome Cathleen. [greetings] [Cathleen -- the Women’s Overseas Service League was formed in 1921, just after the war -- What prompted the formation? Who was it for?] [Would I consider the Women’s Overseas Service League a Veterans Service Organization? How does it differ?] [The league’s focus and mission has evolved over the years? What is the continuing legacy of WWI in within the League?] [Does the League have any specific WWI Centennial commemoration - or any heritage focused programs?] [goodbyes] Cathleen Cordova is the Past National President of the Women’s Overseas Service League. Learn more about the organization and their legacy of friendship and advocacy by following the links in the podcast notes. Link: http://wosl.org/history/ http://wosl.org/ Updates from the States Idaho Commission It’s time for our Updates from the States. This week we’re joined by K.C. Piccard, Commissioner for the Idaho World War 1 Centennial Commission, and Frank Krone, the commission’s co-founder. Welcome! [greetings] [Frank --  I don’t know very much about the Idaho Centennial Commission? Would you tell us about it - and how did it get started?] [K.C.--On the Podcast in February, we told our listeners quite a bit about the sinking of the Tuscania --  You and your Commission got deeply involved with a connected commemoration called Hands Across the Atlantic Project. Can you tell us about it? [Frank - any other plans or programs from Idaho you’d like to tell us about?] [goodbyes/thanks] K.C. Piccard and Franke Krone are with the Idaho World War 1 Centennial Commission. Learn more about the commission and their projects by visiting their website at the links in the podcast notes. links:http://idahoworldwar1centennial.org/ Spotlight in the Media Sgt Stubby Premiere: Follow up Earlier this week, here in Los Angeles, I had the pleasure of joining US WWI Centennial Commissioner Zoe Dunning, and the California WW1 Centennial commission Courtland Jindra and Bill Betten at the premiere of the Animated Feature film - Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero. I have been following the development of this movie for a long time, and of course we have had the film’s producer, writer, and director Richard Lanni and Associate producer Jordan Beck on the podcast over the past months, so I was really ready to see the actual the Sgt. Stubby movie. I loved it! And so did the 800 person audience at the premiere! Flat out - it’s a really good, class double A animated film that delivers a great movie experience for kids and grown up alike. You know, it’s really - I mean REALLY hard to create a sympathetic, animated animal character that is someone that you actually care about. Especially if that character has no voice. Everyone in the room fell in love with Stubby. I didn’t ask the grownups, but I did ask some of the 400 kids in the theater what they thought: [Kid’s comments] Sgt. Stubby - an American Hero - and a really great movie experience coming to a theater near you. Grab a friend, grab a kid, grab a grandparent and go see this really heartfelt and heartwarming movie. Oh yea - did I forget to mention - its based on a real story and its all about WWI. Sorry! Link: http://www.stubbymovie.com/ 100 Cities 100 Memorials Glen Carbon, IL Moving on to our 100 Cities / 100 Memorials segment about the $200,000 matching grant challenge to rescue and focus on our local WWI memorials. Next week, on Friday April 6th, we will be announcing the final 50 Awardees. Some very exciting memorials and project are among that group. Before that, this week, we are going to profile TWO projects from Round #1. They are very different and very much the same -  the first is a deeply meaningful but humble project about a WWI memorial restoration from the Village of Glen Carbon Illinois, where a doughboy statue stands guard over the graves of two local WW1 veterans.   With us tell us about the project is Linda Sinco, Museum Coordinator of the Glen Carbon Heritage Museum.                               Welcome Linda! [greetings] [Linda: Your project was designated as a WWI Centennial Memorial, in part because it represents memorials of it’s type all over the country. Can you tell us about it please?] [The doughboy isn’t a bronze - what is it made out of? What’s the status of the statue now?] [When you took on the project, you did research and got some great local newspaper coverage for the endeavor - what was the community involvement?] [How did you connect with the 100 Cities / 100 Memorials program?] [You rededicated your statue last year in September - Any commemoration plans for Memorial Day or Armistice day this year?] [Linda - thank you so much for looking after your doughboys!] [goodbyes/thanks] Linda Sinco is the Museum Coordinator for the Glen Carbon Heritage Museum.    Learn more about the 100 Cities/100 Memorials program and their doughboy statue restoration at the link in the podcast notes or by going to ww1cc.org/100Memorials Link: www.ww1cc.org/100cities https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VKcETM-DQ-c https://www.glen-carbon.il.us/891/Heritage-Museum-and-Log-Cabin Appleton, WI Our second 100 Cities / 100 Memorials project profile this week is the Spirit of the American Doughboy project in Appleton, Wisconsin. This doughboy sculpture is from famed WWI memorial sculptor E. M. Visquesney and it has had one tough time of it,  since it was erected in 1934. With us tell us about the project, it’s checkered restoration history and its current rescue is Alexander Schultz, Executive Director of Sculpture Valley. Welcome Alex! [greetings] [Alex - This monument was originally put in place in 1934 for $700 - the equivalent of $13,000 today… and it has had a troubled history since. Can you tell us a bit about the maintenance woes of this doughboy?] [So in 2015 Sculpture Valley stepped in to fix the issues from the ground up - what IS Sculpture Valley?] [What kind of support did the project get from the community? ] [You did a rededication on Veterans Day last year - any plans for Armistice day this year?] [Alex: Thanks so much for being here!] [goodbyes/thanks] Alexander Schultz is the Executive Director of Sculpture Valley. Learn more about Sculpture Valley and the 100 Cities/100 Memorials program at the link in the podcast notes or by going to ww1cc.org/100Memorials Link: www.ww1cc.org/100cities https://www.sculpturevalley.com/ https://www.sculpturevalley.com/memorail-restoration-initiative/ [SOUND EFFECT] Speaking WW1 And now for our feature “Speaking World War 1” - Where we explore the words & phrases that are rooted in the war  --- By the time America joined the war, nicknames for the various forces involved in the conflict were already established. The French infantry were known as the Poilus, or the hairy ones -- the Australian and New Zealanders were collectively known as the ANZAC a simple contraction for the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps - meanwhile the New Zealanders were also called Kiwis. The American were often referred to as Sammies but self branded as Doughboys. And the British common soldier? Well, That’s our Speaking WWI word for this week. The British soldier was known as the Tommy. The nickname appears to come from an individual, Tommy Atkins, a mythical, courageous British soldier who fought under the Duke of Wellington in 1794. Lore has it that In 1815, the British War Office asked the Duke for a name that could personify a strong British soldier, and he, apocryphally, replied “Tommy”. From a branding perspective, it sounds like a great choice to an old marketing guy like me…. it’s so aptly descriptive of a regular joe… resolute… a comrade… a good fellow and unlike a lot of the other names - Tommy seems human. The nickname was popular enough in the 19th century that Rudyard Kipling included a poem about a mistreated soldier named Tommy. Tommy didn’t get associated with the British army, until World War I, when the name Tommy Atkins was featured on a guidance sheet enclosed in every pocket ledger provided to every British soldier to inscribe their personal information. Tommy -- a valiant and humble soldier, and this week’s speaking WW1 word. Links:http://www.historic-uk.com/HistoryUK/HistoryofBritain/The-British-Tommy-Tommy-Atkins/ http://www.firstworldwar.com/atoz/tommy.htm [SOUND EFFECT] WW1 War Tech Little Curie This week for WW1 War Tech -- we’re focusing on a medical device that saved countless lives -- and was invented by a woman. Almost immediately after the discovery of the X-ray in 1895, medical professionals began using it to locate foreign objects, that had become lodged in the body. - you know - like bullets. At the start of the war in 1914, the only X-Ray machines to be found where located in city hospitals, far away from the frontlines and only benefiting soldiers that could survive the long journe to get to them. The answer came from famed French scientist Madame Marie Curie, discoverer of radium ... polonium and twice-awarded the Nobel Prize. When the German army began marching toward Paris early in the war, Madame Curie shipped her supply of radium to a bank in Bordeaux and devoted her time to the war effort. Curie came up with the “radiological car” - a rig with an X-Ray machine, a photographic dark room, and an early electrical generator to produce the X-Rays. Using funding from the Union of Women of France and cars donated by wealthy Parisians, she trained some 150 women, including her daughter Irene, to operate these machines and move them around the front lines to where they were most needed. The “little curies” --as they were called-- debuted at the First Battle of the Marne. Over 1 million soldiers received Xray exams from the mobile units over the course of the war. The LIttle Curie-- a big idea from an awesome scientist, Madame Marie Curie, and this week’s WW1 War Tech. Learn more, and see images of the mobile machines, at the links in the notes. Link: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/how-marie-curie-brought-x-ray-machines-to-battlefield-180965240/ Articles and Posts For Articles and posts we want to re-introduce you to a fantastic WWI Centennial resource. It’s the Commission’s weekly Dispatch Newsletter. Every week, the Commission publishes all sorts of great information about WWI and the centennial commemoration. There are articles posted in the website’s news section, New Stories of Service that are submitted by you. Important commemoration events. Blog posts and postings from our state partners. And even the highlight listing from the WWI Centennial News podcast. Well - in the dispatch, the editor, Chris Christopher works diligently to keep it short and useful.  He provides a quick summary of each new post with links to read, listen or see more… It takes just a minute to subscribe, and only a couple of minute to scan each Dispatch issue when it comes in to your email on Tuesday mornings - It’s a great way to see if there is something you’d like to know more about. So sign up for the Weekly  Dispatch newsletter at ww1cc.org/subscribe and take a look at samples in the archive at ww1cc.org/dispatch or follow the link in the podcast notes. Link: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/2015-12-28-18-26-00/subscribe.html http://ww1cc.org/dispatch The Buzz And that brings us to the buzz - the centennial of WW1 this week in social media with Katherine Akey - Katherine, what do you have for us this week? Adopt an Orphan! We shared a beautiful image this week on Facebook from the Marine Corps History Division. It’s a studio portrait of a little girl, Jeanne Louise Alphonsine Pascal. She’s maybe three or four years old, dressed in a dark frock with an enormous white bow atop her head. She is the Mascot of Company L, Thirteenth Regiment, U.S. Marines, A.E.F. Under the auspices of the American Red Cross, soldiers were able to adopt war orphans; it’s a very early example of a familiar charitable system. For four cents a month, per man, a unit of some 200 men could fully feed, clothe and house an orphan. Some estimated 200,000 children were orphaned in France and Belgium alone during the war. Grassroots orphans’ relief efforts appeared in France as early as 1914. Many editions of the Stars and Stripes-- the American Expeditionary Forces’ official newspaper-- discuss and promote The Red Cross’s orphan relief campaigns, including the issue from this week 100 years ago. These children, supported by the Allies and under the care of a variety of service organizations, were beneficial for the soldiers; they reminded the men of their children back home and the orphans received food and care from the Allied troops. By April 1918, Stars and Stripes reports that 38 children were adopted by various Infantry companies. You can read the article “Take as your mascot a French war orphan” in the Stars and Stripes, and see the image of little Jeanne Louise, by following the links in the podcast notes. That’s it for this week in the Buzz. Link:https://cdn.loc.gov/service/sgp/sgpbatches/batch_dlc_argonne_ver03/data/20001931/print/1918032901/0001.pdf https://www.facebook.com/36536773014https://cdn.loc.gov/service/sgp/sgpbatches/batch_dlc_argonne_ver03/data/20001931/print/1918032901/0001.pdf7282/photos/a.367850739898981.107284.365367730147282/1062367587113956/?type=3&theater https://rememberingwwi.villanova.edu/orphans/ Thank you Katherine - Outro And that is also it for this week’s episode of WW1 Centennial News. Thank you for listening. We also want to thank our guests... Mike Shuster, Curator for the great war project blog Dr. Edward Lengel, Military historian and author Cathleen Cordova the Past National President of the Women’s Overseas Service League KC Piccard, and and Frank Krone co-founders of the Idaho World War 1 Centennial Commission, Linda Sinco with the 100 Cities/100 Memorials project at Glen Carbon, Illinois Alexander Schultz with the 100 Cities/100 memorials project from Appleton, Wisconsin Katherine Akey, the commission’s social media director and line producer for the podcast A shout out to Eric Maar as well as our intern John Morreale for their great research assistance. And I am Theo Mayer - your host. The US World War One Centennial Commission was created by Congress to honor, commemorate and educate about WW1. Our programs are to-- inspire a national conversation and awareness about WW1; Including this podcast! We are bringing the lessons of the 100 years ago into today's classrooms; We are helping to restore WW1 memorials in communities of all sizes across our country; and of course we are building America’s National WW1 Memorial in Washington DC. We want to thank commission’s founding sponsor the Pritzker Military Museum and Library as well as the Starr foundation for their support. The podcast can be found on our website at ww1cc.org/cn   on  iTunes, Google Play, TuneIn, Podbean, Stitcher - Radio on Demand --- or using your smart speaker.. Just say “Play W W One Centennial News Podcast” and we are excited to announce - as of this week - you can listen to us on Spotify. Search ww1 Centennial News. Our twitter and instagram handles are both @ww1cc and we are on facebook @ww1centennial. Thank you for joining us. And don’t forget to share the stories you are hearing here today about the war that changed the world! [music] What did the American Captain shout to the British left-tennant as the German barrage rained down? [insert music clip Tommy] So long!
March 23, 2018
Highlights Spring Offensive Spring offensive in the media | @01:50 Operation Michael Overview - Mike Shuster | @10:10 3rd Division, 6th Engineers grab a gun and go - Dr. Edward Lengel | @14:05 ‘Women’s Voices In Letters” exhibit - Lynn Heidelbaugh | @20:10 US Army Women’s Museum - Dr. Francoise Bonnell | @25:30 Book “Paws of Courage” - Nancy Furstinger | @31:45 Journey’s end director - Saul Dibb | @38:00 NC State 100C/100M project - Thomas Skolnicki, Benny Suggs and Commissioner Jerry Hester | @44:30 Centennial in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @53:20----more---- Opening Welcome to World War 1 centennial News - episode #64 - It’s about WW1 THEN - what was happening 100 years ago this week  - and it’s about WW1 NOW - news and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. Today is March 23rd, 2018 and our guests for this week include: Mike Shuster, from the great war project blog giving an overview of the big German Spring Offensive - Operation Michael Dr. Edward Lengel with a story of US Combat Engineers joining in the fight Lynn Heidelbaugh introducing the new women’s exhibit at the Smithsonian’s  National Postal Museum Dr. Francoise Bonnell discussing the history of women and the US Army Nancy Furstinger talking about man’s best friends in WWI -- and other critters... Saul Dibb the director of the feature film Journey’s End  talks about being in the trenches to make the film Thomas Skolnicki, Benny Suggs and US WWI Centennial Commissioner Jerry Hester, sharing the 100 Cities/100 Memorials project at NC State University Katherine Akey with the WW1 commemoration in social media A great lineup of guest for WW1 Centennial News -- a weekly podcast brought to you by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and the Starr foundation. I’m Theo Mayer - the Chief Technologist for the Commission and your host. Welcome to the show. Link: https://open.spotify.com/show/4xrhXYSHPEtG1CqMXEJj67 [MUSIC] Preface Every week as we prepare the podcast, we pour through the publications that came out that week 100 years ago and look for themes, trends and what is being talked about. This week, we were struck with what WASN’T being talked about - especially in government related media like the Official Bulletin - the government’s daily war gazette - published for the President by George Creel’s Committee on Public Information or the American Expeditionary Forces’ weekly Stars and Stripes newspaper. This is the week, on March 21st, that the Germans slammed down their hammer with the first phase of their spring offensive.   With that as a setup, let’s jump into our Centennial Time Machine and roll back 100 years to the week that launched the definitive 6 months of DO or DIE -  in the War that Changed the World! World War One THEN 100 Year Ago This Week It’s the third week of March, 1918 And to review the situation once again, Even before the Brest-Litovsk Treaty earlier this month, which successfully wraps up the war on Eastern Front for the Germans - the front collapsing has been freeing up massive resources of men, arms and munitions which are now being re-deployed to the Western Front. Germany's General Erich Ludendorff plans a massive spring offensive designed to separate the British and French armies and force a surrender which the Germans feel pressure to do -  before the American troops can affect the outcome. The offensive is code named Operation Michael, and unbeknownst to the allies is scheduled for March 21st., 1918. Though the Allies could have   been more prepared, they surely were not surprised. Most historians agree that the only surprise is the specific day and the specific location for the offensive’s launch. In fact,  by mid-February 1918, the buildup of both men and heavy artillery on the German side had become too large to dismiss any doubt of a coming attack. In a letter from Sir Douglas Haig, Commander in Chief of the British Armies, written after the fact, he describes aerial operations revealing expanded ammunition and supply dumps all along the Western Front, but with a clear buildup in the Arras sector, leading Haig to believe that this is the most probable place for a German offensive to take place. By some accounts, the actual date of Operation Michael is uncovered by British intelligence a few days before the fact. Unfortunately, defenses are still being prepared on March 21st. Even more unfortunately, General Haig has decided to strengthen his left wing at the expense of his right, and his right wing is exactly where the full force of the German hammer comes down.   According to historian Robert Doughty, French intelligence also discovers a high probability of a German attack at Arras, but the lack of a overarching structure connecting the two armies hampers collaboration. Meanwhile the US Government seems to be focusing its public with misdirection. SOUND EFFECT: Dateline Monday March 18, 1918 As the offensive encroaches - Here is a sampling of headlines in the Official Bulletin: More than 12 Billion Dollars now in War risk insurance…. Woman on Sub teaches men how to cook under water Norway protests to german people over convoy sinking Bakers must bake VICTORY bread or close shop after March 20 The next day the war department briefs the press causing the NY TImes to print an article doubting the offensive is imminent. [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline Tuesday March 19, 1918 A headline in the NY times reads: Offensive in west foe’s last Resort? Washington believes it won’t be delivered unless strategy compels it. Massing of more enemy troops is impracticable. And the article reads: Doubt that the German military leaders will launch their offensive in the west unless compelled by the strategy of the situation to do so,  is expressed in the weekly statement issued by the war Department today, reviewing military operations of the last week. Meanwhile, the next day In the Official Bulletin we find headlines that include: No icing on this year’s Hot Cross Buns for good Friday National Conference called to discuss plans for Americanization of Aliens Live day-old chicks may be sent by mail on 72-hour journeys Export of Oleomargarine to be licensed to Canada And still nothing about the impending offensive! But that is not true for the public press! In contrast to the government media, the NY Times is all over the start of the German spring offensive! Dateline March 21, 1918 The headline in the NY times reads Concentrated assault made to pinch British out of their front line intense struggle ensues The battle spreads north and south and is still continuing with great fury Shell storm over lines Wide area back of British front is swept by German missiles And the story reads: The Germans this afternoon launched a heavy attack against British lines over a wide front in and near the Cambrai sector, and the assault bears all the earmarks of being the beginning of the enemy’s much heralded grand offensive. The attack was preceded by a heavy bombardment from guns of all calibers and the duel between the opposing heavy batteries has been rocking the countryside for hours. [ Sound Effect ] Another Headline Reads Washington still doubtful on drive. American officers wait for full scope of German move to develop. However, the next day on March 22nd, a reporter name Philip Gibbs files a cable report to the NY TIMES that is, in retrospect, the most accurate description in this dynamic moment. Dateline March 22, 1918 The headline in the New York Times reads Germans vast superiority in Guns is backed by 50 divisions of men One cannon for every 12 yards of front One British division fought six near St.  Quentin The enemy flung the full weight of his great army against the British yesterday. Nearly 40 divisions are identified and it is certain that as many as 50 must be engaged. In proportion of men, the British are much outnumbered, therefore the obstinacy of the resistance of the troops is to be admired. Nine German divisions were hurled against three British at one part of the line, and eight against two at another. All the storm troops, including the guards, were in brand-new uniforms. They advanced in dense masses and never faltered until shattered by machine gun fire. As far as I can find, the enemy introduced no new frightfullness, no tanks, and no specially invented gas, but instead, relied on the power of his artillery and the weight of his infantry assault. The supporting waves advanced over the bodies of the dead and wounded. The German commanders were ruthless in the sacrifice of life, in the hope of overwhelming the defense by the sheer weight of numbers. And that is how the media ran - this week 100 years ago - when the German Spring Offensive launches -  in the war the changed the world We have put the links to some of our research in the podcast notes for you to explore. Links:https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/19/102677903.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/20/102678449.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/22/102679611.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/22/102679611.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/22/102679618.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/22/102679621.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/23/102680289.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/23/102680281.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/23/102680343.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/24/121603161.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/24/121603157.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/24/121603160.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/24/121603155.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/24/121603154.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/24/121603152.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/24/121603188.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/24/121603187.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/24/121603659.pdfhttps://www.britannica.com/biography/Erich-Ludendorff http://www.remembrancetrails-northernfrance.com/history/battles/kaiserschlacht-the-german-spring-offensive-of-1918.html https://www.warmuseum.ca/firstworldwar/history/people/generals/sir-arthur-currie/ https://search-proquest-com.proxygw.wrlc.org/docview/304508344/23D471EBD41649A9PQ/8?accountid=11243 http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/battles/british-field-commanders-despatches/sir-douglas-haigs-sixth-despatch-german-spring-offensives-1918/ https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-first-world-war-a-very-short-introduction-9780199205592?cc=us&lang=en& https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/gwu/reader.action?docID=3300066&ppg=420 [SOUND EFFECT] Great War Project That brings us to Great War project with Mike Shuster - former NPR correspondent and curator for the Great War project Blog…. Mike: We have been looking at this moment through the lens of press reports - and your post this week offers a great congealing overview of the first days of the spring offensive. What your headline Mike? [MIKE POST] Mike Shuster from the Great War Project blog. LINK: http://greatwarproject.org/2018/03/18/last-chance-for-both-sides-as-germany-attacks/ America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 No w for this  week’s segment of America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI with Dr. Edward Lengel. Ed: Your story this week is about a 3rd division regimen of engineers. When I read it, it really struck me as a great example of what the Americans brought to the bone tired, desperate and war weary allies. It was more than bodies and equipment - it was also a very special, almost naive but very recognizable spirit.   [ED LENGEL] [MUSIC TRANSITION] [Ed, what will you be telling us about next week?] Dr. Edward Lengel is an American military historian, author, and our segment host for America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI. There are links in the podcast notes to Ed’s post - and I recommend that you take a look at it. The pictures Ed included are memorable.   Links:http://www.edwardlengel.com/easter-sunday-1918-american-engineers-combat/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ [SOUND EFFECT] The Great War Channel If you’d like to see videos about WWI, we suggest our friends at the Great War Channel on Youtube. This week’s new episodes include:   Allied Unified Command on the Horizon King George V in WW1 Inside the German A7V WW1 Tank See their videos by searching for “the great war” on youtube or following the link in the podcast notes! Link:https://www.youtube.com/user/TheGreatWar World War One NOW It is time to fast forward into the present with WW1 Centennial News NOW - [SOUND EFFECT] This part of the podcast isn’t about the past - it is about NOW and there is a lot going on to commemorate the centennial of the War that changed the world! Remembering Veterans Women’s Voices in Letters Lynn Heidelbaugh This week for remembering veterans and for Women’s History Month - we are highlighting a special exhibit:  In Her Words: Women's Duty and Service in World War I Which is on view at the Smithsonian’s     National Postal Museum. We’re joined by Lynn Heidelbaugh, the Curator for the exhibit.   Lynn - Nice to have you back to the Podcast! [greetings] [With families being separated and with more and more men sent to training camps and abroad-- is there an estimation of how much mail was being sent during WW1?] [An on-going subject on the show is new roles and jobs women were taking on during the war-- did the postal service also see women joining its ranks at that time? ] [Lynn - let’s talk a bit about the exhibit-- what inspired it, and how does it differ from your other WW1 letters exhibit, My Fellow Soldiers ] [Is there one particular or special women’s letter that you’d like to highlight ?] [goodbyes] Lynn Heidelbaugh is a Curator at the Smithsonian National Postal Museum. Learn more about their WW1 exhibits by following the links in the podcast notes. Link: https://postalmuseum.si.edu/In-Her-Words/index.html https://postalmuseum.si.edu/MyFellowSoldiers/index.html US Army Women's Museum Now Sticking with museums and continuing our focus on Women’s History Month we are joined by Dr. Francoise Bonnell, the director of the U.S. Army Women's Museum at Fort Lee, Virginia. She is an author and a recognized authority in women’s military history. Dr. Bonnell! Welcome, [greetings] [Dr. Bonnell, I’d like to start by asking you about the U.S. Army Women’s Museum. can you give us a quick overview?] [I know we need to get to WWI but I was struck by something I read on your website. It states that the museum covers the service of Army women from 1775 to the present -  well 1775 is when the colonies kicked off the Revolutionary war against England’s King George - That is pre-United States --- so what was the role of women in our colonial 1775 army?] [OK - on to WWI - Dr. Bonnell - How did women affect the army in WWI and how did their service affect womanhood?] [Is there a continuing legacy of WW1 for women in the army today?] [Does the museum have any WWI centennial commemoration plans?] Dr. Francoise Bonnell is the director of the U.S. Army Women's Museum at Fort Lee, Virginia. Learn more about the museum and the legacy of women’s service in the Army by visiting the link in the podcast notes. Links: http://www.awm.lee.army.mil/about/more_than_a_museum/ Paws of Courage Men served in WWI and as we have been exploring this month - Women served in WWI, but in addition to people - over 16 million animals were mobilized for the war effort. We’ve covered these stories in the past - horses, mules, pigeons, the lion cubs Whiskey and Soda, the elephants of the Berlin Zoo and last weeks the trench rats of the Chemin de Dames…  Today we’re joined by Nancy Furstinger (FUR-stinger), an animal author -- whose book “Paws of Courage” highlights the tales of our heroic canines. Welcome, Nancy! [greetings] [Nancy, to start -- can you give us an overview of the various roles Dogs played in the Armed Forces during WW1?] [Everyone’s been talking about Sgt. Stubby -- and of course, next week he premieres as the star of an animated feature film! What other famous wartime canines are there from WWI?] [Your book covers dogs in service -- and as we mentioned in the opening, there were a lot of different animals that served in WWI. from your research - what strikes you as the most interesting?] [goodbyes/thanks] Nancy Furstinger is the author of over 100 books - and many about her life’s passion - animals. Learn more about Nancy, her writings and the service of animals by following the links in the podcast notes. Links:http://www.nancyfurstinger.com/ http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/brookeusa-home-page.html http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/3917-the-animals-that-helped-win-world-war-i.html http://americanhistory.si.edu/blog/how-did-animals-even-slugs-serve-world-war-i https://www.iwm.org.uk/history/15-animals-that-went-to-war Spotlight in the Media Journey’s End Last week in Spotlight on the media we introduced you to a WWI feature film that premiered over the weekend in both New York and Los Angeles. Journey’s End is a powerful film about a group of British soldiers that rotated into the front line trenches - just about exactly 100 years ago this week, at the cusp of the anticipated great German offensive. I had a chance to catch up with the film’s Director, Saul Dibb in a call to London. Welcome, Saul! [Saul - Journey's end is a very intimate film - about a very intimate subject - men, mortality and fear - Can you give us a quick overview of the story? ] [Journey's End was a stage play, in fact a very good stage play,  before you made it into a film - so it was conceptualized to happen on the confines of a stage - with a story that plays out largely in the confines of a trench system - how did that affect your approach?] [The art direction, cinematography, performance and obviously the script are all amazing - as the director - what your biggest challenge in bringing this all together.] [Saul - You've made several period films - so authenticity is always a key element - how did you go about "getting it right" for Journey's end?]   