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February 6, 2020
Healthy, Happy Travels to Westminster Kennel ClubDr. Marty Greer provides thorough and thoughtful advice for keeping your dog healthy and happy on the way and at the big show. Preparing the DogEnter the dog. Assure the entry has been accepted. Arrange travel. Have an appropriate travel bag or crate, depending on if the dog will travel in the cabin under your seat or in cargo, with or without you on the airplane. Do NOT try to pass the dog off as an “ESA” – Emotional Support Animal if this dog is not certified as such. There is current proposed legislation that will restrict the use of this term as it has been overused and misused by many travelers. A Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI) is required for all animals crossing state lines. This applies whether you are driving or flying the dog to the destination. Most of the time, you will not be asked for this document. However, if you are without it, your travel plans may be interrupted. This must be issued by a veterinarian who is “Accredited” by USDA. Not all Veterinarians are accredited so be sure you have a veterinarian who can sign this paperwork. A current rabies certificate is also required for all dogs traveling. A “Letter of Acclimation” if the dog is flying in cargo. This will reflect the temperatures the dog has been acclimated to prior to travel. This is issued by your veterinarian. Microchip and identification collar with your current cell phone number. Anti-anxiety medication if indicated. Acepromazine and Benadryl/diphenhydramine are NOT anti-anxiety medications. Alprazolam, trazodone, or gabapentin may be suitable if indicated and prescribed by your veterinarian. Preparing the EquipmentMake a list of the least amount of equipment and supplies you can manage with. Consider shipping these ahead to the hotel. Arrange to rent equipment Travel bag, leash and collar. A quiet toy to keep your dog busy and avoid annoying fellow travelers. Travel crate, absorbent material, leash, collar, ID, small bag of food enough for one meal, bowls (the kind that flatten are easiest) and a toy to keep your dog busy. Preparing you!Buy tickets for admission to Westminster. Make flight arrangements. Be sure you include the dog(s) on the reservation. Make hotel reservations. Be sure you include the dog(s) on the reservation.
January 23, 2020
Specialty vs All Breed Dog ShowsIn certain breeds, the judging of breed specialists and at specialty shows draws higher entries and is of greater interest to the exhibitors than the day in, day out all-breed shows with which most of us are familiar. In part one of this panel discussion, three exhibitors and judges from some of these breeds share their thoughts about why this is so. "We wanted to take back ownership of our breed. Generic dogs were winning at all breed shows versus the details of breed type that breed specialist judges would reward."Our panelists are: [caption id="attachment_7682" align="alignleft" width="300"] David Alexander[/caption] David Alexander, Bull Terrier Breeder, [caption id="attachment_7683" align="alignleft" width="209"] Jason Nicolai[/caption] Jason Nicolai, Staffordshire Bull Terrier Breeder [caption id="attachment_7681" align="alignleft" width="300"] Marcy Fine[/caption] and Marcy Fine, Collie breeder. Bull Terriers, Staffordshire Bull Terriers and Collies are all breeds in which specialties are the holy grail and all-breed dog shows are considered less important. Take a listen to part one of this challenging conversation about the "why" and join us next week, when we talk about the solutions. My thanks to Lorelei Craig, President of the Staffordshire Bull Terrier Club of America for arranging this panel of experts.
January 20, 2020
“Space Whippet,” Insta Celeb, Provides Social Media TipsBeth Gordon acquired a race-bred whippet after her mixed breed rescue developed IVDD (intervertebral disc disease). Kuiper the Space Whippet's rise to fame on social media provides a blueprint for others to follow in promoting purebred dogs. “I wanted a healthy dog I could do sports with. It’s ok to not want a project. We’ve spent as much as my college education on our older dog with health issues. I just didn’t want to have to do that again,” Gordon said. “I decided we needed better influencers on this new-fangled thing called (https://www.facebook.com/spacewhippet/) . In just a couple years, Gordon and Kuiper have acquired more than 150,000 Instagram followers and been to Kennedy Space Center for a photo shoot for the account. Utterly shameless self-promotion makes all the difference, Gordon said. “Business cards cost $20 and people love to get them.” “Even though the account name is space whippet, I get a lot of questions about his breed,” Gordon said. “I think it’s a good opportunity. The way you increase representation for anything is by showing it to people, not making a big deal out of it. “When you’ve been fed this line there’s so many rescue dogs, why don’t you have a rescue dog. My answer is that purebred dogs are not fungible with rescue dogs. If my choice was another rescue dog or no dog, I just wouldn’t get a dog. If you have specific things you want to do, you’re much better to get a breed designed for that. “The general public don’t know there’s so many things you can do with your dog. May not consider their dog is trainable. Increasing awareness of the sports they can do is so important. Purebred dogs are not just for beauty, dogs are functional,” Gordon said. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
January 13, 2020
Genetic Testing Helps You Swipe Right for Your DogToday’s dog breeders are getting a boost from the burgeoning field of genetic testing. (https://www.dobermandiversityproject.org/) co-founder Sophie Liu talks about her work using advanced tools to improve genetic health issues in Doberman Pinschers. Liu was a vet student researching her next dog when she became aware of the multitude of health challenges facing Dobermans. According to the DDP website: ​OUR MISSION is to reduce the incidence of heritable diseases in the Doberman by studying and addressing the depression in the overall genetic diversity of the Doberman breed and studying and researching widespread disease-associated mutations, through comprehensive genetic testing and analysis, development and sharing of evidence-based breeding findings, development of online breeder decision-making tools, and long-term tracking of results to measure the effectiveness of varied approaches to breeding -- in terms of genetic health and longevity.Combatting DCMLiu said that a major focus of their research is geared toward reducing the incidence of Dilated Cardiomyopathy in the breed, which currently is plagued by the devastating disease, with nearly half of the breed being affected. A great deal of DDP’s research and studies are directed at developing a tool which establishes a genetic value for the risk of passing on DCM. Building on the work done by Guide Dogs for the Blind, DDP hopes to enable breeders to determine an “ (https://www.vet.cornell.edu/health-topics/estimated-breeding-values-ebvs) ” for DCM on a pedigree and genetic basis. “This is a super powerful tool,” Liu said. “This is how guide dogs have systematically improved their breeding program.” The two genes identified to date that are associated with DCM in Dobermans are autosomal dominant, Liu said. Because the disease shows up late in a dog’s life, it can be hard to stay ahead of, she noted. Genetic testing offered through Embark at cost enables DDP to track genetic data. Study participants also update all clinical health data for the research project. Need more dogs testedLiu said that in just about two years DDP has tested more than 2,500 dogs, but they need many more. “We need more dogs tested. Affected and unaffected dogs. We need raw data and clinical updates and medical records,” Liu said. The guide dog programs’ success relies on having the advantage of huge breeding colonies that are all tested in house, she added. DDP’s relationship with Embark enables breeders to find the right balance between the inbreeding percentages needed to fix type and maintain health. Embark’s breeder tool enables people to make that decision for themselves, Liu noted, “just like Tinder for your Doberman.” “We’re finding out that the genetic bottlenecks are worse than we thought,” Liu noted. “Over 99% of Dobermans share a single paternal haplotype, in other words, one stud dog is behind nearly every Doberman tested.”The research is also turning up valuable information about the heritability of various traits – in other words, how much variation of the trait is genetic. For example, studies indicate 40 percent of fear behavior is genetic. For more on the topic of how genetics impact fear behavior, listen to Pure Dog Talk (https://puredogtalk.com/podcast/testing-the-genetics-and-biological-markers-of-fear-in-dogs-pure-dog-talk/) . “People go to breeders for consistency,” Liu said. “The better we get at it, the better it is for everyone.”Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
January 6, 2020
Scott Sommer on the Owner/Professional Handlers RelationshipScott Sommer, handler of two different Westminster Kennel Club Best in Show winners is back for the third and final installment of his conversation with host Laura Reeves. Today we’re talking about owner handlers and professional handlers. Plus, Sommer talks about the most difficult trimming techniques he learned and offers invaluable tips from an experienced veteran about working with scissored coats and other tricks of the trade. Handlers compete with the best to improveDiscussing the Owner Handled competition, Sommer reflects on the past when direct competition between amateur and professional handlers forced owners to “Step up and compete with handlers, which made them better.” “Owner Handled allows them to compete against one another. I’m not opposed, but I think it separates the whole dog show world,” Sommer observed. “It takes away from people’s ability to learn. You have to compete with the better (competitor) to make your dog better. It makes a difference.“The Owner Handlers have to compete with people who can make a dog look like it isn’t. It’s a hard thing to do. I worked for Michael Kemp for 16 years. Even now, I struggle with some things. It takes a long time to learn.” Still learning after all this timeSommer said that even after 40 years, his biggest struggle is trimming a dog’s off-side front leg. “It’s horrible,” Sommer said. “The hardest thing in the world for me to get right was the neck in to shoulder. The best thing you can do is never touch the head and neck until a day after they are bathed. You can trim the body. But if you trim (the head/neck of a Bichon Frise) right after you dry, there’ll be no hair left. It needs at least a day.”Sommer noted that climate, humidity, and even water quality makes a tremendous difference in coat texture. He advised bathing a Bichon two to three days ahead of the show in order to have enough spring in their coat. “When I was in dry areas, I’d just spray water and pat the hair down,” Sommer said. “Kaz (Hosaka, legendary poodle handler and protégé of Anne Rogers Clark) taught me that. “There’s so much to tell people. (Learning all of this) doesn’t just happen overnight.”
January 2, 2020
Veterinary Legislation is Slippery Slope for Pet OwnersDr. Marty Greer, DVM, NAIA (National Animal Interest Alliance) board member, puts on her legislative hat and talks with host Laura Reeves about proposed legislation in New York and around the US regarding crop, dock, declaw, bark softening and more. “As soon as they start dictating to us what veterinary care we need and need not do, we are on a slippery slope we aren’t going to like,” Greer said. “Once they start saying you cannot do an ear crop, tail dock, declaw, bark softening… You MUST do a spay… then we get into you must do a dental cleaning, you must provide this level of veterinary care, you have all rights taken away as pet owner. If those things are mandated, we will have people stop getting veterinary care because it’s being dictated. That scares me a lot.” These procedures should be a decision made between veterinary and client, Greer noted. “While a veterinarian is involved, we can provide supportive care. Without veterinary involvement, it can fall into the hands of lay people, where we don’t have pain management or appropriate anesthesia. Once veterinarians lose these procedures, the level of care goes down for the animals.” Veterinarians have been coerced into thinking this is not an ethical thing, Greer observed. Noting “those procedures are going to keep happening.” Isn’t it ironic…Meanwhile, as legislation is proposed banning these very safe, minimally invasive procedures, other legislation is advocating mandatory spay/neuter. “Patients are being spayed/neutered too young and with insufficient care. Research has shown tremendous health risks with young spay/neuter,” Greer said. “And spay, particularly, is a major abdominal, full anesthesia procedure. “The primary reason we spay/neuter is because we are unable or too lazy to manage our animals’ sexual behavior. There is no reason to spay/neuter our pets unless they have tumors. Less bone cancer. Less urinary incontinence. Less obesity when pets are left intact. “People are being forced into having an invasive elective procedure done on their pets and then we tell them they can’t have a minor elective procedure, like bark softening, that allows them to keep the dog in their neighborhood. “There are many more functional reasons to do tail docks, for example, than a spay.   “Our ancestors came here because they wanted the freedom to make decisions for themselves,” Greer insisted.
December 26, 2019
Scott Sommer: Work Hard and Never Stop TryingScott Sommer, one of only a handful of people to show multiple dogs to Best in Show at Westminster Kennel Club, offers his best advice for success. Both JR, the Bichon Frise and Stump, the Sussex Spaniel were surprise, dark horse winners at the Garden in their respective years. JR won under Dorothy MacDonald, defeating Mick, the incomparable Kerry Blue Terrier, handled by (https://puredogtalk.com/podcast/26-winners-of-westminster-dog-show-bill-mcfadden-valerie-nunes-atkinson-andy-linton-2/) , in a match up of Titans in the dog world. Stump was the oldest dog to win the coveted award. He came out of retirement to celebrate surviving a nearly tragic illness, winning under Sari Tietjen, the roar of the Madison Square Garden crowd ringing in Sommer’s ears. Sommer’s family bred smooth fox terriers. In fact, his mother sold legendary dog man Bobby Fisher his first show dog. Sommer showed his first dog at five years old and was hooked. He later apprenticed for Bob and Jane Forsyth. On his 16th birthday, Sommer moved to Houston and went to work for Michael Kemp. Best adviceHis best advice? “Work hard and never stop trying. This is not something you can learn overnight. Work for it and you will get rewarded.” “I think the initial steps are taking care of the dogs, cleaning them, feeding them, from there go forward,” Sommer said. Top dogsJR was the Number One ranked dog in country in 2001. But Sommer said he’d never shown the dog to MacDonald before that Best in Show lineup. “How she decided between JR & Mick I’ll never know,” Sommer said. “I fully expected the Kerry to win. When she said ‘Bichon,’ I just ran… “JR was a great show dog. He just never let down. It could be hot, cold, wet, it didn’t matter. He was so dependable. When you show a dog at that level that is so important,” Sommer added. Both JR and Stump lived out their lives with Sommer. They were inseparable best friends and died a week apart. Run!Sommer’s best recommendations for the Garden include making sure large breed dogs have boots so the salt on the streets doesn’t hurt their feet. “Go in with all the confidence in the world, hope and pray, and do the best job you can,” Sommer said. “If (the judge) points at you, RUN!” Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
December 23, 2019
Attitude of Gratitude at the Holidays Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, blessed holy days, praise the universe for Winter Solstice and a joyous new year to one and all. As we celebrate the fourth Pure Dog Talk Christmas, I am focused on an Attitude of gratitude. Number one Gratitude to my listeners who encourage me, share the love, provide GREAT ideas and support the show financially through our (https://patron.podbean.com/puredogtalk) program. I am so grateful that you all take the time to listen in to the incredible conversations I am so lucky to have. We surpassed a half million downloads on Thanksgiving day this year, on the three year anniversary of our debut episode. And our audience and listernership is growing by leaps and bounds every day. Please, continue to share the show, bring people to the table who might enjoy our “talks.” And, absolutely, give me your ideas. I can’t swear I’ll get to every single one immediately, but they are ALL on a LOOOOOONG list of great topics for upcoming shows. Number twoGratitude to my guests. I am not kidding when I say I am the luckiest girl alive. I get to talk to ALL of the coolest people in dogs. And, after 40 years of grooming, training, handling, now judging, I literally learn something from EVERY single episode. My guests give freely of their time, their experience, their accumulated DECADES of wisdom and offer YOU the listener an unbelievable platform on which to gather knowledge. Number threeGratitude to my sponsors. These corporations have made a conscious decision to reach out to the purebred dog community, to support us, our education, our goals, ambitions and dreams. Trupanion (https://trupanion.com/ec/breeder?utm_source=puredogtalk&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=pdt_092018) and, for the first time, (drumrollllll) announcing our brand new sponsor Embark, have committed not just money but dedication to the purebred dog fancier that is admirable, and entirely worthy of your business. I am a firm believer that we support those companies who support us. Without these amazing companies, Pure Dog Talk would not exist. And that’s a fact. Check out Trupanion’s Breeder Support program and breeding rider. Investigate Embark’s DNA genetic testing. I cannot say enough about Trupanion and Embark and their willingness to invest in YOUR future. I MUST also shoutout to the Dog Show Superintendent’s Association which was the very FIRST supporter that stepped up and said “YES, Pure Dog Talk is exactly the type of education and mentorship program our sport needs. Here, let us help you.” ALWAYS remember to stop by the superintendent’s desk and give them a shout out for their support of Pure Dog Talk. Our advertisers and partners, from Show Dog Prep School to Leading Edge Dog Show Academy to local clubs, are also due my unending gratitude for their confidence in our platform. Number fourMoving on, I am and we ALL should be offering our undying gratitude to the Breeders who came before us. We are, without exception, building on the shoulders of those who came before. In my own case, Ray and Lyn Calkins, Cascade Wirehairs, Mildred Revell, Weidenhugel Wirehairs, Bernee Brawn, Justa GWP, Silke Alberts Cadenberg GWP, and the additional mentors who took the time to help me like GWPCA founding member Genevieve Capstaff, Pat Laurans, Joy Brewster, Judy Cheshire, Laura Myles, Doug Ljungren and many more. If you haven’t done it already, make that same list. Send them a little note this Christmas and say thank you. Thank you for the help, the guidance, the information, the direction, the encouragement, the criticism and the hard work YOU have done to bring the breed to the place it is today. We NEED Dog BreedersSo, now my stump speech…. When my family & I got involved in purebred dogs 40+ years ago, the dog show was chock a block with, you guessed it, dog breeders. Today, dog breeders at the dog show are phantoms, rarely seen. Today, we have exhibitors. And Exhibitors, dog...
