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October 15, 2019
This week, we’re producing episodes of “The Daily” from The New York Times’s Washington bureau.  The impeachment inquiry is entering a pivotal phase as Congress returns from recess. The White House’s strategy to block the investigation is beginning to crumble, with five administration officials set to testify before House investigators. On Monday, those committees heard testimony about why the president removed the longtime ambassador, Marie L. Yovanovitch, just two months before the call in which he asked the Ukrainian president for a favor. Today, we look at how Ms. Yovanovitch ended up at the center of the impeachment process.  Guests: Sharon LaFraniere, an investigative reporter based in Washington, and Rachel Quester and Clare Toeniskoetter, producers for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background coverage: Marie L. Yovanovitch told House investigators that she was removed from office on the basis of “false claims by people with clearly questionable motives.” The effort to pressure Ukraine so alarmed John Bolton, then the national security adviser, that he told an aide to alert White House lawyers. “Giuliani’s a hand grenade who’s going to blow everybody up,” an aide quoted him as saying of President Trump’s personal lawyer.
October 14, 2019
Turkey has invaded Kurdish-controlled territory in Syria, upending a fragile peace in the region and inciting sectarian bloodshed. The Trump administration has ordered a full evacuation of the 1,000 American troops that remain in northeastern Syria, leaving Gen. Mazloum Kobani Abdi and his Kurdish forces to rely on Russia and Syria for military assistance.   Who are the Kurds? How is it that Kurdish fighters came to be seen as allies to the United States and terrorists to Turkey? And what would the fall of Kurdish territory in northeastern Syria mean for the region? Guest: Ben Hubbard, Beirut bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background coverage: Turkey’s invasion upended a fragile peace and risks enabling the resurgence of the Islamic State.American troops who fought alongside Kurdish allies have expressed regret after the U.S. abandoned posts in northeastern Syria. “It’s a stain on the American conscience,” one Army officer said.
October 12, 2019
Today on “The Daily,” we present Episode 5, Part 2 of “1619,” a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast. The Provosts, a family of sugar-cane farmers in Louisiana, had worked the same land for generations. When it became harder and harder to keep hold of that land, June Provost and his wife, Angie, didn’t know why — and then a phone call changed their understanding of everything. In the finale of “1619,” we hear the rest of June and Angie’s story, and its echoes in a past case that led to the largest civil rights settlement in American history. Guests: June and Angie Provost; Adizah Eghan and Annie Brown, producers for “1619”; and Khalil Gibran Muhammad, a professor of history, race and public policy at Harvard University and the author of “The Condemnation of Blackness.” Background reading:“The number of black sugar-cane farmers in Louisiana is most likely in the single digits,” Khalil Gibran Muhammad writes in his essay on the history of the American sugar industry. “They are the exceedingly rare exceptions to a system designed to codify black loss.”The “1619” audio series is part of The 1619 Project, a major initiative from The Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. Read more from the project here.
October 11, 2019
A seven-word tweet in support of Hong Kong’s antigovernment protests by Daryl Morey, general manager of the Houston Rockets, triggered a furor in both China and the United States. The ensuing controversy revealed the unspoken rules of doing business with Beijing. Guest: Jim Yardley, the Europe editor of The New York Times and author of “Brave Dragons: A Chinese Basketball Team, an American Coach, and Two Cultures Clashing.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background coverage: An exhibition game between the Los Angeles Lakers and the Brooklyn Nets in Shanghai this week was nearly canceled because of China’s dispute with the league. At the game, even longtime fans said they would choose patriotism over the N.B.A.President Trump declined to criticize China’s handling of the controversy, instead opting to publicly condemn two basketball coaches who have spoken out against him in the past.
October 10, 2019
The White House response to the impeachment inquiry has been to dismiss the allegations, deflect the facts and discredit the Democrats. It’s the same approach that Republicans used in 2018 to push through the Supreme Court nomination of Brett M. Kavanaugh. The New York Times reporters Kate Kelly and Robin Pogrebin, the authors of “The Education of Brett Kavanaugh,” talk to the Republican strategist who wrote the political playbook used — then and now. Guest: Kate Kelly, a reporter for The Times covering Wall Street and Robin Pogrebin, a reporter on The Times’s Culture Desk, spoke to Mike Davis, a Republican strategist. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background coverage: The White House’s declaration of war against the House impeachment inquiry this week has set the stage for a constitutional clash with far-reaching consequences.Mr. Davis crafted a “brass knuckles” approach to help confirm conservative Supreme Court justices.Here’s the latest on the impeachment inquiry.
October 9, 2019
Days after moderate House Democrats announced they would support an impeachment inquiry against President Trump, a recess began and they returned home to their swing districts. Now they would face their constituents. Congresswoman Elissa Slotkin of Michigan went to three town halls last week. We went with her. Guest: Representative Elissa Slotkin, Democrat of Michigan. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background coverage:Democrats face a tricky balancing act in battleground districts: protecting political gains from 2018 while selling voters on an inquiry into the president.
October 8, 2019
President Trump vowed to withdraw United States troops from the Syrian border with Turkey. But such a move could harm one of America’s most loyal partners in the Middle East, the Kurds, who have been crucial to fighting the Islamic State. Guest: Eric Schmitt, who covers terrorism and national security for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background coverage: President Trump’s announcement raised fears that he was giving Turkey the go-ahead to move against Kurdish forces in northern Syria.The American pullback could create a void in the region that could benefit Iran, Russia and the Islamic State.American troops have “operated between two allies: Turkey and the Kurds,” our colleagues write in a news analysis. “The problem for Washington has been that the two hate each other.”
October 7, 2019
The House Democrats leading the impeachment inquiry of President Trump called their first witness: Kurt Volker, a top American diplomat involved in the negotiations with Ukraine. We look at what Mr. Volker’s testimony — and the text messages he turned over to Congress — revealed about the inquiry’s direction. Guest: Julian E. Barnes, who covers national security for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background coverage: A text exchange appears to show a dispute among American diplomats over whether President Trump was seeking a quid pro quo from Ukraine.A second whistle-blower, said to have firsthand knowledge about the president’s dealings with Ukraine, has come forward.
October 5, 2019
Today on “The Daily,” we present Episode 5, Part 1 of “1619,” a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast. More than a century and a half after the promise of 40 acres and a mule, the story of black land ownership in America remains one of loss and dispossession. June and Angie Provost, who trace their family line to the enslaved workers on Louisiana’s sugar-cane plantations, know this story well. Guests: The Provosts, who spoke with Adizah Eghan and Annie Brown, producers for “1619.” Background reading:The story of the Provosts contains “echoes of the policies and practices that have been used since Reconstruction to maintain the racial caste system that sugar slavery helped create,” Khalil Gibran Muhammad writes in his essay on the history of sugar in the United States.The “1619” audio series is part of The 1619 Project, a major initiative from The Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. Read more from the project here.