Saul Dibb is the director of the feature film Journey’s End, now in limited release in us theaters across the country. We put links in the podcast notes for both the trailer and the theater show listing - or Google Journey’s End - I you are interested in what this first week of spring was like for the Tommies in the trenches in 1918  - This fine film will take you there. links:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tLpyaLNfudY http://www.journeysendthefilm.com/watch/movies/journeys-end-622437?gwiCampaign=official+site_official+site_2018-01-11_7876&gwi_campaign=Official+Site&lead_partner_id=360&partner_asset_id=7876&version=2#theater-list 100 Cities 100 Memorials Moving on to our 100 Cities / 100 Memorials segment about the $200,000 matching grant challenge to rescue and focus on our local WWI memorials. This week we are profiling the Memorial Bell Tower project at NC State University in raleigh, North Carolina. With us tell us about their project are Thomas Skolnicki [SKOAL-nick-ee], A veteran and the Landscape Architect for the University -- retired US navy Rear Admiral  -- Benny Suggs, the director of NC State's Alumni Association and US Air Force Veteran, World War One Centennial Commissioner Jerry Hester, and all three men are alumni of the school! Welcome gentlemen! [greetings] [Let me start with a courtesy - Commissioner Hester - We have not had the pleasure of your presence on the Podcast before - I just want to welcome you to the show.] [My first questions is to you Tom - The North Carolina State University Bell Tower is a very unusual building with an interesting history. It started out as a low 16 foot ww1 memorial - a cornerstone monument known as the shrine room but, like a tree it started to grow! For decades! Up to 115 feet tall. Can you tell us the story?] [Commissioner Hester - you are an alumni of the University - did you encourage them to participate in the 100 Cities / 100 Memorials Project - or did you learn about their participation after?] [Benny - this is our first “Spring of 2018” episode and appropriately, for your restoration project is adding a poppy beds to the tower. Can you tell us about that and the dedication plans?] [Commissioner - You have been promoting poppy plantings all over the state - even along the highways - I understand it was pretty spectacular last year.] Thomas Skolnicki is the University Landscape Architect at NC State University, Benny Suggs is the director of NC State's Alumni Association, and Jerry Hester is a World War One Centennial Commissioner. Learn more about the 100 Cities/100 Memorials program at the link in the podcast notes or by going to ww1cc.org/100Memorials Link: www.ww1cc.org/100cities [SOUND EFFECT] The Buzz And that brings us to the buzz - the centennial of WW1 this week in social media with Katherine Akey - Katherine, what do you have for us this week? St. Patrick’s Day and Literacy Hi Theo -- we celebrated St Patrick’s Day this past weekend, and in honor of that I wanted to share two quick articles about the Irish and Irish Americans of WW1 that we shared on Facebook this past week. The first comes from NPR and tells the story of a torpedoed Irish ship and the cargo aboard that saved its sailors lives. The ship was making its way across the Irish Sea, a favored hunting ground for German uboats, when it was struck by a torpedo and split in two. As the ship began to sank, sucking the sailors down into the water with it, the cargo floated up to the surface -- barrels and barrels of the iconic Irish stout, Guinness. Holding on to the Guinness, the sailors drifted in the sea and were rescued a few hours later. Read the full story at the link in the notes. To wrap up St Patrick’s Day, head to Saratogian News where they recently published an article about the experience of an Irish American regiment, a part of the 42nd Rainbow Division, during the St Patrick’s Day of 1918. They celebrated the holiday just after having experienced some heavy losses at the hand of the German’s and their artillery. Read about their valiant efforts under intense German fire, and their celebration of the holiday, at the link in the podcast notes. Finally for the week, head over to Mental Floss to take a WW1 era literacy test. With a rapidly growing armed forces, drawn from all corners of the country and all segments of the population, officials and army leaders saw indications of life in the early 20th century: nutrition and literacy in this cross-section of America were not at the levels they had expected. Though reading and writing might are not necessarily the most important requirement for trench warfare -- and indeed several combatants, including Russia, Italy and Turkey had shockingly low rates of literacy in their ranks-- the U.S. Army became increasingly concerned with whether or not its soldiers were literate as the war picked up pace. Thousands of American soldiers couldn't read printed directions on basic military tasks -- posing a potentially dangerous problem for the fledgling force. The Army didn't implement its first major literacy program until the 1940s, but it did use a battery of yes or no questions to test literacy as new recruits came in. Some of the questions are quite simple, like “is coal white?” but they escalate in complexity to ones like “Are members of the family usually regarded as guests” and “Are loquacious and voluble opposite in meaning?” You can take the test yourself, and read more about the pitfalls of this first literacy battery, by visiting the link in the notes. That’s it for this week in the Buzz. Link:https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2018/03/17/594440438/for-st-patricks-day-a-true-tale-of-8-sailors-saved-by-guinness?utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=npr&utm_term=nprnews&utm_content=20180317 http://www.saratogian.com/article/ST/20180317/NEWS/180319837 http://mentalfloss.com/article/535841/would-you-be-able-pass-world-war-i-military-literary-test Outro And that is also it for this week’s episode of WW1 Centennial News. Thank you for listening. We also want to thank our guests... Dr. Edward Lengel, Military historian and author Mike Shuster, Curator for the great war project blog Lynn Heidelbaugh, curator at the Smithsonian National Postal Museum Dr. Francoise Bonnell, Director of the U.S. Army Women's Museum at Fort Lee, Virginia Nancy Furstinger, animal lover, and author about animals Saul Dibb. director of the feature film Journey’s End Thomas Skolnicki, Benny Suggs and WW1 Centennial Commissioner Jerry Hester, from the 100 Cities/100 Memorials project at NC State University Katherine Akey, the commission’s social media director and line producer for the podcast A shout out to Eric Maar as well as our intern John Morreale for their great research assistance. And I am Theo Mayer - your host. The US World War One Centennial Commission was created by Congress to honor, commemorate and educate about WW1. Our programs are to-- inspire a national conversation and awareness about WW1; Including this podcast! We are bringing the lessons of the 100 years ago into today's classrooms; We are helping to restore WW1 memorials in communities of all sizes across our country; and of course we are building America’s National WW1 Memorial in Washington DC. We want to thank commission’s founding sponsor the Pritzker Military Museum and Library as well as the Starr foundation for their support. The podcast can be found on our website at ww1cc.org/cn   on  iTunes, Google Play, TuneIn, Podbean, Stitcher - Radio on Demand --- or using your smart speaker.. Just say “Play W W One Centennial News Podcast” and we are excited to announce - as of this week - you can listen to us on Spotify. Search ww1 Centennial News. Our twitter and instagram handles are both @ww1cc and we are on facebook @ww1centennial. Thank you for joining us. And don’t forget to share the stories you are hearing here today about the war that changed the world! [music] So long! Next week: 1418 now join us for an interview 100c/100m in Appleton WI Women's Overseas Service League Idaho WW1 Commission
March 17, 2018
Highlights Death and Taxes Federal Income Tax in 1918 | @02:15 Casualty List Controversy | @05:20 America Emerges - 26th Yankee Division and rats - Dr. Edward Lengel | @07:35 War In The Sky - Personal account of Paris air raids | @13:30 US anti-war activism in 1918 - Mike Shuster | @16:10 Euro WWI Commemoration events - Dr. Monique Seefried | @21:05 Dog Tags reunited with Doughboy - James Shetler | @30:15 Spotlight in the media 1: Sgt. Stubby - Jacy Jenkins | @36:45 Spotlight in the media 2: Journey’s End - Trailer clip | @42:35 100C/100M in Ogden Utah, Terry Schow | @44:55 Speaking WWI - Penguin | @51:10 WWI Commemoration in Social Media - Katherine Akey | @52:45----more---- Opening Welcome to World War 1 centennial News - episode #63 - It’s about WW1 THEN - what was happening 100 years ago this week  - and it’s about WW1 NOW - news and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. Today is March 16th, 2018 and our guests for this week include: Dr. Edward Lengel with a story from the Yankee Division and rats... Mike Shuster, from the great war project blog revisiting the ongoing anti-war movement in America Commissioner Monique Seefried tells us about upcoming centennial events in Europe James Shetler with the story of one doughboy’s dog tags and their journey back beside him Jacy Jenkins gets us ready for the premiere of the new animated WWI set film Sgt Stubby: An American Hero Terry Schow, sharing the 100 Cities/100 Memorials project in Ogden Utah Katherine Akey with the WW1 commemoration in social media   WW1 Centennial News -- a weekly podcast brought to you by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and the Starr foundation. I’m Theo Mayer - the Chief Technologist for the Commission and your host. Welcome to the show. [MUSIC] Preface This week, as we were looking at the news and articles from various publications 100 years ago, an unexpected theme popped out.. A theme that covers two ideas that are said to be the only sure things in life. Death and Taxes - both of which are all over the news this week 100 years ago. With that as a setup, let’s jump into our Centennial Time Machine and roll back 100 years to understand how we see death and taxes 100 years ago in the War that Changed the World! World War One THEN 100 Year Ago This Week Taxes We are back in 1918 and some things never change. We are in mid March, heading towards April and it’s TAX TIME!! [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline March 11, 1918 A headline from the Official Bulletin reads: Voices of 25,000 Four-Minute Men to Be Heard Throughout the Land, Warning All to Make Tax Returns The story opens with: Twenty-five thousand Four-Minute Men will start out today on a nation-wide campaign to impress upon the American public their patriotic duty promptly to file their income tax return and pay their taxes. The period for filing ends April 1. You remember who the four-minute-men are, right? The four minute men are a force of volunteers that are deployed by George Creel - America’s propaganda chief - to deliver 4 minute government written pitches to the population. The article continues to explain: The Four-Minute Men will appear in theaters, moving picture houses, and public gatherings.  Special meetings will be held by chambers of commerce, boards of trade, rotary clubs, luncheon clubs, and business organizations. " Don't delay " is the warning that will be given by the speakers. Taxpayers will be urged to protect themselves and aid the Government by being prompt. It will cost the Government money and trouble to hunt down the man who dodges the income tax, but the word has gone forth from headquarters that this will be done. Be it known that the “slacker " will be shown no leniency.   Now here it gets interesting! The article goes on to reveal how much people actually pay for taxes in 1918 - In the article it states: The man of modest income is made to bear a just share of the common burden. Tables have been produced comparing the rate of tax in the United States and Great Britain. Here in the United States, the married man with an income of $2,500 pays $10 in taxes while in Great Britain the-man with an income of $2,500 pays a tax of $223! However, larger incomes in the US are subject to a surtax! The normal rate of tax under the war revenue act of 1917 is 2 percent on the net Income of married persons earning $2,000. The surtax ranges from an additional 1 per cent on incomes between $5,000 and $7,500 to a surtax of 50 percent on incomes in excess of $1,000,000. So in 1918, we have a tax code that can be explained in 4 minutes. It supports working people with a small tax burden and expects the wealthy to contribute a substantial share back to the nation that makes it possible for them to gain such wealth. Weird - huh!? Death OK So much for Taxes - Let’s talk about the other sure thing in life - Death! This week 100 years ago there is great controversy raging in the pages of the NY times over the publication of casualty lists. Concerned over German abilities to derive useful military information from casualty lists and under pressure from the French, Pershing only publishes names of casualties with no unit, or home address information. [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline: March 11, 1918A headline in the NY Times reads: WAR DEPARTMENT STANDS-BY-THE BAN ON CASUALTY LISTS Shows No Intention of Yielding on Publication of Addresses. CONGRESSMEN OBJECT Expect Flood of Protests from Constituents Information is Declared to be Valuable to Foe The article goes on to explain that the French do not publish ANY casualty lists instead they simply inform the next of kin directly. George Creel,  the head of the Committee on Public information, also easy to describe as America’s propaganda chief is in on this fight, as the Times describes the committee’s stand as: “The mere publishing of name of soldiers without home addresses to Identify them to neighbors and friends or to prevent confusion with other men of similar names, is so devoid of news value that the committee will not Issue the lists.” Interestingly, the NY Times clearly has it wrong - because George Creel is also the publisher of the government daily War Gazette the “Official Bulletin” -- and on the same day, May 11, in issue #254 - on page 2 -- there is an article whose headline reads: LIST OF CASUALTIES AS REPORTED AMONG THE U.S. FORCES OVERSEAS And continues to list the casualties by the Rank, first name, middle initial and last name. Looking further into it we found something else fascinating. A few days later, on March 16, another article in the NY times is published: [SOUND EFFECT] Headline: 1,722 Casualties in Overseas Forces so Far; 162 Killed in Action or Dead From Wounds. The article goes on to list what the causes of the casualties are. Some of the smallest numbers are death from gas, civilians and executions - but when you look at the numbers you realize that out the casusualies, less than 10% are killed in action. About the same % as killed by accidents, while a whopping 37% -  over ⅓ of casualties are the result of disease. So if you are an American Soldier in Europe in March of 1918 - you are nearly 4 times more likely to get killed by a bacterium or a virus than you are likely to get killed by the Kaiser’s forces… a strange twist of fate at this stage in the war that changed the world! Links: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/educate/places/official-bulletin/3343-ww1-official-bulletin-volume-2-issue-254-march-11-1918.html https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/16/98260787.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/11/118139263.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/12/98259936.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/15/98260374.pdf [SOUND EFFECT] America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 And that brings us to this week’s segment of America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI with Dr. Edward Lengel. Ed: This week your story is about the 26th Yankee division.. And last week you teased us with the fact that this week’s story was going to include special RATS! Can’t wait to hear the story! [ED LENGEL] [Ed, what will you be telling us about next week?] Dr. Edward Lengel is an American military historian, author, and our segment host for America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI. There are links in the podcast notes to Ed’s post and his website as an author. Links:http://www.edwardlengel.com/100-years-ago-1918-yankee-divisions-secret-weapon/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ [MUSIC TRANSITION] War in the Sky Combining the War in The Sky and Women’s History Month we have this first person account from a YMCA canteen worker who went to Paris to help our boys: This week, one hundred years ago, the war in the sky over Paris is alive with attacks on the city. This is from one of the last letters written by a Miss Winona C Martin,  a YMCA worker who was killed in a German air raid attack on Paris. In this letter she describes another raid much like the one in which she was killed. Hospitalized in Paris with Bronchitis she writes: “Above the red brick wall, which is all I see, of the world’s most beautiful city, there rises a patch of sky… and as the light began to fade on my first night in the hospital, I noticed some stars of marvelous brilliance. Suddenly they began to move about in the weirdest manner, which I thought due to the fact that I was slightly lightheaded. My nurse came to me presently and explain that they were airplanes on guard. She said the Bosh were expected any moment, because it was full moon. The following night I was watching them again when suddenly I heard the boom of canons. There came the call of sirens, which warn Paris that an air raid is on. There followed a scene as I hope never to witness again. All lights were extinguished and the women in the ward across the hall awakened and commenced to call on the Saints and the Virgin for protection. Further down, I heard babies crying. The nurses walked up and down ringing their hands, yet trying to prevent a panic. For half an hour the firing continued. Sometimes directly above our heads, sometimes becoming more distant. Meanwhile the whole battle was visible from my window. The airplanes, mere streaks of light,  darted hither and thither and sometimes there was a blaze like a falling star when one was hit. At the end of that time, the firing ceased. The siren blew the recall, which meant that the Bosh were driven back. And to my immense surprise, the whole hospital instantly calmed down, turned over on its pillows and went peacefully to sleep. Miss Martin was a civilian casualty this month, but her letters home give us a  special glimpse into one woman’s experience of the war in the sky, the war on the sea, and the war in Paris 100 years ago this week. Link:  https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/17/109329237.pdf Great War Project Now on to the Great War project with Mike Shuster - former NPR correspondent and curator for the Great War project Blog…. Mike, this week you turn your focus back to the homefront with a report on those who still resist America’s participation in the war. Their voice is not a welcome echo in the US, is it Mike?   it certainly is not Theo… The headline on the "Great War Project" this week read… [MIKE POST] Mike Shuster from the Great War Project blog. LINK: http://greatwarproject.org/2018/03/11/american-anti-war-movement-still-alive/ [SOUND EFFECT] The Great War Channel If you’d like to see videos about WWI, we suggest our friends at the Great War Channel on Youtube. This week’s new episodes include:   Peace in the east -- The Treaty of Brest-Litovskand German Tactics for the 1918 Spring Offensive   See their videos by searching for “the great war” on youtube or following the link in the podcast notes! Link:https://www.youtube.com/user/TheGreatWar World War One NOW It is time to fast forward into the present with WW1 Centennial News NOW - [SOUND EFFECT] This part of the podcast is not about the past - it is about NOW and what is happening to commemorate the centennial of the War that changed the world! Commission News/Events Euro Commemoration Events with Commissioner Seefried This week in Commission News, we’re looking across the Atlantic and towards the summer-- to the many centennial commemoration events that will be taking place all across Europe as the desperate and decisive battles that brought the war to end are remembered. Joining us now with an overview on some of these commemorations,  is US World War One Centennial Commissioner Dr. Monique Seefried. [Monique - Welcome back to the podcast! We haven’t had you on the show for a long time!] [greetings] [Monique - In overview, what are the key commemoration events planned in Europe this year?] [I know there is one event in particular that is close to your heart. It is taking place at the Croix Rouge farm in late July-- what is it ?] [If Americans want to participate in these commemorations - how to they go about it? ] [goodbyes/thanks] Dr. Monique Seefried is a Commissioner on the US WW1 Centennial Commission. We have put a number of links including to some of the guide Dr. Seefried mentioned into the podcast notes. Links: https://www.abmc.gov/news-events/news/world-war-i-centennial-ceremonies-abmc-sites http://www.greatwar.co.uk/events/2014-2018-ww1-centenary-events.htm http://www.1914.org/ http://eventi.centenario1914-1918.it/ http://croixrougefarm.org/inauguration/ http://www.worldwar1.com/ http://www.worldwar1.com/pdf/AEF_Battlefields.pdf https://war-travel.com/illustrated-travel-guides/north-east-france Remembering Veterans Dog Tags Reunited In our Remembering Veterans segment this week -- we’re joined by James Shetler, a citizen historian and independent researcher. James is here to tell us the story of a pair of dog tags-- and their long journey back to the doughboy that had lost them a century ago. Welcome, James! [greetings] [James - to start-- Can you tell us a bit about the man these dog tags belonged to-- Captain Swenson?] [So, how did the dog tags come to be in your possession?] [So you went to back to France to return the tags?] [Are you working on any other World War One research projects now?] Thank you! [goodbyes]James Shetler is a citizen historian who pursued a story of service! If you have the story of someone who serves in WWI ---- a doughboy, volunteer, an individual - your ancestor or someone who you just connect with, lime James did with captain swenson, we can help you share their story and get it into the permanent national archival record about WWI. Just go to ww1cc.org/stories where you can submit their story of service to be published and archived. That link as well as the expanded story of Captain Swenson are in the podcast notes. Links: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/commemorate/family-ties/stories-of-service.html http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/4185-my-journey-with-captain-alfred-marcy-swenson.html https://jayinthegreatwar.com/ Spotlight in the Media Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero This week for our Spotlight in the Media -- We’re joined by Jacy Jenkins, VP of Partnerships and Outreach from Fun Academy Motion Pictures. That is who is putting out the new animated film: Sgt Stubby: An American Hero! Which is having a combination world premiere showing and children’s benefit in Los Angeles later this month on March 27th. Welcome, Jacy! [greetings] [Jacy, Sgt. Stubby is a great story about the relationship between some American Doughboys and a very special dog that they adopted or maybe a dog  that adopted them. But it’s based on a true story, right? ] [The premiere is also a fundraiser -- can you tell us about that?] [Jacy - that seems to be part of the Fun Academy’s culture - you make movies but you also have a philanthropic bent - creating events to raise awareness for the film and raise money for causes -- Can you tell us about the Sgt Stubby look-alike contest?] [When can the public go see Sgt Stubby in theaters?] [Is there anything else you’d like us to know about the film?] [goodbyes] Jacy Jenkins is the VP of Partnerships and Outreach from Fun Academy Motion Pictures. You can learn more about the film Sgt Stubby: An American Hero by following the links in the podcast notes; we’ve included links to the most recent  trailers and to their social media accounts. Link:http://www.stubbymovie.com/ https://twitter.com/stubbymovie?lang=en https://www.facebook.com/StubbyMovie/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ab0pd9oNf7Q&feature=youtu.be Journey’s End Another Spotlight in the Media is for another WW1 film premiering THIS weekend in New York and LA. Journey’s End is an intimate, gritty, and powerful film about men, mortality and fear. It’s about a group of British soldiers sent back to the front line trenches - just about exactly 100 years ago -- som this podcast audience knows what going on right now…. there is an imminent massive German assault rumored to be coming…. Like right now…. and these seasoned veterans, who are joined by a fresh faced young 19 years old, know what they are probably in for! [run sound clip] I just saw a viewing copy of the film and I have to tell you - this is a beautifully made, wonderfully written, well cast, powerful and poignant WWI movie you’ll want to make an effort to see. The film is going into limited release in the US and we have included a link to the playdate schedule in the podcast notes. You can also google Journey’s End to learn more. Tune in next week, when we’ve arranged an interview with the film’s director, Saul Dibb. Both the trailer and the showing listing are linked below. links:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tLpyaLNfudY http://www.journeysendthefilm.com/watch/movies/journeys-end-622437?gwiCampaign=official+site_official+site_2018-01-11_7876&gwi_campaign=Official+Site&lead_partner_id=360&partner_asset_id=7876&version=2#theater-list 100 Cities 100 Memorials Moving on to our 100 Cities / 100 Memorials segment about the $200,000 matching grant challenge to rescue and focus on our local WWI memorials. This week we are profiling the WWI doughboy monument project by the Weber County Historical Society & American Legion Post 9 in Ogden, Utah. With us tell us about their project is Terry Schow [Scow] , a member of the National Executive Committee for The American Legion of Utah. Welcome Terry! [greetings] [Terry - You were one of the very first projects to submit a grant application to the 100 Cities / 100 Memorials program. When did you get started on this?] [Your doughboy statue was originally installed way up high on the side of a building  - at the legion post wasn’t it?] [It’s been a while - but didn’t you have a story about gold radiator paint being used to refurbish the statue back in the 70’s or something?] [You pulled together a really strong coalition of project partners in Ogden… who all signed on?] [Well, congratulations on being selected as a World War 1 Centennial Memorial. Are there re-dedication plans?] Terry Schow is a member of the National Executive Committee for The American Legion of Utah. Learn more about the 100 Cities/100 Memorials program at the link in the podcast notes or by going to ww1cc.org/100cities Link: www.ww1cc.org/100cities [SOUND EFFECT] Speaking WW1 And now for our feature “Speaking World War 1” - Where we explore the words & phrases that are rooted in the war  --- 100 years ago, penguins stumbled across grassy fields of America, France, and england - playing a critical and important role in the aerial war effort. Penguins!? Yea - Penguins! In your mind’s eye, are you still seeing little black-and-white, flightless,  tuxedo clad birds --- flapping their stubby wings on grassy knolls? Well - actually you’ve got the stubby wings, the flightless and grassy knolls right! Penguin is our Speaking WWI word, this week… And the penguins of World War One were indeed flightless and stubby winged. They were trainer planes for the air corps. These non-flying trainer aircraft were made for teaching new recruits how to operate an aircraft while still reasonably safe at ground level. Around 300 of the “Penguin” trainers were made during the course of the War, with wings too short and engines too small to lift the craft into actual flight, allowing trainees to experiment with the flight controls, engine operations, and flight procedures while still at ground level. These “aircraft” were jokingly nicknamed “Penguins” because both creatures and planes were something that probably should fly, but don’t. Penguins -- a useful training tool for a novice pilot, a cute but very smelly animal - and this week’s Speaking WW1 Word. Check the podcast links to learn more, and to see photographs of the Penguin planes. Links: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc2.ark:/13960/t9t156s17;view=1up;seq=155 http://www.cradleofaviation.org/history/exhibits/exhibit-galleries/world_war_i/breese_penguin.html https://iansumner.blogspot.com/2013/09/kings-of-air-of-penguins-and-men-part-2.html http://www.cradleofaviation.org/history/exhibits/exhibit-galleries/world_war_i/breese_penguin.html https://www.historyofsimulation.com/flight-simulators-in-world-war-1/ [SOUND EFFECT] The Buzz And that brings us to the buzz - the centennial of WW1 this week in social media with Katherine Akey - Katherine, what do you have for us this week? Trunk and Daylight Savings Hi Theo-- Daylight savings time appears in the news both this week in 2018 and this week in 1918. In fact, the most popular article we shared across social media accounts this week had to do with daylight savings time; most reactions to it were barf emojis and despair, which is pretty much how i felt trying to get up Monday morning at what felt like 5 am. But the NYtimes article from 1918 has a different tone: after months of tightly regulated coal and electricity usage, which meant many Americans spent their Mondays in the cold, Daylight Savings promised to help take the edge off coal rationing by giving us an hour more daylight in which to work and an hour less darkness that needed illumination. The change seems welcomed by the people of 1918, but I’m guessing they didn’t expect the wartime procedure to come back, and stay back, for a century. So, if you’re feeling as grumpy as I am about daylight savings-- you can thank the coal shortages of a century ago for the disruption. Moving on to nicer news, we shared another story about a treasure trove found in a trunk this week. Last week, we told the story of a man who has written a book about his father’s life and service in the war, which he put together after inheriting his father’s foot locker, filled with wartime belongings. It seems that trunks and footlockers were the go-to way to store belongings a century ago, as a WW1 era trunk was recently donated to the Texas Military Forces Museum. The museum posted a video of curators and archivists opening the trunk, astonished at the good condition and the sheer quantity of objects inside; dozens of letters, photographs, mess kits, magazines, and well kept uniforms -- the possessions of two brothers-- one with the 141st Infantry Regiment and the other with the 149th and 150th Machine Gun Battalion, 42nd Rainbow Division. Watch the whole video for a sneak peak at the collection-- and if you have a weird old trunk in your attic, you may want to crack it open and see what treasures you may have! Check the notes for links to these stories, and that’s it this week for the Buzz. link:https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/16/98260764.pdf https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2018/03/06/daylight-saving-time-almost-here-and-its-turning-100-years-old/395953002/ https://www.facebook.com/texasmilitaryforcesmuseum/videos/1680597135312139/   Thank you Katherine - Outro Thank you for listening to this week’s episode of WW1 Centennial News. We also want to thank our guests...   Dr. Edward Lengel, Military historian and author Mike Shuster, Curator for the great war project blog Monique Seefried, World War One Centennial Commissioner James Shetler, citizen historian and humanist Jacy Jenkins, VP of Partnerships and Outreach at Fun Academy Motion Pictures Terry Schow from the 100 Cities 100 Memorials project in Ogden, Utah Katherine Akey, the commission’s social media director and line producer for the podcast Thanks also to Eric Maar as well as our intern John Morreale for their great research assistance. And I am Theo Mayer - your host.   The US World War One Centennial Commission was created by Congress to honor, commemorate and educate about WW1. Our programs are to-- inspire a national conversation and awareness about WW1; this podcast is a part of that…. Thank you! We are bringing the lessons of the 100 years ago into today's classrooms; We are helping to restore WW1 memorials in communities of all sizes across our country; and of course we are building America’s National WW1 Memorial in Washington DC.   We want to thank commission’s founding sponsor the Pritzker Military Museum and Library as well as the Starr foundation for their support. The podcast can be found on our website at ww1cc.org/cn   on  iTunes, Google Play, TuneIn, Podbean, and now also on Stitcher - Radio on Demand --- as well as the other places you get your podcast --  even on your smart speaker.. Just say “Play W W One Centennial News Podcast.” Our twitter and instagram handles are both @ww1cc and we are on facebook @ww1centennial. Thank you for joining us. And don’t forget to share the stories you are hearing here today about the war that changed the world! [music] OK…So what do you call a penguin in the trenches during WW1…? Lost! So long!