December 19, 2019
Australian Cattle Dogs and the History of AustraliaAuthor, researcher and purebred dog enthusiast Guy Hull shares the fascinating history of the development of Australian Cattle Dogs and how they helped build a fledgling nation. Today’s episode is brought to you in cooperation with (https://www.facebook.com/groups/caninecandc/) Facebook group. Hull is the author of (https://www.amazon.com/Dogs-That-Made-Australia-Transformation/dp/B07DNL3LZF) . (https://www.kombinalongacds.com/history-of-the-breed.asp) , Hull said, are the only breed resulting from the successful hybridization of dogs and dingoes. “Australia, more than any other country, was so dependent on dogs,” Hull said. “Especially native bred dogs that could cope with all of the hardships of the land.”The progenitors of the breed were created by the Hall family. These early Australian settlers owned 700+ square miles outside of Sydney. They needed a dog that could deal with wild cattle imported from South Africa. Sheep didn’t survive well in the hostile environment of the new country. Beef cattle could survive, but they needed tough dogs to help manage them. The Hall family crossed an English dog known as the “droving cur,” tailless, square in profile, speckled blue, with dingoes. Dingoes, as a species, are classified as wolves. Hall's HeelersDingo genes are so strong they dominate domestic genes, Hull said. It took multiple generations of back crossing to the domestic dogs to create the dog we know today. By 1832 the Halls had two types, including the Australian Cattle Dog progenitor. These dogs, known as Hall’s Heelers, were privately held from 1830-70. Managers of 200 Hall properties carried forward the breeding program. When the family sold all of their holdings after 1870, the dogs became available to the general public. Around this same time, long distance droving dogs became redundant with the advent of wire fencing and railroads. Hall’s dogs were designed to work wild cattle. When cattle became quieter and easier to manage, with the import of new cattle breeds, fences and transportation, the dogs were too “hard” for the domestic cattle. Border collies, kelpies and other “collie” type breeds became popular to work the more domesticated stock. The show fraternity preserved the Australian Cattle Dog after its job was no longer needed. “They are a dog that has re-invented itself as all around Australian guard dog and companion,” Hull said. “They are supposed to have a suspicious glint in their eyes.”Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by Trupanion.
December 16, 2019
The Azawakh is one of AKC’s newest recognized breeds. The long-legged, aloof hounds have been in the US since 1988, but were only approved for the hound group in January 2019. With only an estimated 150 dogs in the States and less than 3,000 worldwide, Azawakh fall in to the category of “threatened” breed populations.
December 12, 2019
Juan Miranda, FCI's youngest all-breeds judge, survived a car-jacking attack and returned to purebred dogs.
December 9, 2019
Tracy Szaras: “It Looks Pretty Good, but it’s Not Perfect Yet” Professional handler Tracy Szaras, whose Hungarian heritage leads her mother to describe her as a “real Gypsy,” says the pursuit of perfect is her secret to success. Szaras showed her first dogs in grade school, because her mom showed dogs. Her mom was a great trainer, Szaras said, who helped her process questions. Mom taught her proper conditioning and basic animal husbandry. Szaras’ first breed is Lakeland Terriers, so her mom took her to Montgomery County Kennel Club for the first time almost 30 years ago. Montgomery County started it all “I saw all these dogs looking awesome, everybody dressed to the nines. I really got into it that weekend. That next year I went to work for Greg Strong. I thought I knew how to pull hair until I went there. He showed me how to do flatwork, to do it correctly. I became driven. Greg taught me more, about trimming, skittish dogs, etc. I learned a lot in a short time. “Then I went to Bergit Coady and learned about low-legged terriers.  On my days off I went to Gabriel Rangel‘s kennel to learn more. “I was a sponge. I didn’t even date. All I wanted to do was learn and know everything about terriers. “I learned detail work from Gabriel. Learned by watching. I learned trimming, especially heads, from Gabriel. “I thought I was going out on my own. Next came Maripi Wooldridge. When she was considering quitting, she wanted me to take over her clients. “I was amazed. I thought I’d learned all I could. There’s always something to learn. Now, I’m always looking. It looks pretty good, but it’s not perfect yet. I want to be the best. I don’t want to short cut anything, thanks to Maripi. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
December 6, 2019
Safely Incorporating Our Dogs in Holiday Festivities Dr. Marty Greer, DVM and Host Laura Reeves riff on safely incorporating our pets in the holiday festivities, from electricity to plants to food to weather. Greer’s recommendations include: * Electric cord safety – wrap thin cords with metal safety coil * Jingle bells on low branches for warning that the dog is in trouble * Unwrapped candy canes that aren’t dangerous on low branches * Keep the canned spinach on hand * Secure tree to ceiling or wall * Crate the dog during dinner with a stuffed kong or chew bone to entertain them. * Beware of alcohol consumption. Guests don’t always take the dog into consideration when setting down a glass. * Make your dog part of the meal with snacks of raw carrots, small bits of meat instead of fats * Save broth cooked with bones, carrots, celery for food dressing * No more than 10% of meal should be additive. Commercial kibble is precisely formatted to meet the dogs needs. Substantially altering the contents of the meal can cause problems. * Mistletoe and Easter Lilly and Yew plants are highly toxic. Poinsettia actually isn’t. Macadamia nuts and raisins are food items less known to be toxic. * Boots are good for dogs in extreme cold or wet snow. Greer recommends  the musher boots used in the Iditarod. * Pet safe deicer and antifreeze — both products are excellent. If dogs walk on salt or deicer that isn’t suited to pets, rinse their feet thoroughly as soon as you can. * Dressing up our dogs entertains us, but not all dogs find it funny. Let your pet make the choice on outfits. * Slushy snow is bad as it can freeze in the feet and undercarriage. For more information about preventing and dealing with potential intestinal blockages, listen here. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
December 5, 2019
Safely Incorporating Our Dogs in Holiday Festivities Dr. Marty Greer, DVM and Host Laura Reeves riff on safely incorporating our pets in the holiday festivities, from electricity to plants to food to weather. Greer's recommendations include: * Electric cord safety – wrap thin cords with metal safety coil * Jingle bells on low branches for warning that the dog is in trouble * Unwrapped candy canes that aren’t dangerous on low branches * Keep the canned spinach on hand * Secure tree to ceiling or wall * Crate the dog during dinner with a stuffed kong or chew bone to entertain them. * Beware of alcohol consumption. Guests don't always take the dog into consideration when setting down a glass. * Make your dog part of the meal with snacks of raw carrots, small bits of meat instead of fats * Save broth cooked with bones, carrots, celery for food dressing * No more than 10% of meal should be additive. Commercial kibble is precisely formatted to meet the dogs needs. Substantially altering the contents of the meal can cause problems. * Mistletoe and Easter Lilly and Yew plants are highly toxic. Poinsettia actually isn’t. Macadamia nuts and raisins are food items less known to be toxic. * Boots are good for dogs in extreme cold or wet snow. Greer recommends the musher boots used in the Iditarod. * Pet safe deicer and antifreeze -- both products are excellent. If dogs walk on salt or deicer that isn't suited to pets, rinse their feet thoroughly as soon as you can. * Dressing up our dogs entertains us, but not all dogs find it funny. Let your pet make the choice on outfits. * Slushy snow is bad as it can freeze in the feet and undercarriage. For more information about preventing and dealing with potential intestinal blockages, listen here. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
December 2, 2019
Ideas to Grow Our Sport: Amateur Champion, Critiques, Welcome Join a conversation between judges and exhibitors brainstorming ideas to grow the sport of purebred dogs. Lesley Hiltz, Karen Ericson and Sid Marx join  moderator Laura Reeves along with exhibitors at the Whidbey Island Kennel Club. This is part two of the Pure Dog Talk Saturday Symposium posted last week. The Q&A discussion examined various perspectives on ideas to help increase conformation numbers and enthusiasm. Building on a suggestion from Marx in part one, audience questions focused on the idea of creating an actual amateur championship, akin to the same title in field trials, for the sport of conformation. “I’ve always thought there should be an amateur division and an open division everyone can enter,” Ericson said, similar to horse shows. “In Australia, every kennel club is only allowed one Championship show a year and are required to hold an open show, where no points are awarded,” Hiltz added. Marx spoke to the idea of a “breed level show” judged by provisional judges and “group shows” judged by regular status judges. Provisional judges can learn at the “breed level” where they can take more time. Critiques redux A common theme in our exhibitor conversations is the ongoing desire for critiques. Our judge panelists, who judge internationally, spoke to the practice in other systems. Hiltz noted that in Denmark, for example, judges receive extensive training in the skills required to offer useful critiques. She also noted that technology is such that the judges words are uploaded almost instantaneously. One exhibitor comment referenced the common practice in livestock/4-H judging whereby judges give reasons for each placement “We give critiques to the rep after we judge when we have provisional breeds. If we can do that, we should be able to give them for exhibitors as well,” Marx observed. Ericson noted that all judges have a learning curve. “It’s easy to pick out faults. There’s a real training process to pick out virtues and achieve positive judging.” On those same lines, Marx made a point about the process that judges go through and that while adult learners do best when they use their knowledge right away, the process in place functionally means judges receive provisional approval and it might be a year before they have a chance to judge. Ericson reminded the participants that dog shows can be intimidating for new folks. “We just have to be a lot more welcoming.” Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
December 2, 2019
Ideas to Grow Our Sport: Amateur Champion, Critiques, Welcome Join a conversation between judges and exhibitors brainstorming ideas to grow the sport of purebred dogs. Lesley Hiltz, Karen Ericson and Sid Marx join moderator Laura Reeves along with exhibitors at the Whidbey Island Kennel Club. This is part two of the Pure Dog Talk Saturday Symposium posted last week. The Q&A discussion examined various perspectives on ideas to help increase conformation numbers and enthusiasm. Building on a suggestion from Marx in part one, audience questions focused on the idea of creating an actual amateur championship, akin to the same title in field trials, for the sport of conformation. “I’ve always thought there should be an amateur division and an open division everyone can enter,” Ericson said, similar to horse shows. “In Australia, every kennel club is only allowed one Championship show a year and are required to hold an open show, where no points are awarded,” Hiltz added. Marx spoke to the idea of a “breed level show” judged by provisional judges and “group shows” judged by regular status judges. Provisional judges can learn at the “breed level” where they can take more time. Critiques redux A common theme in our exhibitor conversations is the ongoing desire for critiques. Our judge panelists, who judge internationally, spoke to the practice in other systems. Hiltz noted that in Denmark, for example, judges receive extensive training in the skills required to offer useful critiques. She also noted that technology is such that the judges words are uploaded almost instantaneously. One exhibitor comment referenced the common practice in livestock/4-H judging whereby judges give reasons for each placement “We give critiques to the rep after we judge when we have provisional breeds. If we can do that, we should be able to give them for exhibitors as well,” Marx observed. Ericson noted that all judges have a learning curve. “It’s easy to pick out faults. There’s a real training process to pick out virtues and achieve positive judging.” On those same lines, Marx made a point about the process that judges go through and that while adult learners do best when they use their knowledge right away, the process in place functionally means judges receive provisional approval and it might be a year before they have a chance to judge. Ericson reminded the participants that dog shows can be intimidating for new folks. “We just have to be a lot more welcoming.” Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
November 29, 2019
Inspiring True Story: From First Show to Best in Show Antoinelle Vulpis chose a Skye Terrier as her first show dog. Two years after their first show, Vulpis and Archer won Best in Show at The Kennel Club of Philadelphia’s National Dog Show. Vulpis offers another inspiring “newbie” story as she shares her journey, the importance of her breeders/mentors and the support of the dog show community. “I grew up like any kid watching Westminster on TV. We had Golden Retrievers as family dogs, but I always kind of wanted something a little different. I was a total dog geek,” Vulpis said. After college, Vulpis got a job at AKC that required her to attend dog shows. “I decided I wanted to try this myself. Then I saw Larry Cornelius and Charlie the Skye Terrier. THAT was the dog for me,” Vulpis said. Parent Clubs and Handlers Vulpis made contact with Michael Pesare through the Skye Terrier Club of America. She then waited a year for the right dog from the right litter. Her puppy arrived exactly two years before her first best in show. “My mentors drove three hours one way without a dog entered just to cheer me on at my first dog show,” Vulpis said. Her breeders helped her learn how to groom the rare breed and supported her at every step, she added. “My handler friends are so willing to help me and share. They’re the people who inspire me. I try to learn from them,” Vulpis said. “Asking someone more experienced than you will really pay off.” Vulpis counts professional handlers from Greg Strong to Ernesto Lara in her list of people who have helped her along the way. Listen to the input “I asked all kinds of people for advice,” Vulpis said. Vulpis’ favorite grooming product is #1 All Systems Invisible Hold “It’s the holy grail for keeping the part to stay in place.” “I don’t brush him every day because it takes hair out. Only once or twice a week to keep mats under control. I keep him clean, and bathe him weekly,” Vulpis noted. “Now that I’m realizing I can make a difference in how he’s presented and how he looks. I get to the dog show early and spend time bathing his under-carriage and blow dry him. The extra time and care really has paid off,” Vulpis said. For more stories from new people to the sport, listen here and here. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
November 28, 2019
Inspiring True Story: From First Show to Best in Show Antoinelle Vulpis and "Archer" winning BIS Sunday at The Kennel Club of Philadelphia. Antoinelle Vulpis chose a Skye Terrier as her first show dog. Two years after their first show, Vulpis and Archer won Best in Show at The Kennel Club of Philadelphia’s National Dog Show. Vulpis offers another inspiring “newbie” story as she shares her journey, the importance of her breeders/mentors and the support of the dog show community. "I grew up like any kid watching Westminster on TV. We had Golden Retrievers as family dogs, but I always kind of wanted something a little different. I was a total dog geek," Vulpis said. After college, Vulpis got a job at AKC that required her to attend dog shows. "I decided I wanted to try this myself. Then I saw Larry Cornelius and Charlie the Skye Terrier. THAT was the dog for me," Vulpis said. Parent Clubs and Handlers Vulpis made contact with Michael Pesare through the Skye Terrier Club of America. She then waited a year for the right dog from the right litter. Her puppy arrived exactly two years before her first best in show. "My mentors drove three hours one way without a dog entered just to cheer me on at my first dog show," Vulpis said. Her breeders helped her learn how to groom the rare breed and supported her at every step, she added. "My handler friends are so willing to help me and share. They're the people who inspire me. I try to learn from them," Vulpis said. "Asking someone more experienced than you will really pay off." Vulpis counts professional handlers from Greg Strong to Ernesto Lara in her list of people who have helped her along the way. Listen to the input "I asked all kinds of people for advice," Vulpis said. Vulpis' favorite grooming product is #1 All Systems Invisible Hold "It's the holy grail for keeping the part to stay in place." "I don't brush him every day because it takes hair out. Only once or twice a week to keep mats under control. I keep him clean, and bathe him weekly," Vulpis noted. "Now that I'm realizing I can make a difference in how he's presented and how he looks. I get to the dog show early and spend time bathing his under-carriage and blow dry him. The extra time and care really has paid off," Vulpis said. For more stories from new people to the sport, listen here and here. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
November 26, 2019
Saturday Symposium – Preservation Breeding With Experts Host and Moderator Laura Reeves is joined by breeders/judges Lesley Hiltz, Sid Marx and Karen Ericson at the Whidbey Island Kennel Club with a robust conversation about preservation breeding. This is part one. Part two, including audience participation, conversation and more idea generation will be posted next Monday. Preservation of our breeds to save their place in history “When you judge in Europe,” Hiltz noted, “the average exhibitor age is mid 30s. There are lots of families, often three generations together. It’s a family sport. But they also only have one show a month. If we had fewer shows we could see more support for the ones remaining.” Marx observed that too often exhibitors haven’t even read the standard for their breed. “People become captive to what’s winning. Breeding to what’s winning rather than what’s correct. We want to get as many new young exhibitors involved in the sport as we can. But they need to make an effort to find mentors and learn the history of their breed,” Marx said. Ericson encouraged folks to “Get our dogs out among the public.” Clubs need to do things besides dog shows, she added. “To get a dog from a breeder, you might as well apply to be a CEO of a fortune 500 company,” Erickson said. “Trust people with your best, not your worst. Tell them you are trusting them with a piece of my heart and legacy.” “Dog shows in Australia are less stressful and more fun,” Marx said. “Certainly more wine is drunk. It’s a party at their shows. It’s an event.” Proactive policies Some ideas from the panelists: * Encourage altered dog competition * Encourage anyone who shows a spark to come to the dog show. Stop what you’re doing and share with public. Share excitement about the show. * Bring back dog shows that stop at the breed level. Rankings are hurting us. The average person isn’t at the dog show to fight for Group 1. * Follow Austalia’s lead: “class in group awards.” So if your 6-9 puppy wins his class, he competes in 6-9 competition in group. People stay for group, talk to other people in other breeds. Gives a whole lot of other people the chance to win something in group. To hear previous discussions on this topic, click here and here. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
November 25, 2019