October 4, 2019
The investigation of Harvey Weinstein that helped give rise to the #MeToo movement had seemed, for a moment, to unite the country in redefining the rules around sex and power. But as a backlash emerged, the Supreme Court confirmation of Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh became a kind of national trial of the movement. On the one-year anniversary of Judge Kavanaugh’s confirmation, we look at new reporting on the story of the woman at the center of it — Dr. Christine Blasey Ford — and the journey that led to her searing testimony in Washington. Guests: Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, investigative reporters for The New York Times and the authors of “She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background coverage: Last month, several Democratic presidential candidates called for the impeachment of Justice Kavanaugh after The Times published new information about allegations of sexual misconduct against him.
October 3, 2019
In 2018, President Trump hired Rudolph W. Giuliani, his longtime friend and the former New York City mayor, to In 2018, President Trump hired Rudolph W. Giuliani, his longtime friend and the former mayor of New York City, to defend him against the special counsel’s Russia investigation. So how is it that Mr. Giuliani helped get the president entangled in another investigation, this time involving Ukraine?  Our colleague investigated the remarkable behind-the-scenes campaign, encouraged by Mr. Trump and executed by Mr. Giuliani, to gather and disseminate political dirt from a foreign country. Guest: Kenneth P. Vogel, a Washington correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: The story of a shadow foreign policy in Ukraine unfolded against the backdrop of three elections — this year’s vote in Ukraine and the 2016 and 2020 presidential races in the United States.Secretary of State Mike Pompeo confirmed he listened in on the phone call at the center of the impeachment inquiry.Follow our live updates from the investigation in Washington.
October 2, 2019
We spoke with a colleague on the ground about the stark contrasts he has witnessed as a tale of two cities unfolds.
October 1, 2019
Three past American presidents have confronted the possibility that members of their own party would support their impeachment. Only one, Richard M. Nixon, left office because of it, when Republicans eventually abandoned him. But what can we expect this time, in the impeachment inquiry of President Trump?  Guests: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times and an author of “Impeachment: An American History,” in conversation with Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: The impeachment inquiry was prompted by a July call between President Trump and the Ukrainian leader. Details of a second call have now emerged, in which Mr. Trump pressed the Australian prime minister to help investigate the Mueller inquiry’s origins.In a news analysis, Peter Baker explains how preventing foreign influence is one of the oldest issues in America’s democratic experiment.
September 30, 2019
It took just days for a whistle-blower complaint to prompt an impeachment inquiry of President Trump. But it took weeks for the concerns detailed in the complaint to come to light — and they nearly never did. Guest: Julian E. Barnes, who covers national security for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: The Trump administration’s handling of the accusations is certain to be scrutinized by lawmakers.President Trump was repeatedly warned by his own staff that the Ukraine conspiracy theory was “completely debunked.”
September 29, 2019
Nine-year-old Ella was terrified of tornadoes and getting sick. So she did something that was even scarier than her fears: confront them. Guests: Ella Maners and her mother, Katie Maners, and Julia Longoria, a producer for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Ella spent a week at Fear Facers Summer Camp, a day camp in Florida that helps children learn to deal with obsessive-compulsive and anxiety disorders.
September 27, 2019
The whistle-blower complaint at the center of the impeachment inquiry was released on Thursday as the Trump administration official who had declined to turn it over — Joseph Maguire, the acting director of national intelligence — testified before Congress. Here’s the latest from Capitol Hill. Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, the congressional editor for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: The complaint accused President Trump of pressuring Ukraine’s leader to investigate a political rival and alleged that the White House tried to “lock down” the transcript of the call.Here’s what we’ve learned about the whistle-blower.Read a declassified version of the complaint, with annotations, and eight takeaways from the document.
September 26, 2019
The White House released a reconstructed transcript of President Trump’s phone call with Volodymyr Zelensky, the leader of Ukraine. In it, Mr. Trump asks for an investigation into Joseph R. Biden Jr., a potential 2020 rival. We consider what that request means for the impeachment inquiry now underway. Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who covers national security and federal investigations for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Different interpretations of the phone call are shaping a debate over whether the president committed high crimes and misdemeanors.Read the full declassified record of the call, with annotations.Here’s what we know so far about the whistle-blower complaint that set off this controversy.
September 25, 2019
Speaker Nancy Pelosi has begun a formal impeachment investigation of President Trump, saying he “must be held accountable.” We spoke to our colleague who was at the announcement and to one of the lawmakers who helped convince Ms. Pelosi that it was time. Guests: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times, and Representative Mikie Sherrill, Democrat of New Jersey. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Though the outcome is uncertain, the inquiry raises the possibility that Mr. Trump could become only the fourth president in American history to face impeachment.After months of caution from House Democrats, why is this happening now? “They believe the new accusations against Mr. Trump are simple and serious enough to be grasped,” our colleague Carl Hulse writes in a news analysis.Here’s how the impeachment process works.
September 24, 2019
President Trump vowed to crack down on undocumented immigration and empower the Border Patrol. Three years later, the agency is the target of outrage, protest and investigation into its mission and conduct, and many of the agents who have supported Mr. Trump say that morale is low. We spoke with one of them. Guest: Art Del Cueto, a Border Patrol agent in Arizona and vice president of the National Border Patrol Council. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Overwhelmed by desperate migrants and criticized for mistreating those in their care, many agents, whose work has long been viewed as a ticket to the middle class, have grown frustrated and bitter.
September 23, 2019
Over the weekend, reports of a secret whistle-blower complaint against President Trump turned into allegations that the president had courted foreign interference from Ukraine to hurt a leading Democratic rival, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. Mr. Trump called the allegations a “witch hunt” and accused Mr. Biden of corruption. Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who covers national security and federal investigations for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: President Trump acknowledged that he discussed Mr. Biden during a phone call with Ukraine’s president, but he did not directly confirm news reports that he had pressured the foreign leader for an investigation.Here’s what we know about the role of Mr. Biden and his son Hunter in the controversy.
September 20, 2019
With crowds that are said to number 15,000 to 20,000 people, Senator Elizabeth Warren’s campaign events frequently dwarf those of her Democratic rivals. This week, we experienced the growing phenomenon that is the Warren rally. Guest: Thomas Kaplan, a political reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Ms. Warren, running on a message of sweeping change, is solidifying her place in an exclusive club of presidential candidates who have become crowd magnets.At her campaign events, Ms. Warren’s speech is only the first act. Act Two? The selfie line.Back-to-back rallies by Ms. Warren and President Trump laid out competing versions of populism that could come to define the 2020 presidential campaign.
September 19, 2019
In Part 1 of this series, our colleagues Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey reported on Lisa Bloom, a victims’ rights attorney who used her experience representing women to defend Harvey Weinstein. In Part 2, we look at the role of Ms. Bloom’s mother, the women’s rights lawyer Gloria Allred.  Guests: Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, investigative reporters for The New York Times and the authors of “She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.