March 9, 2018
Highlights The US Army Signal Corps in WW1 The founding of the US Army Signal Corps @ |01:30 The Signal Corps in WW1 @ |04:25 War In The Sky - Signal Corps Connections @ |09:00 Alvin York’s crisis of conscience w/ Dr. Edward Lengel @ |13:30 Germany’s starts big push w/ Mike Shuster @ |20:25 Women in the AEF w/ Dr. Susan Zeiger @ |25:15 The Hello Girls w/ Dr. Elizabeth Cobbs @ |32:05 100C/100M in Worcester MA w/ Brian McCarthy @ |40:35 Speaking WW1 - Shody @ |46:15 Social Media Pick w/ Katherine Akey @ |48:15----more---- Opening Welcome to World War 1 centennial News - episode #62 - It’s about WW1 THEN - what was happening 100 years ago this week  - and it’s about WW1 NOW - news and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. Today is March 9th, 2018 and our guests for this week include: Dr. Edward Lengel, exploring Alvin York’s crisis of conscience as he entered the military Mike Shuster, from the great war project blog with an update on German war activities in May Dr. Susan Zeiger telling us about the women workers of the American Expeditionary Forces Dr. Elizabeth Cobbs with the story of the Hello Girls Brian McCarthy, sharing the 100 Cities/100 Memorials project in Worcester Massachusetts Katherine Akey with the WW1 commemoration in social media WW1 Centennial News -- a weekly podcast brought to you by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and the Starr foundation. I’m Theo Mayer - the Chief Technologist for the Commission and your host. Welcome to the show. [MUSIC] Preface This week several stories came up that pointed to US Army Signal Corps. You know.. they’re not just the guys who made the movies and took the pictures…   Actually they have a heritage of being “New Tech” gurus  - taking initial responsibility for classic ideas, later managed by other organizations including military intelligence, weather forecasting and especially aviation. That because it all started with a visionary guy named Albert James Myer. Myer started as a Medical Officer in Texas before the civil war and ended up a brigadier general with the title of First Chief Signal Officer and a legacy as “The father of the US Army Signal Corps” Early on - Myer came up with a flag waving scheme to send messages during combat - which the Army adopted it in 1860 - one year before the start of the Civil War. It’s high falutin’ name was Aerial Telegraphy but, everyone called it WIG WAG. During the Civil War, WigWag was used on the battlefield to direct artillery fire-- and Myer started to experiment with balloons, electric telegraph and other kinds of new tech. Because he fostered such an innovation culture in the signal corps - ten years late, In 1870 when the US government AKA the congress decided to  mandate a National Weather Service - they tasked Myer and the Signal Corps to create it - which he did to great international acclaim. Myer died a decade later in 1880, and his lab “slash” school in Arlington Virginia was ultimately renamed Fort Myer to honor the father of the US Signal Corps. By the turn of the century the US Army Signal Corps had taken on a leadership role not just with visual signalling but also with the telegraph, telephone, cable communications, meteorology, combat photography and had even sprouted an aeronautical and aviation section. Nearly a decade before American Forces engaged the enemy, the wright brothers made test flights of the army’s first airplane built to Signal Corps’ specifications. Tests appropriately performed at Fort Myers. Army aviation stayed with the Signal Corps until May of 1918, when the Aviation Section of the Signal Corps is transformed by President Wilson’s  Executive order, into the Army Air Service - the forerunner of the United States Air Force. With that as a setup, let’s jump into our Centennial Time Machine - which the Signal Corps DID NOT develop - and roll back 100 years to learn what the US Army Signal Corps was - during the War that Changed the World! World War One THEN 100 Year Ago This Week [MUSIC TRANSITION] We are back in 1918 and we are going to focus on two of the key things the Signal Corps does during WW1. Communication and Documentation --- and always with an eye on innovation. Because with battles and offensives no longer organize neatly into line-of-sight groups, innovations is required to communicate and coordinate. The field telephone is one of those basic elements… The challenge of wired electric connections between two telephone devices is that you need the wire… which tends to get blown up, trampled, cut, damaged and sometimes tapped into by the enemy in the field. And because, the telephone in 1918 is a point-to-point connection… that means that, in order to re-connect a field telephone from one place to another - you need to physically repatch the connection - a function performed by a telephone operator. The “Hello Girls” who go to France to do that job, are sworn into the US Army Signal Corps as soldiers… yup… but then at the end of the war, they are just let go -- and not given honorable discharges and so don’t qualify for veteran benefits! We have a whole section for you with Dr. Elizabeth Cobbs - the author of the book “The Hello Girls” later in the show...---- OK --- Then there is WIRELESS communication. The Signal corps teams up with private industry to advance radio transmission and reception and create new devices that are smaller, more practical and more capable. Of course the challenge with radio communications is that everyone can receive it… creating a serious security challenge and a great intelligence opportunity - both of which the Signal Corps addresses. So when the United States enters the war in early 1917, its own capacity for radio intelligence is significantly underdeveloped. But, with the help of their British and French allies, and the dedicated work of over 500 men, the Signal Corps’ Radio Section collects huge amounts of radio and other communications traffic to help the American Expeditionary Forces stay one step ahead of their enemy. This area of activity is known as Signt or Signal Intelligence. One battle in which victory is particularly credited to the work of the Radio Section is the Battle of Saint-Mihiel in September 1918, as American operators are able to discover the location of several German command posts, and warn the Army of a German counteroffensive several hours in advance. But not everything signal corps is tech! They also take 600 carrier pigeons to France including a pigeon named Cher Ami (dear friend) who is credited with a stallworth, heroic,  wounded delivery of a message credited for saving 194 US Soldiers of the 77th Infantry Division - the famed Lost Battalion. Then there is the Documentation roll of the US Army Signal Corps! According to an article by Audrey Amidon: The Signal Corps pays relatively little attention to photography until July 1917 when they are assigned the responsibility for obtaining photographic coverage of American participation in World War I. That means both moving and still imagery. The purpose is for propaganda, scientific, identification, and military reconnaissance purposes but primarily for the production of a pictorial history of the war. The Photographic Section of the Signal Corps manages to build up quite a large and efficient organization. Beginning with 25 men in August 1917, the Photographic Section attached to the AEF reaches a strength of 92 officers and 498 men by November 1918 They defined a photographic unit as one motion-picture cameraman and one still-picture photographer, plus  assistants. So they are capturing stills and motion pictures simultaneously at each location. Each Division (remember from last week is a force of around 40,000 American soldiers) gets a photographic unit. They also hace units that cover headquarters, sea transport, service and supply, red cross and so forth. Between the AEF footage, domestic training documentation and special projects including training films for soldier and pilots, the US Army  Signal Corps shoots nearly 1 million feet of movie film to document the war that changed the world! Other links: https://unwritten-record.blogs.archives.gov/2017/03/16/shooting-world-war-i-the-history-of-the-army-signal-corps-cameramen-1917-1918/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Signal_Corps_(United_States_Army) For much deeper learning, if people are interested: https://history.army.mil/html/books/060/60-15-1/CMH_Pub_60-15-1.pdf War in the Sky This week, one hundred years ago,  the war in the sky preparations were in full view in the Official Bulletin - The government’s daily war gazette published by George Creel, President Wilson’s propaganda chief. And as we have told you before, the Commission re-publishes each issue of the Official Bulletin on the Centennial of its original publication date - a great primary source of information about WWI you are invited to enjoy at ww1cc.org/bulletin. We selected two articles from this week’s issues that illustrate the Signal Corp’s roll in the War in the Sky - the first article is about seeing the foundation of a new US Aerospace industry forming. [sound effect] Dateline: March 5, 1918 The article headline reads: 10,000 SKILLED MEN NEEDED BY THE AVIATION SECTION The article goes on to read: The US Army Signal Corps has authorized the call for 10,000 machinists, mechanics, and other skilled workers needed by the Aviation Section of the Signal Corps. Even though the strength of that service is already 100 times what it was in April of last year, it is now understood that nearly 98 of every 100 men in the service need to be highly skilled. Airplane work has been wholly new and unfamiliar to American Mechanics. It has been necessary for both officers and men to learn very largely by experience. The article continues with with a comment by War secretary Baker about keeping those planes flying in the field: The great problem now remaining is to secure the thousands of skilled mechanics, engine men, motor repair men, wood and metal workers needed to keep the planes always in perfect condition. This great engineering and mechanical force at the airdomes, flying fields, and repair depots, both here and behind the lines in France, is a vital industrial link in the chain of air supremacy. The next day, an article illustrates the foundation of the modern cartography a technology we now all enjoy casually and daily with applications like Google Maps: [Sound Effect] Dateline: March 5, 1918 The article headline reads: 1,000 Trained Photographers Wanted at Once for Signal Corps Aeroplane -and Ground Duty And the article reads: One thousand men trained in photographic work are needed by the Signal Corps before March 10 As an aside - that is only 5 days after this article publishes - it goes on with: These men are to be instructed at the new school for aerial photography just opened at Rochester, N. Y., preparatory to going overseas. This ground force for America's aerial photography requires three types of men: Laboratory and dark room experts, especially fast news photographers, familiar with developing, printing, enlarging, retouching, and finishing panchromatic photography, men who can take a plate from the airmen and hand over, ten minutes later, a finished enlargement to the staff officers. These men will work in motor lorries as close to the front and staff as possible. Men able to keep the whole delicate equipment in good condition, such as camera and optical constructions plus repairmen, lens experts, cabinet makers, instrument makers, and so forth... Men to fit the finished prints into their proper places in the photographic reproduction of the German front --- to work out the information disclosed, and to keep the whole map a living hour-to-hour story of what the Germans are doing.s Many men not physically fit for line service are eligible for this so-called limited military service, as defective vision corrected by glasses and other minor physical disabilities' are waived. Owing to the shortness of time it is requested that only men fully qualified apply for this service. That is a great closing line, as this article was published on May 5th, and they want 1,000 men by May 10 as the army Signal Corps plays out its role in the War in the Sky one hundred years ago this week! America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 For the war on the ground, here is this week’s segment of America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI with Dr. Edward Lengel. Ed: This week your story is about one of the best known soldier heroes of WWI - and his very profound crisis of conscience in entering his military service.. Who was he and what is his story? [ED LENGEL] [Thank you Ed. Before we close - I want to ask you something that struck me in hearing this account. When Alvin York asked his Captain and his battalion commander  “I wish you would tell me what this war is about,” I know we have no record of that they actually said - but as a historian - how might these military commander have responded? What was the common wisdom and answer to that question at the time?] [Ed, what will you be telling us about next week?] Dr. Edward Lengel is an American military historian, author, and our segment host for America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI. There are links in the podcast notes to Ed’s post and his website as an author. Links:http://www.edwardlengel.com/one-hundred-years-ago-alvin-yorks-decision/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ Great War Project Now on to the Great War project with Mike Shuster - former NPR correspondent and curator for the Great War project Blog…. Mike, your post this week is about the pre “spring offensive” actions in Europe - On the front and reaching into Allied capitals - It really feels like there is an undercurrent of desperation - and to me - desperation on all side - is that a theme here? [MIKE POST] Mike Shuster from the Great War Project blog. LINK: http://greatwarproject.org/2018/03/04/germany-now-dominates-on-western-front/ [SOUND EFFECT] The Great War Channel We love that you listen to us - but If you’d like to watch some videos about WW1, go see our friends at the Great War Channel on Youtube. This week’s new videos include:   Ludendorff's Window of Opportunity From Caporetto to Cambrai: A Summary Lenin and Trotsky - Their Rise to Power To see their videos by searching for “the great war” on youtube or following the link in the podcast notes! Link:https://www.youtube.com/user/TheGreatWar World War One NOW OK… time to  fast forward --  back to the present with WW1 Centennial News NOW - [SOUND EFFECT] This is the part of the podcast where we explore what is happening NOW to commemorate the centennial of the War that changed the world! Remembering Veterans Women Workers of the AEF This week in remembering veterans and for Women’s History Month - We’re continuing our focus on Women in WW1. We’re joined by Dr. Susan Zeiger (tiger), an author and member of the Commission’s Historical Advisory Board. She is also the Program Director at Primary Source ----  non-profit, advancing global and cultural learning in schools---- She is a professor emeritus of History at Regis College in Weston, Massachusetts, and the author ofIn Uncle Sam’s Service: Women Workers with the American Expeditionary Forces, 1917-1919. Welcome, Dr. Zeiger! [greetings] [The phenomenon you describe in your book -- thousands of women taking on responsibilities usually reserved for men-- seems groundbreaking in many ways. What motivated thousands of American women to volunteer for overseas service during World War I? [What kinds of resistance did women encounter-- at home and on the job-- as they set off to work? ] [goodbyes] Thank you for joining us today. Dr. Susan Zeiger is a member of the Commission’s Historical Advisory Board, the Program Director at Primary Source, professor emeritus of History at Regis College and author. Learn more about her and her work by following the links in the podcast notes. Link: https://www.primarysource.org/about-us/our-staff/susan-zeiger http://eh.net/book_reviews/in-uncle-sams-service-women-workers-with-the-american-expeditionary-force-1917-1919/ https://www.amazon.com/Service-Workers-American-Expeditionary-1917-1919/dp/B001H8E6NQ Spotlight in the Media Hello Girls This week for our Spotlight in the Media -- We’re joined by Dr. Elizabeth Cobbs, whose book The Hello Girls: America’s First Women Soldiers. Is the basis for the documentary The Hello Girls, which just had a very successful world premiere in Washington DC at the Women’s Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery. Dr. Cobbs is also the Melbern Glasscock Chair at Texas A&M University, as well as a Senior Fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution. [greetings] Welcome Dr. Cobbs! [Dr. Cobbs, I heard great things about the films showing in DC last week including the attendance by two grand daughters of Hello Girls - Were you there? ]   [We mentioned the Hello Girls at the top of the show in our segment on the US Army Signal Corps - Who were the Hello Girls? What kinds of women were they?]   [So these women signed up as soldier and then got gypped out of their veteran benefits - what what’s that story?]   [Did the Hello Girls continue to be telephone operators when they returned home and into the workforce?]   [Dr. Cobbs - we’ve included a link to your book in the podcast notes, but where can people see the documentary? ]   [What is the most important thing we should remember about the story of these women?]   [goodbyes] Dr. Elizabeth Cobbs is the Melbern Glasscock Chair at Texas A&M University, a Senior Fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution and an acclaimed author. You can learn more about her and her  book The Hello Girls: America’s First Women Soldiers by following the links in the podcast notes. link:https://www.amazon.com/Hello-Girls-Americas-First-Soldiers/dp/0674971477 http://elizabethcobbs.com/the-hello-girls/ https://www.npr.org/2017/04/06/522596006/the-hello-girls-chronicles-the-women-who-fought-for-america-and-for-recognition https://www.npr.org/2017/04/06/522596006/the-hello-girls-chronicles-the-women-who-fought-for-america-and-for-recognition https://the1a.org/shows/2017-07-12/americas-first-women-soldiers-had-to-fight-for-recognition-as-veterans 100 Cities 100 Memorials Moving on to our 100 Cities / 100 Memorials segment about the $200,000 matching grant challenge to rescue and focus on our local WWI memorials. This week we are profiling the Memorial Grove at Green Hill Park in Worchester MA. With us tell us about this ambitious restoration WWI is Brian McCarthy, President of the Green Hill Park Coalition Inc [Brian - Thank you for joining us on the podcast] [greetings] [Brian: the Memorial in Worcester was originally put in 1928 by Post 5 of The American Legion. What did they do and what is the history of the memorial?]   [Brian - Your Green Hill Park Coalition took this on - not as a little spruce up (no tree pun intended) but a very ambitious multi-hundred thousand dollar memorial park renovation. How did this come about?]   [When I saw your design study and planning documents - I was genuinely impressed by your thinking and your beautiful but practical vision. What is the status of the project now?]   [Well - your project has deservedly been designated as a WWI Centennial Memorial - How can people help?] Brian McCarthy is President of the Green Hill Park Coalition. Their Go Fund me site and more information about the 100 Cities/100 Memorials program are both available through the links in the podcast notes. Link: www.ww1cc.org/100cities https://www.gofundme.com/28f8c5vq [SOUND EFFECT] Speaking WW1 And now for our feature “Speaking World War 1” - Where we explore the words & phrases that are rooted in the war  --- The American armed forces ballooned in size during 1917 and 1918. Putting men in uniform was not just a conceptual statement but a literal one! Underwear, socks, shoes, belts, and uniforms for millions were needed NOW! This week 100 years ago on March 6th in the pages of the Official Bulletin - and apparently after accusations of problems, the government seeks to reassure the country, that Army Uniforms are made with the absolute best materials and did not overuse... QUOTE “shoddy” --- Our speaking WW1 word this week. Shoddy may have originally derived from a mining term “Shoad” meaning scraps,  the article goes on to define what the government means by “shoddy” -- This indicates to us that it was not a term commonly used in 1918 - but it is today “shoddy” is simply reworked wool remnants and clippings worked into fiber of the virgin wool, you know - like stretching the ground sirloin with some bread crumbs! The use of shoddy, or reworked wool, was urged by the government’s wool experts as a helpful, partial solution for the huge wool shortage - but it had to be added sparingly. Shoddy was also used in military uniforms during the the Civil War but apparently overused. There are stories of soldiers’ clothes falling to pieces after just a few days’ wear, or even in a heavy rain giving those uniforms a really bad reputation and re-defining the word “Shoddy” not as wool clipping but a description of something poorly made.   Luckily, the shoddy laden wool in WW1 uniforms were not as shoddy as the shoddy uniforms of the Civil War-- they did hold up in the rain and mud of the trenches. No shame in that Shoddy-- our word for this week’s Speaking WW1. Learn more at the links in the podcast notes. link: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/educate/places/official-bulletin/3339-ww1-official-bulletin-volume-2-issue-250-march-06-1918.html https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/03/04/102676957.pdf https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/shoddy#Etymology https://www.historyextra.com/period/what-are-the-origins-of-the-word-shoddy/ [SOUND EFFECT] The Buzz And that brings us to the buzz - the centennial of WW1 this week in social media with Katherine Akey - Katherine, what do you have for us this week? Long Lost Diary This week, we shared an article on Facebook from Longmont, Colorado, where a local man named Paul Hansen discovered a long forgotten world war one era diary. The diary belonged to Hansen’s father, who left it, along with a few other mementos of his service in the war, in his army issued footlocker, left to collect dust in the family barn. Hansen inherited the box from his father, opening it and rediscovering the life his father had lived as a soldier in the war. In it he found his father’s diary, as well as his Victory Medal and love letters between his father and his girlfriend, who died from influenza before he returned home from the battlefield. Hansen has taken all of these items -- and the very detailed diary -- and brought them into a book, “Soldier of the Great War: My Father’s Diary”. The story of this man and his very personal discovery of his father’s service -- it’s a reminder that, though the war is a hundred years passed, so many stories of the war are yet to be discovered and told. You can read more about the incredible history pieced together by this veteran’s son by visiting the link in the podcast notes. link:http://www.timescall.com/longmont-local-news/ci_31707868/longmont-man-finds-long-forgotten-world-war-i Outro Thank you for listening to this week’s episode of WW1 Centennial News. We also want to thank our guests...   Dr. Edward Lengel, Military historian and author Mike Shuster, Curator for the great war project blog Dr. Susan Zeiger, member of the Commission’s Historical Advisory Board, author and the Program Director at Primary Source Dr. Elizabeth Cobbs, historian and author Brian McCarthy from the 100 Cities/100 Memorials project in Worcester Massachusetts Katherine Akey, the commission’s social media director and line producer for the podcast Thanks also to Eric Maar as well as our intern John Morreale for their great research assistance. And I am Theo Mayer - your host.   The US World War One Centennial Commission was created by Congress to honor, commemorate and educate about WW1. Our programs are to-- inspire a national conversation and awareness about WW1; this podcast is a part of that…. Thank you! We are bringing the lessons of the 100 years ago into today's classrooms; We are helping to restore WW1 memorials in communities of all sizes across our country; and of course we are building America’s National WW1 Memorial in Washington DC. We want to thank commission’s founding sponsor the Pritzker Military Museum and Library as well as the Starr foundation for their support. The podcast can be found on our website at ww1cc.org/cn   on  iTunes, Google Play, TuneIn, Podbean, new this week on Stitcher - Radio on Demand --- as well as the other places you get your podcast --  even on your smart speaker.. Just say “Play W W One Centennial News Podcast.” Our twitter and instagram handles are both @ww1cc and we are on facebook @ww1centennial. Thank you for joining us. And don’t forget to share the stories you are hearing here today about the war that changed the world! [music] Hello Girls - Could one of y’all please connect me with field Marshall Foshe silv vous play - Why thank you ma’am! So long! Next week: We speak with the team about the upcoming Sgt Stubby film release Promote reconciliation week events in Reims, June 2018 Speak with the curator of the Postal Museum: Women's WW1 Letters exhibit Interview with Commissioner Monique Seefried about commemoration events in Europe 100 Cities / 100 Memorials in Ogden Utah Hear a story about returning American dog tags to France