Saturday Symposium – Preservation Breeding With Experts Host and Moderator Laura Reeves is joined by breeders/judges Lesley Hiltz, Sid Marx and Karen Ericson at the Whidbey Island Kennel Club with a robust conversation about preservation breeding. This is part one. Part two, including audience participation, conversation and more idea generation will be posted next Monday. Preservation of our breeds to save their place in history Lesley Hiltz "When you judge in Europe," Hiltz noted, "the average exhibitor age is mid 30s. There are lots of families, often three generations together. It's a family sport. But they also only have one show a month. If we had fewer shows we could see more support for the ones remaining." Marx observed that too often exhibitors haven’t even read the standard for their breed. "People become captive to what’s winning. Breeding to what’s winning rather than what’s correct. We want to get as many new young exhibitors involved in the sport as we can. But they need to make an effort to find mentors and learn the history of their breed," Marx said. Sid Marx Ericson encouraged folks to "Get our dogs out among the public." Clubs need to do things besides dog shows, she added. "To get a dog from a breeder, you might as well apply to be a CEO of a fortune 500 company," Erickson said. "Trust people with your best, not your worst. Tell them you are trusting them with a piece of my heart and legacy." "Dog shows in Australia are less stressful and more fun," Marx said. "Certainly more wine is drunk. It’s a party at their shows. It’s an event." Proactive policies Karen Ericson Some ideas from the panelists: * Encourage altered dog competition * Encourage anyone who shows a spark to come to the dog show. Stop what you’re doing and share with public. Share excitement about the show. * Bring back dog shows that stop at the breed level. Rankings are hurting us. The average person isn't at the dog show to fight for Group 1. * Follow Austalia's lead: "class in group awards." So if your 6-9 puppy wins his class, he competes in 6-9 competition in group. People stay for group, talk to other people in other breeds. Gives a whole lot of other people the chance to win something in group. To hear previous discussions on this topic, click here and here. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
November 22, 2019
History: To Understand the Present, Must Know the Past Lesley Hiltz, long time Beagle breeder and conformation judge, details a new history project launched by Beagle enthusiasts worldwide. “The Beagle History Resource is a non-profit website with the aim to preserve the history of beagles and the community surrounding it for the future. All is maintained by volunteers and beagle enthusiasts, and we rely purely on donations to keep the service free for the public,” according to the website. The driving forces behind this initiative are: Toke Larsen from Denmark, Hiltz from the USA, Jonathon Willis from New Zealand and Alice Cancikova from Czech Republic. Additional volunteers are needed, Hiltz noted. Email the committee to help in any way, she added. Saved to the cloud Hiltz praised Larsen for his technology skill and abilities to preserve the history utilizing the “cloud” into perpetuity “or whatever comes next.” The website has the capacity to host photos, writings and other documents. Other breeds also have developed similar concepts, including: https://whippet.breedarchive.com/home/index http://borzoipedia.com/ (currently under construction) Beagles at sea Hiltz’ story of transporting two of her early Beagles from England to Australia via cargo ship is mesmerizing and puts all current import/export complaints in context. Actively involved in Beagles since the early ‘60s, in Australia, England and the United States, Hiltz offers a wide ranging and compelling narrative of her personal history in the breed. Preserving her breed and its history is the driving force for Hiltz in working on the development of this online resource. But she envisions it as an opportunity to develop a worldwide, all breeds repository. “I can envision a kennel club taking up this project and having a central location for all of the information that’s out there,” Hiltz said. “To understand the present, we must know the past.” Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
November 21, 2019
History: To Understand the Present, Must Know the Past Lesley Hiltz, long time Beagle breeder and conformation judge, details a new history project launched by Beagle enthusiasts worldwide. “The Beagle History Resource is a non-profit website with the aim to preserve the history of beagles and the community surrounding it for the future. All is maintained by volunteers and beagle enthusiasts, and we rely purely on donations to keep the service free for the public,” according to the website. The driving forces behind this initiative are: Toke Larsen from Denmark, Hiltz from the USA, Jonathon Willis from New Zealand and Alice Cancikova from Czech Republic. Additional volunteers are needed, Hiltz noted. Email the committee to help in any way, she added. Saved to the cloud Hiltz praised Larsen for his technology skill and abilities to preserve the history utilizing the “cloud” into perpetuity “or whatever comes next.” The website has the capacity to host photos, writings and other documents. Other breeds also have developed similar concepts, including: https://whippet.breedarchive.com/home/index http://borzoipedia.com/ (currently under construction) Beagles at sea Hiltz’ story of transporting two of her early Beagles from England to Australia via cargo ship is mesmerizing and puts all current import/export complaints in context. Actively involved in Beagles since the early ‘60s, in Australia, England and the United States, Hiltz offers a wide ranging and compelling narrative of her personal history in the breed. Preserving her breed and its history is the driving force for Hiltz in working on the development of this online resource. But she envisions it as an opportunity to develop a worldwide, all breeds repository. “I can envision a kennel club taking up this project and having a central location for all of the information that’s out there,” Hiltz said. “To understand the present, we must know the past.” Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
November 19, 2019
How One “Dog Person” is Revolutionizing Flying Our Dogs Pilar Kuhn is revolutionizing flying purebred dogs. Kuhn and her husband Rod Ott are breeders of Scottish Terriers and Bouvier des Flandres. They also run a shipping company transporting dogs for breeders and exhibitors world-wide. In her work, Kuhn has established strong relationships with the major US carriers. When she identified a problem, specifically crate sizing and helping her clients meet the needs of the airlines, she just naturally decided to devise a solution. “After six months working with the airlines, I said, ‘how can we solve this!’,” Kuhn said. K9 PreCheck Kuhn’s solution was enabled by understanding both sides of the equation: * exhibitors and breeders’ needs to get their dog from point A to point B without any hassle or concern about the dog being in the proper crate for the airline’s requirements, and * airlines’ needs to provide safe, reliable transport for the dogs in their care. Kuhn’s new domestic service means your dog will fly in cargo with zero complications. A nominal membership fee with K9PreCheck, means your dog is “in the system” and is guaranteed to fly. Kuhn also has negotiated lower rates with the airlines and can often save owners money on the flight. The basis of the service is that exhibitors and breeders need (not just want) their dogs to get to point A at a certain time and get home again. Clients provide Kuhn with photos of the dog, crate, buckets, etc, as well as proof of entry or other timeline. K9 PreCheck assures the airlines the dogs and owners are “following the rules” and removing the “discretion of the agent” worries aside. Kuhn’s service is not for exhibitors flying *with* their dogs as “excess baggage.” It is specifically for clients flying dogs as “cargo.” Contact Kuhn at her pet shipping website, www.casafairviewk9s.com or call 310-742-2242 for more information. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
November 18, 2019
How One “Dog Person” is Revolutionizing Flying Our Dogs Pilar Kuhn is revolutionizing flying purebred dogs. Kuhn and her husband Rod Ott are breeders of Scottish Terriers and Bouvier des Flandres. They also run a shipping company transporting dogs for breeders and exhibitors world-wide. In her work, Kuhn has established strong relationships with the major US carriers. When she identified a problem, specifically crate sizing and helping her clients meet the needs of the airlines, she just naturally decided to devise a solution. “After six months working with the airlines, I said, ‘how can we solve this!’,” Kuhn said. K9 PreCheck Kuhn’s solution was enabled by understanding both sides of the equation: * exhibitors and breeders’ needs to get their dog from point A to point B without any hassle or concern about the dog being in the proper crate for the airline’s requirements, and * airlines’ needs to provide safe, reliable transport for the dogs in their care. Kuhn’s new domestic service means your dog will fly in cargo with zero complications. A nominal membership fee with K9PreCheck, means your dog is “in the system” and is guaranteed to fly. Kuhn also has negotiated lower rates with the airlines and can often save owners money on the flight. The basis of the service is that exhibitors and breeders need (not just want) their dogs to get to point A at a certain time and get home again. Clients provide Kuhn with photos of the dog, crate, buckets, etc, as well as proof of entry or other timeline. K9 PreCheck assures the airlines the dogs and owners are “following the rules” and removing the “discretion of the agent” worries aside. Kuhn’s service is not for exhibitors flying *with* their dogs as “excess baggage.” It is specifically for clients flying dogs as “cargo.” Contact Kuhn at her pet shipping website, www.casafairviewk9s.com or call 310-742-2242 for more information. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
November 15, 2019
The Uber Dog Needs a Job: German Wirehaired Pointer The German Wirehaired Pointer is generally the smartest dog in the room, according to panelists at the GWPCA national specialty show. “They’d rather break in to your house than out of your house. They want to be with you. They want lots of attention and want to be part of the family. I want to sell a dog to someone who is active, does a lot, tries new things. You need to do something with the dog.” — Breeder and Judges Education Coordinator, Judy Cheshire “They do require a tremendous amount of time. You have to be with them. You cannot not have a plan regarding all the events you do with them and commit to that from day one. I can’t even imagine not crate training a wirehair. I love how they learn, I love how they think. They’re people in their previous lives.” — Veterinarian and GWP owner, Robin Nelson “Owners with small, furry, edible pets are screened out from the beginning. They’re incredibly smart loyal and manipulative. To successfully live with GWP, you need structure. Left without structure they are sort of like Dennis the Menace crossed with Home Alone. It’s not enough to just exercise the dog. They enjoy doing things. But they tend to thrive in a benevolent dictatorship.” — Breeder, Conformation, Hunt Test and Field Trial Judge, Laura Myles Versatile hunting dogs, versatile performance dogs “The Germans in the late 1800s wanted a dog that could do everything. Hunt fur and feather, retrieve on land and in water, track wounded game, dispatch small predators, guard hearth and home,” Cheshire said. “A lot of breeds were being developed at that time. This splinter group broke off  who decided performance was most important. The early GWP motto was ‘Breed as you like, be honest, tell what you’re breeding to, make progress,'” Cheshire added. “They don’t quit. They go til they’re dead. I love their drive. I truly believe you can teach them anything,” Nelson observed. “If you can break it into the steps, there is nothing you can’t teach them. They get bored easily and they rewrite the lesson plan for you. The dog needs to buy in to the lesson plan with you. You have to be prepared. And always stop on a positive,” Myles noted. For more information, visit: https://gwpca.com/ Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
November 14, 2019
The Uber Dog Needs a Job: German Wirehaired Pointer The German Wirehaired Pointer is generally the smartest dog in the room, according to panelists at the GWPCA national specialty show. "They’d rather break in to your house than out of your house. They want to be with you. They want lots of attention and want to be part of the family. I want to sell a dog to someone who is active, does a lot, tries new things. You need to do something with the dog." -- Breeder and Judges Education Coordinator, Judy Cheshire Robin Nelson "They do require a tremendous amount of time. You have to be with them. You cannot not have a plan regarding all the events you do with them and commit to that from day one. I can’t even imagine not crate training a wirehair. I love how they learn, I love how they think. They’re people in their previous lives." -- Veterinarian and GWP owner, Robin Nelson Laura Myles "Owners with small, furry, edible pets are screened out from the beginning. They’re incredibly smart loyal and manipulative. To successfully live with GWP, you need structure. Left without structure they are sort of like Dennis the Menace crossed with Home Alone. It's not enough to just exercise the dog. They enjoy doing things. But they tend to thrive in a benevolent dictatorship." -- Breeder, Conformation, Hunt Test and Field Trial Judge, Laura Myles Versatile hunting dogs, versatile performance dogs Judy Cheshire "The Germans in the late 1800s wanted a dog that could do everything. Hunt fur and feather, retrieve on land and in water, track wounded game, dispatch small predators, guard hearth and home," Cheshire said. "A lot of breeds were being developed at that time. This splinter group broke off who decided performance was most important. The early GWP motto was 'Breed as you like, be honest, tell what you’re breeding to, make progress,'" Cheshire added. "They don’t quit. They go til they’re dead. I love their drive. I truly believe you can teach them anything," Nelson observed. "If you can break it into the steps, there is nothing you can’t teach them. They get bored easily and they rewrite the lesson plan for you. The dog needs to buy in to the lesson plan with you. You have to be prepared. And always stop on a positive," Myles noted. For more information, visit: https://gwpca.com/ Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
November 12, 2019
Crowd Sourcing Knowledge of Devastating Disease Barb Jenness, chair of the Newfoundland Club of America Forelimb Anomaly Committee, joins host Laura Reeves to talk about the crowd sourcing their group is doing to identify and research this little-known but crippling disease. A 1981 case study conducted in Norway first described the condition: ABSTRACT A description of a litter of Newfoundland dogs of which six out of seven puppies suffered from, more or less, deformation of the elbow joints, is presented. The two male dogs were, because of the condition, destroyed at 20 weeks of age. The patho-anatomical examination revealed abnormalities of the joint cartilage of all the major joints of the extremities. The condition is described as a generalized fibroid, proliferative degeneration of the joint cartilage. Jenness said puppies affected with FLA “their front legs bow out. It’s not dwarfism, but that’s what it looks like. Dwarfism affects all the legs, this is just the front legs.” According to the FLA website: “We believe it is not viral, bacterial, caused by rapid growth, or a specific diet. Most researchers believe it is genetic but the exact mode of inheritance is unknown.” The defect is often not recognized until eight to 12 weeks of age and the puppies may be in their new homes before anyone determines there is a problem, Jenness said. Not Just Newfoundlands A current study, and working with OFA, has enabled the Committee to identify other affected breeds, including Tibetan Mastiffs, Saint Bernards, Bernese Mountain Dogs, Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers and Chesapeake Bay Retrievers. Jenness noted that all of the breeds with affected puppies have some relation to the Newfoundland. Jenness’ committee was established to create a clearinghouse of xrays and information because the disease is often undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Her other primary goal is to “get the word out” to owners and club members so that if a puppy is affected, it’s xrays, DNA and case history can be added to the committee’s crowdsourcing approach to gathering data. “Nobody wants to come face to face with such a crippling disease,” Jenness said, addressing the challenges of working with breeders on the problem.  “Overcoming stigma is a challenge.” Jenness said a test breeding was done in the ‘80s, before the availability of DNA and genetic testing available today. The test breeding mated two affected dogs, which produced zero affected progeny. From that test, Jenness said, “We have determined it is not a simple recessive. At this point we believe it is a polygenic trait with a trigger that turns it on or off, although this still unconfirmed.” “It’s hard to get studies funded that are focused on just one breed,” Jenness said. “As we’ve identified other breeds affected, we have ongoing studies and promising information is coming out. But we need more samples, more x-rays, more confirmed cases to be reported so we can add to the information.” Anyone with questions or concerns about their dogs, or who would like to participate in the studies, contact Jenness at forelimbanomaly@gmail.com Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
November 11, 2019
Crowd Sourcing Knowledge of Devastating Disease Barb Jenness, chair of the Newfoundland Club of America Forelimb Anomaly Committee, joins host Laura Reeves to talk about the crowd sourcing their group is doing to identify and research this little-known but crippling disease. A 1981 case study conducted in Norway first described the condition: ABSTRACT A description of a litter of Newfoundland dogs of which six out of seven puppies suffered from, more or less, deformation of the elbow joints, is presented. The two male dogs were, because of the condition, destroyed at 20 weeks of age. The patho-anatomical examination revealed abnormalities of the joint cartilage of all the major joints of the extremities. The condition is described as a generalized fibroid, proliferative degeneration of the joint cartilage. Photo courtesy of NCA Charitable Trust, Forelimb Anomaly Committee. Jenness said puppies affected with FLA “their front legs bow out. It’s not dwarfism, but that’s what it looks like. Dwarfism affects all the legs, this is just the front legs.” According to the FLA website: "We believe it is not viral, bacterial, caused by rapid growth, or a specific diet. Most researchers believe it is genetic but the exact mode of inheritance is unknown." The defect is often not recognized until eight to 12 weeks of age and the puppies may be in their new homes before anyone determines there is a problem, Jenness said. Not Just Newfoundlands A current study, and working with OFA, has enabled the Committee to identify other affected breeds, including Tibetan Mastiffs, Saint Bernards, Bernese Mountain Dogs, Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers and Chesapeake Bay Retrievers. Jenness noted that all of the breeds with affected puppies have some relation to the Newfoundland. Jenness’ committee was established to create a clearinghouse of xrays and information because the disease is often undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Her other primary goal is to “get the word out” to owners and club members so that if a puppy is affected, it’s xrays, DNA and case history can be added to the committee’s crowdsourcing approach to gathering data. “Nobody wants to come face to face with such a crippling disease,” Jenness said, addressing the challenges of working with breeders on the problem. “Overcoming stigma is a challenge.” Jenness said a test breeding was done in the ‘80s, before the availability of DNA and genetic testing available today. The test breeding mated two affected dogs, which produced zero affected progeny. From that test, Jenness said, “We have determined it is not a simple recessive. At this point we believe it is a polygenic trait with a trigger that turns it on or off, although this still unconfirmed.” “It’s hard to get studies funded that are focused on just one breed,” Jenness said. “As we’ve identified other breeds affected, we have ongoing studies and promising information is coming out. But we need more samples, more x-rays, more confirmed cases to be reported so we can add to the information.” Anyone with questions or concerns about their dogs, or who would like to participate in the studies, contact Jenness at forelimbanomaly@gmail.com Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