September 18, 2019
Last week, our colleagues Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey published a book documenting their investigation of Harvey Weinstein. In writing it, they discovered information about two feminist icons — Gloria Allred and her daughter, Lisa Bloom — that raises questions about their legacies and the legal system in which they’ve worked. Today, we look at the role of Ms. Bloom, a lawyer who represented Mr. Weinstein.  Guests: Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, investigative reporters for The New York Times and the authors of “She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: New reporting in “She Said” shows how some figures who have presented themselves as allies of victims have helped maintain their silence — and, in some cases, profited from it.Read more about Ms. Bloom’s involvement in the Weinstein case.
September 17, 2019
President Trump is saying that Iran appears to be responsible for the weekend attacks on oil facilities in Saudi Arabia. We look at where things are likely to go from here. Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: President Trump said that the United States was prepared for war if necessary, but that he would “like to avoid” a military conflict with Iran.Mr. Trump’s response to the attacks offered insight into his deference to the Saudi royal family.
September 16, 2019
Last week, CNN broke the story that the United States had secretly extracted a top spy from Russia in 2017. What does that mean now for American intelligence operations? Guest: Julian E. Barnes, who covers national security for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: The Moscow informant was instrumental to the C.I.A.’s conclusion that President Vladimir V. Putin had ordered and orchestrated Russia’s election interference campaign.
September 14, 2019
Today on “The Daily,” we present Episode 4 of “1619,” a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast. Black Americans were denied access to doctors and hospitals for decades. From the shadows of this exclusion, they pushed to create the nation’s first federal health care programs. Guests: Jeneen Interlandi, a member of The New York Times’s editorial board and a writer for The Times Magazine, and Yaa Gyasi, the author of “Homegoing.” Background reading:“One hundred and fifty years after the freed people of the South first petitioned the government for basic medical care, the United States remains the only high-income country in the world where such care is not guaranteed to every citizen,” Jeneen Interlandi writes.The Times Magazine asked 16 writers to bring pivotal moments in African-American history to life. Read Yaa Gyasi’s story “Bad Blood” here.The “1619” audio series is part of The 1619 Project, a major initiative from The Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. Read more from the project here.
September 13, 2019
Just 10 candidates qualified for the stage in Houston, but that didn’t change some recurring themes: Joe Biden was again the target of fierce scrutiny, and health care was a central point of contention. But what else did we learn? Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Attacks on Mr. Biden highlighted the divide over the Obama legacy, with the former vice president repeatedly invoking his old boss’s name.Many Democrats hoped that defeating an unpopular, rampaging president would be relatively simple. But party officials are wary of some potential vulnerabilities that this debate re-emphasized.Here are six takeaways from the contest.
September 12, 2019
Andrew Yang, a former tech executive, remains one of the least known candidates in a Democratic presidential field that includes senators, mayors, a governor and a former vice president. But by focusing on the potential impact of automation on jobs, he has attracted surprisingly loyal and passionate support. One of our technology writers has been following his campaign since before it officially began. Guests: Andrew Yang, a candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination; and Kevin Roose, who writes about technology for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Armed with numbers, history lessons and the occasional self-deprecating joke, Mr. Yang has been preaching a grim gospel about automation. And voters are responding.The top 10 Democrats will share one stage for the first time starting at 8 p.m. Eastern. Here’s what to watch for.
September 11, 2019
John Bolton, the national security adviser, was ousted after fundamental disputes with President Trump over how to handle foreign policy challenges like Afghanistan, Iran and North Korea. But the two men disagreed about how they parted ways. Guest: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:President Trump said he fired John Bolton; Mr. Bolton insisted that he had resigned. Regardless, they had a fundamental disagreement over foreign policy, most recently Afghanistan.Mr. Trump is now looking for the fourth national security adviser of his presidency. Here is a short list of possibilities.
September 10, 2019
President Trump abruptly called off negotiations between the United States and the Taliban that could have ended the war in Afghanistan and canceled a secret meeting at Camp David. We look at how a historic peace deal went off the rails. Guest: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:The United States and the Taliban, after nine rounds of painstaking negotiations in Doha, Qatar, appeared to have ironed out most of the issues between them. But President Trump canceled a secret meeting at Camp David and called off the talks.What jarred many Afghans was how a single attack and the death of one American, cited by Mr. Trump, could upend 10 months of negotiations.
September 9, 2019
In a battle over what kind of democracy would prevail in Britain, Prime Minister Boris Johnson seemed to have gained the upper hand by cutting Parliament out of Brexit. Until last week. Guest: Mark Landler. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: In Washington, scarcely a handful of Republicans have stood up to President Trump. In comparison, Prime Minister Boris Johnson has found lawmakers in his Conservative Party to be much more rebellious.Mr. Johnson has received messages of support from President Trump, and there are some obvious parallels in the rise of the two leaders. But the “bromance” between Mr. Johnson and Mr. Trump is more complex than it might seem.Mr. Johnson’s chief aide, Dominic Cummings, who appeared to revel in the feud with Parliament, has become a lightning rod for criticism of the government’s strategy.
September 7, 2019
Today on “The Daily,” we present Episode 3 of “1619,” a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast. Black music, forged in captivity, became the sound of complete artistic freedom. It also became the sound of America. Guest: Wesley Morris, a critic-at-large for The New York Times. This episode contains explicit language. Background reading: “The proliferation of black music across the planet — the proliferation, in so many senses, of being black — constitutes a magnificent joke on American racism,” Wesley Morris writes.The “1619” audio series is part of The 1619 Project, a major initiative from The Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. Read more from the project here.
September 6, 2019
For almost two decades, the United States and Israel have tried to stop Iran from developing nuclear weapons. Israeli leaders — including the current prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu — have pushed for a military strike on Iran, a prospect that American presidents have long opposed. But a Times investigation reveals a secret history that shows how close the three countries came to war. Guest: Mark Mazzetti, a Washington investigative correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Interviews with dozens of current and former American, Israeli and European officials over several months reveal the startling details of a narrowly averted war and raise questions about how President Trump will respond.Moving further away from the 2015 nuclear agreement, Iran said on  Thursday that it had stopped honoring the deal’s limits on research and development.
September 5, 2019
A month after a gunman killed 22 people at a Walmart store in El Paso, the nation’s largest retailer, said that it would stop selling ammunition used for handguns and military-style weapons and call on Congress to consider a new ban on assault rifles. We look at what Walmart’s move means, and how corporate America could play a role in curbing the epidemic of gun violence. Guest: Andrew Ross Sorkin, a financial columnist for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Walmart, whose reach has reshaped communities nationwide, largely avoids publicly wading into politics. That made its decision to limit ammunition sales even more notable.The move by Doug McMillon, Walmart’s chief executive, “to engage in a meaningful conversation about responsible gun sales in America could give license to other business leaders to enter the conversation,” Andrew Ross Sorkin writes. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.
September 4, 2019
The Democratic presidential race has entered a phase that is specifically designed to reward front-runners and push out lesser-known candidates. We look at how that will influence the campaign. Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background coverage: Which candidates are leading the Democratic primary? Here’s a look at the state of the race.Listen to an episode of “The Daily” about the intended and unintended consequences of the Democratic National Committee’s new debate qualifying rules.