March 3, 2018
Highlights - Healers of WW1 March Preview - Roundtable with Dr. Edward Lengel, Katherine Akey & Theo mayer | @02:15 Spoils of War from Russia - Mike Shuster | @13:10 Medicine in WW1 - Charles Van Way, George Thompson & Sanders Marble | @18:30 New VSO WW1 support site @ ww1cc.org/veteran | @26:00 African American nurses in WW1 - Dr. Marjorie DesRosier | @27:35 100C/100M project from Raymond WA - Gordon Aleshire | @33:25 Women Physicians in WW1 - Eliza Chin, Keri Kukral & Mollie Marr | @36:50 Speaking WW1 - “Archie” | @43:10 WW1 War Tech - The Browning Machine Gun | @45:05 WWrite Blog on Brest-Litovsk Treaty | @47:10 American War Artist and his curator - Katherine Akey | @48:10----more---- Opening Welcome to World War 1 centennial News - episode #61 - It’s about WW1 THEN - what was happening 100 years ago this week  - and it’s about WW1 NOW - news and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. Today is March 2nd, 2018 and our guests for this week include: Dr. Edward Lengel, Joining Katherine Akey and I in a March preview roundtable. Mike Shuster, from the great war project blog with an update on the fallout from the Russian defeat on the Eastern Front Charles Van Way, George Thompson, and Sanders Marble on Medicine in WW1 and their new website at the Commission Dr. Marjorie DesRosier on the struggle of African American Nurses in WW1 Gordon Aleshire, telling us about the 100 Cities/100 Memorials project in Raymond, Washington Eliza Chin, Keri Kukral and Mollie Marr telling us about the short documentary At Home and Over There: American Women Physicians in World War I Katherine Akey, with a special report on an amazing French WWI photography curator A great lineup -- today -- on WW1 Centennial News -- a weekly podcast brought to you by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and the Starr foundation. I’m Theo Mayer - the Chief Technologist for the Commission and your host. Welcome to the show. [MUSIC] Preface Last month we did an experiment. Dr. Edward Lengel, Katherine and I sat down together - as we often do in our editorial meetings - and talked about the upcoming month of February. We got great feedback from you so we are going to do it again, here at the top of March! I put a sidecar on our centennial Time Machine so we’d all fit as we roll back 100 years to the war that changed the world! World War One THEN 100 Year Ago This Week [MUSIC TRANSITION] Overview Chat with Ed, Katherine and Theo Ed, Katherine - welcome to early March 1918. [Ed & Katherine make some comment] So guys - I understand that this is our last chance to take a breather - Starting this month, the action gets pretty hot and heavy with the Germans getting ready for their big Spring offensive. [Katherine - you use the term Kaiser Schlagt or Emperor’s Strike. Is that the same thing as the “spring offensive?”] [Ed - this is going to go on for months going forward - can you give us an overview and what the German’s have in mind?] [Quick change of subject - As we get into the military action we keep throwing around all these names of military formation like division, corps, regiment, brigade -  and I’ll wager 80% of our audience has no idea of what all that means - so let’s do an overview - We sent over a Field Army - that’s the big one - the American forces] [Ed - can you break it down for us - sort of big to small and tell us about how many soldiers are in these various formations?] [Force building in Europe - March - April - May - June etc…] [Now that we have a clear idea that there are ARMIES on the ground - As the German offensive starts - Our US General Pershing needs to integrate with the French and the British commands - How does all that lay out?] [Flu begins] That was Dr. Edward Lengel and Katherine Akey as we talked about an overview for the upcoming month of March, 1918 and even looking forward a bit more than that. Next week we will be back to our regular 100-years-ago this week format including our regular feature ‘America Emerges - Military Stories from WWI” [SOUND EFFECT] Great War Project Now on to the Great War project with Mike Shuster - former NPR correspondent and curator for the Great War project Blog…. Mike’s recent   posts have told us of the devastating suffering of the German people in the fatherland, But…. the Kaiser and his Generals are feeling hot and empowered by the total defeat of the Russians on the Eastern front. They think they are going to win this thing! The spoils-of-war from that campaign include vast territorial gains, massive stashes of captured arms, repatriation of huge numbers of soldier all now available to put the big wallop on the French and Brits -  hopefully before the Americans can really join in the fight. So Mike the details of the Russian collapse are really monumental, aren’t they!? [MIKE POST] Mike Shuster from the Great War Project blog. LINK: http://greatwarproject.org/2018/02/25/german-attack-in-west-is-imminent/ [SOUND EFFECT] The Great War Channel The Great War Channel on Youtube is hosted by Indy Neidel. Here is Indy. [Hello WW1 Centennial News Listeners - I’m Indy Neidell, host of the Great War Channel on Youtube. American troops are about to experience their first major battle of the war-- the Kaiserschlacht. Join us every Thursday for a new episode to follow this massive German offensive as it unfolds. Find us on Youtube and follow us on Facebook.] This week’s new videos from the Great War Channel include:   Operation Faustschlag - Germany advances in the east again Amphibious Landing Craft The Czechoslovak Legion’s Odyssey through Russia To see their videos by searching for “the great war” on youtube or following the link in the podcast notes! Link:https://www.youtube.com/user/TheGreatWar World War One NOW OK… time to  fast forward into the present with WW1 Centennial News NOW - [SOUND EFFECT] In this section we explore what is happening NOW to commemorate the centennial of the War that changed the world! Commission News Medicine in WW1 Website We have a lot to unpack here so let’s get going with Medicine in WWI! We have three guests with us today who not only know a whole lot about the subject - but they have also bundles that know-how into an amazing new website on the Commission’s server at WW1CC.org/medicine - all lower case. Charles Van Way, a retired Army Colonel, Professor Emeritus at University of Missouri–Kansas City George Thompson, Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of the History and Philosophy of Medicine at the University of Kansas Medical Center, and Sanders Marble, the senior historian with the Army Medical Department Center of History and Heritage. These are the three men responsible for this website. And they did a masterful job. It may be one of the most authoritative, in-depth, well illustrated and concise subject sections on our site. Welcome, gentlemen! [greetings] [Gentlemen: At the very top of your website you put a statement.. It reads: A century ago, American Medicine went to war! I love that - it’s very illustrative.] [How did the three of you come together to undertake making with wonderful resource?] [What was the biggest impact of the war on American Medicine? Charles, let’s start with you.] [OK - a round table question - with a one phrase answer - what was the single most important innovation in medicine coming out of this war - ] [Sanders --- George --- Charles----] (talk about how they agree and disagree) [We just had a question come in from a member of our live audience: When influenza cases started to appear on the in-transit troop ships - what kind of isolation units were set up on these overcrowded transports to lower the contagion rate? ] [Quickly about the website - It is really comprehensive - You could do a semester course with it. Charles, could you give us a high level overview of what all is there? Gentlemen - thank you for introducing us to the subject of Medicine in WWI - but most of all - thank you for the huge effort you put into building the scholarly, in-depth and well thought web site at ww1cc.org/medicine! [they respond] [goodbyes] Charles Van Way, George Thompson, and Sanders Marble are the curators of Medicine in WW1, the amazing new resource at ww1cc.org/medicine. Link: www.ww1cc.org/medicine Remembering Veterans New Veterans Landing page To kick off our Remembering Veterans Section this week, let’s talk about VSOs - that stands for Veteran Service Organizations. Organizations like  the American Legion, the Veterans of Foreign Wars or VFW, The Daughters of the American Revolution or DAR and a whole lot of others. These organizations are very important partners for the commission with closely aligned goals and missions. Many of you listening today are in fact members of a VSO, but if you are not, let me give you an overview of who they are. First of all - they are amazing - and amazingly dedicated organizations focused on the men and women who served and sacrificed for our nation. And although they have national organizations, for the most part - they are very grassroots by nature with thousands of local posts or chapters all around the country that do all the real hands stuff. For example - When my dad, who was a Marine Corps Pilot in WWII passed away, a local American Legion post provided an honor guard for his funeral - because he served his nation! And they won’t forget one of their own. And I’ll never forget how they honored him - even though he was not a member of their post. VSO’s have been deeply involved in many of our commemoration programs including 100 Cities / 100 Memorials, centennial commemorations with States, and they have been key financial contributors to the national WWI Memorial project in Washington DC. But as I said - it is all about the local level - so for the local posts and chapters -  we just published a special landing page on our website just for them - it’s a landing page with a series of “subject and activity tiles” that make it easy to see how to get involved with the centennial commemoration of the war that changed the world. It’s actually not a bad resource for anyone - at ww1cc.org/veteran all lower case and of course you can always follow the link in the podcast notes. Link: www.ww1cc.org/veteran African American Nurses Staying with veterans, wrapping up African American History Month and leading us into Women’s History month, this segment is about the experiences of African American Nurses. Joining us again is Dr. Marjorie DesRosier (de-roh-zuhr), who was on a few weeks ago. Dr. DesRosier is an international nurse historian and independent scholar. She, herself is also a Registered Nurse and former clinical professor from the University of Washington School of Nursing, in Seattle. Welcome back, Dr. DesRosier! [greetings] [The story of African American Nurses in WWI is fascinating - To start, could you tell us about how an African American woman would go about becoming a Nurse in that era? ] [What kinds of resistance did these women encounter?] [How did these women respond? Especially to the Surgeon General’s policies?] [Did it work?] [Where can people learn more about this?] We’ve posted some links in the podcast notes for our listeners - Dr. DesRosier - thank you for coming back on the show to bring us this story. [goodbyes] Dr. DesRosier is an international nurse historian, independent scholar and registered nurse  - Follow the link in the podcast notes to learn more about African American Nurses in WW1 and Dr. DesRosier’s work. link:http://desrosierhistory.com/ http://history.amedd.army.mil/ancwebsite/articles/blackhistory.html http://www.edwardianpromenade.com/african-american/african-americans-in-the-great-war/ http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/4046-honoring-african-american-women-who-served-in-the-army-nurse-corps-in-wwi.html 100 Cities 100 Memorials Moving on to our 100 Cities / 100 Memorials segment about the $200,000 matching grant challenge to rescue and focus on our local WWI memorials. This is a perfect tie-in to the VSO story we told you about earlier -  because this project is being done by --- Veterans of Foreign Wars post 968 in Raymond, Washington. With us tell us about their city and the project is Gordon Aleshire, Adjutant of VFW Post 968. Welcome Gordon! [greetings] [Gordon - you live in a beautiful - and pretty remote part of the country - tells us about Raymond, Pacific County and the areas roll in WWI?] [I have seen the before and “in process” pictures of your memorial. It really needed help. Tell us about how the post decided to take this on.] [Did the 100 Cities / 100 Memorials project come along for you before or after you took on the challenge?] [What are your rededication plans?] Gordon - Thank you and post 968 for the great work you are doing in remember our WW1 doughboys! [goodbyes] Link: www.ww1cc.org/100cities Project support link:  https://www.gofundme.com/ww-i-memorial-restoration Gordon Aleshire, is Adjutant of VFW Post 968 in beautiful Raymond Washington Spotlight in the Media As we mentioned - March is Women’s History month - So This week for our Spotlight in the Media -- We’re joined by Eliza Chin, Keri Kukral and Mollie Marr. They are the team that researched and produced a documentary called: At Home and Over There: American Women Physicians in World War I. [greetings] Welcome to you! [Eliza: You are the executive Director of the American Medical Women’s Association - Briefly - what is that? What does the organization represent?] [Keri: You are the founder and CEO of Raw Science TV - again briefly what is that?] [Mollie: you know this was coming - I know you are a student at the Oregon Health & Science University - but you’re also the Executive Chair of the American Medical Women's Association branch at the school - how does that work at a university?] [Alright - So the three of you came together to create this wonderful documentary - AND I have to add - impressive companion online web exhibit - How did this come together? Eliza can you tell us? [Keri-- the film has a 3D component to it. Tell us about that - What was the intent?] [Mollie would you please tell us how you researched the subject - anything particularly surprize you?] [Eliza -- If someone would like to book the film for a local screening or WWI event -- how do they do that?] Thank you all for joining us today and telling us about this great project! [goodbyes] Eliza Chin is Executive Director of the American Medical Women's Association -- Keri Kukral is the CEO of Raw Science TV -- and Mollie Marr is an MD/PhD student at Oregon Health and Science University. You can learn more about their project: At Home and Over There: American Women Physicians in World War I and how to access the documentary for your WWI event by following the links in the podcast notes. link:https://www.amwa-doc.org/ https://www.amwa-doc.org/wwi-exhibition/ https://www.amwa-doc.org/wwi-film/ [SOUND EFFECT] Speaking WW1 And now for our feature “Speaking World War 1” - Where we explore the words & phrases that are rooted in the war  --- During WWI as planes flew over the front - little puffs of smoke appeared in the sky… Well - actually each one of those puffs was a deadly expanding ball of shrapnel designed to mangle planes and pilots! True to British humor this deadly deterrent for fliers got a silly nickname - which is our Speaking WWI word for this week. “Archie” -- was the British nickname for anti-aircraft fire-- and it has two contested origins. Origin #1:  A pilot in the Royal Air Force, Vice-Marshall Borton, who, upon encountering enemy anti-aircraft fire, apparently quoted a lyric from a popular music hall song of time: “Archibald certainly not!” - a popular contemporary cultural exclamation of defiance. [*play song*] Origin #2: The training grounds for RAF pilots back in England at --- Brooklands in Surrey -  neighbored a “sewage farm” -- The Archibald sewage farm. Apparently the farm, which processed sewage to irrigate and fertilize the land, had notoriously difficult air currents above it, creating a wafting turbulence the pilots found quite similar to that of the anti-aircraft weapons. Either way, Archie! an humorous and very English term for the explosives that trailed and tormented pilots as they flew over the front in WWI. -- See the podcast notes to learn more! link: https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/301554/why-is-german-anti-aircraft-fire-called-archibald http://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/11156904/The-slang-words-that-defined-the-First-World-War.html http://mentalfloss.com/article/58233/21-slang-terms-world-war-i Song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mZkyKLZghUc https://languagesandthefirstworldwar.wordpress.com/2017/06/06/archibald-certainly-not/ [SOUND EFFECT] WW1 War Tech Browning Machine Gun For WW1 War Tech -- this week, we’re taking a look at  The Browning Machine Gun. It got a lot of press this week 100 years ago because apparently on February 27, 1918, in the vicinity of Congress Heights in Southeastern Washington D.C, it sounded like the War in Europe had suddenly spread to America. This is because they were test firings of the new Browning at the U.S. Government’s shooting range. The guns, the Browning Automatic Rifle (BAR) and the Browning M1917, were being demonstrated to a crowd of American politicians, foreign army officers, and the press. The firearms were being touted as “the finest gun in the world”. The machine guns were the brainchild of John Moses Browning, a man known as “the father of modern firearms” whose weapons designs, including the pump-action shotgun. When the Army sent out a request to all American inventors asking for new firearms designs in 1917, Browning personally traveled to the capital to present his new prototypes. The Ordinance Department demanded these weapons be put to the test by shooting 20,000 rounds of ammunition. When the test was performed at the Government Proving Grounds in May 1917, Browning’s gun fired the 20,000 rounds with no complications, then fired another 20,000 only breaking a single part. Besides reliability, another impressive feature was a design so simplistic,  the officers who demonstrated the weapon could take it apart and put it back together while blindfolded. This made such an impression on the War Department that the “blindfold test” soon became an essential part of military training. Mass production began soon thereafter, with the first Browning guns arriving in France on June 29, 1918. Though only 1,168 Brownings saw combat, the general design proved so useful the Browning M1917 was an essential part of the American arsenal all the way until the Korean War. Read more about the Browning at the links in the podcast notes. Links: http://www.sadefensejournal.com/wp/?p=358 https://www.militaryfactory.com/smallarms/detail.asp?smallarms_id=785 http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/gun-designer-john-browning-is-born http://www.firstworldwar.com/atoz/mgun_bar.htm http://www.firstworldwar.com/atoz/mgun_browning.htm https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/02/27/103191974.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/02/28/109328811.pdf http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/educate/places/official-bulletin/3329-ww1-official-bulletin-volume-2-issue-244-febuary-27-1918.html Articles and Posts WWrite Blog This week for the WWrite Blog, which explores WWI’s Influence on contemporary writing and scholarship, the post reads: “Brest-Litovsk: Eastern Europe’s Forgotten Father” The post was  written by Adrian Bonenberger In his lifetime, the world-famous Polish dancer, Vaslav Nijinsky, might have also claimed Russian, German, or Ukrainian nationality. The future of Nijinsky's Europe–and his identity–was decided on March 3, 1918. Veteran author, Adrian Bonenberger, calls the event "the moment" when "the old world falls apart, and creates space for the new to arise." In this week's WWrite post, Bonenberger gives us a rich overview of the Brest-Litovsk Treaty and its implications for the former Soviet bloc countries! Read the story at the Wwrite Blog. Ww1cc.org/w w r i t e or follow the link in the podcast notes. Link: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/articles-posts/4094-brest-litovsk-eastern-europe-s-forgotten-father-2.html Waldo Peirce Changing formats a little - Katherine Akey is going to close out this week with a story about an article we posted on our website at ww1cc.org/news about American painter and ambulance driver - Waldo Pierce - but her report is equally about the Corine Reis - the author of the article and a dedicated French curator of WWI stories and images. [Katherine - you were the one who came across Corine that led to the article maybe we should start with her - her curated images are truly  AMAZING!!!] Hey Theo -- yeah, the project Corine has been working on is something else. Published on our website, and included in our weekly email dispatch, is an interview with Corine. She’s a French citizen historian -- and the great-niece of American painter and ambulance driver Waldo Peirce. He was one of the many students voluntarily leaving their lives at home-- for him, his studies at Harvard-- to aid the French years before America joined the war. Corine meticulously, and with a great sense of storytelling, curates and shares his photographs, artwork and writings on her Tumblr and Facebook pages, chronicling his experience throughout the war. Her interest and personal connection to Waldo grew over time, expanding to include the American Volunteers of WW1 at large. In the interview, Corine discusses her passion, the incredible archive left behind by her great-uncle Waldo, and her plans for documenting the lives of volunteers during WW2 as well. Additionally to reading the interview, I’d really, really encourage you to take the time to scroll through her Tumblr, which can be found embedded in the interview at WW1cc.org. To say that Corine is a dedicated storyteller is a understatement of the highest order. Through this project, she has gathered photographs and excerpts from collections all across the world, creating a single body of stories that is unlike most we encounter when researching World War One. I first came across her Tumblr during my weekly search for photographic content for the Commission, and was really surprised at how few of the images were familiar to me. So much of what she has rediscovered and shared with the world is quiet, quotidian, and somehow spectacular: An image of a woman ambulance driver holding a kitten and casually wearing the Croix de Guerre; an over-the-shoulder shot of a young British officer staring longingly at a photo of a woman tucked inside his hat; an image of a man sitting in the midst of a dense, unspoiled French forest as sunbeams glance through the trees; a crowd gathering around a deep, shearing hole in the Parisian street, the result of a recent German air raid. The collection Corine has assembled -- and continues to assemble-- is exceptional. The hours of work -- as well as her very artful eye and deep passion for the subject-- are evident in every post. We’ve included links in the podcast notes to the interview we did with her, as well as to her Facebook and Tumblr pages. Links: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/4082-waldo-peirce-goes-to-war-is-a-remarkable-new-wwi-tumblr-blog.html https://waldopeircegoestowar.tumblr.com/ https://www.facebook.com/waldo.peirce Thank you Katherine - Outro Thank you for listening to this week’s episode of WW1 Centennial News. We also want to thank our guests... Dr. Edward Lengel, Military historian and author Mike Shuster, Curator for the great war project blog Charles Van Way, George Thompson, and Sanders Marble, the curators of the new Medicine in WW1 website Dr. Marjorie DesRosier, nurse, author and historian Gordon Aleshire, Adjutant of VFW Post 968 Eliza Chin, Keri Kukral and Mollie Marr, the production team behind the documentary At Home and Over There: American Women Physicians in World War I Katherine Akey, the commission’s social media director and line producer for the podcast Thanks also to our intern John Morreale for his great research assistance. And I am Theo Mayer - your host. [MUSIC] CLOSING The US World War One Centennial Commission was created by Congress to honor, commemorate and educate about WW1. Our programs are to-- inspire a national conversation and awareness about WW1; this podcast is a part of that…. Thank you! We are bringing the lessons of the 100 years ago into today's classrooms; We are helping to restore WW1 memorials in communities of all sizes across our country; and of course we are building America’s National WW1 Memorial in Washington DC. We want to thank commission’s founding sponsor the Pritzker Military Museum and Library as well as the Starr foundation for their support. The podcast can be found on our website at ww1cc.org/cn   on  iTunes, Google Play, TuneIn, Podbean, new this week on Stitcher - Radio on Demand --- as well as the other places you get your podcast --  even on your smart speaker.. Just say “Play W W One Centennial News Podcast.” Our twitter and instagram handles are both @ww1cc and we are on facebook @ww1centennial. Thank you for joining us. And don’t forget to share the stories you are hearing here today about the war that changed the world! [MUSIC] Archie, Veronica and Jughead - Three types of deadly munitions from WWI - Not true…. Just kidding… So long! So long!