November 8, 2019
Intestinal Blockages: Prevention, Treatment, Recovery Dr. Marty Greer DVM shares some horror stories of what and why dogs eat things they shouldn’t that cause intestinal blockages. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, Greer said. Puppy Proof Your House Puppies explore their environment with their mouths, Greer noted. “If it’s smaller than their head, they may swallow it,” she said. Be careful with your pets’ access to anything they can eat, bottom line. The dog that eats things often will repeat the behavior. The owners need to learn from the dog’s mistakes and be sure their environment is safe. Even a crated dog isn’t always out of danger — be sure not to put anything on or near the dog’s crate. Retrievers at High Risk Teaching young dogs to trade something inappropriate in their mouths for a treat is a helpful way to set the dog up for success and avoid dangerous blockages. Induce Vomiting We have all been told to use hydrogen peroxide to make the dog vomit if you see it eat something inappropriate. Greer strongly recommends, instead, a trip to the vet for a dose of Apomorphine. This is a safer alternative than the peroxide, which can have dangerous side effects. Difficult Diagnosis Even when you suspect the dog might have eaten something, the x-rays are not always successful at showing a blockage. Cloth and non-metal items won’t show up. A lethargic dog that doesn’t eat and has repeated vomiting, can’t keep down food or even water, is one that is going to be suspect for a blockage. Pregnancy Increases Danger Pregnant bitches may have nausea that they will try to assuage by eating whatever they can get ahold of, Greer said. Hyper awareness with them is imperative. Treatment Intestinal blockage is a life-threatening situation. The dog will need emergency and often exploratory surgery. The recovery is extended and difficult. After surgery, the dogs are required to stay on IV fluids for 48-72 hours. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
November 7, 2019
Intestinal Blockages: Prevention, Treatment, Recovery Dr. Marty Greer DVM shares some horror stories of what and why dogs eat things they shouldn’t that cause intestinal blockages. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, Greer said. Puppy Proof Your House Puppies explore their environment with their mouths, Greer noted. “If it’s smaller than their head, they may swallow it,” she said. Be careful with your pets’ access to anything they can eat, bottom line. The dog that eats things often will repeat the behavior. The owners need to learn from the dog’s mistakes and be sure their environment is safe. Even a crated dog isn’t always out of danger -- be sure not to put anything on or near the dog’s crate. Retrievers at High Risk Teaching young dogs to trade something inappropriate in their mouths for a treat is a helpful way to set the dog up for success and avoid dangerous blockages. Induce Vomiting We have all been told to use hydrogen peroxide to make the dog vomit if you see it eat something inappropriate. Greer strongly recommends, instead, a trip to the vet for a dose of Apomorphine. This is a safer alternative than the peroxide, which can have dangerous side effects. Difficult Diagnosis Even when you suspect the dog might have eaten something, the x-rays are not always successful at showing a blockage. Cloth and non-metal items won’t show up. A lethargic dog that doesn’t eat and has repeated vomiting, can’t keep down food or even water, is one that is going to be suspect for a blockage. Pregnancy Increases Danger Pregnant bitches may have nausea that they will try to assuage by eating whatever they can get ahold of, Greer said. Hyper awareness with them is imperative. Treatment Intestinal blockage is a life-threatening situation. The dog will need emergency and often exploratory surgery. The recovery is extended and difficult. After surgery, the dogs are required to stay on IV fluids for 48-72 hours. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
November 5, 2019
Black & Tan Dynamos: The Wash & Wear Manchester The Manchester Terrier has two varieties, Standard and Toy, both descended from the extinct black and tan terrier, according to a panel of experts at the American Manchester Terrier Club National Specialty. The Manchester’s job was to hunt rats and other vermin in England and they retain the high prey drive today. Our experts encourage new owners to be sure their Manchester is on lead when outside a fenced area. “You can have a good recall, but a squirrel will always take precedence,” said Marla Zoz. Key Manchester Points: * High drive, are food motivated but easily distracted. * Very smart, pick up new skills quickly. * Get very attached to their people. Suitable for a house or apartment. * Need lots of physical activity. * Require a lot of attention. * Love being a part of the family. * Need to spend time to develop well balanced companion. * Low maintenance grooming… nails, clean teeth, wash and wear. * Longevity – 15+ years. * Health issues include cardiomyopathy and vWD, a bleeding disorder. When visiting with a potential breeder, be sure to ask if he/she is testing for these conditions with available DNA tests. “You want to go, they’re ready at a moment’s notice. You want to cuddle on the couch, they’re right there,” said Jim Burrows. These dogs are terriers, whether standard or toy sized, our panelists noted. They can “talk a lot.” Everyone agreed that the “four-footed burglar alarm” breed can be vocal. “They’re going to bark if they see something they don’t know,” Burrows said. While generally aloof with strangers, the Manchester will warm up to new folks quickly. The breed needs a lot of socializing to develop a well-rounded dog, the breeders all agreed. Dog aggression, typical of many terriers, is manageable with appropriate socializing and training. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
November 4, 2019
Black & Tan Dynamos: The Wash & Wear Manchester Fun loving, smart, active, long-lived, wash and wear... The Manchester Terrier is an all-around favorite as a companion. The Manchester Terrier has two varieties, Standard and Toy, both descended from the extinct black and tan terrier, according to a panel of experts at the American Manchester Terrier Club National Specialty. The Manchester’s job was to hunt rats and other vermin in England and they retain the high prey drive today. Our experts encourage new owners to be sure their Manchester is on lead when outside a fenced area. “You can have a good recall, but a squirrel will always take precedence,” said Marla Zoz. Key Manchester Points: * High drive, are food motivated but easily distracted. * Very smart, pick up new skills quickly. * Get very attached to their people. Suitable for a house or apartment. * Need lots of physical activity. * Require a lot of attention. * Love being a part of the family. * Need to spend time to develop well balanced companion. * Low maintenance grooming… nails, clean teeth, wash and wear. * Longevity – 15+ years. * Health issues include cardiomyopathy and vWD, a bleeding disorder. When visiting with a potential breeder, be sure to ask if he/she is testing for these conditions with available DNA tests. Standard Manchester Terriers are allowed to have naturally erect ears, button (shown here) or cropped. Toy Manchesters are only shown with naturally erect ears. “You want to go, they’re ready at a moment’s notice. You want to cuddle on the couch, they’re right there,” said Jim Burrows. Toy Manchester Terriers are under 12 pounds, Standard are 12-22 pounds. These dogs are terriers, whether standard or toy sized, our panelists noted. They can “talk a lot.” Everyone agreed that the “four-footed burglar alarm” breed can be vocal. “They’re going to bark if they see something they don’t know,” Burrows said. While generally aloof with strangers, the Manchester will warm up to new folks quickly. The breed needs a lot of socializing to develop a well-rounded dog, the breeders all agreed. Dog aggression, typical of many terriers, is manageable with appropriate socializing and training. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
November 1, 2019
20th Century Secrets in a 21st Century Format, Jaraluv Part two of the powerful interview with Ray and Jana Brinlee of Jaraluv Scottish Deerhounds applies their breeding secrets to today’s society. The small number operation modeled by the Brinlees is far more applicable to today’s world than the huge kennels maintained in the heyday of the sport. “We need breeders to mentor new people,” Ray said. “There might be 20 good breeders and 80 people who breed dogs. There’s a difference.” Ray’s solution to the “more exhibitors, fewer breeders” matrix that is at the center of dog show’s perceived decline is – it’s part of mentorship “Breeders need to encourage pet people to show dogs,” Ray said. “We need breeders to tell folks, ‘that’s a heck of a dog I sold you, let’s try this, let’s go to this show, don’t waste those genes.” The subjective nature of dog shows often is a driving force for exhibitors who turn to companion events, but the Brinlees see a different perspective. “The difference is, as a breeder, you are doing it for the love of the breed,” Jana said. “You are trying to maintain the breed in the best way you can. All these other events are nice, they are fun, but they are not about preserving or maintaining your breed.” Form IS Function “We have to be concerned about the function of our dogs,” Ray noted “but many of our breeds are not allowed to do their historical jobs.” The Deerhound, for example, hunted in mountainous terrain. The flat track racing style of lure coursing doesn’t accurately test the breed’s function, Jana observed. On the other hand, Ray contends that the classic “Deerhound movement…. Easy, active, true… if they do that, they will get around eight hours with the Hunt Masters hunting deer.” Breed standards were written to describe the dogs that were best at their job. “We have to rely on that written word and be careful when you read it. That scares me about the generic show dog judging … the race to get more breeds makes me uncomfortable,” Jana said. “It is important to us breeders that judges are a custodian for our breeds,” Ray added. Listen to part one of the interview here. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
October 31, 2019
20th Century Secrets in a 21st Century Format, Jaraluv MBIS Ch. Jaraluv Ouija – Faith’s daughter who holds the BIS record for Deerhounds in the US with 21 All Breed BIS. Pictured here at 8 years at the SDCA national specialty. Part two of the powerful interview with Ray and Jana Brinlee of Jaraluv Scottish Deerhounds applies their breeding secrets to today’s society. The small number operation modeled by the Brinlees is far more applicable to today’s world than the huge kennels maintained in the heyday of the sport. “We need breeders to mentor new people,” Ray said. “There might be 20 good breeders and 80 people who breed dogs. There's a difference.” Ray’s solution to the “more exhibitors, fewer breeders” matrix that is at the center of dog show’s perceived decline is – it’s part of mentorship “Breeders need to encourage pet people to show dogs,” Ray said. “We need breeders to tell folks, ‘that’s a heck of a dog I sold you, let’s try this, let’s go to this show, don’t waste those genes.” The subjective nature of dog shows often is a driving force for exhibitors who turn to companion events, but the Brinlees see a different perspective. “The difference is, as a breeder, you are doing it for the love of the breed,” Jana said. “You are trying to maintain the breed in the best way you can. All these other events are nice, they are fun, but they are not about preserving or maintaining your breed.” Form IS Function “We have to be concerned about the function of our dogs,” Ray noted “but many of our breeds are not allowed to do their historical jobs.” The Deerhound, for example, hunted in mountainous terrain. The flat track racing style of lure coursing doesn’t accurately test the breed’s function, Jana observed. On the other hand, Ray contends that the classic “Deerhound movement…. Easy, active, true… if they do that, they will get around eight hours with the Hunt Masters hunting deer.” Breed standards were written to describe the dogs that were best at their job. “We have to rely on that written word and be careful when you read it. That scares me about the generic show dog judging … the race to get more breeds makes me uncomfortable,” Jana said. “It is important to us breeders that judges are a custodian for our breeds,” Ray added. Listen to part one of the interview here. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
October 28, 2019
Jaraluv Scottish Deerhounds: 7 Secrets to Success Ray and Jana Brinlee, Jaraluv Scottish Deerhounds, have a truly notable record. Breeding on a very limited basis since the early 1980s, they have produced a total of 94 dogs. Of which, 75 are champions of record and 11 are Best in Show Winners. A 12 percent ratio of BIS winners to puppies produced is remarkable in any breed, never mind an aloof, tousled sighthound. The Brinlees are world-renowned for producing a very identifiable style of Deerhound. They were selected as AKC Hound Breeder of the year in 2016. In this part one of a two part interview, Ray and Jana share what developed very organically through their time in the breed, which they have distilled into seven “secrets to success” for any breeder. Secrets to Success * Imprint * Experience, mentors * Foundation stock * Dedication and commitment * Breeding plan * Presentation * Sharpen the Saw Imprint the image of perfection in your breed in your mind’s eye. Be SURE that the vision you breed to is accurate to the standard! Gain experience and seek mentors who will guide you, both in the breed and in other breeds. These folks can give you direction and encouragement. Start with the best foundation stock you can get your hands on. Whatever your goals are, start with best and do the research to find complementary breedings. Breeding dogs successfully requires dedication and commitment of time, money and effort. As Jana notes, nobody is getting rich doing this. Every breeder needs a breeding plan. This is a point of distinction that is worth noting. Plan ahead. KNOW what you want to do and how you want to do it. Admittedly plans can change, but start with a plan and work the plan for the best chance of success. Outcross? Linebreeding? What’s your plan? Presentation is a major key to success. If you’re breeding show dogs, they need to be in condition, in proper weight and trim and they need to be immaculately presented whether that is by an amateur or a professional, don’t ask judges to “find the diamond in the rough.” Sharpen the Saw is a great “Rayism”… Ray describes this as a wrap up, as a continuing striving for success. Of knowing history – “you can’t mow the lawn in the dark because you can’t see where you’ve been.” Join us for Part 2 on Thursday of this valuable series. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
October 28, 2019
Jaraluv Scottish Deerhounds: 7 Secrets to Success BIS & MBISS Ch. Jaraluv Keep The Faith, shown here at Eukanuba. Three-time consecutive national specialty winner -- 2002, 2003, and 2004. Ray and Jana Brinlee, Jaraluv Scottish Deerhounds, have a truly notable record. Breeding on a very limited basis since the early 1980s, they have produced a total of 94 dogs. Of which, 75 are champions of record and 11 are Best in Show Winners. A 12 percent ratio of BIS winners to puppies produced is remarkable in any breed, never mind an aloof, tousled sighthound. The Brinlees are world-renowned for producing a very identifiable style of Deerhound. They were selected as AKC Hound Breeder of the year in 2016. In this part one of a two part interview, Ray and Jana share what developed very organically through their time in the breed, which they have distilled into seven “secrets to success” for any breeder. Secrets to Success * Imprint * Experience, mentors * Foundation stock * Dedication and commitment * Breeding plan * Presentation * Sharpen the Saw Imprint the image of perfection in your breed in your mind’s eye. Be SURE that the vision you breed to is accurate to the standard! Gain experience and seek mentors who will guide you, both in the breed and in other breeds. These folks can give you direction and encouragement. Start with the best foundation stock you can get your hands on. Whatever your goals are, start with best and do the research to find complementary breedings. Breeding dogs successfully requires dedication and commitment of time, money and effort. As Jana notes, nobody is getting rich doing this. Every breeder needs a breeding plan. This is a point of distinction that is worth noting. Plan ahead. KNOW what you want to do and how you want to do it. Admittedly plans can change, but start with a plan and work the plan for the best chance of success. Outcross? Linebreeding? What’s your plan? Presentation is a major key to success. If you’re breeding show dogs, they need to be in condition, in proper weight and trim and they need to be immaculately presented whether that is by an amateur or a professional, don’t ask judges to “find the diamond in the rough.” Sharpen the Saw is a great “Rayism”… Ray describes this as a wrap up, as a continuing striving for success. Of knowing history – “you can’t mow the lawn in the dark because you can’t see where you’ve been.” Join us for Part 2 on Thursday of this valuable series. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
October 25, 2019
Golden Retriever Breed Education with Michael Faulkner In honor of the Golden Retriever National Specialty, currently under way in Southern California, Host Laura Reeves visits with legendary judge and breeder Michael Faulkner. Actively involved with Goldens since 1969, Faulkner is deeply passionate about his breed. Primarily a hunting dog “This is the GOLDEN Retriever,” Faulkner said. “They have a coat of lustrous gold, they are a water dog, their form and function is to retrieve. “The standard says ‘primarily a hunting dog,’ moderate, to be shown in good, hard working condition,” Faulkner said “Yellow Wavy Coated Retrievers” The double coat protects and wraps the body, Faulkner said. Early historians talk about the development in Scotland of “yellow, wavy coated retrievers.” “Quite often when you’re judging my breed you’re going to see a coat that wraps the body and it may have a slight wave. That’s perfect. We love it when you can see the natural wrap and frame. The coat should never be curly, but wave is perfectly acceptable,” Faulkner said. Moderation in all things Faulkner compares the correct Golden Retriever to a cow: “Moderate, legs underneath them, big rib cage, short loin, level back, thick thigh, tail straight off the back. It’s not a complicated breed.” A well-known stickler and “old guard” in the breed, Faulkner insists that Goldens were never meant to be “fluffy” and that they “should not look like a baby Newfy.” Proportions are the biggest thing next to grooming, Faulkner said. The breed standard calls for the body to be [12:11], just off square. They should never be long and low. Gentleman’s gun dog “The dogs are not supposed to roll, or lumber (when they move),” Faulkner said. “They are supposed to converge to the center line of travel. People forget that they are supposed to be primarily a hunting dog. “They were kept by the nobility. Bred to go out with the hunter, work close to their side, bring the bird back, shake dry and lie next to fire.” The cold water and rocky terrain of the breed’s native Scotland made endurance essential, Faulkner noted. Any exaggeration would hinder the working dog’s efficiency. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
October 24, 2019