September 3, 2019
After months of negotiations in Qatar, the United States appeared to have reached an agreement with the Taliban that could take a step to end America’s longest-running war. We spoke with our colleague about what he learned while covering the peace talks. Guest: Mujib Mashal, a senior correspondent for The New York Times based in Afghanistan. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background coverage: The American special envoy who led talks with the Taliban said that the United States had reached an agreement “in principle” with the Afghan insurgents, but that final approval rested with President Trump.
August 31, 2019
Today on “The Daily,” we present Episode 2 of “1619,” a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast. The institution of slavery turned a poor, fledgling nation into a financial powerhouse, and the cotton plantation was America’s first big business. Behind the system, and built into it, was the whip. Guests: Matthew Desmond, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine and the author of “Evicted,” and Jesmyn Ward, the author of “Sing, Unburied, Sing.” This episode includes scenes of graphic violence. Background reading:“As the large slave-labor camps grew increasingly efficient, enslaved black people became America’s first modern workers,” Matthew Desmond writes.The “1619” audio series is part of The 1619 Project, a major initiative from The Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. Read more from the project here.
August 30, 2019
Two battles over the meaning of democracy are now playing out in Europe. We look at the political power maneuvers this week in Britain and Italy. Guest: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background coverage: Facing a furious backlash over his decision to suspend Parliament next month, Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain promised to speed up Brexit negotiations with Brussels.In Italy, two political parties that had been sworn political enemies struck a deal to form a new government that sidelined Matteo Salvini, the hard-right leader.Listen to “The Battle for Europe,” a series from “The Daily” with Katrin Bennhold about the future of liberal democracy in the European Union.
August 29, 2019
Uber transformed American transportation and changed the United States economy. But a decade after its founding, the once-swaggering company is losing more money and growing more slowly than ever. What happened? Guest: Mike Isaac, a technology reporter for The New York Times and the author of “Super Pumped: The Battle for Uber.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background coverage: The Uber of 2019 displays little of the braggadocio of its past, and competitors and critics are moving in.
August 28, 2019
More than 26,000 fires have been recorded inside the Amazon rainforest in August alone, leading to global calls for action. But Brazil’s government has told the rest of the world to mind its own business. Guest: Ernesto Londoño, the Brazil bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background coverage: Brazil began a military operation to battle the fires after European leaders threatened to cancel a trade deal and calls to boycott Brazilian products spread on social media.In many parts of Brazil, there is strong support for President Jair Bolsonaro’s Amazon policy, which prioritizes economic development over environmental protections.Here’s what we know about the fires.
August 27, 2019
At the Group of 7 summit in France, President Trump seemed determined to prove that he can wage a trade war with China without hurting the economy. But there are already signs of distress. Guest: Peter S. Goodman, an economics correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background coverage: President Trump can confront China or expand the economy, but he can’t do both at the same time, our economics correspondent writes in a news analysis.Mr. Trump shifted his tone on the trade war yet again on Monday, calling President Xi Jinping of China a “great leader” three days after branding him an “enemy.”
August 26, 2019
This episode contains descriptions of sexual assault.  Nearly a decade before any police investigation into Jeffrey Epstein’s predatory actions toward young girls, two sisters came forward to say they had been lured in and abused by the financier and his companion, Ghislaine Maxwell. Now that he’s dead, the sisters are wrestling with what might have happened if someone had listened. Guests: Mike Baker, a national correspondent for The New York Times, spoke with Maria and Annie Farmer, and shared their story with Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background coverage: The Farmer sisters spoke to The Times about their accusations, offering a look at how Mr. Epstein, who killed himself in prison this month, managed to avoid significant scrutiny for years.
August 23, 2019
Four hundred years ago, in August 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in the British colony of Virginia. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the 250 years of slavery that followed.  “1619,” a New York Times audio series, examines the long shadow of that fateful moment. Today, instead of our usual show, we present Episode 1: “The Fight for a True Democracy.” Host: Nikole Hannah-Jones, who writes for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  This episode includes scenes of graphic violence. Background reading:“Without the idealistic, strenuous and patriotic efforts of black Americans, our democracy today would most likely look very different — it might not be a democracy at all,” Nikole Hannah-Jones writes.The “1619” audio series is part of The 1619 Project, a major initiative from The Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. Read more from the project here.
August 22, 2019
Song playlists at presidential campaign rallies can be about more than music — they can reflect a candidate’s values, political platform, identity and target audience. We examine the role of these playlists in the 2020 campaign. Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:The Times analyzed playlists used by nine Democratic candidates and President Trump to see how they help set the tone for each campaign. Turn your sound on.
August 21, 2019
For decades, American corporations have prized profits for shareholders above all else. Now, the country’s most powerful chief executives say it’s time to do things differently. What’s driving that change? Guest: Andrew Ross Sorkin, a financial columnist for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Almost 200 chief executives, including the leaders of Apple, Pepsi and Walmart, argued that companies must invest in employees, protect the environment and deliver value to customers.Shareholder democracy seemed like a good idea at the time, but it hasn’t worked, Andrew Ross Sorkin writes in his latest column.
August 20, 2019
Al Franken resigned from the Senate more than 18 months ago over allegations of sexual harassment. New reporting about those allegations has revived the debate over whether the Democratic Party — particularly senators currently seeking the presidency — moved too fast in calling for him to step down. In an interview, one of those senators, Kirsten Gillibrand, says absolutely not. Guest: Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, a New York Democrat and 2020 presidential candidate. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Ms. Gillibrand’s stance on Mr. Franken’s departure has come up persistently during her struggling presidential campaign.Our colleague Lisa Lerer interviewed Ms. Gillibrand for the On Politics newsletter.
August 19, 2019
The New York Times investigated how Cordelia Scaife May, an heiress to the Mellon family’s banking and industrial fortune, used her wealth to sow the seeds of the modern anti-immigration movement — and of Trump administration policy. Guests: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The Times, spoke with Nicholas Kulish, who covers immigration issues. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Newly unearthed documents show how an environmental-minded socialite became a nativist whose vision for strictly limiting immigration has, in many ways, reached a culmination in the Trump presidency.Groups that Mrs. May funded shared policy proposals with the Trump campaign, sent staff members to join the administration and have close ties to Stephen Miller, the architect of the president’s immigration agenda.
August 16, 2019
At least seven people were killed by a mysterious explosion in northern Russia, and U.S. officials believe it happened during the test of a prototype for a nuclear-propelled cruise missile. President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia has hailed the weapon as the centerpiece of Moscow’s arms race with the United States — but what will this mean for an arms race that both countries want to win? Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Intelligence officials suspect the blast involved a prototype known as Skyfall, a missile that Mr. Putin has boasted can reach any corner of the earth and evade American missile defenses.As the death toll has risen from the explosion, Russia’s silence and contradictory accounts have conjured dark memories of Chernobyl.