February 23, 2018
Highlights The Government's Expanding Power | @10:30 America Emerges: 1st Division learns tough lessons - Edward Lengel | @08:55 War in the Sky: First US planes get shipped to France | @13:15 GWP Blog: Wrapup on Tuscania  - Mike Shuster | @15:30 A Century in the Making: A busy week for the memorial project | @20:15 Remembering Veterans: the 370th Infantry Regiment - Colonel Eugene Scott | @24:00 Education: Poppy Program in middle school - Taylor Gibbs & Lyvia bartoli | @31:35 Speaking WW1: Camouflage | @36:55 WW1 War Tech: Depth Charge | @39:00 WWrite Blog: This Colored Man Is No Slacker | @41:00 Buzz: The flu then, the flu now - Katherine Akey | @42:05----more---- Opening Welcome to World War 1 centennial News - episode #60 - It’s about WW1 THEN - what was happening 100 years ago this week  - and it’s about WW1 NOW - news and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.   Today is February 23rd, 2018 and our guests for this week include: Dr. Edward Lengel, with a story about the 1st Division’s early encounter with gas warfare Mike Shuster, from the great war project blog with a wrap up story of the sinking of the Tuscania Colonel Eugene Scott - US Army Retired - with the restoration of the 370th regiment Victory Monument in Chicago Taylor Gibbs and Lyvia Bartoli sharing their experience fundraising with the Commission’s Poppy Program Katherine Akey, with the centennial of WWI in social media All now -- on WW1 Centennial News -- a weekly podcast brought to you by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and the Starr foundation. I’m Theo Mayer - the Chief Technologist for the Commission and your host. Welcome to the show. [MUSIC] Preface In October of 1917, Wilson signs the "Trading with The enemy" act into law giving him sweeping new powers to manage and control international trade. We covered this in some detail during episode #42 and here are the highlights: Enemy owned property can be seized Enemy intellectual property can be ignored The Treasury department gets extensive powers over the international movement of precious metals and securities The postmaster General gets total censorship rights over international communications including telegraph Interestingly - “enemy” is defined as someone we have declared war on OR a nation that the President simply proclaims as an enemy OR a company engaged in commerce with an enemy OR a company incorporated or operating in enemy territory OR a company that has ties to one of the many things above. With free reign to seize and capture foreign properties - the administration sets up the Office of the Alien Property Custodian putting a guy named A. Mitchell Palmer in charge of “appropriating” enemy held properties. This week 100 years ago - Using the “Trading with the Enemy” and the “espionage” acts as foundations - President Wilson goes the next mile and issues a series of proclamations including taking total control of all the foreign commerce of the United States. With that that as a setup - it's time to jump into our centennial Time Machine and roll back 100 years to the war that changed the world. World War One THEN 100 Year Ago This Week [MUSIC TRANSITION] It is mid February 1918. From the pages of the Official Bulletin - the government war gazette published by George Creel - the nation's propaganda chief comes the following: [radio and telegraph sound effect] Dateline: Friday February 15, 1918 The headline in the Official Bulletin Reads: PRESIDENT ISSUES PROCLAMATIONS FOR CONTROL OF ENTIRE FOREIGN COMMERCE OF UNITED STATES LICENSES REQUIRED FOR ALL IMPORTS AND EXPORTS And the story reads: The President has today issued two proclamations which will become effective to-morrow. After February 16, 1918, no commodities may be exported from this country or imported into this country except under license. The administration states that: “the military situation and the tonnage situation have made increasingly apparent the necessity of Instituting a complete and thorough control of all our exports and imports. [theo] The entire second page of the article  - all three columns -- are dedicated to the detailing of the scores of types of goods now under import and export regulation as well as the dozens of countries now under commerce restrictions. You can read the full text of the proclamations yourself, since we re-publish every issue of the official bulletin on the Commission’s web site at ww1cc.org/bulletin - go to the February 15th issue and read the story on page 1 and 2. In the same issue the treasury department announces that they have begun a nation-wide hunt for Alien Property to be impounded or confiscated. [SOUND EFFECT] Headline: Nationwide Hunt for Alien Property Is Begun by U. S. Custodian Palmer WARNING NOTICE GIVEN Persons Evading Law Liable to $10,000 Fine or Ten Years' Imprisonment or Both. [Theo] As an aside - $10,000 in 1918 is the equivalent of $180 grand today. The story reads: Mitchell Palmer, Alien Property Custodian, authorizes the following statement: Federal agents have begun a search of the country from coast to coast to get in alien property still outstanding. Holders of property thus uncovered who have failed to report it, may be fined or imprisoned, or both. The law will be impartially enforced against all individuals or corporations who fail to report the possession of enemy property. But the Wilson administration is not stopping there - They are also going for total control of the railroads - Dateline Feb. 22. 1918 A headline in the NY times reads The Senate Passes Railroad Bill [Theo] And the story reads: With Administration forces victorious · on every contested point, the bill for Government control of railroads passes the Senate tonight without a roll call. Determined efforts to prescribe limitations beyond which the President or the Director General might not go in managing the railroads,  failed when Senators of both parties rallied strongly behind Senator Smith of South Carolina --- the Administration spokesman on this measure. [Theo] The story goes on to read: So generous was the Senate that the President is to be untrammeled by any existing law that he deems will handicap or hinder effective governmental control and management of the transportation systems. [Theo] But there are those in the government that are getting worried about the Executive branch gathering so much dictatorial power - and where this may leave the nation after the hostilities cease. [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline: February 19, 1918 In a New York Times headline: WATSON CRITICIZES POWERS GIVEN TO WILSON Senator Watson opposes power extension for after the war ends In the story senator Watson, a Republican is quoted: I am willing to confer upon the President all the power necessary to Win this war: I have voted for several measures, the necessity of which I doubted, because he stated that the authority sought was essential to the successful prosecution of this conflict; but I am not yet convinced that, ln order to win this war, it is necessary to confer upon the President these tremendous powers for a period of peace after the conflict shall have ceased. To that end let us firmly resolve that, with the proclamation of peace, the President shall surrender all the vast powers willingly conferred upon him by an aroused people, because of the exigent necessities of war: and that this nation shall return to the kind of republic founded by the revered fathers of this Union! And so the Wilson Administration consolidates its unprecedented and overarching power across all sectors of American industry, food production, transportation, finance and trade 100 years ago this week in the war the changed the world. Follow our research links in the podcast notes. Links: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/educate/places/official-bulletin/3327-ww1-official-bulletin-volume-2-issue-240-febuary-21-1918.html https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/02/19/103191523.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/02/19/103191559.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/02/19/103191562.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/02/21/102672512.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/02/22/102673051.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/02/23/102673526.pdf America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 This week on: America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI… Dr. Edward lengel recounts the story of the First Division - the Big Red One in action, as they face off a deadly gas attack. Welcome Ed. [ED LENGEL] Ed - Next week you’ll be joining Katherine and I for our March preview roundtable - looking forward to speaking with you then! [Thanks Theo] Dr. Edward Lengel is an American military historian, author, and our segment host for America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI. There are links in the podcast notes to Ed’s post and his website as an author. Links:http://www.edwardlengel.com/big-red-one-action-ansauville-1918/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ War in the Sky This week for the War in the Sky we are going to look at some articles from the times and the Bulletin. [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline: Thursday February 21, 1918 A headline in the NY Times reads: FOE COMES AND GOES AT WILL Enemy Airplanes View Positions and Take Observations Freely Above The Reach of Guns Only Fighting Air Machines Can Stop Their Calm Parade Over Enemy Lines And the story reads: Control of the air in the American Sector belongs to the enemy. Any officer at the front will make this declaration - and all have made it. Every time the Germans come over, their path through the sky is followed by fleecy shrapnel puffs, but the the chances of hitting an airplane with anti-aircraft shells at those high altitudes is so remote that the enemy aviators calmly fly along, as if on a pleasure tour. The article closes with the question: "When are some American Planes Coming Here?" The answer is published on the same day in the Official Bulletin this week: [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline: Thursday February 21 1918 Headline: First American-Made Aerial Warships Now on Way to the French Battlefront,   A statement by the Secretary of War reads: The first American-built battle planes are to-day en route to the front in France. This first shipment, though in itself not large, marks the final overcoming of many difficulties met in building up this new and intricate industry. These planes are equipped with the first American “Liberty motors” from machine production. One of them in a recent test surpassed all records for speed and climbing for planes of that type. Engine production, which began a month ago, is now on a quantity basis and the peak of production will be reached in a few weeks. [theo] And so the first planes are shipping to France from the US with the aim of changing the dynamics of the war in the sky 100 years ago this week . See the links in the podcast notes. Link: www.ww1cc.org/warinthesky http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/educate/places/official-bulletin/3327-ww1-official-bulletin-volume-2-issue-240-febuary-21-1918.html https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/02/21/102672505.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/02/21/102672510.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/02/22/102673069.pdf [SOUND EFFECT] Great War Project Now on to the Great War project with Mike Shuster - former NPR correspondent and curator for the Great War project Blog…. This week Mike takes another look at the Tuscania sinking in the context of the great troop movements over the Atlantic. Our research for the podcast shows that this singular ship sinking was in news for weeks and somehow marks a psychological watershed for the US. Perhaps it was the realization that we were in a real life and death struggle. What are your headlines Mike? [MIKE POST] Mike Shuster from the Great War Project blog. LINK: http://greatwarproject.org/2018/02/18/a-gathering-flood-of-doughboys/ https://cdn.loc.gov/service/sgp/sgpbatches/batch_dlc_argonne_ver03/data/20001931/print/1918022201/0001.pdf [SOUND EFFECT] The Great War Channel For videos about WWI we recommend the Great War Channel on Youtube. These veteran WWI story producers are offering several new videos this week including: Russian Pistols of WW1 No War, No Peace - Trotsky’s Gamble France’s War Aims and Refugees To see their videos about WWI follow the link in the podcast notes or search for “the great war” on youtube. Link:https://www.youtube.com/user/TheGreatWar World War One NOW It is time to fast forward into the present with WW1 Centennial News NOW - [SOUND EFFECT] this section is not about history, but rather - it explores what is happening NOW to commemorate the centennial of the War that changed the world! A Century in the Making A century in the making - the story of America’s WW1 Memorial in Washington DC. In this segment we take you on an insider’s journey that explores this grand undertaking, and the people behind it. It’s been an exciting week for the Memorial Team. Late last week, Maquette in hand - the maquette being the 10 foot long first draft miniature of the stunning sculpture for the memorial - the team set up for a meeting and review by the Washington Commission of Fine Arts - one of the governing bodies for what is -- and what is not built in the Nation’s Capital. Good progress was made with the CFA commissioners providing their insight and feedback to the team. Then it was off to New York for the project’s first exposure on national networks television, as Commission Chairman Terry Hamby, Sculptor Sabin Howard and the Maquette joined host Steve Doocy for an interview recording on the set of Fox and Friends - The segment aired this past Tuesday Morning [RUN EXCERPT CLIP FROM INTERVIEW] The airing resulted in thousands of page views of the memorial webiste and most important hundreds of people making their first donations to the project. Now the Maquette and team have set up a special showing the historic Willard Hotel in Washington DC - located directly across the street from Pershing Park - the future home of America’s WWI Memorial in Washington DC. It’s been a big week for a wonderful project that has been A Century In The Making. If you are not familiar with this great project, let me invite you for a direct look at ww1cc.org/memorial or follow the link in the podcast notes Link: http://ww1cc.org/memorial Remembering Veterans/100 Cities 100 Memorials Today we are combining our Remembering Veterans AND our 100 Cities / 100 Memorials segments with an interview with Colonel Eugene Frederick Scott - US Army Retired --  born in the South - Raised in Chicago - and forged in the US Army with a 28 year military career included two tours of duty in Vietnam. A man like this does not retire - and in his post military career he became the publisher of the Chicago Daily Defender Newspaper, and a very busy social activist. Colonel Scott - along with his equally formidable wife - Beverly - who I suspect may be his secret weapon - showed up in my world during the 100 Cities / 100 Memorials project where they submitted a Chicago Monument to the 370th Infantry Regiment. Welcome Colonel Scott. [Colonel: Let me start by talking local Chicago history - Can you give us an overview of the 370th and their role in WWI?] [could you tell us a bit about the monument that is one of the awardees for the 100 Cities / 100 Memorials project] [Colonel - what other WWI centennial projects are you working on or with?] [Thank you for joining us today] Colonel Eugene F. Scott US Army Retired and Former publisher of the Chicago Daily Defender Newspaper. Link: get links http://www.thehistorymakers.org/biography/col-eugene-scott https://www.pritzkermilitary.org/whats_on/video-rucksack/2016-liberty-gala-oral-history-video-remarks-colonel-ret-eugene-f-scott/ Education Poppy Packet Fundraising Today in our Education section, we are joined not by an educator but by two very special entrepreneurial and dedicated young students. Taylor Gibbs and Lyvia Bartoli from St. John the Evangelist Middle School in Watertown, Connecticut. They brought the Centennial Commission's Poppy Seed Fundraising Program to their school, to help raise awareness for our World War I veterans, and to help raise money for America’s World War I Memorial at Pershing Park in Washington, DC. Welcome Lyvia and Taylor!   [greetings]   [How did you hear about the WW1 Poppy Program and what made it appealing to you to get involved with?] [How did the fundraising go?] [Did you find that the Poppy Packets increased interest in WW1 from the buyers?] [What advice would you give to anyone else using the Poppy Packets to raise funds?] [Have you been surprised at how much recognition you’re getting for this effort?] [goodbyes] Taylor Gibbs and Lyvia Bartoli are students at St. John the Evangelist Middle School, and are Poppy Seed Fundraising pros! Learn more about their efforts, and the Poppy Program, by visiting ww1cc.org/poppy or at the links in the podcast notes. Links: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/4038-watertown-ct-students-support-memorial-with-poppy-seed-sales.html http://www.ww1cc.org/poppy Education Newsletter To wrap up Education this week -- The latest WW1 education newsletter just came out! Issue 11 is “Women in War!” and focuses on the diverse roles women took on to support the war, both abroad and at home. This issue includes resources for teaching about The Hello Girls, Female Yeoman, Women Warriors in Russia, Women’s Rights in Turkey -- and the legacy of the Women’s Suffrage movement. The newsletter is published by the National WW1 Museum and Memorial in partnership with the WW1 Centennial Commission.  Go to our new education website at ww1cc.org/ e d u  where you can sign up for the education newsletters and connect with the commission education program - or  follow the link in the podcast notes. Link: ww1cc.org/edu Updates from the States This week for our updates from the States - we are actually going to look at something from 100 years ago. In our research this week for our THEN history section - we found this very interesting map that was published in the February 21 issue of the Official Bulletin on page 8. The headline reads: COST PER MAN DRAFTED FOR SERVICE AS INDICATED, BY STATES It’s worth a look with Delaware recruitment the most costly per soldier at $19 and Oklahoma the least at a dollar fifty-seven. The average draftee inducted cost the government $4.93 each. Check out the article and the map to see what it cost in your state - see Page 8 of the February 21st issue of the Official Bulletin at ww1cc.org/bulletin or follow the link in the podcast notes. link:http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/educate/places/official-bulletin/3327-ww1-official-bulletin-volume-2-issue-240-febuary-21-1918.html [SOUND EFFECT] Speaking WW1 And now for our feature “Speaking World War 1” - Where we explore the words & phrases that are rooted in the war  --- In 1914, the French army still used the same military uniform they had for decades, with vibrant red pantaloons and bright white gloves. The “see me - shoot me” uniforms were one of the factors that led to their route by the German army in the first few months of the war. In response, the French launched a special unit in 1915, whose members, mostly artists, were known as camoufleurs. The french term “se, camoufler” means to hide oneself. This led to this week’s “speaking WWI “ word camouflage. Quite popular as a clothing style most often used as the slang - Camo In the military sense, the word denotes “the disguising of military personnel, equipment, and installations by painting or covering them to make them blend in with their surroundings.” With planes scouting every mile of active front for troop movements, ammunition stores and other valuable information -- hiding in plain sight became increasingly important. So armies looked to nature for ideas on how to hide tanks, hospitals, snipers, bridges and even ships from the enemy’s prying eyes. Camouflage-- this week’s speaking ww1 word -- See the podcast notes to learn more! link: http://content.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1906083,00.html    https://www.iwm.org.uk/history/5-facts-about-camouflage-in-the-first-world-war Stars and Stripes While we talking about words - in this week’s Stars and Stripes issue from their on-going feature “ A Doughboy’s Dictionary”--- Our favorite definition this week is: Socks Socks are defined as: Foot coverings composed of substance represented to the Government or the Red Cross as being wool, and possessed of the same capacity for contracting holes as is a machine gun target at fifty yards. Read this all of  this week’s stars and Stripes newspaper from 1918 -  by following the link in the podcast notes. Link:https://cdn.loc.gov/service/sgp/sgpbatches/batch_dlc_argonne_ver03/data/20001931/print/1918022201/0003.pdf [SOUND EFFECT] WW1 War Tech Depth Charge For WW1 War Tech -- we are going to talk about the Depth Charge. U-boats were the scourge of the seas -- taking out almost five thousand ships over the course of the war. German U-boats especially focused their attacks on British shipping, both military and commercial, the Royal Navy considered many possible strategies to defeat this threat, but none seemed viable until the summer of 1916, when naval engineer Herbert Taylor perfected the hydrostatic trigger, allowing for a weapon that could be detonated when it experienced certain levels of water pressure -- in other words -  at certain depths.The underwater pressure explosions were devastating to submarine hulls while not damaging surface ships. Though only 2 U-Boats were sunk by depth charges in 1916, production was increased as the conflict went on, and by the end of the war, the Royal Navy had used depth charges to sink 20 submarines, limiting the ability of the German Navy to halt Allied shipping. And that’s THIS Weeks, WWI War Tech. Read more about depth charges during WW1 at the links in the podcast notes. Links: http://online.wsj.com/ww1/depth-charges http://mentalfloss.com/article/31882/12-technological-advancements-world-war-i https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depth_charge https://www.ussslater.org/tour/weapons/dpthchrg/dpthchrg.html Articles and Posts African American Nurses in WW1 In articles and posts-- from our rapidly growing website at ww1cc.org -- this week, we are featuring an article about the African American women who served in the Army Nurse Corps during WW1. Eighteen African American women served stateside -- and their story is not well known. Their courage in overcoming the discrimination and segregation barriers still resonates today. The story of one of these Nurses, Frances Reed Elliott Davis of North Carolina, is particularly poignant. She was the orphaned, illegitimate daughter of a white woman and a half-Cherokee, half-black sharecropper. She faced enormous challenges in her life, overcoming them to become the first officially registered African American Nurse in the Red Cross. Read more about her, and other African American nurses, at the link in the podcast notes. Link: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/4047-world-war-i-nurse-frances-reed-elliott-davis.html http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/4046-honoring-african-american-women-who-served-in-the-army-nurse-corps-in-wwi.html WWrite blog In our WWRITE blog, which explores WWI’s Influence on contemporary writing and scholarship, this week's post also helps us wrap up February’s theme as African American History month. The posts title comes from a poster that reads: This Colored Man Is No Slacker - “Slacker” was a WWI terms for those who avoided the draft. In 1919, the slogan on this WWI-era poster inspired two young African American sisters from West Virginia to write and publish a book of poems whose intention was to “show the Negro’s loyalty to the stars and stripes in the war with Germany and to show the need of unity of all men in the fight for democracy." Read the story about these young women’s literary work supporting the patriotism of African Americans in WW1-- at ww1cc.org/wwrite or by following the link in the podcast notes. Link: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/articles-posts/4058-the-colored-man-is-no-slacker-wwi-poems-by-the-peters-sisters.html The Buzz - WW1 in Social Media Posts And that brings us to the buzz - the centennial of WW1 this week in social media with Katherine Akey - Katherine, what do you have for us this week? Hi Theo! Flu Flu Flu This week’s most popular posts on Social Media were all about one thing: the flu. With this year’s flu season proving long and deadly, it’s no surprise that people are drawing parallels to the great flu of 1918. Against the backdrop of this year’s flu season, WWI Centennial Commissioner Dr. Libby O’Connell discussed the deadly “Spanish Flu” pandemic at the Museum of American Armor in New York. Dr O'Connell observed that 20 to 50 million people died from “The Spanish Flu” Pandemic, far more than all those who perished during World War I. An estimated 43,000 American Doughboys died of the disease out of a total of 675,000 American who would succumb. A third of all Americans would become infected with the “Spanish Flu” which would ravage the world for an entire year. You can find links to some photographs and an article from Newsday of Dr. O’Connell’s talk in the podcast links. I’ve also included a link to an article we shared from The Wichita Eagle, a newspaper out of Kansas, outlining the spread of the so-called Spanish Flu from it’s epicenter: that’s right, it seems that Kansas, not Spain, was the ground-zero for the deadly, world-changing flu of 1918. Read more about the flu’s origins in Kansas 100 years ago, and how they tried, in vain, to stop its spread, by visiting the link in the podcast notes. That’s it this week for the buzz. link:https://www.facebook.com/ww1centennial/posts/930053607169938 https://www.facebook.com/ww1centennial/photos/a.311069102401728.1073741832.185589304949709/930363853805580/?type=3&theater http://www.kansas.com/news/local/article200880539.html Outro Thank you for listening to this week’s episode of WW1 Centennial News. We also want to thank our guests... Dr. Edward Lengel, Military historian and author Mike Shuster, Curator for the great war project blog Colonel Eugene Scott, US Army Retired and former publisher of the Chicago Daily Defender newspaper Taylor Gibbs and Lyvia Bartoli, students at St. John the Evangelist Middle School Katherine Akey, the commission’s social media director and line producer for the podcast Thanks also to our intern John Morreale for his great research assistance. And I am Theo Mayer - your host. The US World War One Centennial Commission was created by Congress to honor, commemorate and educate about WW1. Our programs are to-- inspire a national conversation and awareness about WW1; this podcast is a part of that…. Thank you! We are bringing the lessons of the 100 years ago into today's classrooms; We are helping to restore WW1 memorials in communities of all sizes across our country; and of course we are building America’s National WW1 Memorial in Washington DC.   We want to thank commission’s founding sponsor the Pritzker Military Museum and Library as well as the Starr foundation for their support.   The podcast can be found on our website at ww1cc.org/cn   on  iTunes, Google Play, TuneIn, Podbean or the other places you get your podcast and even on your smart speaker.. Just say “Play W W One Centennial News Podcast.” Our twitter and instagram handles are both @ww1cc and we are on facebook @ww1centennial. Thank you for joining us. And don’t forget to share the stories you are hearing here today about the war that changed the world! [music] Can you see me… I wearing my camouflage - Oh wait - this is audio only. Never mind! So long!