Golden Retriever Breed Education with Michael Faulkner In honor of the Golden Retriever National Specialty, currently under way in Southern California, Host Laura Reeves visits with legendary judge and breeder Michael Faulkner. Actively involved with Goldens since 1969, Faulkner is deeply passionate about his breed. Primarily a hunting dog “This is the GOLDEN Retriever,” Faulkner said. “They have a coat of lustrous gold, they are a water dog, their form and function is to retrieve. “The standard says ‘primarily a hunting dog,’ moderate, to be shown in good, hard working condition,” Faulkner said “Yellow Wavy Coated Retrievers” The double coat protects and wraps the body, Faulkner said. Early historians talk about the development in Scotland of “yellow, wavy coated retrievers.” “Quite often when you’re judging my breed you’re going to see a coat that wraps the body and it may have a slight wave. That’s perfect. We love it when you can see the natural wrap and frame. The coat should never be curly, but wave is perfectly acceptable,” Faulkner said. Moderation in all things Faulkner compares the correct Golden Retriever to a cow: “Moderate, legs underneath them, big rib cage, short loin, level back, thick thigh, tail straight off the back. It’s not a complicated breed.” A well-known stickler and “old guard” in the breed, Faulkner insists that Goldens were never meant to be “fluffy” and that they “should not look like a baby Newfy.” Proportions are the biggest thing next to grooming, Faulkner said. The breed standard calls for the body to be 12:11, just off square. They should never be long and low. Gentleman’s gun dog “The dogs are not supposed to roll, or lumber (when they move),” Faulkner said. “They are supposed to converge to the center line of travel. People forget that they are supposed to be primarily a hunting dog. “They were kept by the nobility. Bred to go out with the hunter, work close to their side, bring the bird back, shake dry and lie next to fire.” The cold water and rocky terrain of the breed’s native Scotland made endurance essential, Faulkner noted. Any exaggeration would hinder the working dog’s efficiency. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
October 22, 2019
Pyrenean Shepherd: Small, Smart, Rare Pyrenean Shepherd fancier Joni McKeown shares details of this endangered herding breed from the Pyrenees mountains of France. The small herding breed accompanied the Great Pyrenees guarding the flocks that moved between the isolated and remote regions of the mountains and valleys. “When people come to shows, everyone thinks they are cute.  They have a mischievous, funny sense of humor, and a really cute little head, but this is a working dog. It should not just be a pretty face,” McKeown said. From the AKC website: These tough, lean, and lively herders, famous for their vigorous and free-flowing movement, come in two coat varieties: rough-faced and smooth-faced. Roughs have profuse, “windswept” hair above the muzzle and a generally harsh coat; smooths have short facial hair, a finer-textured coat, and a slightly longer, pointier muzzle. Both varieties of this sinewy, rectangular breed come in many colors and patterns. Pyr Sheps see the world through dark almond-shaped eyes conveying an alert and cunning expression. PyrSheps are a prime example of why pet owners should learn the history of a breed in order to better understand its temperament and behavior. “Because of their job, the breed is just hardwired to see the world as friend or foe. There’s not a lot of grey area for them. Preserving that heritage is so important. French judges fuss at us for how friendly our dogs are. We kind of live in a world where we need the dogs to be friendlier. But we’re losing genetics if we start turning a Pyrenean Shepherd into a Golden Retriever (temperament). You can’t expect to have that across the board,” McKeown said. Faces rough or smooth Differences between the two “types” are notable. Head and body structure are different and both types are born in the same litter. Traits definitely pass together, McKeown observed. The rough face develops a characteristic “windblown look” of hair on its face, she added. “This is the only breed that only cords on the back half of the body. In France all the adult dogs are corded. Different dogs have different types of cords. In the US you don’t see that many people cording the dogs. It’s a very rustic look. But you can keep them brushed out,” McKeown said. The standard offers no preference for corded or not in the show ring. The coat is described as half way between sheep and goat hair. It has a very coarse texture. Exhibitors are encouraged to not do a lot of bathing or blow drying as it changes the coat texture. The standard also includes strong penalties for trimming anything but the pads of the feet. Best owners PyrSheps can live 17 to 20 years. They need a dedicated owner who will give them lots of activity, McKeown noted. “These dogs really, really need a job. The breed is brilliant. Almost frightening sometimes the things they figure out. They’re not always the best breed for a novice dog owner. More intense even than other herding breeds because they’re closer to the roots,” McKeown said. For More Information: http://www.pyrshepclub.org/breed-info/history/ Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by
October 21, 2019
Pyrenean Shepherd: Small, Smart, Rare Joni McKeown with Pyrenean Shepherds Pyrenean Shepherd fancier Joni McKeown shares details of this endangered herding breed from the Pyrenees mountains of France. The small herding breed accompanied the Great Pyrenees guarding the flocks that moved between the isolated and remote regions of the mountains and valleys. “When people come to shows, everyone thinks they are cute. They have a mischievous, funny sense of humor, and a really cute little head, but this is a working dog. It should not just be a pretty face,” McKeown said. A brindle PyrShep showing cording on the back half of the dog as is correct. From the AKC website: These tough, lean, and lively herders, famous for their vigorous and free-flowing movement, come in two coat varieties: rough-faced and smooth-faced. Roughs have profuse, “windswept” hair above the muzzle and a generally harsh coat; smooths have short facial hair, a finer-textured coat, and a slightly longer, pointier muzzle. Both varieties of this sinewy, rectangular breed come in many colors and patterns. Pyr Sheps see the world through dark almond-shaped eyes conveying an alert and cunning expression. Pyrenean Shepherd puppy PyrSheps are a prime example of why pet owners should learn the history of a breed in order to better understand its temperament and behavior. “Because of their job, the breed is just hardwired to see the world as friend or foe. There's not a lot of grey area for them. Preserving that heritage is so important. French judges fuss at us for how friendly our dogs are. We kind of live in a world where we need the dogs to be friendlier. But we’re losing genetics if we start turning a Pyrenean Shepherd into a Golden Retriever (temperament). You can’t expect to have that across the board,” McKeown said. Faces rough or smooth Differences between the two “types” are notable. Head and body structure are different and both types are born in the same litter. Traits definitely pass together, McKeown observed. The rough face develops a characteristic “windblown look” of hair on its face, she added. "This is the only breed that only cords on the back half of the body. In France all the adult dogs are corded. Different dogs have different types of cords. In the US you don’t see that many people cording the dogs. It's a very rustic look. But you can keep them brushed out," McKeown said. The standard offers no preference for corded or not in the show ring. PyrShep on the move. The coat is described as half way between sheep and goat hair. It has a very coarse texture. Exhibitors are encouraged to not do a lot of bathing or blow drying as it changes the coat texture. The standard also includes strong penalties for trimming anything but the pads of the feet. Best owners PyrSheps can live 17 to 20 years. They need a dedicated owner who will give them lots of activity, McKeown noted. "These dogs really, really need a job. The breed is brilliant. Almost frightening sometimes the things they figure out. They're not always the best breed for a novice dog owner. More intense even than other herding breeds because they're closer to the roots," McKeown said. For More Information: http://www.pyrshepclub.org/breed-info/history/ Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by
October 17, 2019
Secret to Success with Owner-Handler Matt Palmer The 2019 Secret to Success award goes to owner-handler Matt Palmer winning Best of Breed at Westminster Kennel Club with his first show dog. Host Laura Reeves gets up close and personal with everyone’s newest hero. A Missouri State Public Defender, Palmer discovered Golden Retrievers at the Kennel Club of Philadelphia dog show he visited on a whim. He took AKC’s advice on how to find a reputable breeder, winding up with “great mentors, breeders who took a chance on selling a nice puppy to someone they didn’t know.” “It’s remarkable the number of people who have “scaffolded me” in this sport,” Palmer said. “People have been amazing. Everyone I’ve come across has helped me in one way or another.” Palmer said his secret to success came when he was working his dog at a handling class. An instructor noticed the dog tensing up when he was hand-stacked. After working through the problem, Palmer said he realized he “was worried about my jacket riding up and basically mooning everyone.” He bought a pair of suspenders on Amazon and his confidence skyrocketed. The team’s success took off from that point. “I now own 10 pairs of suspenders and have a couple pair of extras in my tack box,” Palmer said. “I wanted the purple and gold” Palmer said his high school sports experiences left him “competitive to a fault,” and gave him the drive to achieve more. While he competed in the National Owner Handled Series his first year or so, glad to have extra time in the ring to practice, “I wanted purple and gold, not the maroon ribbon,” he opined. Missouri to Manhattan Deciding to attend Westminster Kennel Club was sort of a lark for Palmer. “I thought it would be cool to go see it. I had absolutely no expectation of significant success,” he said. As his case load was starting to build up at work, Palmer had planned not to go. After visiting with professional handler friends at the dog show, he finally decided to go ahead and make the trip with them. Professionals, not adversaries “I think there is a divide between owner-handler and professional handler when there doesn’t need to be one,” Palmer noted. “I tell people I’m happy to help, hold dogs, etc  if they could give me a few minutes of feedback. “Any chance to learn from professionals is invaluable. I try to absorb things that are second nature, reflexive to them. “My (professional handler) friend came early to meet me at the Piers so he could be ringside for the breed. He could have been in bed, but instead he grabs a bucket and a towel and stands ringside and cheers me on.” Poop strike The most terrifying moment of the Garden experience, Palmer said, is his dog wouldn’t potty. “He grew up in Kansas and Missouri, he’d never seen all that concrete. He wouldn’t poop! I was mortified he was going to touch that green carpet and decide it was a perfect place to poop,” Palmer said wryly. “Dog shows have been a great social outlet,” Palmer said. “We’ll keep going. It’s so cool, everywhere you go, you see somebody you met somewhere else… “Sometimes we win, most the time we don’t. But when we do, it’s pretty fun.” For more inspiring stories of owner-handlers check out some of these past episodes: 57 – Best in Show: How an Owner-Handler Competes with the Pros – Tricia Stanczyk 318 – Owner Handler Secrets: Make a Plan and Be Consistent | Pure Dog Talk
October 17, 2019
Secret to Success with Owner-Handler Matt Palmer Missouri public defender Matt Palmer, with his Golden Retriever, on his way to winning Best of Breed at Westminster Kennel Club with his first show dog. The 2019 Secret to Success award goes to owner-handler Matt Palmer winning Best of Breed at Westminster Kennel Club with his first show dog. Host Laura Reeves gets up close and personal with everyone’s newest hero. A Missouri State Public Defender, Palmer discovered Golden Retrievers at the Kennel Club of Philadelphia dog show he visited on a whim. He took AKC's advice on how to find a reputable breeder, winding up with "great mentors, breeders who took a chance on selling a nice puppy to someone they didn't know." "It's remarkable the number of people who have “scaffolded me” in this sport," Palmer said. "People have been amazing. Everyone I’ve come across has helped me in one way or another." Palmer said his secret to success came when he was working his dog at a handling class. An instructor noticed the dog tensing up when he was hand-stacked. After working through the problem, Palmer said he realized he "was worried about my jacket riding up and basically mooning everyone." He bought a pair of suspenders on Amazon and his confidence skyrocketed. The team's success took off from that point. "I now own 10 pairs of suspenders and have a couple pair of extras in my tack box," Palmer said. "I wanted the purple and gold" Palmer said his high school sports experiences left him "competitive to a fault," and gave him the drive to achieve more. While he competed in the National Owner Handled Series his first year or so, glad to have extra time in the ring to practice, "I wanted purple and gold, not the maroon ribbon," he opined. Missouri to Manhattan Deciding to attend Westminster Kennel Club was sort of a lark for Palmer. "I thought it would be cool to go see it. I had absolutely no expectation of significant success," he said. As his case load was starting to build up at work, Palmer had planned not to go. After visiting with professional handler friends at the dog show, he finally decided to go ahead and make the trip with them. Professionals, not adversaries "I think there is a divide between owner-handler and professional handler when there doesn’t need to be one," Palmer noted. "I tell people I'm happy to help, hold dogs, etc if they could give me a few minutes of feedback. "Any chance to learn from professionals is invaluable. I try to absorb things that are second nature, reflexive to them. "My (professional handler) friend came early to meet me at the Piers so he could be ringside for the breed. He could have been in bed, but instead he grabs a bucket and a towel and stands ringside and cheers me on." Poop strike The most terrifying moment of the Garden experience, Palmer said, is his dog wouldn't potty. "He grew up in Kansas and Missouri, he'd never seen all that concrete. He wouldn’t poop! I was mortified he was going to touch that green carpet and decide it was a perfect place to poop," Palmer said wryly. "Dog shows have been a great social outlet," Palmer said. "We'll keep going. It's so cool, everywhere you go, you see somebody you met somewhere else… "Sometimes we win, most the time we don’t. But when we do, it’s pretty fun." For more inspiring stories of owner-handlers check out some of these past episodes: 57 – Best in Show: How an Owner-Handler Competes with the Pros – Tricia Stanczyk 318 – Owner Handler Secrets: Make a Plan and Be Consistent...
October 15, 2019
John Buddie part 2: Respect, Reverence and Romance Master Breeder, John Buddie, Tartanside Collies, talks about the three “Rs”: Respect of the individuals who went before, reverence of finding and holding these people in high regard, and the romance of the history and studying the lore of the breed. “If it’s all statistics and numbers and cut and dried, I think you burn out,” Buddie said. In the second half of our interview, Buddie talks about maintaining virtues, the importance of selection and having heroes. “You can lose the existing quality in a line by not maintaining emphasis on virtues, especially when you are trying to achieve improvement in an outcross,” Buddie said. “Don’t put so much emphasis on that new added characteristic that you lose sight of what you’ve worked so hard on to date” Outcrosses “You don’t always get the results you were aiming for until the generation after what you’ve done. The key is what you do with the outcrossed generation that makes or breaks you.” Selection, selection, selection * Take time to really observe and evaluate puppies at various ages. * Don’t get rid of a puppy too early or too late. * Good, but not good enough. Is it the best of the best or the best of what you have? * Make a list of virtues of sire/dam… Identify what you most want to keep a puppy for from the litter. * Watch puppies in a pen. Too many folks want to just pick up and look at profile. * I take my time when evaluating puppies. People rush to judgement. * Photos give you a static picture and can be inaccurate based on how legs are placed. * More important to see in a natural position. Back in the day, the optimum time to finish a dog was three years old, Buddie noted. “I’m afraid too many people are just getting the points, not really appreciating the dog show itself, the evaluation process, who you showed to and what a difference it made. “Be stimulated by being inspired. Just make sure you’re inspired by the right person who really believes in the sanctity of the breed and the sport,” Buddie said. Listen to Part 1 of our conversation here. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
October 14, 2019
John Buddie part 2: Respect, Reverence and Romance Master Breeder, John Buddie, Tartanside Collies, talks about the three "Rs": Respect of the individuals who went before, reverence of finding and holding these people in high regard, and the romance of the history and studying the lore of the breed. "If it’s all statistics and numbers and cut and dried, I think you burn out," Buddie said. In the second half of our interview, Buddie talks about maintaining virtues, the importance of selection and having heroes. "You can lose the existing quality in a line by not maintaining emphasis on virtues, especially when you are trying to achieve improvement in an outcross," Buddie said. "Don’t put so much emphasis on that new added characteristic that you lose sight of what you’ve worked so hard on to date" Outcrosses "You don’t always get the results you were aiming for until the generation after what you’ve done. The key is what you do with the outcrossed generation that makes or breaks you." Selection, selection, selection * Take time to really observe and evaluate puppies at various ages. * Don’t get rid of a puppy too early or too late. * Good, but not good enough. Is it the best of the best or the best of what you have? * Make a list of virtues of sire/dam… Identify what you most want to keep a puppy for from the litter. * Watch puppies in a pen. Too many folks want to just pick up and look at profile. * I take my time when evaluating puppies. People rush to judgement. * Photos give you a static picture and can be inaccurate based on how legs are placed. * More important to see in a natural position. Back in the day, the optimum time to finish a dog was three years old, Buddie noted. "I'm afraid too many people are just getting the points, not really appreciating the dog show itself, the evaluation process, who you showed to and what a difference it made. "Be stimulated by being inspired. Just make sure you’re inspired by the right person who really believes in the sanctity of the breed and the sport," Buddie said. Listen to Part 1 of our conversation here. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
October 10, 2019
Breeding Rules from John Buddie, Tartanside Collies John Buddie has spent a lifetime with Collies. His Tartanside family of dogs is world famous and widely respected. His Breeding Rules are a distillation of more than 50 years’ experience and success. This is part one of a two part series. Buddie’s original breed mentor gave him much of the knowledge he continues to share today. “This was mentorship in the days of letter writing, plus weekends spent doing kennel chores, brushing dogs, really hands on work,” Buddie said. “When I asked a question, she would ask me a question to make me think.” Spoon-feeding someone an answer doesn’t have the same impact as helping someone come to their own conclusion, Buddie observed. Buddie’s “rules” are guidelines that are applicable across breeds and generations. *Leave the sport/breed no worse than you found it Show respect for the lines and breeders who came before by preserving that quality. *The number of champions finished/ribbons earned is not the measure of a breeder “There have been many important contributing breeders who changed the face of a breed who bred on a small scale,” Buddie said. “For every record achieved there will always be someone who can break that record.” *Learn to read a pedigree Research, look to breeders of the past, learn what they accomplished and how. *Look to the grandparents Most top producing dogs are just carrying the pedigree forward. Top sires, often the strength comes from dam side. “I’ve had great success using the Maternal grandsire effect, in other words breed a quality bitch to her maternal grandsire,” Buddie said. *You can never outrun a problem “It’s a lot easier to rid yourself of problems with testing now. But you have to admit the problem and deal with it. It can mean scrapping a couple generations of breedings to clear it out. But you have to protect your breeding program as a whole.” *Learn to see quality in other people’s dogs “We make evaluations of dogs when we’re competitors… when you’re judging you realize you weren’t as open minded as you thought you were.” *Attend national to see dogs that you wouldn’t see any other time Join us next week for the continuation of this fabulous conversation. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