August 15, 2019
Under international pressure, China has said it has released a vast majority of the Muslim Uighurs it had placed in detention camps. We follow up with an American citizen who says the Chinese government cannot be trusted, and find out how Beijing’s propaganda machine has responded to his efforts to protect a relative who was detained. If you missed the previous interview, listen to it here. Guest: Paul Mozur, a technology reporter for The New York Times based in Shanghai, spoke with Ferkat Jawdat, a Uighur and American citizen who lives in Virginia. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Reporters from The Times found, over seven days of traveling through the Xinjiang region, that the vast network of detention camps erected by the government of China’s authoritarian leader, Xi Jinping, continues to operate, and even expand.China’s most recent campaign echoes tactics used by other countries, principally Russia, to inundate domestic and international audiences with bursts of information, propaganda, and in some cases, outright disinformation.
August 14, 2019
Protesters have flooded Hong Kong’s airport, paralyzing operations and escalating tensions between the semiautonomous territory and Beijing. The protesters are trying to send a message to government officials — and to people in mainland China. Guest: Javier C. Hernández, a New York Times correspondent based in Beijing. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:Demonstrations led the airport, one of the world’s busiest, to suspend check-ins for two days in a row this week, causing hundreds of flight cancellations. On Wednesday, some protesters apologized for the disruption.The unrest is exposing the inherent conflict in Hong Kong’s political system since China reclaimed the territory from Britain in 1997: an effort to unite Beijing’s authoritarianism with civil liberties.Here’s a guide to what prompted the Hong Kong protests, and a look at how they have evolved.
August 13, 2019
Federal prosecutors were confident that, this time, justice would be served in the case of Jeffrey Epstein. What happens to the case against him now that he is dead?  Guest: Benjamin Weiser, an investigative criminal justice reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:Despite Jeffrey Epstein's death, the criminal investigation that led to the sex-trafficking charges continues. Prosecutors will focus on those who may have aided him.At Mr. Epstein’s Palm Beach home, it was hard for workers to miss what was happening, with about 100 masseuses seen there at various times.
August 12, 2019
Since Democrats retook the House last November, the world has come to know the progressive and divisive vision of four freshmen congresswomen known as “the squad.” But it was moderates — less well-known and laser-focused on common ground between Democrats and Republicans — who were responsible for flipping seats and winning back the House. Today, we meet a moderate Democrat who offers a competing vision of the party ahead of the 2020 election.  Guests: Representative Mikie Sherrill, Democrat of New Jersey; Kate Zernike, a political reporter for The New York Times; and Lisa Chow and Rachel Quester, producers for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Disconnects between liberal and moderate House Democrats have exploded into public view at critical moments during their seven months in power.The two rounds of Democratic presidential debates showcased divisions over ideology and identity in a party that appears united only in its desire to defeat President Trump.
August 9, 2019
India has guaranteed a degree of autonomy to the people of Kashmir, a disputed territory between India and Pakistan, since 1947. Why did India unilaterally erase that autonomy this week? Guest: Jeffrey Gettleman, the South Asia bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: To Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India, eliminating the autonomy of Kashmir was an administrative move. But to his critics, the decision was a blow to India’s democracy and secular identity.On Thursday, Mr. Modi addressed the nation about the decision against a backdrop of rising protests, mass arrests and escalating tensions with Pakistan.Read more about the roots of the crisis and what could happen next.
August 8, 2019
President Trump traveled on Wednesday to Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, where mass shootings killed 31 people. Our colleagues described the scene in both cities. Guests: Mitch Smith, who covers the Midwest for The New York Times, and Michael Crowley, a White House correspondent. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: President Trump began a day set aside for healing in Dayton and El Paso by lashing out at rivals, using the kind of divisive language that prompted protests in both cities even before he arrived.Across El Paso, some residents worried that Mr. Trump’s visit might do more harm than good.
August 7, 2019
In the years before his death, Osama bin Laden seemed to be grooming a successor to lead Al Qaeda: his own son. Here’s what we learned this week about those plans. Guest: Rukmini Callimachi, who covers terrorism for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: The care Osama bin Laden showed his son was not just fatherly, but appears to have been an attempt by the world’s most hunted terrorist to secure his legacy.The United States had a role in the operation that killed Hamza bin Laden, officials said. But other details, including where he died, are unknown.
August 6, 2019
At least three mass shootings this year — including one in El Paso — have been announced in advance on the online message board 8chan, often accompanied by racist writings. We look at the battle over shutting down the site. Guests: Kevin Roose, who writes about technology for The New York Times, spoke with Fredrick Brennan, the founder of 8chan. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:Fredrick Brennan started 8chan as a free speech utopia. But the site became known as something else: a megaphone for mass shooters, and a recruiting platform for violent white nationalists.Several tech providers pulled support for 8chan, temporarily taking the site offline. The decision to do so was not a straightforward one for the security company Cloudflare.
August 5, 2019
In two days, in two cities — El Paso and Dayton, Ohio — two mass shootings have left at least 29 people dead. We look at two stories from one of those shootings. Guests: Simon Romero, a national correspondent for The New York Times, and Jennifer Medina, who is covering the 2020 presidential campaign, spoke with us from El Paso. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The back-to-back bursts of gun violence left a nation stunned and shaken.The shooting rampage in El Paso was the deadliest anti-Latino attack in modern American history. It is being investigated as domestic terrorism.The Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke, who represented El Paso for years in Congress, said that President Trump had “a lot to do with what happened.”
August 2, 2019
Twenty Democratic presidential candidates have appeared on the debate stage for the last time. That’s in part because the Democratic National Committee has introduced a set of rules explicitly designed to narrow the field. We look at the intended and unintended consequences of that change. Guest: Reid J. Epstein, a political reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: It will be twice as hard for the 2020 Democrats to qualify for the next debate. In addition to the seven who already have, three are within striking distance.Democratic candidates aiming to replace President Trump are forced to choose between adopting his media tactics or being left behind as others do.
August 1, 2019
The United States economy is in the middle of a record-long expansion. So why is the government deploying an economic weapon it last used during the 2008 financial crisis? Guest: Ben Casselman, who covers the economy for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: The Federal Reserve cut its benchmark interest rate for the first time in more than a decade as it tried to insulate the economy from President Trump’s trade war and a global slowdown.The quarter-point reduction is unlikely to get you a better mortgage rate. Here’s where you might see effects.
July 31, 2019
Democratic voters have been drawn to Senator Kamala Harris as a messenger, even though her message remains a work in progress. Ahead of her second presidential debate appearance, we consider what the candidate says she believes. Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times, spoke with Ms. Harris. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Ms. Harris says she wants relevant policy, not “a beautiful sonnet.” Is that enough for voters?Read a transcript of our reporter’s conversation with Ms. Harris.
July 30, 2019
Two crashes involving Boeing 737 Max jets have been linked to a software system that helped send the planes into a deadly nose-dive. Our colleague investigated what federal regulators responsible for ensuring the safety of the jets knew about that system. Guest: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: A Times investigation found that the Federal Aviation Administration’s regulatory process, which gave Boeing significant oversight authority, compromised the safety of the 737 Max.