February 17, 2018
Highlights Wilson vs William | @ 01:25 Stars and stripes launches | @ 07:30 War in the sky - AirMail | @ 08:50 America Emerges - 32nd Red Arrow Division - Dr. Edward Lengel | @ 10:45 Great War Project - German Homefront - Mike Shuster | @ 15:40 Commission News - Service Medals NOW | @ 20:15 Remembering Veterans - 371st Regiment - Sonya Grantham | @ 22:05 Speaking WWI - Doughboy Dictionary | @ 29:50 International Report - Brazil in WWI - Matheus Lacerda | @ 31:35 WW1 War Tech - Synthetic Rubber | @ 38:15 Articles & Posts - Freddie Stowers and Pyjamas | @ 39:55 Valentine’s Special - letters, stories and music | @ 42:25 The Buzz - Katherine Akey | @ 47:30----more---- Opening Welcome to World War 1 centennial News - episode #59 - It’s about WW1 THEN - what was happening 100 years ago this week  - and it’s about WW1 NOW - news and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. Today is February 16th, 2018 and our guests for this week include: Dr. Edward Lengel, with a story about the 32nd Red Arrow Division Mike Shuster, from the great war project blog with the eroding situation on the German homefront Sonya Hodges Grantham sharing the story of the 371st regiment and her recent cemetery restoration efforts Matheus Lacerda with the history of Brazil in WW1 Katherine Akey, with some selections from the centennial of WWI in social media   All this and more -- on WW1 Centennial News -- a weekly podcast brought to you by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and the Starr foundation. I’m Theo Mayer - the Chief Technologist for the Commission and your host. Welcome to the show. [MUSIC] Preface A few weeks ago, in Episode #56, we brought in Woodrow Wilson expert, John Milton Cooper Jr, an American historian, author, educator, and Former Senior Scholar at the Wilson Center. At the end of the interview I asked him what is the most important thing we should keep in mind about Wilson as we follow his actions: [FOR LIVE AUDIENCE“Insert audio : clip” - “As we hear the ongoing story of WWI on this podcast, what else should be understand about Wilson to help us keep it all --- and him in context?” answer about Wilson being a Phd, and one of history’s great political scientists - with ideas about how national politics work.] So 100 years ago this week - one of the big stories on the domestic front is Wilson’s address to a joint session of congress further laying out the path to a negotiated peace.   With that as a setup, let’s jump into our centennial time machine and slide  back 100 years to mid February 1918 in the war that changed the world! World War One THEN 100 Year Ago This Week [MUSIC SOUND EFFECT TRANSITION] From the pages of the “OFFICIAL BULLETIN”, the government’s daily war gazette, published by George Creel -- a great primary source for WWI -- which we re-publish EVERY DAY on the Commission’s web site at ww1cc.org/bulletin and that apparently a few hundred of you now read daily… [RADIO TUNING SOUND EFFECT TO MORSE CODE SOUND EFFECT] DATELINE: Monday February 11, 1918 Headline: President, in Address to Congress, Outlines the Basis for General Peace, Asserts All Nations Now at War Must Join in the Settlement of Every Issue Involved The story opens with Wilson expanding on his 14 points by laying out 4 principles. He states: The test of whether it is possible for governments to go any further in the comparison of views is simple and obvious. The principles to be applied are these: FIRST, that each part of the final settlement must be based upon the essential justice of that particular case and upon such adjustments as are most likely to bring a peace that will be permanent; SECOND, that peoples and Provinces are not to be bartered about from sovereignty to sovereignty as if they were mere chattels and pawns in a game, even the great game, now forever discredited, of the balance of power; but that THIRD, every territorial settlement involved in this war must be made in the interest and for the benefit of the populations concerned, and not as a part of any mere adjustment or compromise of claims amongst rival States; and FOURTH, that all well-defined national aspirations shall be accorded the utmost satisfaction that can be accorded them without introducing new or perpetuating old elements of discord and antagonism that would be likely in time to break the peace of Europe and consequently of the world. -President Woodrow Wilson. So what is going on here? Well, one interpretation is this: For 3 ½ horrific years powerful imperial forces have been trying to enforce their will and their agenda on peoples and populations resulting in an economic and human slaughter accompanied by unprecedented carnage. No one is laying out a foundation for resolution. Instead the mindset is in terms of conquest and annihilation. Suddenly this guy - this leader - this political scientist - whose nation is not under direct threat of conquest or annihilation starts to lay out how all this might be resolved… what the path to resolution looks like… how a new world order might rise out of the ashes - not under one conqueror - but as a new community of nations. This actually sounds pretty good to a lot of war weary participants - but to Kaiser Willam - not so much! As a contrasting story about Ukraine’s defeat at the hands of Germany illustrates:   [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline: From Amsterdam, Monday February 11, 1918 Headline: Kaiser Declares that Germany will impose peace on All. The story reads: “Germany desires peace, but before it can be attained, her enemies must recognize that Germany has been victorious” Kaiser William said in a dispatch - which continues with “We ought to bring peace to the world. Such an end was achieved yesterday in a friendly manner with an enemy which, beaten by our armies, perceives no reason for fighting longer, extends a hand to us, and receives our hand. We clasp hands. But he who will not accept peace, but on the contrary declines, must be forced to have peace. We desire to live in friendship with neighboring peoples, but the victory of German Arms must first be recognized. Our troops under the great Hindenburg will continue to win it. Then peace will come.   This is a pretty poignant example of the contrasting positions and points-of-view from two of the leaders 100 years ago this week in the war that changed the world! We have a lot of links for you about this in the podcast notes. Link:http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/educate/history/official-bulletin/3332-ww1-official-bulletin-volume-2-issue-231-febuary-11-1918.html https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/02/12/102668422.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/02/12/102668417.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/02/12/102668418.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/02/12/102668423.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/02/13/102668830.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/02/15/102669807.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/02/15/102669811.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/02/16/102670209.pdf [SOUND EFFECT] Stars and Stripes launches On a lighter note --  100 years ago, a new weekly publication found its way into the hands of Doughboys in France: The Stars and Stripes newspaper. Although the classic periodical was originally produced by Union Soldiers in the Civil War, who found an abandoned printing press - they only ran 6 one-page issues at the time.   The publication was revived for World War 1, produced by an all-military staff and aimed directly at the doughboys of the American Expeditionary Force. Stars and Stripes is filled with cartoons and articles by and for doughboys, making light of everything from living covered in lice in the trenches to struggling to communicate with their new French comrades.  Though all tactical information is redacted, the content’s humor, irreverence and fun is surely a pickup for the boys.  I have only seen a couples of issues but I have already become a fan. Besides - My mom worked for the Stars and Stripes in postwar Germany in the 50s. You’ll get a taste a little later as we use an article from an early issue of the Stars and Stripes for our Speaking WWI section later in the podcast. Meanwhile, check the podcast notes to read some of the pages yourself. You WILL enjoy@! Link:https://www.loc.gov/resource/20001931/1918-02-15/ed-1/?sp=1 https://www.stripes.com/ War in the Sky 100 years ago this week in the War in The Sky - a projected POST war vision using war tech is announced. An article in the Official Bulletin contemplates the future application of the airplane! [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline: Wednesday February 13, 1918 Headline: AERIAL MAIL ROUTE BETWEEN WASHINGTON, PHILADELPHIA AND NEW YORK IS PLANNED BIDS FOR FIVE AIRPLANES ASKED Machines to Make One Round Trip a Day Will Be Permanent if Practicability is Assured.   And the story reads: Postmaster General Burleson flias called for bids for the construction of five airplanes to be used in the establishment of an aerial route for the delivery of first class mail. The bids are to be opened at 2 o'clock on February 21. The contract Will be awarded to the bidder whose airplanes have stood satisfactory service tests --- in the War and Navy Departments; the airplanes and parts to be delivered not later than April 25, 1918. The call for bids requires that the airplanes shall be complete, capable of carrying 300 pounds of mail a distance of not less than 200 miles without stop. The intention is, as soon as the authority of Congress is received, to establish an aerial route to Philadelphia and New York, carrying 300 pounds of first-class mail, for which a special postage rate will be charged, not exceeding 25 cents per ounce or fraction thereof, and to maintain a permanent service on regular scheduled time. And that is a new civilian infra structure vision launched 100 years ago this week - Because of the war in the sky. Read the announcement for yourself on page 2 of the Wednesday February 13 issue of the Official Bulletin by following the link in the podcast notes or go to ww1cc.org/bulletin Link: www.ww1cc.org/warinthesky http://www.historynet.com/airmail-service-it-began-with-army-air-service-pilots.htm http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/educate/history/official-bulletin/3321-ww1-official-bulletin-volume-2-issue-233-febuary-13-1918.html America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 This week on: America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI… Dr. Edward lengel introduces us to the 32nd Red Arrow Division, made from the Michigan and Wisconsin National Guard. [What’s the story Ed?] [ED LENGEL] [What are you going to tell us about next week Ed?] Dr. Edward Lengel is an American military historian, author, and our segment host for America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI. There are links in the podcast notes to Ed’s post and his website as an author. Links:http://www.edwardlengel.com/red-arrow-leviathan-michigan-wisconsin-doughboys-go-war-1918/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ [SOUND EFFECT] Great War Project Now on to the Great War project with Mike Shuster - former NPR correspondent and curator for the Great War project Blog…. Mike: Even though our ground troops are still being organized in Europe - The US Navy has been operational in the war for nearly a year - including reinforcing the British blockade on Germany. What’s the effect in Germany Mike? [MIKE POST] Mike Shuster from the Great War Project blog. LINK: http://greatwarproject.org/2018/02/11/germany-suffering-economic-warfare/ [SOUND EFFECT] The Great War Channel You met the host Indy Neidell and producer Florian Wittig from the great war Channel on Youtube in last week’s podcast - Here are the channels new episodes for this week: Austro-Hungarian House of Cards Motor Torpedo Boats in World War 1 Strikes and Mutiny And more. To see their videos about WWI follow the link in the podcast notes or search for “the great war” on youtube. Link:https://www.youtube.com/user/TheGreatWar World War One NOW It is time to fast forward into the present with WW1 Centennial News NOW - [SOUND EFFECT] this section is not about history, but rather - it explores what is happening NOW to commemorate the centennial of the War that changed the world! Commission News In commission news - between right now and next tuesday, February 20th at noon easter is the ONLY TIME EVER --- IN HISTORY ---- that you will be able to order one of the collectible commemorative WWI service medal sets. We have talked about them before…. These are special US Mint created WWI commemorative silver medal for each of the military services that fought in WWI. There is one each for the Army, the Marines, the Army Air corps the Navy and the US Coast Guard…   They are really beautiful and actual collectibles because -- after this single mint run, that’s it. That is how many will exist in the world… So order yours today - Most important, and why we are promoting them, every commemorative WWI medal set you buy, helps build the National WWI Memorial in Washington DC. Every sale adds $10 to the memorial effort. So grab a valuable piece of history and at the same time honor all those who served in WWI! The order site is at the US mint but we made it single step easy for you. Type ww1cc.org/coin into your browser and you’ll be there. That’s the letters ww -the number 1 - the letters C C DOT O R G forward slash and the word coin. Or - of course- follow the link in the podcast notes! In fact… Pause the podcast. Right now. Go put in an order! We’ll be here later - but these special WWI commemorative service medal won’t. Link: https://catalog.usmint.gov/coins/commemoratives/?cm_sp=TPL-_-wwi-intro-button-_-020118 www.ww1cc.org/coin Remembering Veterans 371st Cemetery Restoration with Sonya Grantham This week in our Remembering Veterans section we are being joined by Sonya Hodges Grantham, a mother, grandmother, genealogist, author, citizen historian, and researcher, with a motto of "Get The Job Done and Get It Done Right". She is the Founder and President of the World War I - 371st Historical Society and the Restorer of Childs Cemetery in South Carolina. Welcome, [Sonya] [greetings] [Sonya, your interest in restoring this particular cemetery stems from your own family history-- can you tell us the story?] [The 371st is one of the less known black regiments of WW1, yet the regiment’s Corporal Freddie Stowers is one of only two African-American Congressional Medal of Honor awardees from WWI  -- can you tell us about the regiment?]   [Unkempt or abandoned cemeteries are all over the Southern countryside -- given your experience so far, what advice can you offer someone who may, like you did,  take on the conservation of an  abandoned cemetery?] [You’ve taken on the Childs cemetery solo -- how did that go?] [goodbyes] Sonya Hodges Grantham, is a genealogist, author, citizen historian, and researcher -- the Founder and President of the World War I - 371st Historical Society and the sole Restorer of Childs Cemetery in South Carolina. Follow the links in the podcast notes to learn more about her  and her work restoring the Childs Cemetery. Link:https://www.free-times.com/news/local-and-state-news/marker-will-honor-black-wwi-soldiers-from-richland-based-regiment/article_1b8633c2-9f9e-11e7-a9ff-9b9b4d57fb3f.html?utm_medium=social&utm_source=email&utm_campaign=user-share http://www.thestate.com/news/local/article14349458.html http://www.blogtalkradio.com/bernicebennett/2015/05/29/the-371st-infantry-of-world-war-i-with-sonya-hodges-and-douglas-culbreth-1 http://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/world-war-one/10561261/First-World-War-love-letters-from-the-trenches.html https://www.iwm.org.uk/history/letters-to-loved-ones [SOUND EFFECT] Speaking WW1 And now for our feature “Speaking World War 1” - Where we explore the words & phrases that are rooted in the war  --- Adjusting to life in the Army, and in Europe, was a huge change for many of the young men serving in the AEF - the American Expeditionary Force. As we mentioned at the top of the show, starting this week 100 years ago, The Stars and Stripes newspaper offered sincere, if tongue-in-cheek, advice and stories to our boys. The February 15th, 1918 edition includes a cheat sheet of terms and phrases for the new army: the Doughboy’s Dictionary.   Items defined in this dictionary include: Insurance Premium -- Something that puts about one-sixth of your pay where you will never be able to get at it. Abri -- An underground shelter entirely populated by soldiers and cooties Dugout --The most satisfactory life insurance policy sold in the less healthy portions of France. Trench - Singular. A hole in the ground, without beginning and without end. entirely filled by water and very frequently the object of the enemy's attention. Trenches - Plural. The things in which the people back home imagine we are all of the time. Machine Gun -- An arrangement alleged to be an aide to do the work of fifteen men but requiring the work of thirty men to keep it in operation. And Underwear -- The favorite ration of the goat, sheep-tick and flea.   The Doughboy’s Dictionary -- helping our boys with Speaking WWI 100 years ago - See the podcast notes to learn more! link: https://cdn.loc.gov/service/sgp/sgpbatches/batch_dlc_argonne_ver03/data/20001931/print/1918021501/0005.pdf [SOUND EFFECT] International Report Brazil in WWI For our International report this week -- We have something special for you --- Calling in from Brazil today, we are joined by Matheus Lacerda [Maatheus LaSERda], a Passionate hobby historian with a masters degree in International Relations. Matheus recently published a book, about Epitacio Pessoa [Pess-oh-uh]...  who was the head of the Brazilian delegation at the Versaille Peace Conference in 1919, and who was later elected president of Brazil. Welcome Matheus! [greetings] [Matheus, I think many listeners will be surprised to hear about Brazil’s involvement in the war. Can you give us an overview of Brazil’s WWI story?]   [Your book is about Epitacio Pessoa at the Versaille Peace Conference of 1919-- who is he, and what what role did he take at the conference?]   [Pessoa visited the United States once he became president elect of Brazil in 1919-- what was significant about this visit?] [Matheus - We keep calling WWI “The War That Changed the World” - Did it change Brazil? And how? ] [Thank you so much for calling in from Brazil to join us!] [goodbyes] Matheus de [JE] Medeiros Lacerda,author of the “Diplomacy of President Epitacio Pessoa”. Learn more about the book and Brazil in WW1 by visiting the links at the podcast notes. Link: http://www.editoraappris.com.br/diplomacia-presidencial-de-epitacio-pessoa https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OoTwUcLJwvY&vl=en WW1 War Tech Synthetic Rubber This week in WW1 War Tech -- we are going to talk about Synthetic Rubber! The rise of motor vehicles was huge in WWI, the new transport helped get soldiers to the front, carried wounded to hospitals, and hauled supplies every which way. But the tires on these machines were made of rubber, something that came nearly exclusively from the British colonies of Ceylon and Malaya in South Asia. AND rubber was one of many important materials that Germany found herself blockaded from by the British Navy -- Helped by the US Navy  of course, as Mike explained earlier--- Cut off from the world’s supply, the German tire industry supply of rubber was stretched thin, and the German Army faced a logistical problem. The answer came from a german chemical company we now associate with aspirin - Bayer who came up with and started to mass produce methyl rubber, that was created from lime and coal. 24,000 tonnes of methyl rubber was produced during the War, but it was an inferior substitute for the real thing - didn’t work well in the cold and let to many tailbone bruises for the troops - It helped get Germany through the war but after the war - methyl rubber went the way of imperialism, and also was never considered seriously again. Importantly, the work on these materials eventually led to more effective synthetic rubber substances, including those manufactured by American rubber companies in World War II when WE lost access to South Asia. Read more about synthetic rubber during WW1 at the links in the podcast notes. Links: https://encyclopedia.1914-1918-online.net/article/rubber https://www.icis.com/resources/news/2008/05/12/9122056/history-of-the-synthetic-rubber-industry/# https://www.popularmechanics.com/military/research/g1577/7-surprising-scientific-advances-that-came-out-of-world-war-i/ https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/whatischemistry/landmarks/syntheticrubber.html Articles and Posts Corporal Stowers In articles and posts-- from our rapidly growing website at ww1cc.org - and tying neatly into the story told by our guest Sonya Grantham --- this week, there is an article about Corporal Freddie Stowers, an African-American war hero who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his service in WW1. Corporal Stowers was born in 1896 in Anderson County, South Carolina. Despite the discrimination he faced there, he made the decision to serve in the segregated 371st Infantry Regiment. He was serving as the squad leader in Company C of that regiment, in the 93rd Infantry Division, during an attack on Hill 188, in the Champagne-Marne Sector of France. He was killed in action that day, but the story of his exceptional bravery and leadership lived on, earning him the Medal of Honor posthumously. Read the entire inspiring story of Corporal Freddie Stowers at the link in the podcast notes. Link: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/4028-corporal-freddie-stowers.html Pyjamas Also in articles and posts this week, a story about how a new technological terror of the war inspired the world of fashion. World War I introduced so many terrible new war machines and prominent  among those was, of course, the aircraft -- which could now reached beyond the battlefield and into the homeland - a genuine weapon of terror, bringing the war from the soldier to the citizen. For Londoners, the threat began in January 1915, when the Germans sent Zeppelins loaded with bombs across the Channel. Eventually, they sent planes, too. In fact, the WWI air raids, often at night, accomplished very little tactically, but their true purpose was to upset peace, terrorize civilians and sink morale. The threat of bombings in the middle of the night meant that Londoners had to be ready to evacuate their homes with little to no notice; and no proper british woman wanted to be caught out in the street during a raid in her nightgown! So, new sleeping suits and pyjama with legs made their way into magazines, fashion and British bedrooms, ensuring a good night’s sleep and a practical, modest and stylish retreat in case of a nighttime raid. Read more about how, just days after the first Zeppelin raid over England, British women were already dressing for bed to be prepared to “meet the midnight world at a minute’s notice” -- at the link in the podcast notes. Link: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/4031-wwi-s-zeppelin-bombings-popularized-the-trend-of-pyjamas.html Valentine’s Special Love Letter This week, special thoughts of love for valentines - Often when we talk about the war, we focus on the more gruesome details-- the death, the mud, the gas, the lice, the devastation -- but everyday life continued throughout the war, despite all its horrors. Husbands missed their wives, and girls missed their sweethearts. 2nd Lieutenant Francis Tracy wrote to his wife, full of longing and love and apologies for how hard his absence had been on her --   Tracy wrote this letter to his wife on September 20th 1918, only seven days before he died in battle. He is buried in the Meuse-Argonne Cemetery. The track is an excerpt from the youtube Series: The Letters - and  performed by Farhang Ghajar. The link is in the podcast notes. Link:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9N39r3FDSSU Love Story On our website at ww1cc.org, you can find the story of Rebecca and Charles Duffy, submitted by their daughter Lucy. Rebecca, who was a young French girl when the war broke out, met and fell in love with an American Soldier who was taking French lessons with her mother. The infatuation was immediate, with Charles proposing to Rebecca after just three weeks! Read their incredible story  by following the link in the podcast notes. Missing American Love Letters from WWI You know - when we were preparing this story ---- It seems like American Love letters from WWI have not been well archived or collected Hint hint to our listeners - there is a great project and opportunity for you!!!  American Love Letters from WWI needs someone’s attention--- - Meanwhile In the UK media and web you will find hearts beating fondly - we have put a list of links for you to explore below. Link:   https://transcribathon.com/en/runs/love-run/ http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/2388-rebecca-and-charles-a-testimony-from-beyond-the-atlantic.html https://news.sky.com/story/dear-heart-love-letters-from-the-trenches-released-10767255 https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/2859049/love-letters-first-world-war-soldiers-passchendaele-sweethearts-home/ Love Songs And to wrap things up for Valentines - here are some audio clips from love songs of the times. Songs: Im crazy over every girl in france https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fM_ZvSbqXn4 My sweetheart is somewhere in france https://www.loc.gov/item/jukebox.6356/ Other songs: https://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/4847 https://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/5457 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wt7GCL1iUKk https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Billy_Murray_-_K-K-K-Katy.ogg https://www.loc.gov/item/jukebox.6356/ The Buzz - WW1 in Social Media Posts And that brings us to the buzz - the centennial of WW1 this week in social media with Katherine Akey - Katherine, what do you have for us this week? Hi Theo! Naturalization Webinar Our friends at the Department of Homeland Security's U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services History Office are hosting an online webinar about the history of WWI soldier naturalizations on February 22nd. During World War I, nearly one-fifth of the American armed forces were foreign-born. In fact, Congress passed laws to expedite military naturalizations, encouraging immigrant enlistments and to naturalize servicemen before they shipped out. The webinar will provide an overview of the Immigration Service’s WWI soldier naturalization program, and explore some of the unique research challenges the records present. Make sure to tune in at the link in the podcast notes, as the webinar won’t be recorded! You can also go back to our Episode #41 to hear our interview with Allison S. Finkelstein and Zack Wilske from the USCIS History Office and Library. link:https://www.uscis.gov/HGWebinars https://www.facebook.com/ww1centennial/posts/926359477539351 That’s it this week for the Buzz! link:https://www.militarytimes.com/military-honor/black-military-history/2018/02/06/william-h-carney-the-first-black-soldier-to-earn-the-medal-of-honor/ Outro Thank you everyone for listening to another episode of WW1 Centennial News. We want to thank our guests... Dr. Edward Lengel, Military historian and author Mike Shuster, Curator of the great war project blog Sonya Hodges Grantham, citizen historian and researcher Matheus Lacerda, Brazilian author and citizen historian Katherine Akey, the commission’s social media director and line producer for the podcast Thanks also to our new intern John Morreale for his great research assistance. And I am Theo Mayer - your host. The US World War One Centennial Commission was created by Congress to honor, commemorate and educate about WW1. Our programs are to-- inspire a national conversation and awareness about WW1; this podcast is a part of that…. Thank you! We are bringing the lessons of the 100 years ago into today's classrooms; We are helping to restore WW1 memorials in communities of all sizes across our country; and of course we are building America’s National WW1 Memorial in Washington DC. We want to thank commission’s founding sponsor the Pritzker Military Museum and Library as well as the Starr foundation for their support. The podcast can be found on our website at ww1cc.org/cn   on  iTunes and google play at ww1 Centennial News, and on Amazon Echo or other Alexa enabled devices. Just say: Alexa: Play W W One Centennial News Podcast. Our twitter and instagram handles are both @ww1cc and we are on facebook @ww1centennial. Thank you for joining us. And don’t forget to share the stories you are hearing here today about the war that changed the world! [music] Hey I saved one more entry from the Doughboy Dictionary for you Officer of the Day A lieutenant troubled with sleeplessness and possessed of bad habit of coming around between midnight and dawn and asking embarrassing questions. So long!