October 10, 2019
Breeding Rules from John Buddie, Tartanside Collies John Buddie with L to R - Ch.Tartanside Picturesque, Ch. Tartanside Audaicious (lying) Ch. Tartanside Arabesque, Ch. Tartanside Limerick Debut, Ch. Tartanside Aliage, Ch. Tartanside Imagination. John Buddie has spent a lifetime with Collies. His Tartanside family of dogs is world famous and widely respected. His Breeding Rules are a distillation of more than 50 years' experience and success. This is part one of a two part series. Buddie's original breed mentor gave him much of the knowledge he continues to share today. "This was mentorship in the days of letter writing, plus weekends spent doing kennel chores, brushing dogs, really hands on work," Buddie said. "When I asked a question, she would ask me a question to make me think." Spoon-feeding someone an answer doesn’t have the same impact as helping someone come to their own conclusion, Buddie observed. Buddie's "rules" are guidelines that are applicable across breeds and generations. *Leave the sport/breed no worse than you found it Show respect for the lines and breeders who came before by preserving that quality. *The number of champions finished/ribbons earned is not the measure of a breeder "There have been many important contributing breeders who changed the face of a breed who bred on a small scale," Buddie said. "For every record achieved there will always be someone who can break that record." *Learn to read a pedigree Research, look to breeders of the past, learn what they accomplished and how. *Look to the grandparents Most top producing dogs are just carrying the pedigree forward. Top sires, often the strength comes from dam side. "I've had great success using the Maternal grandsire effect, in other words breed a quality bitch to her maternal grandsire," Buddie said. *You can never outrun a problem "It's a lot easier to rid yourself of problems with testing now. But you have to admit the problem and deal with it. It can mean scrapping a couple generations of breedings to clear it out. But you have to protect your breeding program as a whole." *Learn to see quality in other people’s dogs "We make evaluations of dogs when we’re competitors… when you're judging you realize you weren’t as open minded as you thought you were." *Attend national to see dogs that you wouldn’t see any other time Join us next week for the continuation of this fabulous conversation. Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
October 8, 2019
Dogs Saving Cats: Livestock Guardians and Cheetahs My very special guest today is Dr. Laurie Marker of the Cheetah Conservation Fund. We discuss her work with Cheetahs and “dogs saving cats”… dogs as “emotional support” animals for Cheetahs raised in captivity, as livestock guardians for flocks in Namibia so the farmers don’t kill the Cheetahs who might otherwise prey on their stock, even dogs tracking down “scat” for research. I first met Marker some 40 years ago when she was working in my hometown at the Wildlife Safari. What an incredible opportunity this conversation was! LGD Program began in 1994 “We decided to celebrate the program anniversary by naming 2019 the Year of the Livestock Guarding Dog. The program holds a special place in my heart. It has been incredibly successful at mitigating human/wildlife conflict not only in Namibia but across the cheetah’s current range,” Marker said. “Anatolian shepherds were chosen for many reasons,” Marker notes on the organization’s website. “The breed has a 6,000-year pedigree and history of guarding sheep in Turkey. Their short coats protect them from thorns and bushes being caught in their coats, and make it easier for them to adapt to fluctuating temperatures – both hot and cold. Their independent nature and ability to think for themselves means they don’t need to have people with them to successfully guard their livestock. They were the best choice for the conditions faced on Namibian farmlands. They have the will and drive to travel vast distances with their herd due to their natural loyalty and endurance. In February, 1994, four Anatolian shepherds, the breed of dogs used in the research that took place in Oregon, were established with herds of sheep and goats here in Namibia. The dogs were donated by the Birinci Kennels in the USA.” Endangered species and endangered breeds The LGD program has since placed close to 700 dogs with farmers in and around Namibia. Marker said she has seen a dramatic decrease in the number of big cats killed to protect livestock and a stabilization of the numbers in this critically endangered species. Fewer than 7500 Cheetahs are believed to exist in the wild. Listen to the podcast for more of this outstanding discussion. Amazingly, genetic diversity concerns of the same kind we face with purebred dogs are also an issue for these unique big cats. Learn more about Marker’s Cheetah Studbook! Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
October 7, 2019
Dogs Saving Cats: Livestock Guardians and Cheetahs Dr. Laurie Marker with one of the Livestock Guarding Dogs bred and raised by the Cheetah Conservation Fund to give farmers in Namibia safety for their flocks. My very special guest today is Dr. Laurie Marker of the Cheetah Conservation Fund. We discuss her work with Cheetahs and "dogs saving cats"... dogs as "emotional support" animals for Cheetahs raised in captivity, as livestock guardians for flocks in Namibia so the farmers don't kill the Cheetahs who might otherwise prey on their stock, even dogs tracking down "scat" for research. I first met Marker some 40 years ago when she was working in my hometown at the Wildlife Safari. What an incredible opportunity this conversation was! LGD Program began in 1994 “We decided to celebrate the program anniversary by naming 2019 the Year of the Livestock Guarding Dog. The program holds a special place in my heart. It has been incredibly successful at mitigating human/wildlife conflict not only in Namibia but across the cheetah’s current range,” Marker said. “Anatolian shepherds were chosen for many reasons,” Marker notes on the organization’s website. “The breed has a 6,000-year pedigree and history of guarding sheep in Turkey. Their short coats protect them from thorns and bushes being caught in their coats, and make it easier for them to adapt to fluctuating temperatures – both hot and cold. Their independent nature and ability to think for themselves means they don’t need to have people with them to successfully guard their livestock. They were the best choice for the conditions faced on Namibian farmlands. They have the will and drive to travel vast distances with their herd due to their natural loyalty and endurance. In February, 1994, four Anatolian shepherds, the breed of dogs used in the research that took place in Oregon, were established with herds of sheep and goats here in Namibia. The dogs were donated by the Birinci Kennels in the USA.” Endangered species and endangered breeds Puppies in the CCF's Livestock Guarding Dog program. The LGD program has since placed close to 700 dogs with farmers in and around Namibia. Marker said she has seen a dramatic decrease in the number of big cats killed to protect livestock and a stabilization of the numbers in this critically endangered species. Fewer than 7500 Cheetahs are believed to exist in the wild. Listen to the podcast for more of this outstanding discussion. Amazingly, genetic diversity concerns of the same kind we face with purebred dogs are also an issue for these unique big cats. Learn more about Marker’s Cheetah Studbook! Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
October 4, 2019
Poopy Happens: Puppy Diarrhea Causes and Treatments Puppy diarrhea can be serious and dangerous due to dehydration risks, says Dr. Marty Greer, DVM. While “poopy happens” is a pretty common issue in a litter of puppies, some causes are more serious than others. Causes of “bad potty” can range from the benign to the deadly and knowing which is which and how to treat them can be a matter of life and death. “I can’t believe I ate the WHOLE thing….” Overeating is pretty common, particularly when puppies transition to solid food during weaning. “While nursing, the diarrhea is white in color, and the puppy is very hefty,” Greer said. She strongly recommends dog specific probiotics during weaning, particularly Proviable or Fortiflora. “What do you have in your mouth?!” Eating inappropriate stuff like rocks, sticks, leaves is another common problem in puppies that can cause stomach upset and loose stools. Since puppies are curious and often investigate their new and expanding world with their mouths, it can also be dangerous! Watch what they pick up and police their areas for hazards. All kinds of bad bugs Viral infections such as parvovirus and distemper are life threatening emergencies. Certain breeds don’t titer well to parvo vaccines and these diseases can even be transmitted by raccoons in “latrines.” Parasites, Greer noted, affect as much as 95 percent of puppies. Worm puppies at 2, 4, 6, 8 weeks if the bitch is not on dewormer *during* pregnancy. Greer recommends a specific protocol of treating the pregnant bitch with fenbendazole daily from the 5th week of pregnancy to the 2nd week of lactation. “You can worm bitch forever, but parasites will encyst in her muscles,” Greer said. “The stress of pregnancy and lactation reactivates these into her bloodstream. The parasites are then passed through placenta AND milk to the puppies. Puppies that are still nursing, are still receiving the larval form of the parasite through milk.” Giardia and coccidia are common in puppies. Giardia responds to Panacur. Coccidia responds to Albon. Cleanliness is next godliness Bleach is my favorite disinfectant. Visit this site to learn about proper dilution in different scenarios: https://www.aspcapro.org/resource/bleach-dilution-calculator Treatment Kaopectate, the human grade over the counter item, has changed formula and metabolizes as aspirin in the dog, Greer said. She strongly recommends a low-cost and effect solution, the original kaolin-pectin. And don’t forget to send your puppies home with insurance!! Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by (and highly recommends!):
October 3, 2019
Poopy Happens: Puppy Diarrhea Causes and Treatments Puppy diarrhea can be serious and dangerous due to dehydration risks, says Dr. Marty Greer, DVM. While “poopy happens” is a pretty common issue in a litter of puppies, some causes are more serious than others. Causes of "bad potty" can range from the benign to the deadly and knowing which is which and how to treat them can be a matter of life and death. "I can't believe I ate the WHOLE thing...." Overeating is pretty common, particularly when puppies transition to solid food during weaning. "While nursing, the diarrhea is white in color, and the puppy is very hefty," Greer said. She strongly recommends dog specific probiotics during weaning, particularly Proviable or Fortiflora. "What do you have in your mouth?!" Eating inappropriate stuff like rocks, sticks, leaves is another common problem in puppies that can cause stomach upset and loose stools. Since puppies are curious and often investigate their new and expanding world with their mouths, it can also be dangerous! Watch what they pick up and police their areas for hazards. All kinds of bad bugs Viral infections such as parvovirus and distemper are life threatening emergencies. Certain breeds don't titer well to parvo vaccines and these diseases can even be transmitted by raccoons in “latrines.” Parasites, Greer noted, affect as much as 95 percent of puppies. Worm puppies at 2, 4, 6, 8 weeks if the bitch is not on dewormer *during* pregnancy. Greer recommends a specific protocol of treating the pregnant bitch with fenbendazole daily from the 5th week of pregnancy to the 2nd week of lactation. "You can worm bitch forever, but parasites will encyst in her muscles," Greer said. "The stress of pregnancy and lactation reactivates these into her bloodstream. The parasites are then passed through placenta AND milk to the puppies. Puppies that are still nursing, are still receiving the larval form of the parasite through milk." Giardia and coccidia are common in puppies. Giardia responds to Panacur. Coccidia responds to Albon. Cleanliness is next godliness Bleach is my favorite disinfectant. Visit this site to learn about proper dilution in different scenarios: https://www.aspcapro.org/resource/bleach-dilution-calculator Treatment Kaopectate, the human grade over the counter item, has changed formula and metabolizes as aspirin in the dog, Greer said. She strongly recommends a low-cost and effect solution, the original kaolin-pectin. And don't forget to send your puppies home with insurance!! Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by (and highly recommends!):
October 1, 2019
MORE on Preserving Our Breeds. What can WE do? Today we have more lively conversation. Pure Dog Talk’s host Laura Reeves moderates part 2 of a Saturday Symposium panel discussion at the Rogue Valley Kennel Club show on the topic of “Preserving Our Breeds. What can WE do?” Panelists are Ed Thomason, professional handler and noted breeder of American Staffordshire Terriers; Michelle Santana, AKC Breeder of the Year of Doberman Pinschers; and, Fran Stephens, Saint Bernard breeder-judge and AKC delegate for Puyallup Valley Dog Fanciers. The panelists discuss a recent presentation to the delegate body by Bill Shelton and Doug Johnson among other areas of interest in which purebred dog fanciers can promote their breeds and purebred dogs in general. Reach out to the community “Quit blaming other people,” Reeves said. “WE need to step up and not just on Facebook, all social media is important. All breeders are on the same side. We don’t have to like how other people breed. We can help them do better. Help them improve.” Thomason agreed. “Some of the greatest breeders in this country that ever bred dogs kept and housed over 100 dogs. Why wouldn’t we help these commercial breeders breed better dogs. “We don’t breed enough dogs. It’s as simple as that,” Thomason said. Go out in public with your dogs Stephens related her all breed club’s struggle to get club members to come share their dogs at the Washington state fair on Labor Day weekend. “We have a barn and booth space from PVDF,” Stephens said. “We see *hundreds of thousands* of people, families with children. come to see the dogs… It’s like pulling teeth to get club members to come. Go, take your dogs to public events. Put your dogs out in public so people can see you. Then breed more dogs.” Audience member Ray Brinlee, who started showing dogs in 1959, noted that the ’73 oil embargo is what brought on dog show clusters in order to save gas. “It was a terrible mistake,” Brinlee said. “Dog shows need to serve the community.” Just Be NICE! An audience member, Rebecca, recounted her own efforts to educate clients who hire her for behavioral training of their dogs. “When I recommend they come to a show and talk to people, the breeders start with why they shouldn’t own this breed,” Rebecca said. “It took *15* years to talk someone into selling me a show dog. It frustrates me that my clients go to people with no health testing on their dogs because those people are nice to them. It’s sad that we have to tell people to make friends in other breeds and get a thick skin. Hardest thing to be a new person, and you don’t know who you can go to…” “The main thing we need to keep in mind,” Stephens said, “is we have to keep breeding our dogs. Our breeds. If we don’t, they’ll go away. It’s as simple as that. Deciding to spay/neuter everything not in your control is detrimental to the breed. The dog may have a fault you don’t want, but may have good qualities from your line that can complement someone else’s lines. We have shot ourselves in the foot by spay/neuter more than 50% of our litters.” Borzoi breeder Kristina Terra ended the discussion with a positive idea. When members of the public as if one of her dogs is a rescue, she replies “No! In fact she hasn’t had a bad second in her life. And neither has her mother or grandmother…” Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
September 30, 2019
MORE on Preserving Our Breeds. What can WE do? Today we have more lively conversation. Pure Dog Talk’s host Laura Reeves moderates part 2 of a Saturday Symposium panel discussion at the Rogue Valley Kennel Club show on the topic of “Preserving Our Breeds. What can WE do?” Panelists are Ed Thomason, professional handler and noted breeder of American Staffordshire Terriers; Michelle Santana, AKC Breeder of the Year of Doberman Pinschers; and, Fran Stephens, Saint Bernard breeder-judge and AKC delegate for Puyallup Valley Dog Fanciers. The panelists discuss a recent presentation to the delegate body by Bill Shelton and Doug Johnson among other areas of interest in which purebred dog fanciers can promote their breeds and purebred dogs in general. Reach out to the community "Quit blaming other people," Reeves said. "WE need to step up and not just on Facebook, all social media is important. All breeders are on the same side. We don’t have to like how other people breed. We can help them do better. Help them improve." Thomason agreed. "Some of the greatest breeders in this country that ever bred dogs kept and housed over 100 dogs. Why wouldn’t we help these commercial breeders breed better dogs. "We don’t breed enough dogs. It's as simple as that," Thomason said. Go out in public with your dogs Stephens related her all breed club's struggle to get club members to come share their dogs at the Washington state fair on Labor Day weekend. "We have a barn and booth space from PVDF," Stephens said. "We see *hundreds of thousands* of people, families with children. come to see the dogs… It's like pulling teeth to get club members to come. Go, take your dogs to public events. Put your dogs out in public so people can see you. Then breed more dogs." Audience member Ray Brinlee, who started showing dogs in 1959, noted that the ’73 oil embargo is what brought on dog show clusters in order to save gas. "It was a terrible mistake," Brinlee said. "Dog shows need to serve the community." Just Be NICE! An audience member, Rebecca, recounted her own efforts to educate clients who hire her for behavioral training of their dogs. "When I recommend they come to a show and talk to people, the breeders start with why they shouldn’t own this breed," Rebecca said. "It took *15* years to talk someone into selling me a show dog. It frustrates me that my clients go to people with no health testing on their dogs because those people are nice to them. It’s sad that we have to tell people to make friends in other breeds and get a thick skin. Hardest thing to be a new person, and you don’t know who you can go to..." "The main thing we need to keep in mind," Stephens said, "is we have to keep breeding our dogs. Our breeds. If we don’t, they’ll go away. It’s as simple as that. Deciding to spay/neuter everything not in your control is detrimental to the breed. The dog may have a fault you don’t want, but may have good qualities from your line that can complement someone else’s lines. We have shot ourselves in the foot by spay/neuter more than 50% of our litters." Borzoi breeder Kristina Terra ended the discussion with a positive idea. When members of the public as if one of her dogs is a rescue, she replies "No! In fact she hasn’t had a bad second in her life. And neither has her mother or grandmother…" Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
September 27, 2019