July 29, 2019
The Supreme Court ruled last month that federal courts cannot rule on cases of partisan gerrymandering, saying that judges are not entitled to second-guess the decisions made by state legislators who draw voting maps. We spoke to one man who has long believed there’s a way to address the issue without the courts. Guest: Eric H. Holder Jr., who served as the United States attorney general for six years under President Barack Obama. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: The Supreme Court’s decision on gerrymandering instantly raised the stakes for the nation’s state legislative races, which are often overlooked by voters, but can shape the course of policy from abortion rights to education.What is gerrymandering, and why did the Supreme Court rule on it? Here’s a refresher.
July 26, 2019
Maxwell’s yearslong relationship with Jeffrey Epstein has raised questions about what she may have known about the allegations of sex trafficking against him. Now, thousands of pages of sealed documents stemming from their relationship are about to be made public. Guest: Megan Twohey, an investigative reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:With Mr. Epstein under federal indictment on charges of sexually trafficking and abusing young girls, there are growing questions about his relationship with Ms. Maxwell. For more than a decade she helped manage Mr. Epstein’s homes, facilitate his social relationships and recruit masseuses, according to his former employees.
July 25, 2019
The former special counsel, Robert S. Mueller III, testified on Wednesday before Congress. He declared that his two-year investigation did not exonerate President Trump and that Russia would meddle again in American elections. Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who has been covering the special counsel investigation for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:Lawmakers hunted for viral sound bites and tried to score political points, but Mr. Mueller consistently refused to accommodate them in his long-awaited appearance before Congress.Here are seven takeaways from the hearings.
July 24, 2019
The majority of Americans disapprove of President Trump. But in 2020, Democrats will still have a hard time defeating him. Here’s why. Guest: Nate Cohn, who covers elections, polling and demographics for The Upshot at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: President Trump’s edge in the Electoral College may leave him closer to re-election than one might think based on his approval ratings — and may also blunt the electoral cost of actions like his attacks against four congresswomen of color.
July 23, 2019
Robert S. Mueller III, the former special counsel, will testify before the House Judiciary Committee and the House Intelligence Committee beginning at 8:30 a.m. Eastern on Wednesday. We spoke to our colleague about what to expect. Guest: Michael S. Schmidt, who has been covering the special counsel investigation for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Read more about what you need to know before the testimony.Here are 19 lingering questions for Mr. Mueller, along with what we know or don’t know about the answers.
July 23, 2019
Dr. Leana Wen, the first physician to lead Planned Parenthood in decades, was ousted after just eight months on the job. Her departure highlights a central tension over the direction of the group: Is it a political organization first, or a health organization? Guest: Sarah Kliff, an investigative reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: As states began to pass ever more restrictive laws on abortion, Planned Parenthood’s leaders felt they needed a more aggressive political leader to fight efforts to roll back abortion access.“I was asked to leave for the same reason I was hired: I was changing the direction of Planned Parenthood,” Dr. Wen wrote in an Op-Ed for The Times.
July 22, 2019
After trying and failing to withdraw Britain from the European Union, Theresa May will resign this week as the country’s prime minister. Here’s how the man expected to succeed her, Boris Johnson, made Brexit — and how Brexit may soon make him prime minister. Guest: Sarah Lyall, a writer at large for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:Mr. Johnson has become one of the great escape artists of British politics.Some of Mr. Johnson’s family members, once staunch opponents of Brexit, have had to perform a complicated political jujitsu around his candidacy for prime minister.Prime Minister Theresa May is scheduled to step down on Wednesday. Only 160,000 Conservative Party members can vote for the next leader, sidelining 99 percent of registered voters.
July 21, 2019
There are two stories from the 1960s that America likes to tell about itself — the civil rights movement and the space race. We look at the brief moment when the two collided. Guest: Emily Ludolph, who covered this story for The New York Times, spoke with Ed Dwight, a former Air Force pilot who had trained to be the first black astronaut. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: President John F. Kennedy was Ed Dwight’s champion. Within weeks of the president’s assassination, Mr. Dwight’s career as a prospective astronaut ended.
July 19, 2019
Hundreds of leaked text messages revealed the governor of Puerto Rico mocking his own citizens. For many Puerto Ricans, it was the last straw. Guest: Patricia Mazzei, the Miami bureau chief for The New York Times, spoke with us from San Juan, P.R. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Tens of thousands of people from across Puerto Rican society have united in nearly a week of protests that reveal deep dissatisfaction with how the island is governed.
July 18, 2019
The first Democratic debate brought renewed attention to busing as a tool of school desegregation. We spoke to a colleague about what the conversation has been missing. Guest: Nikole Hannah-Jones, who writes about racial injustice for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: “The school bus, treasured when it was serving as a tool of segregation, became reviled only when it transformed into a tool of integration,” Nikole Hannah-Jones writes in a news analysis.
July 17, 2019
One day before the fifth anniversary of Eric Garner’s death at the hands of police officers in New York, the Justice Department said it would not bring federal civil rights charges against an officer involved. We look at that decision. Guest: Ashley Southall, who covers New York for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Attorney General William P. Barr made the call not to seek a civil rights indictment against Officer Daniel Pantaleo.“The D.O.J. has failed us,” Mr. Garner’s mother, Gwen Carr, said. “Five years ago, my son said ‘I can’t breathe’ 11 times. Today, we can’t breathe. Because they have let us down.”
July 16, 2019
In a second day of attacks, President Trump said that four Democratic congresswomen hated the United States and were free to leave the country. The lawmakers — Representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, Ayanna S. Pressley of Massachusetts and Rashida Tlaib of Michigan — said they refused to be silenced. Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. This episode includes disturbing language. Background reading: President Trump appeared determined on Monday to amplify remarks that members of his own party called racist. The lawmakers he singled out responded by charging that the president was pressing the agenda of white nationalists.
July 15, 2019
This past weekend, immigration officials were scheduled to begin arresting and deporting thousands of undocumented immigrants who had been ordered to leave the United States but had remained. On Friday evening, we spoke to one woman who feared she was on the list. Guest: Herminia, an undocumented immigrant who has been living in the United States with her husband and children for more than a decade. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:A small number of raids targeting recently arrived undocumented migrant parents and their children took place over the weekend. More raids are expected to follow throughout the week.
July 12, 2019
As mass shootings became commonplace, attempts to hold gun makers accountable kept hitting the same roadblock — until now. We look at a lawsuit that could transform the firearms industry. Guests: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with David Wheeler, whose 6-year-old son, Ben, died in the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School; and Sheryl Gay Stolberg, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: A Connecticut Supreme Court ruling has created a potential opening for Sandy Hook families to maneuver around the gun industry’s legal shield and hold companies liable for the attack.The families are hoping to replicate a tactic used in lawsuits against cigarette manufacturers.