February 9, 2018
Highlights Food Will Win The War - an overview | @01:55 History through the lens of Food - Dr. Libby O’Connell  | @05:40 War in the sky | @10:30 America Emerges - Dr. Edward Lengel | @11:45 Great War Project - Mike Shuster | @17:25 Great War Channel on Youtube - Indy Neidell & Flo Wittig | @21:05 Family’s History - Ambassador Carol Moseley Braun | @29:25 Remembering Veterans - Dr. Richard Slotkin | @34:30 A Century in the Making - Maquette on Fox and Friends | @42:45 Speaking WWI - Hooverized Recipes | @44:45 States - Ohio web site - Amy Rohmiller | @46:10 The Buzz - Katherine Akey | @52:25 and more....----more---- Opening Welcome to World War 1 centennial News - episode #58 - It’s about WW1 THEN - what was happening 100 years ago this week  - and it’s about WW1 NOW - news and updates about the centennial and the commemoration.   Today is February 9th, 2018 and our guests for this week include: Dr. Libby O’Connell, talking to us about the food administration’s rationing directives 100 years ago this month Dr. Edward Lengel, with a story about an interesting military demonstration by the doughboys at New York’s Hippodrome Mike Shuster, from the great war project blog with the AEF’s first military engagements of 1918 Indy Neidell and Florian Wittig from the Great War Channel on YouTube talking with us about producing this long running video series Ambassador Carol Moseley Braun telling us about her family’s connection to WW1 Dr. Richard Slotkin who examines the shifting ethnic and cultural landscape in America during WW1 Amy Rohmiller introducing the Ohio WW1 centennial effort and their new website Katherine Akey, with some selections from the centennial of WWI in social media   All that and more --- this week -- on WW1 Centennial News -- a weekly podcast brought to you by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and the Starr foundation. I’m Theo Mayer - the Chief Technologist for the Commission and your host. Welcome to the show. [MUSIC] Preface Food will win the war! That was the rallying cry for Herbert Hoover… A mining engineer by training, an entrepreneur by character and a public servant by circumstance.   Herbert Hoover was in Europe in 1914 when it all hit the fan. He stepped up and helped organize the return of around 120,000 Americans who got stranded. He led 500 volunteers in distributing food, clothing, steamship tickets and cash to get the Americans home. Hoover, who would become the 31st President of the United States remarked: QUOTE: I did not realize it at the moment, but on August 3, 1914, my career was over forever. I was on the slippery road of public life."     And so It is no surprize that President Woodrow Wilson tapped the young Hoover to run his wartime food administration…   And what a challenge food production and management had become. The men who farmed put on uniforms. Armies of them needed to be fed, shiploads of food needed to be transported and in europe after 3 ½ years of devastation and fighting the populations were starving. [MUSIC] With that as an overview, let’s jump into our wayback machine and go back 100 years to the war that changed the world! World War One THEN 100 Year Ago This Week [MUSIC SOUND EFFECT TRANSITION] It’s late January 1918 - President Wilson issues a proclamation in the "Official Bulletin" - the government’s war gazette published by George Creel’s Committee on Public Information for the administration. [Sound effect] DATELINE: January 28, 1918 HEADLINE: President’s Proclamation Calls Upon People of Nation to Reduce Consumption of Wheat and Meat Products in Order to Feed America's Associates in the War Wilson’s proclamation opens with: "MANY causes have contributed to create the necessity for a more intensive effort on the part of our people to save food in order that we may supply our associates in the war with the sustenance vitally necessary to them in these days of privation and stress. The reduced productivity of Europe because of the large diversion of manpower to the war, the partial failure of harvests, and the elimination of the more distant markets for foodstuffs through the destruction of shipping places…  the burden of their subsistence very largely rests upon our shoulders. The Food Administration has formulated suggestions which, if followed, will enable us to meet this great responsibility, without any real inconvenience on our part." The proclamation goes on to explain the details and concludes with - "I, therefore, in the national interest, take the liberty of calling upon every loyal American to take fully to heart the suggestions which are being circulated by the Food Administration and of begging that they be followed. I am confident that the great body of our women' who have labored so loyally in cooperation with the Food Administration for the success of food conservation, will strengthen their efforts and will take it as a part of their burden in this period of national service to see that the above suggestions are observed throughout the land." President Woodrow Wilson Libby O’connell interview With us again today is Food historian, author and WWI Centennial Commissioner,  Dr. Libby O’Connell [Libby - thank you for taking the time to join us again --- as our go to expert on WWI and food!] [So Libby - The cry was “Food Will Win The War” and this particular program came to be known as Meatless Monday / Wheatless Wednesday - Can you give us some perspective? Was it effective?]   [Libby]   [Thank you once again for your wonderful insights - ] [So long] Dr. Libby O’Connell is former Chief Historian for the History Channel, author, food historian and US WW1 Centennial Commissioner - Follow the link in the podcast notes to learn more about Dr. O’Connell and how “Food Will Win The War!" Link: http://uvamagazine.org/articles/the_peoples_historian http://exhibits.mannlib.cornell.edu/meatlesswheatless/meatless-wheatless.php https://www.history.com/news/hungry-history/author/libby https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/02/08/102666398.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/02/07/102665809.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/02/04/102664455.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/01/28/102662003.pdf War in the Sky 100 years ago this week in the War in The Sky there are two events worth noting. First: The Lafayette Escadrille - the famed squadron of American Flier who flew for the french before America entered the war are officially transferred from the French Army to the US Army and re-designated the 103rd Aero Squadron. Also the US replaces the insignia on all US planes with what is called the roundel  - an outer red ring, then a blue ring, and a white center. The Allies had requested the change out of a fear that the white star in the center of the old design might be mistaken for a German cross in the fog of battle. The roundel remains in use until the US reverts to its former markings in August of 1919.   Fine tuning the army air service 100 years ago this week for the War in the Sky. Follow the war in the sky with our comprehensive nearly day-by-day timeline curated by RG head - you’ll find it at at ww1cc.org/warinthesky - one word - all lower case - or follow the links in the podcast notes. Link: www.ww1cc.org/warinthesky America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 This week for: America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI… Dr. Edward lengel is going to tell us about a very interesting military demonstration by US forces at New York’s Hippodrome. Let me set this up: Large numbers of troops are wrapping up their stateside training and preparing to ship out. The pace is accelerating and multiple divisions are shipping out simultaneously - most of them from the greater New York City area - logistics for  juggling railways, encampments, embarkation and debarkation facilities, ships, food, fuel and weapons is ever more challenging. But the Doughboys are pumped and gripped with excitement as they prepare to “take it to the Kaiser”. Their adventure is about to begin. This is where Ed picks up the story in New York... [ED LENGEL] Thank you Ed. Next week, Dr. Edward Lengel will tell us about the 32nd Red Arrow Division, made from the Michigan and Wisconsin National Guard. Some of the division’s first contingent drowns in the sinking of the Tuscania on February 5, but most of the Red Arrow Doughboys travel on the massive ship - the USS Leviathan, which used to be the German Ship ---Die Vaterland (the fatherland) - but as we declare war - we confiscate her in NY harbor and turned her into a massive troop ship to send doughboys to fight it’s original namesake. Kinda ironic. Dr. Edward Lengel is an American military historian, author, and our segment host for America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI. There are links in the podcast notes to Ed’s post and his website as an author. Links:http://www.edwardlengel.com/doughboys-action-new-york-citys-hippodrome-100-years-ago/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/   [SOUND EFFECT] Great War Project Now on to the Great War project with Mike Shuster - former NPR correspondent and curator for the Great War project Blog…. Mike: Your post this week is titled - The Americans are in it! And by that you mean the trenches and the fighting. I don’t think your story this week needs more introduction than that, Mike! [MIKE POST] Mike Shuster from the Great War Project blog. LINK: http://greatwarproject.org/2018/02/04/the-americans-are-in-it/ [SOUND EFFECT] The Great War Channel Every week we tell you about these wonderful videos on Youtube from The Great War Channel -- The channel has some pretty impressive stats - it launched in May of 2014, has published over 515 episodes, has over 800 thousand subscribers on youtube and has earned over 120 million video views. Earlier this week I called Indy Neidell, the show’s host and Florian Wittig the series producer at their studio in Berlin to learn a little more about their experience in producing the Great War Channel. Indy - Flo welcome! Gentlemen - I wanted to bring you on the show - not to talk about WWI but to talk about ----  telling the story of WWI! [Indy - this project came together in the spring of 2014 - can you tell us with who and how that happened? [Flo - how did you get involved in the project?]   [So gentlemen - for us this is podcast episode #58 - and you are somewhere near episode 520! That leaves me in awe - but also with a question for you Indy: WWI is such an incredibly... insanely…  bizarrely… surreal…  story - How do you think that immersing yourself in it so deeply and for so long -- has affected your worldview?] [Flo - you and I have been chatting every month for a few years now - and I have really enjoyed watching you guide the project to where it is today - One thing that struck me is how incredibly dedicated to your audience you are  - Tell us about them] Last question - really to both of you --- Starting this month the US troops start to actually engage in the fighting and their involvement accelerates rapidly - Do you have any special plans for how to cover this part of the story?Gentlemen - Thanks for spending a little time with our listeners. You have created a really important body of work with your series and as always we encourage our listeners to search for The Great War on youtube or follow the link in our podcast notes. Thanks gents.... [Say goodbye] Indy Neidell, the host, and Florian Wittig, the producer of the Great War Channel on Youtube. Link:https://www.youtube.com/user/TheGreatWar World War One NOW It is time to fast forward into the present with WW1 Centennial News NOW - [SOUND EFFECT] this section is not about history, but rather - it explores what is happening NOW to commemorate the centennial of the War that changed the world! Commission News Interview with Ambassador Carol Moseley Braun   It is a privilege to joined today by a genuine social pioneer… An amazing person of many honors, distinctions and firsts - To start with Carol Moseley Braun was one of the first black women to graduate from the law school at the University of Chicago; She was an Assistant United States Attorney; an illinois state legislator; a US State Senator; an ambassador; and my favorite - she was adopted as a member of a maori tribe; She’s also an entrepreneur - and on the Diplomatic Advisory board to the US WWI centennial commission, Welcome Ambassador Carol Moseley Braun. [greetings] [Ambassador Braun, I want to ask you about your Grandfather - Thomas Davie and his cousin both of whom served in WWI. Could you tell us about them? ] [Did Thomas Davie talk about his experience when he came home?] [Ambassador Braun - why do you think America needs a WWI memorial in the nation’s capital?] [I have to ask - Who inspired you to become the accomplished and amazing person you are?] [Ambassador - Thank you for sharing your family’s story with us.] [thank you/goodbyes] Ambassador Carol Moseley Braun is a pioneering politician, former US Senator from Illinois, she was the Ambassador to New Zealand and Samoa-- and she also serves on the Diplomatic Advisory Board of the WW1 Centennial Commission. Read more about her at the links in the podcast notes. link:http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/about/the-commission/advisory-boards/diplomatic-advisory-board.html http://history.house.gov/People/Detail?id=18611 https://www.militarytimes.com/military-honor/black-military-history/2017/02/15/african-american-heroes-are-a-part-of-a-vanishing-world-war-i-legacy/   Remembering Veterans Interview with Dr. Richard Slotkin We will start this week in our Remembering Veterans section with Dr. Richard Slotkin, historian, professor emeritus of English and American studies at Wesleyan University and author of the book Lost Battalions: The Great War and the Crisis of American Nationality Welcome, [Dr. Slotkin] [greetings] [Dr. Slotkin, your book looks at the changing American cultural identity as experienced by two different units-- the 369th, a black regiment, and the 77th, the “melting pot” division. Why did you choose these two units for your book?]   [How did the experience of these two units differ, in terms of being marginalized ethnically? ]   [In your opinion, why should American students be taught about the exploits of these soldiers? ]   [goodbyes]   Dr. Richard Slotkin is a historian, professor emeritus and author. Follow the links in the podcast notes to learn more about him and his books. Link:https://www.amazon.com/Lost-Battalions-Crisis-American-Nationality/dp/0805081380 https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/richard-slotkin/lost-battalions/ A Century in the Making Now for: A century in the making - the story of America’s WW1 Memorial in Washington DC.   In this segment we take you on an insider’s journey that explores this grand undertaking, and the people behind it. In the summer of 2017, the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts and National Capital Planning Commission unanimously approved the conceptual design for the memorial, centered on a monumental work of bronze sculpture. Sculptor Sabin Howard then embarked on an eight-month effort to bring the memorial to life. And as we’ve heard from Sabin himself in our podcast episodes #54 and #55 --- the sculpture has evolved from his original sketches and drawings into 3D images and 3D models. Sabin’s efforts at the Weta Workshop in New Zealand culminated in late January, with creation of a sculptural maquette of the proposed design - essentially that is the sculpture at 1:6 scale. Last week you heard an audio documentary on this show as this striking model, which is around 10 and a half feet long by around 1 foot high, arrived in Washington DC last week. The maquette serves as the “first draft” of the Memorial’s sculptural design and development and is scheduled to be presented to the Commission of Fine Arts on Thursday February 15th for their review and feedback. On Friday February 16th, the maquette will be unveiled to the public for the first time on the Fox and Friends television show. Pending all regulatory agency approvals anticipated by summer 2018, the design and development of the sculpture will enter its final production phase, including casting. We actually built two of the maquettes to accommodate both public and private displays over the coming months!   Watch the unveiling on Fox and Friends next Fr iday or come to our website that weekend at ww1cc.org/memorial for a first look yourself. Follow the link in the podcast notes to learn more.   Link: www.ww1cc.org/memorial   [SOUND EFFECT] Speaking WW1 And now for our feature “Speaking World War 1” - Where we explore the words & phrases that are rooted in the war  --- As we talked about at the top of the show, rationing and ingredient substitution became necessary in World War One America. Special recipes were developed to keep food tasty but also within the rules laid out in the Food Administration’s guidelines. These new wheatless, meatless and sugarless recipes that strove to keep familiar food on tables of America,  earned their own nickname - which is our Speaking WWI phrase for this week. These wartime foods and recipes were deemed to have been “Hooverized” in honor of the Food Administration's chief, Herbert Hoover. There was cake made with potato flour instead of wheat - candies made with molasses or honey instead of refined sugar, and bread using a mixture of potato, rye and corn flour. Actually Hooverized Foods sound like a very contemporary, trendy, gluten free, health food, paleo, vegan-esque diet. But I think  “Hooverized Recipes” doesn’t sound like a trendy, hip, slick, hook --- even if it IS this week’s phrase for Speaking WWI - See the podcast notes to learn more! link: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc2.ark:/13960/t9t156s17 https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/the-meatless-wheatless-meals-of-world-war-i-america [SOUND EFFECT] Updates from the States Ohio Website Launch For updates from the states -- we’re very pleased to announce that Ohio has launched a new centennial website at ww1cc.org/ohio - all lower case!   With us is Amy Rohmiller, World War I Coordinator at the Ohio History Connection, to tell us more about the site and the WWI Centennial commemoration efforts in Ohio. Welcome, Amy! [greetings] Amy, tell us about the Ohio WWI centennial organization -  how is it structured, and what kind of projects are you working on currently? What was the experience of Ohioans like during the War? What kind of information should people expect to find on your new Ohio website at ww1cc.org/ohio ? [goodbye/thanks] Amy Rohmiller is the World War I Coordinator at the Ohio History Connection. Visit the Ohio WWI Centennial website at ww1cc.org/ohio or by following the link in the podcast notes. Link: www.ww1cc.org/ohio [SOUND EFFECT] The Buzz - WW1 in Social Media Posts And that brings us to the buzz - the centennial of WW1 this week in social media with Katherine Akey - Katherine, what do you have for us this week? Hi Theo! Coloring Book Popular posts on our facebook page this week are all about color! The National World War One Museum and Memorial in Kansas City has started a new project, Color Our Collections. You can follow the link in the podcast notes to download a coloring book drawn from the museum’s collections, including several of Captain Bruce Bairnsfather’s illustrations.   link:http://library.nyam.org/colorourcollections/national-wwi-museum-memorial-coloring-book/?platform=hootsuite http://library.nyam.org/colorourcollections/wp-content/uploads/sites/5/2018/02/NationalWWIMuseum_ColorOurCollections_2018.pdf Color Images from the War Lastly for the week, another collection of color photographs from WW1 is making the rounds online, but these are not black and white images that have since had color added: they’re original color images from 100 years ago. The color process used to create them is called Autochrome, and it used dyed pieces of potato starch to turn a normal black and white negative into the beautiful, velvety color photos you can see at the Slate article in the podcast links. That’s it this week for the Buzz!   link:http://www.slate.com/blogs/behold/2014/08/12/fernand_cuville_s_autochrome_photos_show_world_war_i_in_color.html   Thank you Katherine - Outro Thank you everyone for listening to another episode of WW1 Centennial News. We want to thank our guests... Dr. Libby O’Connell, author, historian and World War One Centennial Commissioner Dr. Edward Lengel, Military historian and author Mike Shuster, Curator of the great war project blog Indy Neidell and Florian Wittig from The Great War channel on Youtube Ambassador Carol Moseley Braun, pioneering politician and Diplomatic Advisor to the Commission Dr. Richard Slotkin, historian, author and professor emeritus Amy Rohmiller, the World War I Coordinator at the Ohio History Connection Katherine Akey, the commission’s social media director and line producer for the podcast   And I am Theo Mayer - your host. The US World War One Centennial Commission was created by Congress to honor, commemorate and educate about WW1. Our programs are to-- inspire a national conversation and awareness about WW1; this podcast is a part of that…. Thank you! We are bringing the lessons of the 100 years ago into today's classrooms; We are helping to restore WW1 memorials in communities of all sizes across our country; and of course we are building America’s National WW1 Memorial in Washington DC. We want to thank commission’s founding sponsor the Pritzker Military Museum and Library as well as the Starr foundation for their support. The podcast can be found on our website at ww1cc.org/cn   on  iTunes and google play at ww1 Centennial News, and on Amazon Echo or other Alexa enabled devices. Just say: Alexa: Play W W One Centennial News Podcast. Our twitter and instagram handles are both @ww1cc and we are on facebook @ww1centennial. Thank you for joining us. And don’t forget to share the stories you are hearing here today about the war that changed the world! [music]   Jeez I need to decide…. The Low FODMAP gluten free diet The gut health diet The matcha turmeric, macca diet The Mediterranean makeover Vegan 2.0 Forget it - I’m just gonna Hooverize my recipes! So long!
February 3, 2018
Highlights Feb. ‘18 overview - Ed Lengel, Katherine Akey, Theo Mayer | @01:40 War In The Sky 1918 preview - RG Head | @11:20 Fighting in Russia - Mike Shuster | @18:20 Harlem’s Rattlers - Dr. Jeffrey Sammons | @22:40 A Century in the Making - The maquette arrives in DC | @30:00 Speaking WWI - Attaboy! | @35:40 Nurse Josephine Heffernan - Dr. Marjorie DesRosier | @37:30 100C/100M Beaverton Michigan - Ed Rachwitz & Scott Govitz | @43:25 WWI War Tech - Gas Masks | @47:55 Articles & Posts - Dazzle Camo & S.S. Tuscania sinks | @49:45 The Buzz - WWI Social Media - Katherine Akey | @51:55----more---- Opening Welcome to World War 1 centennial News - episode #57 - It’s about WW1 THEN - what was happening 100 years ago this week  - and it’s about WW1 NOW - news and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. Today is February 2nd, 2018 and our guests for this week include: Dr. Edward Lengel, in our February 1918 overview RG Head, with a full year look at the War in the Sky Mike Shuster, from the great war project blog looking at the chaotic situation in Russia Dr. Jeffrey Sammons speaking about the Harlem Rattlers and the African American soldiers’ experience in WWI Dr. Marjorie DesRosier telling us about nurse Josephine Heffernan Ed Rachwitz and Scott Govitz, from the 100 Cities/100 Memorials project in Beaverton, Michigan Katherine Akey, with some selections from the centennial of WWI in social media All that and more --- this week -- on WW1 Centennial News -- which is brought to you by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and the Starr foundation. I’m Theo Mayer - the Chief Technologist for the Commission and your host. Welcome to the show. [MUSIC] NEW - Monthly Preview Roundtable Overview Chat with Ed, Katherine and Theo THEO Before we jump into our wayback machine and look at 100 years ago this week, we are going to try something new. You know we have editorial meetings twice a week where we define the content for each week’s show. For the history section - which is one of the most popular parts of the podcast - we get into these great conversations about “what was really going on 100 years ago this week”. We look at the politics, the Official bulletin, the NY times, history book references and of course we have our own little band of experts and researchers - It occurs to us that having a short version of one of these conversations -- in front of YOU at the top of each month…  might be a great way to provide context and overview. In other words  - from an overview perspective and of course with 20/20 hindsight - what is the next month all about in the War the changed the world? - and what are the themes we are going to hear about this coming month… So the other day, Dr. Ed Lengel, Katherine Akey and I sat down (virtually of course - Ed was in Dublin, Katherine in DC and I am in LA) --- and we talked about February 1918 - Here is how it went…. [MUSIC TRANSITION] Ed… it seems like the big theme in February is all about troop movements and preparation - The Americans to Europe and prepping for engaging the enemy - the Germans from the eastern front - leaving Russia for the western front and prepping for a knock-out spring offensive… so what are some of the specifics? ED [ED Lay out the basic outlines and punctuate with the “topic headers” of some specifics - -America sending ever larger numbers of troops over - New rounds of training as arriving divisions get embedded with British and French troops -Loss of the tuscania -German armistice and peace with Russia withdraw from the Eastern front, leave Russia and red/white armies to their internal divisions - While Germans can concentrate forces to counter American support -Germans want to “school” fresh US troops, and want US Media to report on it; Germans being very strategic with their aggression [KATHERINE] -month dramatic climax with the German COUNTER Gas attack on 1st division Ansauville near Metz/Nancy Feb 26/27th THEO TRANSITION Katherine you came up with some great references and article that illustrate Ed’s points - can you give us some of the datelines, headlines and gist of some of these? NOTE: Katherine - based on the articles you are picking - If I know what they are - we might break up ed section with references rather than having them all at the end. -French and British (publically) very optimistic about outlook, skeptical of the strength of German attack on west Links:https://history.army.mil/documents/wwi/ansau/ansac.htm https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/01/23/102660120.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/01/23/102660119.pdf https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1918/01/30/102662967.pdf https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ War in the Sky For our War In The Sky segment, we are joined today by RG Head, retired Air Force Brigadier General, former fighter pilot, military historian, and author Welcome RG [greet one another] [RG - thank for joining us again. I wanted to bring you on to help us with an overview of the War in The Sky for 1918. Of course it has to be in context of the other key events of the year, but what should we expect for 1918 in the the War in the Sky?] RG MAJOR AIR EVENTS OF WORLD WAR I IN 1918 1918 opened gloomily for the Allies. The aerial war in 1917 had introduced massed fighter tactics, close air support of ground forces and some strategic bombing. For the Allies, their many concentrated 1917 offensives failed and resulted in high losses on the ground and in the air. The Allies were on the defensive. On the other hand, Germany instituted "The Amerika Plan," which featured five major offensives in an attempt to win the war before the Americans can make a meaningful contribution. Part of this plan was for the German Air Force to double its size in eight months in the hope of winning back air superiority, which it lost in the months after "Bloody April" 1917. In February, the German Air Service forms two more Fighter Wings based on the success of Manfred von Richthofen's Jagdgeschwader I. In late February, the German Army launches Operation Michael against the British, the first of the major offensives in the West, advancing 30 miles in eight days. The Germans mass 750 aircraft against the English 580, including 38 ground attack squadrons. The air battle is one-sided: the British lost 478 aircraft in 10 days, and by April 29 had lost 1,302. Britain was only saved by their high production rate of aircraft and pilots. On March 3, The Treaty of Brest-Litovsk certified the Russian surrender, and the Germans initiate a massive transfer of hundreds of thousands of soldiers and aircraft from the Eastern to the Western Front. On the first of April, Britain forms the Royal Air Force, the first independent air arm of any nation. The RAF also includes an Independent Air Force performing the first strategic bombing missions on a large scale. The same day in April, German Sergeant Weimar is the first combat pilot to escape his aircraft using a parachute. The British would not issue parachutes to its aviators until September 1918. In the Spring, the major achievement in air operations must be the organization, training and combat performance of the US Air Service. From its status in April 1917 of only 65 officers and 1,100 men, the Air Service grew to 7,700 officers, 51,000 men, with over 75 percent of them deployed to France, supporting 45 fighting squadrons. In June and July, the Germans launch two offensives for the Marne River, the last of their five 1918 desperate attacks. The American Expeditionary Force (AEF) contributes to the Allied victory at Chateau-Thierry in preventing the Germany Army from crossing the river. September is the costliest month of the war for the Allied Air Forces as they lose 580 aircraft to the Germans 107 (over a 5:1 ratio). The US Air Service makes its first big contribution. The German Air Force, led by 80 fighter squadrons, is the only force that significantly impacts the Allies, making the month forever known as "Black September." On the 12th of September the Americans take the offensive in the Battle of St-Mihiel, a distinctly US operation involving seven Army divisions and 665,000 men. Brigadier General Billy Mitchell assembles a force of over 1,400 Allied aircraft, the largest air operation in history, and the Americans are victorious. On the 26th of September, Americans began their most important battle of the war, the Meuse-Argonne Offensive. With over 1,200,000 men we break through the Hindenberg Line, supported by the US Army Air Service.    