Preserving Our Breeds. What can WE do? Pure Dog Talk’s host Laura Reeves moderates a Saturday Symposium panel discussion at the Rogue Valley Kennel Club show on the topic of “Preserving Our Breeds. What can WE do?” This is part one of the discussion. Part two will post next week. Panelists are Ed Thomason, professional handler and noted breeder of American Staffordshire Terriers; Michelle Santana, AKC Breeder of the Year of Doberman Pinschers; and, Fran Stephens, Saint Bernard breeder-judge and AKC delegate for Puyallup Valley Dog Fanciers. The panelists discuss a recent presentation (watch the entire presentation here) to the delegate body by Bill Shelton and Doug Johnson among other areas of interest in which purebred dog fanciers can promote their breeds and purebred dogs in general. “Tell our story” “We have fallen into hiding the fact that we’re breeders,” Thomason said. “Don’t be afraid to say I breed purebred dogs because I’m want to know what I’m going to get,” Stephens said. “We have allowed doodle breeders to become a fad,” Thomason said. “You go underground because you have more dogs than you’re supposed to. But on social media, you can promote your breed, your breeding program without telling where you live. The pet puppy market is a billion dollar industry. Not saying leave here and be puppy mills. Market being manipulated by doodle breeders and rescues. We don’t share our stories. We have to or this ain’t going to be here.” Education is critical Santana discussed her goal of educating John Q Public. “I picked a random pet Doberman social page,” Santana said. “Thousands of people who own a companion Doberman. They need education. Any time I come across an educational article I share to that page. Spay/neuter as an example. Just pick one site that doesn’t get a broad spectrum of education and share to that page. We need to spread this information to people not in our circle. We’re myopic. We can talk to ourselves all we want. But we need to reach out to these people outside our circle.” Stephens noted that there is a vast market for dogs in this country that is largely being filled by doodle breeders and rescue imports. “There are plenty of people wanting dogs,” Stephens said. “It’s how we reach them. How we talk to them.” Join us next week for Part 2 of the discussion!! Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
September 26, 2019
Preserving Our Breeds. What can WE do? Pure Dog Talk’s host Laura Reeves moderates a Saturday Symposium panel discussion at the Rogue Valley Kennel Club show on the topic of “Preserving Our Breeds. What can WE do?” This is part one of the discussion. Part two will post next week. Panelists are Ed Thomason, professional handler and noted breeder of American Staffordshire Terriers; Michelle Santana, AKC Breeder of the Year of Doberman Pinschers; and, Fran Stephens, Saint Bernard breeder-judge and AKC delegate for Puyallup Valley Dog Fanciers. The panelists discuss a recent presentation (watch the entire presentation here) to the delegate body by Bill Shelton and Doug Johnson among other areas of interest in which purebred dog fanciers can promote their breeds and purebred dogs in general. "Tell our story” “We have fallen into hiding the fact that we’re breeders,” Thomason said. “Don’t be afraid to say I breed purebred dogs because I’m want to know what I’m going to get,” Stephens said. “We have allowed doodle breeders to become a fad,” Thomason said. “You go underground because you have more dogs than you’re supposed to. But on social media, you can promote your breed, your breeding program without telling where you live. The pet puppy market is a billion dollar industry. Not saying leave here and be puppy mills. Market being manipulated by doodle breeders and rescues. We don’t share our stories. We have to or this ain’t going to be here." Education is critical Santana discussed her goal of educating John Q Public. "I picked a random pet Doberman social page," Santana said. "Thousands of people who own a companion Doberman. They need education. Any time I come across an educational article I share to that page. Spay/neuter as an example. Just pick one site that doesn’t get a broad spectrum of education and share to that page. We need to spread this information to people not in our circle. We’re myopic. We can talk to ourselves all we want. But we need to reach out to these people outside our circle." Stephens noted that there is a vast market for dogs in this country that is largely being filled by doodle breeders and rescue imports. "There are plenty of people wanting dogs," Stephens said. "It's how we reach them. How we talk to them." Join us next week for Part 2 of the discussion!! Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
September 24, 2019
Dog Judging, Rumors and Reality Checks AKC judge Lee Whittier, founder of Dog Show Mentor and a former AKC Field Rep, and host Laura Reeves talk turkey about judging, judges, the process and the results. Some of the key take-aways from the conversation: * Judges are not all created equal. Some ARE better than others. * Judges WANT and TRY to do a good job. * Judges spend a LOT of time, money and grief to earn the honor of presiding from the center of the ring. Check out the YouTube video of the PureDogTalk Friday Night Forum panel discussion. Current AKC Executive Field Representative Bryan Martin, and AKC judges Brian Meyer and Sylvie McGee share a TON of information about the process of becoming an AKC approved judge. * What a judge sees in the center of the ring is often WAY different than what you see outside the ring. When you see a dog week in and week out, the accumulated knowledge may, in some cases, create a different picture than what the judge has during his/her 2 minutes in the ring. * Judges are NOT hatched from an egg! I say this all the time at the panel discussions. I think exhibitors forget this part. All judges started at basically the same place you are today. They showed dogs, they bred dogs, they schlepped the gear and scooped the poop, they drove the miles and slept in the sketchy hotel rooms. Every single judge in the ring has been there, done that and most likely a whole lot more. * Lee and I agree that we risk accusations of being a bit Pollyanna and acknowledge that bad apples exist, but that we, the exhibitors, should not allow them to spoil the whole basket. * Exhibitors will get the most enjoyment from their dog show experiences if they choose a positive social group, do a little research about their judges and try not to get wrapped up in the rumor-mongering when it happens. Make sure you download and listen to the episode for more “inside insights”… Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
September 23, 2019
Dog Judging, Rumors and Reality Checks AKC judge Lee Whittier, founder of Dog Show Mentor and a former AKC Field Rep, and host Laura Reeves talk turkey about judging, judges, the process and the results. Some of the key take-aways from the conversation: * Judges are not all created equal. Some ARE better than others. * Judges WANT and TRY to do a good job. * Judges spend a LOT of time, money and grief to earn the honor of presiding from the center of the ring. Check out the YouTube video of the PureDogTalk Friday Night Forum panel discussion. Current AKC Executive Field Representative Bryan Martin, and AKC judges Brian Meyer and Sylvie McGee share a TON of information about the process of becoming an AKC approved judge. * What a judge sees in the center of the ring is often WAY different than what you see outside the ring. When you see a dog week in and week out, the accumulated knowledge may, in some cases, create a different picture than what the judge has during his/her 2 minutes in the ring. * Judges are NOT hatched from an egg! I say this all the time at the panel discussions. I think exhibitors forget this part. All judges started at basically the same place you are today. They showed dogs, they bred dogs, they schlepped the gear and scooped the poop, they drove the miles and slept in the sketchy hotel rooms. Every single judge in the ring has been there, done that and most likely a whole lot more. * Lee and I agree that we risk accusations of being a bit Pollyanna and acknowledge that bad apples exist, but that we, the exhibitors, should not allow them to spoil the whole basket. * Exhibitors will get the most enjoyment from their dog show experiences if they choose a positive social group, do a little research about their judges and try not to get wrapped up in the rumor-mongering when it happens. Make sure you download and listen to the episode for more “inside insights”… Pure Dog Talk is sponsored by:
September 20, 2019
Veterinary Voice: Allergies! Food, Inhalant, Fleas & More Food allergies are not as common as people believe, according to veterinarian Marty Greer. Inhalant, contact and flea allergies are more prevalent. Food allergy is mostly associated with chronic ear infections and recurrent skin problems. Conclusive diagnosis requires tedious food elimination diets. “Fall is a terrible time for allergies,” Greer noted. “Especially inhalant allergies and contact allergies of pollen in the grass. You can wash the dog’s feet at night to help reduce symptoms.” Foot chewing is the top symptom for inhalant/contact allergy, Greer said. She also observed that allergies can also be additive. A dog may have a food allergy that is only triggered by the addition of a seasonal contact allergy, for example. It only takes one! Flea allergy is signaled by dogs that are itchy around the rump, Greer noted. She added that one flea bite is all it may take to set off an allergic response. “Flea control products today are really good. Topical or oral, they are very effective. Vacuuming regularly is an important control system for fleas,” Greer said. Newer flea/tick control products affect the nervous system of only the parasite, Greer said. Older organophosphate-based products were not as good, she added. Pro/Con of flea/tick preventatives Oral meds are not recommended for patients with a history of seizures, Greer said. “They are not going to make a normal dog have a seizure. But they could trigger seizure sensitive dogs. Bravecto is the only oral medication labeled for breeding dogs,” she added. Advantages to the oral preventatives are that they leave no residue on coat, Greer said. The advantages of topical treatments is they are not a concern in seizure sensitive patients and they make a repellant shield to biting insects. Topicals also get rid of fleas/ticks more quickly. Anti inflammatory treatments “In the last 10-15 years, new products have come on the market to help to replace long-term steroid use,” Greer said. “Short course steroid use is effective and the side effects are minimal.” Links and information from Dr. Greer to learn more: * Atopica https://www.elanco.us/products-services/dogs/atopica-cyclosporine-capsules-usp-modified Dog Quiz: https://us.atopica.com/survey-dog , Cat Quiz: https://us.atopica.com/survey-cat * Apoquel https://www.zoetisus.com/products/dogs/apoquel/index.aspx * Cytopoint https://www.zoetisus.com/products/dogs/cytopoint/the-itch-cycle.aspx * Do not use APOQUEL in dogs less than 12 months of age or those with serious infections. APOQUEL may increase the chances of developing serious infections, and may cause existing parasitic skin infestations or pre-existing cancers to get worse. APOQUEL has not been tested in dogs receiving some medications including some commonly used to treat skin conditions such as corticosteroids and cyclosporine. Do not use in breeding, pregnant, or lactating dogs. Most common side effects are vomiting and diarrhea. APOQUEL has been used safely with many common medications including parasiticides, antibiotics and vaccines * CYTOPOINT is a monoclonal antibody (mAb)* treatment for dogs that specifically targets and neutralizes canine IL-31,† an important cytokine‡ involved in sending the itch signal to the brain in chronic atopic dermatitis2 * Because it is highly targeted to a specific cytokine involved in canine atopic dermatitis, CYTOPOINT has minimal impact on normal immune functions3 * CYTOPOINT is eliminated via normal protein degradation pathways in the same way as naturally...
September 19, 2019
Veterinary Voice: Allergies! Food, Inhalant, Fleas & More Food allergies are not as common as people believe, according to veterinarian Marty Greer. Inhalant, contact and flea allergies are more prevalent. Food allergy is mostly associated with chronic ear infections and recurrent skin problems. Conclusive diagnosis requires tedious food elimination diets. "Fall is a terrible time for allergies," Greer noted. "Especially inhalant allergies and contact allergies of pollen in the grass. You can wash the dog's feet at night to help reduce symptoms." Foot chewing is the top symptom for inhalant/contact allergy, Greer said. She also observed that allergies can also be additive. A dog may have a food allergy that is only triggered by the addition of a seasonal contact allergy, for example. It only takes one! Flea allergy is signaled by dogs that are itchy around the rump, Greer noted. She added that one flea bite is all it may take to set off an allergic response. "Flea control products today are really good. Topical or oral, they are very effective. Vacuuming regularly is an important control system for fleas," Greer said. Newer flea/tick control products affect the nervous system of only the parasite, Greer said. Older organophosphate-based products were not as good, she added. Pro/Con of flea/tick preventatives Oral meds are not recommended for patients with a history of seizures, Greer said. "They are not going to make a normal dog have a seizure. But they could trigger seizure sensitive dogs. Bravecto is the only oral medication labeled for breeding dogs," she added. Advantages to the oral preventatives are that they leave no residue on coat, Greer said. The advantages of topical treatments is they are not a concern in seizure sensitive patients and they make a repellant shield to biting insects. Topicals also get rid of fleas/ticks more quickly. Anti inflammatory treatments "In the last 10-15 years, new products have come on the market to help to replace long-term steroid use," Greer said. "Short course steroid use is effective and the side effects are minimal." Links and information from Dr. Greer to learn more: * Atopica https://www.elanco.us/products-services/dogs/atopica-cyclosporine-capsules-usp-modified Dog Quiz: https://us.atopica.com/survey-dog , Cat Quiz: https://us.atopica.com/survey-cat * Apoquel https://www.zoetisus.com/products/dogs/apoquel/index.aspx * Cytopoint https://www.zoetisus.com/products/dogs/cytopoint/the-itch-cycle.aspx * Do not use APOQUEL in dogs less than 12 months of age or those with serious infections. APOQUEL may increase the chances of developing serious infections, and may cause existing parasitic skin infestations or pre-existing cancers to get worse. APOQUEL has not been tested in dogs receiving some medications including some commonly used to treat skin conditions such as corticosteroids and cyclosporine. Do not use in breeding, pregnant, or lactating dogs. Most common side effects are vomiting and diarrhea. APOQUEL has been used safely with many common medications including parasiticides, antibiotics and vaccines * CYTOPOINT is a monoclonal antibody (mAb)* treatment for dogs that specifically targets and neutralizes canine IL-31,† an important cytokine‡ involved in sending the itch signal to the brain in chronic atopic dermatitis2 * Because it is highly targeted to a specific cytokine involved in canine atopic dermatitis, CYTOPOINT has minimal impact on normal immune functions3 * CYTOPOINT is eliminated via normal protein degradation pathways in the same way as naturally occurring antibodies...
September 17, 2019
Marketing Strategy Ensures Viability of Endangered Breed Jody Moxham is a Dandie Dinmont Terrier fancier and a globally successful marketing professional. She was asked by her club to create an ad for the breed. She refused. And created far more than just an “ad.” DDTCA created the Strategic advisory committee, which Moxham chairs, exclusively dedicated to ensuring the long-term viability of the Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Surging numbers In three years, the work of the committee has increased registrations of the breed by more than 150 percent. Membership in the club is surging to the point it can’t keep up with printing the membership roster, Moxham noted. According to AKC statistics, the breed has risen six points in popularity after years of decline. “I asked myself, ‘How would best marketers address this.’ There is a thing called the product life cycle in marketing,” Moxham said. “A lot of breeds are in the “decline” phase…. Marketers reposition a “product” and put it back in to introductory stage. That’s what we’re doing. Product marketing techniques “I created a methodology for forecasting success of marketing communications while they were just ideas on paper. We marketed it to multi-national corporations and helped them strengthen the persuasiveness of their strategies and their communications. We were proven effective in 40-some countries, according to the tough measures marketers use. A month after 9/11, the US Government called and asked if we would be willing to see if the methodology that worked so well in the commercial world could also work for national security interests.  We gained contracts from across all arms of the USG – Defense, Military, Intelligence, and State. “It has been a fascinating journey. What drives me is making a difference. I thrive on doing things that have never been done before. Or that are super tough. Easy can be done by anyone. Really hard piques my interest. “We will not stay vulnerable” “That is the background that I brought to tackling the objective of ensuring the viability of the Dandie Dinmont Terrier for generations to come. You probably know we are a highly vulnerable breed. But we will not stay vulnerable. “We started this program three years ago and formed the Strategic Advisory Committee as an action arm of the DDTCA. “The first of four surveys has been released, each dealing with a specific area of breeding and raising healthy litters. Collectively they will be the foundation for mentoring programs for DDTCA and other breed clubs that want to use our findings.  We want the DDTCA to be known as the innovator of support programs for breeders … and as a sponsor of best breeding practices.” To learn more about the DDTCA visit: https://www.ddtca.org/ To hear conversation with legendary Master Breeder Betty-Anne Stenmark about the Dandie Dinmont Terrier and its “gene puddle,” click to listen here.
September 16, 2019
Marketing Strategy Ensures Viability of Endangered Breed Dandie Dinmont Terrier Jody Moxham is a Dandie Dinmont Terrier fancier and a globally successful marketing professional. She was asked by her club to create an ad for the breed. She refused. And created far more than just an “ad.” DDTCA created the Strategic advisory committee, which Moxham chairs, exclusively dedicated to ensuring the long-term viability of the Dandie Dinmont Terrier. Surging numbers In three years, the work of the committee has increased registrations of the breed by more than 150 percent. Membership in the club is surging to the point it can’t keep up with printing the membership roster, Moxham noted. According to AKC statistics, the breed has risen six points in popularity after years of decline. “I asked myself, ‘How would best marketers address this.’ There is a thing called the product life cycle in marketing,” Moxham said. “A lot of breeds are in the “decline” phase…. Marketers reposition a “product” and put it back in to introductory stage. That’s what we’re doing. Product marketing techniques “I created a methodology for forecasting success of marketing communications while they were just ideas on paper. We marketed it to multi-national corporations and helped them strengthen the persuasiveness of their strategies and their communications. We were proven effective in 40-some countries, according to the tough measures marketers use. A month after 9/11, the US Government called and asked if we would be willing to see if the methodology that worked so well in the commercial world could also work for national security interests. We gained contracts from across all arms of the USG - Defense, Military, Intelligence, and State. “It has been a fascinating journey. What drives me is making a difference. I thrive on doing things that have never been done before. Or that are super tough. Easy can be done by anyone. Really hard piques my interest. "We will not stay vulnerable" Betty-Anne Stenmark and Jody Moxham bred Dandie Dinmont Terriers together for many years. “That is the background that I brought to tackling the objective of ensuring the viability of the Dandie Dinmont Terrier for generations to come. You probably know we are a highly vulnerable breed. But we will not stay vulnerable. “We started this program three years ago and formed the Strategic Advisory Committee as an action arm of the DDTCA. “The first of four surveys has been released, each dealing with a specific area of breeding and raising healthy litters. Collectively they will be the foundation for mentoring programs for DDTCA and other breed clubs that want to use our findings. We want the DDTCA to be known as the innovator of support programs for breeders … and as a sponsor of best breeding practices.” To learn more about the DDTCA visit: https://www.ddtca.org/ To hear conversation with legendary Master Breeder Betty-Anne Stenmark about the Dandie Dinmont Terrier and its "gene puddle," click to listen here.