July 11, 2019
Federal courts keep rejecting President Trump’s attempts to ask about citizenship on the 2020 census. But no matter what the courts decide, the president may have already achieved his goal. Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: A day after pledging that the census would not ask about citizenship, Justice Department officials said they were seeking a way to restore the question on orders from President Trump.But for many immigrant communities, the damage may be done when it comes to the census.
July 10, 2019
Out of 198 Republicans in the House of Representatives, just 13 are women. This week, a closely watched election in North Carolina may help determine how serious the party is about changing that. Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, who covers Congress for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Dr. Greg Murphy, a state representative and urological surgeon, defeated Dr. Joan Perry, a pediatrician, in a race that set off a clash at the highest levels of the Republican Party.After watching Democratic women make historic gains in the 2018 midterm election, Republican women have decided to adopt the Democrats’ strategy for themselves.
July 9, 2019
Prosecutors in New York have accused the billionaire financier Jeffrey Epstein of sexually abusing dozens of underage girls and of asking them to recruit others. We spoke with our colleague about what happened in a similar case against Mr. Epstein over a decade ago. Guest: Patricia Mazzei, the Miami bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: The new indictment of Mr. Epstein could prompt a reckoning for the Justice Department, which is facing fresh scrutiny over a plea deal in 2008 that protected him from federal charges.Alexander Acosta, President Trump’s labor secretary and the former United States attorney in the Southern District of Florida, was personally involved in negotiating that plea deal.
July 8, 2019
The trial of Special Operations Chief Edward Gallagher, a decorated member of the Navy SEALs, offered rare insight into a culture that is, by design, difficult to penetrate. Our colleague tells us what he learned from the verdict. Guest: Dave Philipps, who covers the military for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: After a key witness for prosecutors changed his story on the stand, Chief Gallagher was found not guilty of the most serious charges against him, including the first-degree murder of a captive ISIS fighter and attempted murder of civilians in Iraq.Some SEAL commanders expressed worry that the verdict would discourage others from reporting possible war crimes in the future.
July 5, 2019
In 2016, Lordstown, Ohio, helped deliver the presidency to Donald J. Trump, betting that he would fulfill his promise to save its auto industry. Our colleague went there to examine the political fallout from the fact that he didn’t. Guests: Sabrina Tavernise, a national correspondent for The New York Times, met with Brian Milo, who worked at the General Motors plant in Lordstown for a decade; Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The Times, spoke with Sabrina. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: The path to the White House next year runs through places like Lordstown, but many voters there say the G.M. plant shutdown has left them even more at sea politically.For more from Sabrina Tavernise on G.M.’s big tech move and how it’s leaving thousands of workers behind, watch The Times’s new TV show, “The Weekly,” this Sunday night on FX at 10/9c, or Monday on Hulu.
July 3, 2019
In the contest to become the Democratic candidate for president, Joseph R. Biden Jr. is being asked to confront his record on race, including past positions that some in his party now see as outdated and unjust. We look at the policies Mr. Biden embraced and how they were viewed at the time. Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:Mr. Biden’s efforts to play down his role in overhauling crime legislation with segregationist senators in the 1980s and ’90s is at odds with his actions and rhetoric back then.Though a liberal on most civil rights issues, Mr. Biden was a leading opponent of busing as a tool to integrate schools.
July 2, 2019
President Trump made history over the weekend when he became the first sitting American president to step into North Korea. But the biggest impact of that gesture may have been on Iran. Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times and the author of “The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Trump administration officials are at odds over what demands to make in new talks with North Korea, with some now considering a nuclear freeze as a first step.Iran on Monday violated a key element of the 2015 nuclear deal, from which Mr. Trump withdrew the United States last year.
July 1, 2019
Federal courts have ruled that migrant children inside the United States must be housed in “safe and sanitary” accommodation. So what explains the conditions at a Border Patrol station in Clint, Tex.? Guest: Caitlin Dickerson, who covers immigration for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Soiled clothes, no diapers and no access to showers or soap — read more about the conditions that migrant children faced in an overcrowded border station in Texas.The authorities emptied the station, then moved more than 100 children back in. A Times reporter toured the site last week.Congress sent President Trump a $4.6 billion border aid package that left Democratic lawmakers badly divided.
June 29, 2019
Fifty years after the Stonewall riots, as the largest L.G.B.T.Q. Pride celebration in the world takes place in New York this weekend, some leaders of the community are asking a difficult question: What’s lost as the Pride movement becomes mainstream? Guests: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Shane O’Neill, a video editor. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:Divisions have emerged in the L.G.B.T.Q. community over the role of corporate sponsors and of the police in Pride celebrations.Who threw the first brick during the Stonewall uprising? Whatever you’ve heard, it’s probably a myth — and that’s O.K. Here’s why.To capture the evolving ways in which we describe ourselves, The Times asked readers to tell us who they are. More than 5,000 people wrote in.
June 28, 2019
Twenty Democrats seeking their party’s presidential nomination have now made their case to American voters. We take a look at their visions for the future, the breakout performances and the state of the race. Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Here are takeaways from the first night and the second night of the debates.See which candidates spoke the most on Wednesday and on Thursday.Read more of our 2020 election coverage.
June 27, 2019
Note: This episode contains detailed descriptions of an alleged sexual assault. The writer E. Jean Carroll came forward last week with explosive accusations that Donald Trump sexually assaulted her in the 1990s. Today, the two women she privately confided in after the alleged attack go on the record for the first time with our colleague. Guests: Megan Twohey, an investigative reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Ms. Carroll, Lisa Birnbach and Carol Martin. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Read more about why Ms. Carroll, Ms. Birnbach and Ms. Martin went public with the allegations against the president.Ms. Carroll alleges in a forthcoming book that Mr. Trump sexually assaulted her in a Bergdorf Goodman dressing room in the mid-1990s.The president denied the accusations by resorting to a familiar insult: “She’s not my type.”The Times’s top editor, Dean Baquet, acknowledged “we were overly cautious” in our initial coverage of Ms. Carroll’s accusations.
June 26, 2019
Over the next two days, 20 Democrats will take the stage for the first debates of the 2020 presidential race. We look at the competing visions for America they’ll be fighting over this week, and throughout the campaign. Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Does anyone deserve to have a billion dollars? How many hours of sleep do you get? The Times asked 21 Democratic presidential candidates the same set of questions. Here’s what they said, and here are some takeaways.For the candidates, these early debates may represent the first, best — and, in some cases, only — opportunity to stand out from competitors and build national momentum in the primary. Here’s how they’re preparing.Senator Elizabeth Warren is the only candidate on the first night who is polling in double digits, but there are plenty of story lines and political dynamics to watch for.
June 25, 2019
In the weeks since the Mueller report, nearly 80 House Democrats have called for impeaching the president. But with the 2020 campaign underway, the likelihood of such action appears to be fading. That may be exactly what some Democratic leaders want. Guests: Peter Baker, who covers the White House for The New York Times, spoke with Representative Zoe Lofgren, a California Democrat and a member of the House Judiciary Committee. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: In a House that can be dominated by voices on the left, centrist freshman Democrats who flipped seats in 2018 may have the final say on impeachment.Here’s a refresher on how impeachment works.