Finally, the Armistice comes on the 11th of November. [thanks/goodbyes] Thank you RG RG Head, Retired Air Force brigadier general, fighter pilot, military historian and author. His latest book is a biography of Oswald Boelcke, often referred to as the father of combat aviation. RG Head is also the curator a comprehensive - nearly day-by-day “War in the Sky” timeline on the Commission website at ww1cc.org/warinthesky - all lower case - one word. We have links to the book, timeline and RG’s facebook page in the podcast notes Link: https://www.facebook.com/rg.head/ www.ww1cc.org/warinthesky https://www.amazon.com/RG-Head/e/B01M59UA64 [SOUND EFFECT] Great War Project Now on to the Great War project with Mike Shuster - former NPR correspondent and curator for the Great War project Blog…. Mike: So the Russians stopped fighting the German - but the Russians now  sure seem to be fighting each other! Or the Germans are still fighting them - or something - What’s the story Mike? [MIKE POST] Mike Shuster from the Great War Project blog. LINK: http://greatwarproject.org/2018/01/28/lenin-declares-establishment-of-soviet-union/ [SOUND EFFECT] The Great War Channel Here are this week’s new videos our friends at  “The Great War Channel” on Youtube. One is about Russia’s internal wars - Civil War in Finland and Ukraine And - Trenches at 10,000 feet - Fighting on Mount Lagazuoi And Finally  British Special Forces Follow the link in the podcast notes or search for “the great war” on youtube. Link: https://www.youtube.com/user/TheGreatWar World War One NOW It is time to fast forward into the present with WW1 Centennial News NOW - [SOUND EFFECT] this section is not about history, but rather - it explores what is happening NOW to commemorate the centennial of the War that changed the world! Remembering Veterans DONE February is African American History month - so over the next few weeks we will be bringing you a series of guests and stories that highlight the African American experience in WWI. It is an important, complex and sometimes horrific story of brave patriots fighting not only a war, but also a very racist culture. Interview with Dr. Sammons We will start this week in our Remembering Veterans section with Dr. Jeffrey Sammons, historian, professor of history at NYU, member of the commission’s history advisory board and co-author of the book Harlem's Rattlers and the Great War: The Undaunted 369th Regiment and the African American Quest for Equality. Welcome, [Dr. Sammons] [greetings] [Dr.  Sammons - The Harlem rattlers - also known widely as the Harlem Hellfighters are famous as a unit and a regimental band, but who they actually were and what they did is much less known  - Can you give us an overview?] [Dr. Sammons - as we noted at the top of the show - Pershing insisted, for the most part, on troop deployment under American command - but the 369th was under French command operationally until July 1918. Tell us about that please…] [So when they fighting stopped “over there”, there was another big struggle as these men came home. What kind of situation did the African American soldiers and heroes of WW1 come home to?] [goodbyes] Dr. Jeffrey Sammons is a historian, professor, author and Historical Advisor to the WW1 Centennial Commission. Link:https://www.pritzkermilitary.org/whats_on/pritzker-military-presents/jeffrey-sammons-harlems-rattlers-and-great-war/ http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/about/the-commission/advisory-boards/historical-advisory-board.html A century in the making - The Maquette Arrives Now for: A century in the making - the story of America’s WW1 Memorial in Washington DC. In this segment we take you on an insider’s journey that explores this grand undertaking, and the people behind it. This week the Maquette arrived in Washington DC. Sabin Howard, the project’s sculptor, has spent month in New Zealand working with the WETA Workshop to create this first 9 foot long realization of the planned ginormous bronze… late last week he packed it up and shipped it to Washington! (sound from sabin footage) This past Wednesday on January 31st, it arrived on the commission’s doorstep! (more sound) And the team got a first look!!! Including US WWI Centennial Commission Chair Terry Hamby... (first reactions) around the middle of the month - The machete will be presented to and reviewed by Washington’s Commission of Fine Arts - - they one of the governing and approval bodies for any project in Washington DC… After their review, the Maquette will be introduced to the nation on a national television show to be announced shortly. Though we can’t show it to you yet, this is a podcast so we have been able to give you a sneak listen to the maquette arriving in Washington DC! We are going to continue to bring you an insider’s view with stories about the epic undertaking to create America’s WWI memorial in our nation’s capital. Learn more at ww1cc.org/memorial Link: www.ww1cc.org/memorial [SOUND EFFECT] Speaking WW1 And now for our feature “Speaking World War 1” - Where we explore the words & phrases that are rooted in the war  --- We have told you part of this story before - On the morning of July 4th in 1917, the mounted band of the French Republican Guard arrived with a large crowd before the residence in Paris of the recently arrived Gen. John J. Pershing. He came to the window when he heard the “Star Spangled Banner,” and the crowd respectfully removed their hats for the American general. That morning - Gen Pershing and the men of the 16th infantry marched down the streets of Paris, celebrating the renewed Franco-American allegiance. Well - turns out that a French newspaper L’Intransigent reported that, A cry was heard to-day by Parisians who acclaimed Gen. Pershing and his men. It was "Atta boy! atta boy! The phrase is a simple popular contraction for 'That's the boy!' which means 'Here is the man for the situation!" and on our fighting front it soon became a war cry for the American troops. 'Atta boy !' So Soon the phrase became synonymous with the American Troops. In fact, in 1918, according to the Baltimore Evening Sun , the British took a real liking to the phrase after overhearing it being shouted by American soldiers during a baseball game. The paper reported that - “All the London papers have taken it up, with the result that in London, at least, the Americans are now almost unanimously called "Attaboys." But ultimately - Doughboys won out! Attaboy - this week’s phrase for speaking WWI - See the podcast notes to learn more! link: https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc2.ark:/13960/t9t156s17 [SOUND EFFECT] Spotlight in the Media For our Spotlight in the Media this week- We have a story about an episode from a French documentary television program called “13h15”. The episode is about an American Immigrant nurse named Josephine Heffernan, who served in France during WW1. We’re pleased to be joined by Dr. Marjorie DesRosier, who did much of the research on nurse Josephine. Dr. DesRosier is an international nurse historian and independent scholar specializing in the early history of American Red Cross nursing and nursing challenges of the Great War era in the U.S. and Europe. She, herself is also a Registered Nurse and former clinical professor from the University of Washington School of Nursing, in Seattle. Welcome, Dr. DesRosier [greetings] [DesRosier, can you start by telling us a bit about Josephine? Who was she, and how did she end up in France as a nurse?] [Would you tell us the story about the bracelet?] [Are there other stories like Josephine’s-- where you have been able to connect with descendents of the nurses who served in the war?] [Are you working on any other project about WWI nurses?] [Thank you so much for being here!] [goodbyes] Dr. DesRosier is an international nurse historian, independent scholar and registered nurse  - Follow the link in the podcast notes to learn more about nurse Josephine Heffernan. Link:https://www.francetvinfo.fr/replay-magazine/france-2/13h15/13h15-du-dimanche-7-janvier-2018_2539393.html https://www.rte.ie/news/2017/1101/916742-bracelet/ [SOUND EFFECT] 100 Cities/100 Memorials Moving on to our 100 Cities / 100 Memorials segment about the $200,000 matching grant challenge to rescue and focus on our local WWI memorials. This week we are profiling The Survivor' WWI War Monument in Beaverton, Michigan  -- a 100 Cities/100 Memorials round 1 awardee. With us tell us about the project are Ed Rachwitz, member of the Gladwin County American Legion Post 171, and  Scott Govitz, former Beaverton Mayor and current Chair of the Beaverton Downtown Development Authority. Both serve on the Beaverton WW1 Memorial Committee. Welcome gentlemen [The WWI memorial in Beaverton is really striking - as you might guess, I have seen literally hundreds of WWI memorials - and this one is truly unique… it is a really beautiful stone bas-relief sculpture - and it shows both a proud doughboy and the war’s devastation - Since this is an audio program - Can you describe it for our listening audience.] [The artist was a prewar german immigrant named Helmut von Zengen - tells us a bit about him please!] [So apparently some years ago, in a well intentioned but misguided attempt to repair the memorial,  the repair actually caused some damage. That’s an important story to share. Can you tell us about that?] [What are your rededication plans?] Thank you for coming in today.. If you are anywhere near or traveling near Beaverton - take a stop at this memorial. It is unique, it is dramatic and it is worth seeing. [goodbyes] Ed Rachwitz and Scott Govitz serve on the Beaverton. michigan WW1 Memorial Committee. Learn more about the 100 Cities/100 Memorials program by visiting the link at the podcast notes. Link: www.ww1cc.org/100cities WW1 War Tech This week for, WW1 War Tech we are looking at gas masks As we mentioned at the top of the show, gas was one of the most horrific parts of the WW1 arsenal. It was terrifying-- both physically, and psychologically devastating. Developing a means of protecting soldiers from gas’s devastation was critical. In 1915, the allied forces were caught off guard by the first chlorine gas attack at the Battle of Ypres; many suffocated -- and the Soldiers found a quick battlefield remedy: holding a urine soaked cloth to their face to counteract the chlorine. John Scott Haldane, a scottish medical researcher, immediately undertook the task of developing a gas mask for the allies. Haldane had worked on similar problems before for the mining industry -- in fact - you know his work already - he was the man who came up with the idea of using canaries and other small animals in coal mines to detect odorless, deadly gases. His first invention, called the Black Veil respirator, was simply pads of cotton wrapped in gauze and soaked in a chemical solution. This was a start, but with the increasing density and frequency of gas attacks the technology needed to adapt. And so the box respirator was developed. This turned into an arms race over the course of the war. New and different gases were constantly developed and each demanded new and different kind of protective masks. We’ll explore this subject further in the coming months, but right now - you can learn more about Haldane and his development of the first gas mask by following the link in the podcast notes. Link: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/man-who-invented-first-gas-mask-180963073/ https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/REL31825.002 Articles and Posts The Process Behind Dazzle Ships For articles and posts-- from our rapidly growing website at ww1cc.org - in the news section this week, there is an article about the painstaking process of transforming ordinary ships into those decked out with dazzle camouflage. The idea behind dazzle camo, was for ships to be seen, but seen incorrectly. If paint could be used to distort a ship’s angles, the thinking went, that would make it difficult for the ship to be targeted efficiently. Targeting systems at the time were, of course, the human eye and brain, which easily fall prey to being fooled. But how do you test a given scheme for a given ship? The answer: tiny models. Read more about how the U.S. Navy created a vast library of dazzle-painted miniature ships to protect their real counterparts from torpedoes-- by following the link in the podcast notes. BTW - We just heard that there is a Dazzle cammo painted ship scheduled to visit New York Harbor this summer. We’ll let you know more as those plans firm up! Meanwhile we invite you to follow the link in the podcast notes to read the article. Link: http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/3987-the-painstaking-process-behind-those-wild-wwi-dazzle-naval-paint-jobs.html www.ww1cc.org/news S.S. Tuscania Also another new article posted in the news section of the site this week -- volunteer Caitlin Hamon wrote up the story of the S.S. Tuscania, which encountered some serious trouble 100 years ago this week. On February 5, 1918-- the sun was setting as the Tuscania and her accompanying  British convoy made their way toward the cliffs of Scotland. Shortly before 6 p.m. a huge shock sent a tremor through the entire ship; all the lights went out at once, followed by the explosive sound of shattering glass. There was no question as to what had occurred: the Tuscania had been hit by a torpedo-- and over 2,000 American troops were on board. Read the entire story of the dramatic rescues that followed-- and how the local Scottish communities remember the event and those who were lost-- just   following the link in the podcast notes. link:http://www.worldwar1centennial.org/index.php/communicate/press-media/wwi-centennial-news/3988-ss-tuscania-sinking-by-u-boat-in-1918-kills-200-americans.html The Buzz - WW1 in Social Media Posts And that brings us to the buzz - the centennial of WW1 this week in social media with Katherine Akey - Katherine, what do you have for us this week? Hi Theo! Embarkation The Center for Military History has a wonderful website about the WW1 Era. This week, we shared a unique page from that website all about embarkation from the US and what awaited troops once they arrived in Europe. It’s a very thorough page filled with maps, lists of materiel being shipped alongside the troops, and photos of the embarkation camps. Troops were continually being shipped out from the states all through 1918, and you can follow their journey from the harbors of the east coast to the training camps in France by visiting the link in the podcast notes. link:https://history.army.mil/html/bookshelves/resmat/wwi/pt02/ch12/pt02-ch12-sec01.html How did Gavrilo Princip feel? Lastly for the week, we shared a post from the “AskHistorians” subreddit. The question being posed: How did Gavrilo Pincip feel about the war he helped start? Princip lived to see most of the war, but not the end of it, dying of Tuberculosis in April 1918. As utter carnage and destruction swept through Europe, the middle east and Africa, it is a great question to ask; he couldn’t have meant to put into motion the death of millions when he pulled the trigger, could he? As the top response on the question says, “In a word, both Princip, and his conspirators, were unapologetic.” The answer pulls from the notes of a psychologist that conducted interviews with Princip while he was incarcerated, and from Paul Jackson’s book "' Union or Death!': Gavrilo Princip, Young Bosnia, and the Role of 'Sacred Time' in the Dynamics of Nationalist Terrorism". It’s a long but very interesting post, investigating the mind and position of the young man who is often pointed to as the spark that lit the fire of war. Read it at the link in the notes. That’s it this week for the Buzz! link:https://www.reddit.com/r/AskHistorians/comments/7sme6f/how_did_gavrilo_princip_feel_about_the_war_he/?st=JCTMMGCK&sh=f75baa10 Outro Thank you all for listening to another episode of WW1 Centennial News. We want to thank our guests... Dr. Edward Lengel, Military historian and author Mike Shuster, Curator of  the great war project blog RG Head, Retired Air Force brigadier general, fighter pilot, and author Dr. Jeffrey Sammons historian, educator and author Dr. Marjorie DesRosier expert on the history of nursing and author Ed Rachwitz and Scott Govitz, from the 100 Cities/100 Memorials project in Beaverton, Michigan Katherine Akey, the commission’s social media director and line producer for the podcast Special thanks to Eric Marr for his research assistance And I am Theo Mayer - your host. The US World War One Centennial Commission was created by Congress to honor, commemorate and educate about WW1. Our programs are to-- inspire a national conversation and awareness about WW1; this podcast is a part of that…. Thank you! We are bringing the lessons of the 100 years ago into today's classrooms; We are helping to restore WW1 memorials in communities of all sizes across our country; and of course we are building America’s National WW1 Memorial in Washington DC. We want to thank commission’s founding sponsor the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and the Starr foundation for their support. The podcast can be found on our website at ww1cc.org/cn   on  iTunes and google play at ww1 Centennial News, and on Amazon Echo or other Alexa enabled devices. Just say: Alexa: Play W W One Centennial News Podcast. Our twitter and instagram handles are both @ww1cc and we are on facebook @ww1centennial. Thank you for joining us. And don’t forget to share the stories you are hearing here today about the war that changed the world! [music] Attaboy - you doughboy! So long!
January 26, 2018
Highlights 100 Years ago: About President Woodrow Wilson | @01:45 Special Guest: John Milton Cooper Jr. | @07:45 War in The Sky: Introducing General Billy Mitchell | @15:45 American Emerges: Baseball on the Polo Grounds - Dr. Edward Lengel | @16:40 European view of the war: Mike Shuster | @22:10 Special Commemorative Coin and Service Medallion Collector Sets | @27:05 A Century In The Making: Joe Weishaar | @28:25 Speaking WWI: Acronym flips RAMC and REPS | @34:25 Spotlight In The Media: Director Peter Jackson | @35:45 100C/100M: The City of Nitro, West Virginia - Rich Hively and Mayor Dave Casebolt | @38:50 WW1 War Tech: Tankgewehr - David O’Neal | @44:45 The Buzz: Social Media - Katherine Akey | @51:05 ----more---- Opening Welcome to World War 1 centennial News - episode #56 - It’s about WW1 THEN - what was happening 100 years ago this week  - and it’s about WW1 NOW - news and updates about the centennial and the commemoration. Today is January 26th, 2018 and our guests for this week include: John Milton Cooper Jr. giving deeper insight into President Woodrow Wilson Dr. Ed Lengel, with our new segment: America Emerges - Military stories from WWI Mike Shuster, from the great war project blog looking at growing discontent in Europe Joe Weishaar in our “A century in the Making” - an Eagle Scout’s perspective Rich Hively and Mayor Dave Casebolt from the WW1 memorial restoration effort in Nitro, West Virginia David O’Neal and the restoration of a WW1 anti-tank gun And Katherine Akey, with some selections from the centennial of WWI in social media All that and more --- this week -- on WW1 Centennial News -- which is brought to you by the U.S. World War I Centennial Commission, the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and the Starr foundation. I’m Theo Mayer - the Chief Technologist for the Commission and your host. Welcome to the show. [MUSIC] Preface [MUSIC] Woodrow Wilson - an academic and learned man, president of Princeton University from 1902 to 1910 - a progressive Democrat seeking and winning the governorship of New Jersey - then running for and being elected to his first term as president of the United states in 1912 - two years before war broke out in Europe… His progressive agenda and accomplishments in his first term are near legendary. His personal life is equally dynamic, losing his first wife to illness in 1914, and barely more than a year later - re-marrying while still in office. By his second term campaign in 1916 - the war in Europe was in full swing, the Germans had sunk the Lusitania, and Wilson ran for office on a platforms of “America First” - and “He kept us out of the war”. Within months of being sworn in to a second term, he leads the nation to war and into an unprecedented transformation, politically, legally, economically, socially and  Internationally. Wilson takes broad powers and wields sledge hammer transformations, nationalizes industries, quashes freedoms, and when congress does not do his bidding, used executive orders to move the nation into the war effort. Earlier this month 100 years ago, Wilson presents an agenda for a new international world order - instantly thrusting America into a new role as a world leader. With that as an overview, let’s jump into our wayback machine and go back 100 years to the third week of January 1918 in the war that changed the world! World War One THEN 100 Year Ago This Week [MUSIC SOUND EFFECT TRANSITION] It is mid-january 1918. With the Wilson administration ruling as much as governing - some seek to depose his power. Once such incident takes place this week.   [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline: January 20, 1918 A headline in the New York Times reads: War Cabinet Bill Ready For Senate; To give control to council of three… Backing Chamberlain’s Stand - Senate Military Committee Demands Reorganization of War work… This is what is happening…. Oregon’s Democratic Senator George Earle Chamberlain, who serves on the Senate Military Affairs Committee,  makes a speech in New York and states: “the military establishment of America has fallen down because of inefficiency in every bureau and department of the government of the United States... “ And he introduces a bill into the Senate that would retake the powers of the executive and the cabinet back into the legislative branch - specifically the Senate. The White House and the Wilson Administration fires back... [SOUND EFFECT] Dateline: January 22, 1918 From the headline of the Official Bulletin  - The government’s war gazette published by George Creel at the order of the President. President Wilson Answers Criticism by Senator Chamberlain Concerning Departmental Management of War - Claims he was not consulted on proposed legislation And the story includes: "When the President's attention was called to the speech made by Senator Chamberlain at a luncheon in New York on Saturday, he immediately inquired of Senator Chamberlain whether he had been correctly reported, and upon ascertaining from the Senator that he had been, the President felt it his duty to make the following statement:" [WILSON] Senator Chamberlain's statement as to the present inaction and ineffectiveness of the Government is an astonishing and absolutely unjustifiable distortion of the truth. As a matter of fact, the War Department has performed a task of unparallelled magnitude and difficulty with extraordinary promptness and efficiency. There have been delays and disappointments and partial miscarriages of plans, all of which have been drawn into the foreground and exaggerated by the investigations which have been in progress since the Congress assembled-investigators --- these drew indispensable officials of the department constantly away from their work and officers from their commands and contributed a great deal to such delay and confusion as had inevitably arisen. But, by comparison with what has been accomplished, these things, much as they were to be regretted, were Insignificant, and no mistake has been made which has been repeated. President Wilson closes with: My association and constant conference with the secretary of War have tought me to regard him as one of the ablest public officials I have ever known. It will soon be learned whether HE or his critics understand the business at hand. To say, as Senator Chamberlain did, that there is inefficiency in every department and bureau of the Government is to show such ignorance of actual conditions as to make it impossible to attach any importance to his statement. I am bound to infer that the statement sprang out of opposition to the administration's whole policy rather than out of any serious intention to reform its practice. John cooper interview President Woodrow Wilson is truly one of the most remarkable leaders this nation has had. In order to help us get to know him better we have invited John Milton Cooper Jr, an American historian, author, educator, and Former Senior Scholar at the Wilson Center to speak with us today. Welcome, John! [greetings] [Q1: John, Woodrow Wilson is considered one of the greatest American President ever - Was he? And why? ] [Q2: setup John.. Wilson seems like a bundles of contrasting ideas - He campaigns to keep America out of war - but then leads a declaration of war and fields on of the most intense war build ups and efforts in our history. He wants America to fight for freedom and liberty as he nationalized industries, gags dissent and attacks freedom of speech. ============= Q: How do all these contrasting ideas reconcile? ==============] [Q3: This is a man who had a huge effect on the nation and indeed on the world - what would you say his most remarkable achievement was as a President?] [Q4: As we hear the ongoing story of WWI on this podcast, what else should be understand about Wilson to help us keep it all --- and him in context?] [goodbyes] John Milton Cooper Jr is an American historian, author, and educator. Links to his biography of President Wilson and to the Wilson Center are in the podcast notes. Link: https://www.wilsoncenter.org/person/john-milton-cooper https://www.amazon.com/Woodrow-Wilson-John-Milton-Cooper/dp/0307277909 http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9F0CEED7133FE433A25752C2A9679C946996D6CF http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9F02E2D6133FE433A25751C2A9679C946996D6CF http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9B02E3DF103FE433A25757C2A9679C946996D6CF http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=950CEEDF103FE433A25756C2A9679C946996D6CF http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9505E1D8143AEF33A25754C2A9679C946996D6CF http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9E02E1D8143AEF33A25754C2A9679C946996D6CF http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=9A07E4D7143AEF33A25754C2A9679C946996D6CF War in the Sky This week in War in the sky - we want to introduce you to General Billy Mitchell… a pretty extraordinary man. As World War 1 broke out, Billy Mitchell recognized the importance of aviation.  So in 1916, he learned to fly on his own nickel.  Heading to Europe, On January 20, 1918, Mitchell, now a Colonel - was promoted to Chief of the Air Service of the First Army. Colonel Mitchell found himself in command of more than 1,500 British, French and American aircraft - the largest "air force" ever assembled.   We will learn more about this leader and flyer over the coming months - a man who became the chief of air services this month 100 years ago in the war in the sky. See the podcast notes to learn more. Link: http://www.mitchellgallery.org/gen-mitchell/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billy_Mitchell https://www.airspacemag.com/history-of-flight/the-billy-mitchell-court-martial-136828592/ https://www.army.mil/article/33680/william_billy_mitchell_the_father_of_the_united_states_air_force America Emerges: Military Stories from WW1 Welcome to the second installment of our new series: America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI --- with Military Historian, author and storyteller, Dr. Edward Lengel. Hi Ed [Exchange greeting] Ed - Your story this weeks rolls us back to September 1917 when America celebrated National Draft Day - the draft not being the most popular new law of the land - In New York there was a baseball game. We look forward to hearing the story! [ED LENGEL] Ed.. What are you going to tell us about next week? [ED LENGEL] Ed Lengel is an American military historian, author, and our new segment host for America Emerges: Military Stories from WWI. There are links in the podcast notes to Ed’s post about baseball? and his website as an author. Links:http://www.edwardlengel.com/doughboys-baseball-classic-game-polo-grounds-1917/ https://www.facebook.com/EdwardLengelAuthor/ http://www.edwardlengel.com/about/ [SOUND EFFECT] Great War Project Mike: Your story this week is about how the war is being considered in Europe as we roll into 1918. What is the headline? [MIKE POST] Mike Shuster from the Great War Project blog. LINK: http://greatwarproject.org/2018/01/21/americans-now-in-german-gun-sites/ [SOUND EFFECT] The Great War Channel For videos on WWI go see our friends at  “The Great War Channel” on Youtube. This week’s new episodes include Assassination attempt on Lenin Central powers occupation of Italy British Pistols of WW1 And finally - Road Trips 2018 Next month, we have invited the host of The Great Wall Channel, Indy Neidell to join us and talk about how hosting this youtube channel for the past 4+ years has affected him… Meanwhile - Follow the link in the podcast notes or search for “the great war” on youtube. Link: https://www.youtube.com/user/TheGreatWar World War One NOW It is time to fast forward into the present with WW1 Centennial News NOW - [SOUND EFFECT] this section is not about history, but rather - it explores what is happening NOW to commemorate the centennial of the War that changed the world! Commission News: Collective Sets In commission news: As we mentioned last week, the US mint has released a special 2018 WWI commemorative silver dollar - but also -- they created WWI service medallions commemorating the five military branches that fought in WWI - The Army, the Navy, The Marine Corps, the brand new Air Corps - later to become the Airforce, and the Coast Guard. These five special collector sets of Commemorative Silver Dollar and Service  medallions are being minted in very limited quantities and the only time in history - ever - that you will be able to buy them is between RIGHT NOW and February 20th, 2018… So you have less than a month to snag a piece of history with a collectors set - get one, get all five, but get them now. Go to WW1CC.org/coin that is / c o i n… or click on the link in the podcast notes. If you are listening to this podcast, clearly you already have some interest or connection to the centennial of WWI - this is the remembrance of this centennial you will want to keep and pass on to the next generation. But you have to do it NOW. link:www.ww1cc.org/Coin https://catalog.usmint.gov/coins/commemoratives/ A century in the making - America’s WW1 Memorial in Washington DC It’s time for our new 2018 segment: A century in the making - America’s WW1 Memorial in Washington DC. As our regular listeners know, we are building a national WWI Memorial at Pershing Park in the nation’s capitol. It’s a big project. It’s complicated. It’s hard. It’s been a long time coming. So in this segment we are bringing you along on an insider’s journey that explores this grand undertaking, the adventure, and the people behind it. Joe Weishaar - is our brilliant young visionary, who won the international design competition for this memorial -- He is also an Eagle Scout… a designation that just predates WWI. In fact, it turns out that the first Eagle Scout award was given to scout Arthur Rose Eldred in 1912. Now - Eldred actually goes on to join the Navy during WW1. He serves on convoys in the Atlantic and on a submarine chaser in the Mediterranean, surviving both a sinking ship and the Spanish Flu. Last week, Joe spoke at the Boy Scout’s annual midwest regional fundraiser. As an Eagle Scout himself, Joe helps us continue to strengthen the connection between the Boy Scouts and WW1. Welcome, Joe! [greetings] [Joe: when you spoke at the event last week - was it scouts, scout leadership or others? Who was the audience?] [How were you and your story received? [Joe: Do you think that your scouting experience influenced you or prepared you in entering and ultimately prevailing and winning the international design competition for the National WWI Memorial?] [Do you think the scouts are aware of the connections of scouting and WWI?] Something interesting came up this week in our research about WWI 100 years ago… Let me read you an excerpt from the January 21st, 1918 issue of the New York Times… The headline reads: WAR TASK FOR BOY SCOUTS Will Be Dispatch Bearers for Public Information Committee And the story reads: President Wilson has sent the following letter to Colin H. Livingstone, President of the Scout’s National Council: My Dear Mr. Livingstone: I desire to entrust the Boy Scouts of America with a new and important commission - to make them the government dispatch bearers in carrying to the homes of their community the pamphlets on the war prepared by the committee for Public Information. The excellent services performed by the Boy Scouts in the past encourage