June 24, 2019
A military crackdown in Sudan has left more than 100 pro-democracy protesters dead, just weeks after the military offered support in overthrowing the country’s dictator. Our colleague spoke with us from Sudan’s capital, Khartoum. Guest: Declan Walsh, the Cairo bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Lt. Gen. Mohamed Hamdan, the leader of the paramilitary forces that carried out the killings, is now considered by many to be the de facto ruler of Sudan.Listen to an episode of “The Daily” about the fall of Sudan’s longtime dictator, President Omar Hassan al-Bashir, who was deposed by his own generals in May.
June 21, 2019
The Trump administration has been debating a military strike against Iran as tensions with the country escalate. Here’s how we got to this point. Guest: Mark Landler, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: President Trump approved military strikes against Iran in retaliation for downing an American drone, but abruptly called them off on Thursday night.Mr. Trump has veered between bellicose threats against America’s enemies and promises to get the United States out of foreign wars. He may soon have to choose. The United States and Iran, two longtime adversaries, are once again hurtling toward potential crisis. That course was set a year ago.
June 20, 2019
With asylum requests at a record high, the Trump administration is telling migrants to wait in Mexico. We look at how that policy could fundamentally change immigration in the United States. Guests: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Zolan Kanno-Youngs, who covers homeland security. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: A recent State Department report acknowledged the possibility that migrants from Central America were no safer in Mexico than at home from the gangs that had threatened them.The cornerstone of President Trump’s deal to avert tariffs with Mexico — the terms of which were largely already agreed-upon in December — was an expansion of the “Remain in Mexico” program.
June 19, 2019
The president kicked off his re-election campaign on Tuesday with a rally in Orlando, Fla. We spoke with a colleague who was there. Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: President Trump’s messaging at the rally signals a bet that his 2020 campaign will be a replay of 2016 — but this time, with the full support of the Republican Party.Here are eight things our reporters learned from attending the rally.The 2020 election is shaping up as a test: Was Mr. Trump’s victory a historical fluke, or a genuine reflection of America today?
June 18, 2019
A New York Times investigation found that the United States is actively infiltrating Russia’s electric power grid. We look at what that means for the future of cyberwarfare. Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times and the author of “The Perfect Weapon: War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The cyberattacks on Russia’s power grid are intended partly as a warning, and partly to be poised to act if a major conflict broke out between Washington and Moscow.In response to The Times’s report, the Kremlin warned that American attacks could escalate into cyberwar.
June 17, 2019
In Hong Kong, hundreds of thousands remain in the streets, even after city officials said they would suspend the contentious extradition bill that prompted the demonstrations in the first place. We look at why the protesters still don’t trust their government. Guest: Austin Ramzy, who covers Hong Kong for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: If the shelving of the extradition bill and an apology from Hong Kong’s leader were aimed at mollifying the protesters, the measures seem to have had the opposite effect.The bill’s suspension is China’s biggest concession to public pressure in President Xi Jinping’s nearly seven years as leader of the country.Here are photographs of the protests, which are some of the largest in the history of Hong Kong.
June 14, 2019
Across Europe, populists are saying that it’s not democracy they aim to discard, but liberalism. To end our series, we returned to Germany, the country at the heart of a liberal Europe, to see if the rejection of liberalism had also taken hold there. Guests: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for “The Daily,” went to an election party in Berlin for the far-right party Alternative for Germany. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Germany’s political establishment looks increasingly fragile after the European Parliament elections.As anti-Semitic crime rises in Germany, new forms of old hatreds are stoking fear for the nation’s estimated 200,000 Jews.Katrin Bennhold offers her main takeaway after 10 days on the road: “Europe cannot be taken for granted. But neither can its demise.”
June 13, 2019
In Poland, a nationalist party has been in power for four years. We went to Warsaw, the capital, and Gdansk, the birthplace of a movement that brought down Communism, to see how this government has changed democratic institutions. Guests: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for “The Daily,” spoke with Jaroslaw Kurski, a newspaper editor; Magdalena Adamowicz, a politician and the widow of a liberal mayor who was murdered; and Danuta Bialooka-Kostenecka, an official with the governing Law and Justice party. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Poland’s nationalists aren’t seeking to take the country out of the European Union, but to take the European Union out of Poland.With national elections approaching, both the government and its opponents have sought to shape the country’s historical memory.Poland’s governing party has made opposition to gay rights a cornerstone of its campaigning, escalating fears that the divisive rhetoric could translate to violence.
June 12, 2019
In Italy, hard-right populists have moved from the fringes to become part of the national government. Now, the country is on the front lines of a nationalist resurgence in Europe. To understand why, we spent a day with Susanna Ceccardi, a rising star of the far-right League party. Guest Host: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for “The Daily,” hit the campaign trail with Ms. Ceccardi in Tuscany. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Ms. Ceccardi is among a group of nationalist politicians seeking to break the European Union from the inside.A victory for the anti-immigrant League party in the European Parliament elections gave Matteo Salvini, the party’s leader and Italy’s interior minister, the strongest claim to the leadership of Europe’s populists.
June 11, 2019
President Emmanuel Macron of France had been viewed as the next leader of a liberal Europe. But when the Yellow Vest movement swept the country, protesters took to the streets, rejecting him as elitist and questioning the vision of Europe that he stood for. In Part 2 of our series, we traveled to a city in northern France to hear from some of these protesters. Guest Host: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Lynsea Garrison, producers for “The Daily,” met with Yellow Vest demonstrators in Reims. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:For some followers of the Yellow Vest movement, Europe embodies everything they have come to hate: shuttered factories, stagnating wages and a young banker-turned-president in favor of deeper integration.In elections last month for the European Parliament, the far-right leader Marine Le Pen won in the rural, depressed and deindustrialized areas of northern, south-central and eastern France that gave rise to the Yellow Vest revolt.
June 10, 2019
The decades-long plan to stitch together countries and cultures into the European Union was ultimately blamed for two crises: mass migration and crippling debt. Together, those events contributed to a wave of nationalism across Europe. In a five-part series this week, we take a look at some of the movements aiming to disrupt the E.U. from within. Guest: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Before the European Parliament elections last month, Katrin Bennhold and producers of “The Daily” set out on a 10-day trip to find out what Europe means to Europeans today.The results of the elections indicated that the struggle over the future direction of the European Union would only intensify.
June 7, 2019
The police identified a suspect in a double murder after combing through DNA profiles on a website designed to connect family members. We look at what his trial will tell us about the future of genetic genealogy in solving crimes. Guests: Heather Murphy, a New York Times reporter, spoke with CeCe Moore, a genetic genealogist, and Curtis Rogers, a creator of the genealogy website GEDMatch. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: The case of William Earl Talbott II, who is accused of killing a Canadian couple in Washington State 32 years ago, could result in legal precedents involving the use of genetic genealogy techniques by law enforcement.
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