September 13, 2019
The Winning Edge! Panel Discussion With the Masters Host Laura Reeves moderates a Friday Night Forum Panel Discussion on the topic of the “Winning Edge” with Judges Rick Gschwender and Pluis Davern and Professional Handler Bill McFadden. It is not the judge’s job to find a “diamond in the rough,” Reeves posits. “Polish your “gem stone” for your best chance of success.” Good habits Gschwender starts the discussion by asking the audience about their habits with the dogs they exhibit. “How many of you train your dog? Road work him? Take video to see what the judge sees? Clean their teeth?” Gschwender queried. “I see people all the time, they’re paying $30 to enter the dog and haven’t even cleaned teeth.” Gschwender adds, “Watch the judges. If you pay attention, you will see consistency in what they put up. You might not like it, but you will figure out what I like and come back and show that to me.” Motivated by motion Davern noted, in a fascinating observation, that people are *predators.* Which means “we are motivated by motion. What are judges looking at?” Davern asked rhetorically. “Motion. It catches the eye. You can *subtly* move your hand to show a pretty head, for example. “You’re in the ring, you’re all showing the same “product.” There’s 20 boxes of cornflakes. What makes yours better than the others?” Owner handlers have a huge advantage, Davern said. They are spending time with the dog they love. “This is a great sport! Nobody takes a golf club to bed at night,” Davern said. “Life is not all about winning.” Be prepared “Take a deep breath and don’t rush,” McFadden advises. He also notes that in some cases, owner handlers who are long time breeders are “experts showing to novices.” Judges are life-long learners and may be new to a breed. “Present your breed the way it should be shown.” Most importantly, McFadden said, be prepared. “Make sure your dog is in condition, physically, mentally, emotionally.” “You’ll have successes and failures you deserve and ones you don’t. It happens to handlers too. We show 20 dogs and might win with two,” McFadden added. For more insight from a couple of these panelists, you can listen back to: https://puredogtalk.com/10-bill-and-taffe-mcfadden-live-at-akc-nationals-wisdom-wednesday-2/ https://puredogtalk.com/26-winners-of-westminster-dog-show-bill-mcfadden-valerie-nunes-atkinson-andy-linton-2/ https://puredogtalk.com/34-sussex-spaniels-hunt-tests-search-and-rescue-pluis-davern-tells-all-2/ https://puredogtalk.com/35-dogs-to-the-rescue-firefighters-first-responders-and-pluis-davern-2/
September 12, 2019
The Winning Edge! Panel Discussion With the Masters Host Laura Reeves moderates a Friday Night Forum Panel Discussion on the topic of the "Winning Edge" with Judges Rick Gschwender and Pluis Davern and Professional Handler Bill McFadden. It is not the judge’s job to find a “diamond in the rough,” Reeves posits. “Polish your “gem stone” for your best chance of success.” Good habits Gschwender starts the discussion by asking the audience about their habits with the dogs they exhibit. “How many of you train your dog? Road work him? Take video to see what the judge sees? Clean their teeth?” Gschwender queried. “I see people all the time, they’re paying $30 to enter the dog and haven’t even cleaned teeth.” Gschwender adds, “Watch the judges. If you pay attention, you will see consistency in what they put up. You might not like it, but you will figure out what I like and come back and show that to me.” Motivated by motion Davern noted, in a fascinating observation, that people are *predators.* Which means “we are motivated by motion. What are judges looking at?” Davern asked rhetorically. “Motion. It catches the eye. You can *subtly* move your hand to show a pretty head, for example. “You’re in the ring, you’re all showing the same “product.” There’s 20 boxes of cornflakes. What makes yours better than the others?” Owner handlers have a huge advantage, Davern said. They are spending time with the dog they love. “This is a great sport! Nobody takes a golf club to bed at night,” Davern said. “Life is not all about winning.” Be prepared “Take a deep breath and don’t rush,” McFadden advises. He also notes that in some cases, owner handlers who are long time breeders are “experts showing to novices.” Judges are life-long learners and may be new to a breed. “Present your breed the way it should be shown.” Most importantly, McFadden said, be prepared. “Make sure your dog is in condition, physically, mentally, emotionally.” “You’ll have successes and failures you deserve and ones you don’t. It happens to handlers too. We show 20 dogs and might win with two,” McFadden added. For more insight from a couple of these panelists, you can listen back to: https://puredogtalk.com/10-bill-and-taffe-mcfadden-live-at-akc-nationals-wisdom-wednesday-2/ https://puredogtalk.com/26-winners-of-westminster-dog-show-bill-mcfadden-valerie-nunes-atkinson-andy-linton-2/ https://puredogtalk.com/34-sussex-spaniels-hunt-tests-search-and-rescue-pluis-davern-tells-all-2/ https://puredogtalk.com/35-dogs-to-the-rescue-firefighters-first-responders-and-pluis-davern-2/
September 10, 2019
Tricks Are for Show Dogs! Improve Focus in the Ring Show Dog Prep School founder, Vicki Ronchette, provides tips for training tricks to show dogs to help them focus and have fun. “Training tricks is fun,” Ronchette said. “People and dogs enjoy it more than they do training traditional exercises. It is relaxing. And it’s a good way for people to improve their mechanical training skills.” Dogs get bored in the ring, Ronchette noted. Having a repertoire of tricks available helps dogs and exhibitors relax, she said. Bonus, the dogs and handlers having fun makes a good impression on audience and serve as crowd pleasers. Note the phenomenal success of the “sit up” by the Sussex Spaniel, Bean, at the 2018 Westminster Kennel Club show. Ronchette shared a few of her favorite “tricks” to teach clients that provide specific benefits to dogs and their performance. Touch! Target training is a favorite of Ronchette’s. She trains the dog to touch its nose to her hand. “It’s so beneficial,” Ronchette said. “It’s easy to teach. And when you have a distracted dog, it gets their attention.” Sit Pretty Sit up and beg can be a controversial trick, as some feel it can be harmful to the dog’s back. Other trainers argue it is indispensable core conditioning that strengthens back muscles. Either way, that super cute “begging” for attention is a sure fire winner. Get on top Teaching the dog to get up on a big rock, grooming table or other high perch, Ronchette says, is a great confidence builder. “They need to own these behaviors,” she noted. AKC’s Trick Dog program allows owners to put a fun title on the end of the dog’s name, Ronchette noted, helping them “get their feet wet in something other than conformation.” To learn more about the origins of the Trick Dog program, take a listen to my interview with AKC’s Doug Ljungren, the program’s biggest advocate. 128|Doug Ljungren is Up to Tricks…Trick Dogs|AKC VP of Sports and Performance|Pure Dog Talk
September 10, 2019
Tricks Are for Show Dogs! Improve Focus in the Ring Show Dog Prep School founder, Vicki Ronchette, provides tips for training tricks to show dogs to help them focus and have fun. "Training tricks is fun," Ronchette said. "People and dogs enjoy it more than they do training traditional exercises. It is relaxing. And it's a good way for people to improve their mechanical training skills." Teaching a "bow" is a great trick for the conformation ring. Dogs get bored in the ring, Ronchette noted. Having a repertoire of tricks available helps dogs and exhibitors relax, she said. Bonus, the dogs and handlers having fun makes a good impression on audience and serve as crowd pleasers. Note the phenomenal success of the "sit up" by the Sussex Spaniel, Bean, at the 2018 Westminster Kennel Club show. Ronchette shared a few of her favorite "tricks" to teach clients that provide specific benefits to dogs and their performance. Touch! Target training is a favorite of Ronchette's. She trains the dog to touch its nose to her hand. "It's so beneficial," Ronchette said. "It's easy to teach. And when you have a distracted dog, it gets their attention." Sit Pretty Sit up and beg can be a controversial trick, as some feel it can be harmful to the dog's back. Other trainers argue it is indispensable core conditioning that strengthens back muscles. Either way, that super cute "begging" for attention is a sure fire winner. Get on top Teaching the dog to get up on a big rock, grooming table or other high perch, Ronchette says, is a great confidence builder. "They need to own these behaviors," she noted. AKC's Trick Dog program allows owners to put a fun title on the end of the dog’s name, Ronchette noted, helping them "get their feet wet in something other than conformation." To learn more about the origins of the Trick Dog program, take a listen to my interview with AKC's Doug Ljungren, the program's biggest advocate. 128|Doug Ljungren is Up to Tricks…Trick Dogs|AKC VP of Sports and Performance|Pure Dog Talk
September 5, 2019
You ARE What You Eat and So is Your Dog Dr. Diane Brown, CEO of the AKC Canine Health Foundation, joins us again to talk about fascinating new research on the “gut-brain axis.” In other words, the microscopic bugs inside the dog’s body are being proven to interact with what’s going on in its brain. From the CHF Newsletter: “The adage “you are what you eat” may be more profound than we ever realized. A growing body of evidence shows a complex system of two-way communication between the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and neurologic system in humans and dogs. The link between GI health and diseases such as multiple sclerosis, autism, and epilepsy has been studied in humans. In fact, patients with celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease have an increased risk of developing epilepsy. Since the community of microorganisms that live in the digestive tract – known as the gut microbiome – plays an important role in GI health, what impact does it have on neurologic disease? AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) funded researchers are exploring the role of this microbiomegut-brain axis in canine epilepsy.” http://www.akcchf.org/educational-resources/library/articles/AKC-CHF-Discoveries-Summer-2019.pdf Gut microbiome “The bacteria that live in the gut have been shown to have importance to both health and disease,” Brown said. CHF research is determining what type of bugs normally live in the gut (literally any part of the digestive system from top to bottom). Which ones of those bugs are pathogens and which ones prevent disease is an enormous topic. Many of us understand, for example, that antibiotics completely change the gut microbiome. But this new research is documenting associations with other disorders, including the impact of bacterial content in the gut and how it is influencing epilepsy and anxiety. Using proprietary probiotics to manage post antibiotic diarrhea is one thing. But Probiotics used over the course of six weeks is showing an impact on anxiety behaviors in dogs, providing a non-drug based treatment for this frequent issue in all dogs. Poop is cool! Researchers speaking at a recent CHF conference even discussed using fecal transplants, delivered as an enema, to transplant healthy flora fecal material thereby improving the health of the dog.
September 5, 2019
You ARE What You Eat and So is Your Dog Dr. Diane Brown, CEO of the AKC Canine Health Foundation, joins us again to talk about fascinating new research on the “gut-brain axis.” In other words, the microscopic bugs inside the dog’s body are being proven to interact with what’s going on in its brain. From the CHF Newsletter: “The adage “you are what you eat” may be more profound than we ever realized. A growing body of evidence shows a complex system of two-way communication between the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and neurologic system in humans and dogs. The link between GI health and diseases such as multiple sclerosis, autism, and epilepsy has been studied in humans. In fact, patients with celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease have an increased risk of developing epilepsy. Since the community of microorganisms that live in the digestive tract – known as the gut microbiome – plays an important role in GI health, what impact does it have on neurologic disease? AKC Canine Health Foundation (CHF) funded researchers are exploring the role of this microbiomegut-brain axis in canine epilepsy.” http://www.akcchf.org/educational-resources/library/articles/AKC-CHF-Discoveries-Summer-2019.pdf Gut microbiome “The bacteria that live in the gut have been shown to have importance to both health and disease,” Brown said. CHF research is determining what type of bugs normally live in the gut (literally any part of the digestive system from top to bottom). Which ones of those bugs are pathogens and which ones prevent disease is an enormous topic. Many of us understand, for example, that antibiotics completely change the gut microbiome. But this new research is documenting associations with other disorders, including the impact of bacterial content in the gut and how it is influencing epilepsy and anxiety. Using proprietary probiotics to manage post antibiotic diarrhea is one thing. But Probiotics used over the course of six weeks is showing an impact on anxiety behaviors in dogs, providing a non-drug based treatment for this frequent issue in all dogs. Poop is cool! Researchers speaking at a recent CHF conference even discussed using fecal transplants, delivered as an enema, to transplant healthy flora fecal material thereby improving the health of the dog.
September 3, 2019
Cavalettis for Show Dogs with Vicki Ronchette Show Dog Prep School founder Vicki Ronchette shares her tips and tools for using cavalettis to train body awareness, conditioning and more. Cavalettis, Ronchette said, are useful for a variety of issues. Dogs who pace, forge on the leash, need to know where to put their feet amongst other topics are well served by practicing with caveletti training. One of the most common uses is to build muscle memory to increase reach and extension, Ronchette said. “Most dogs love doing the cavalettis,” she added. Using simple, inexpensive materials, Ronchette provides direction for building and utilizing these obstacles in an exhibitor’s “tool kit” of preparing the dogs for the show ring. How To’s and Why For’s One of Ronchette’s most frequently asked questions is how far apart to set the poles for proper gaiting. She said she measures from the front toe to the back toe when the dog is in a comfortable stack. That is the “elementary” distance the poles are placed apart. As the dog gains skill and confidence, the poles are moved further apart to make them the dog increase its stride. “We’re asking these dogs to be athletes in the show ring,” Ronchette said. “It’s more than just walking around. It’s walking around and looking fabulous.” One specific training opportunity Ronchette uses the obstacles for is to teach not to chase other dogs. “I make them concentrate on foot work instead of chasing,” she observed. “I strongly believe that if there is any physical limitation the dog is aware of it and it increases anxiety,” Ronchette said. “When you do these type of exercises, the dog ‘owns’ that behavior and it creates confidence. Confidence changes a dog’s carriage.” Ronchette’s course at Show Dog Prep School. Canine Conditioning with Dixie Rae Sick.
September 2, 2019
Cavalettis for Show Dogs with Vicki Ronchette Vicki Ronchette with her Lowchen. Show Dog Prep School founder Vicki Ronchette shares her tips and tools for using cavalettis to train body awareness, conditioning and more. Cavalettis, Ronchette said, are useful for a variety of issues. Dogs who pace, forge on the leash, need to know where to put their feet amongst other topics are well served by practicing with caveletti training. One of the most common uses is to build muscle memory to increase reach and extension, Ronchette said. “Most dogs love doing the cavalettis,” she added. Using simple, inexpensive materials, Ronchette provides direction for building and utilizing these obstacles in an exhibitor’s “tool kit” of preparing the dogs for the show ring. How To's and Why For's One of Ronchette’s most frequently asked questions is how far apart to set the poles for proper gaiting. She said she measures from the front toe to the back toe when the dog is in a comfortable stack. That is the “elementary” distance the poles are placed apart. As the dog gains skill and confidence, the poles are moved further apart to make them the dog increase its stride. “We’re asking these dogs to be athletes in the show ring,” Ronchette said. “It’s more than just walking around. It’s walking around and looking fabulous.” One specific training opportunity Ronchette uses the obstacles for is to teach not to chase other dogs. “I make them concentrate on foot work instead of chasing,” she observed. “I strongly believe that if there is any physical limitation the dog is aware of it and it increases anxiety,” Ronchette said. “When you do these type of exercises, the dog ‘owns’ that behavior and it creates confidence. Confidence changes a dog’s carriage.” Ronchette's course at Show Dog Prep School. Canine Conditioning with Dixie Rae Sick.
August 30, 2019
Owner Handler Secrets to Success: Make a Plan and Be Consistent Remy Smith-Lewis, breeder, owner, handler of Portugese Water Dogs, shares the secrets that took him to the top, winning his National Specialty as an owner handler. Smith-Lewis said he did not come from a “dog” family. He was awestruck by his breed when the San Francisco Giants began using the dogs to retrieve balls that were hit over the fence. He started as a junior handler, worked for professional handlers Sally George and Bill and Taffe McFadden. He showed his first big winner to multiple Best in Show awards and a national specialty win before turning over the dog’s career to the McFadden team to manage. “I was at a place in my career that I really needed to decide what to do and focus on it,” said Smith-Lewis, who began his career at Google and now works for a new tech start up in the Bay Area. His recommendations to owner handlers working a full time job is, “You CAN do it!” But his secrets are: dedication, making sacrifices, having a plan, keeping on a schedule and staying consistent. Condition, Condition, Condition Whether it is road work, coat work or trimming, competitive dogs MUST be in condition, Smith-Lewis noted. If that means skipping company happy hour in order to spend the extra time brushing, bathing, biking or trimming your dog, that’s what needs to happen. “Complaining about handlers always winning is the easy way out,” Smith-Lewis said. Owner handlers need to remember that dogs need routines, Smith-Lewis noted. The dog can’t always be on the couch. And the owner needs to find a mentor and *listen* to the mentor. Smith-Lewis laughingly recalls a favorite admonition from one of his early mentors, Bill McFadden, “God gave you two ears and one mouth, use them wisely.” “We need to break away on our own at some point,” Smith-Lewis said. “But a mentor’s job is to guide you back onto a good path when you get too far out of line.” One final suggestion? “Join an all-breed club and work and learn,” Smith-Lewis said. Want to hear more from Owner Handlers? Check out these past episodes: 57 – Best in Show: How an Owner-Handler Competes with the Pros – Tricia Stanczyk 25 – Patricia Trotter: Legendary Breeder, Author, and AKC Judge – Vin-Melca’s Norwegian Elkhounds 103 – Ed Thomason Tips for the Owner Handler – From a Breeder Owner Handler Turned Professional Dog Handler
August 29, 2019
Owner Handler Secrets to Success: Make a Plan and Be Consistent Remy Smith-Lewis, breeder, owner, handler of Portugese Water Dogs, shares the secrets that took him to the top, winning his National Specialty as an owner handler. Remy Smith-Lewis, winning best junior handler. Smith-Lewis said he did not come from a "dog" family. He was awestruck by his breed when the San Francisco Giants began using the dogs to retrieve balls that were hit over the fence. He started as a junior handler, worked for professional handlers Sally George and Bill and Taffe McFadden. He showed his first big winner to multiple Best in Show awards and a national specialty win before turning over the dog's career to the McFadden team to manage. "I was at a place in my career that I really needed to decide what to do and focus on it," said Smith-Lewis, who began his career at Google and now works for a new tech start up in the Bay Area. Remy Smith-Lewis handling his Portugese Water Dog to Best in Show at Del Monte Kennel Club under judge Pluis Davern. His recommendations to owner handlers working a full time job is, "You CAN do it!" But his secrets are: dedication, making sacrifices, having a plan, keeping on a schedule and staying consistent. Condition, Condition, Condition Whether it is road work, coat work or trimming, competitive dogs MUST be in condition, Smith-Lewis noted. If that means skipping company happy hour in order to spend the extra time brushing, bathing, biking or trimming your dog, that's what needs to happen. "Complaining about handlers always winning is the easy way out," Smith-Lewis said. Owner handlers need to remember that dogs need routines, Smith-Lewis noted. The dog can’t always be on the couch. And the owner needs to find a mentor and *listen* to the mentor. Smith-Lewis laughingly recalls a favorite admonition from one of his early mentors, Bill McFadden, "God gave you two ears and one mouth, use them wisely." "We need to break away on our own at some point," Smith-Lewis said. "But a mentor's job is to guide you back onto a good path when you get too far out of line." One final suggestion? "Join an all-breed club and work and learn," Smith-Lewis said. Want to hear more from Owner Handlers? Check out these past episodes: 57 – Best in Show: How an Owner-Handler Competes with the Pros – Tricia Stanczyk 25 – Patricia Trotter: Legendary Breeder, Author, and AKC Judge – Vin-Melca’s Norwegian Elkhounds 103 – Ed Thomason Tips for the Owner Handler – From a Breeder Owner Handler Turned Professional Dog Handler
August 27, 2019
New Resources for Purebred Dog Enthusiasts Host Laura Reeves visits with two exhibitors, Cara Ryckman and Michelle Conroy, who have each taken huge steps to create resources to benefit purebred dogs and their people. These three 50something women with passion, dedication and a desire to “*do* something, not just complain” encompass close to 120 years combined experience in purebred dogs. Both Ryckman and Conroy saw voids in the world of purebred dogs and created ingenious ways to fill them. Spending their own time and resources, they have created a brand new social media ap (Ryckman) and a certification of breeders/rescues for the general public’s use (Conroy). Cara Ryckman – Social media gone to the dogs “Dogs are our life! This page and our site brought to you by Cara Ryckman of Terlingua Chihuahuas. I strive to create a friendly, positive, free social experience for people who love purebred dogs! This site was created as a positive step in uniting the dog fancy and the general public in the hopes of preserving our heritage breeds for the future and bringing awareness to the predictability and dependability of purposefully-bred dogs and the fun of the purebred dog world. All are welcome!” https://dogpeoplelife.com Michelle Conroy – Applying a lifetime of knowledge to certify breeders “After more than 30 years working with animals, we have seen a lot and we haven’t always liked what we saw. Bad breeding practices and low-quality rescue operations are gaining ground. Many buyers and adopters hold negative views of breeders, and that’s largely due to a lack of quality control across the industry. Here’s the truth: There are many quality breeders and fantastic rescues out there. The problem is that it’s almost impossible for buyers and adopters to identify them. From mountains of misinformation to practically zero credible resources for finding ethical breeders or rescues, the public struggles to figure out what’s what. We think it’s time for that to stop.” https://breedercertification.org/ Listen now to hear their stories. Then check out these amazing new resources. Join Laura in her ongoing initiative to build up and showcase other innovative folks in the sport. You, too, can support MORE dog people helping dog people. Listen to our previous episodes with OTHER great resources. 79 – Valerie Nunes-Atkinson Handling Seminars: Ready to Handle Like a Pro? 60 – National Purebred Dog Day: Susi Szeremy 91 – Dog Show Grooming, Poodle University, Online Handling and Allison Foley 201 – Exhibitor Education Courses Come Online | Pure Dog Talk
August 26, 2019
New Resources for Purebred Dog Enthusiasts Host Laura Reeves visits with two exhibitors, Cara Ryckman and Michelle Conroy, who have each taken huge steps to create resources to benefit purebred dogs and their people. These three 50something women with passion, dedication and a desire to “*do* something, not just complain” encompass close to 120 years combined experience in purebred dogs. Both Ryckman and Conroy saw voids in the world of purebred dogs and created ingenious ways to fill them. Spending their own time and resources, they have created a brand new social media ap (Ryckman) and a certification of breeders/rescues for the general public’s use (Conroy). Cara Ryckman - Social media gone to the dogs Cara Ryckman with her heart dog, GCH-S CH Hi-C Chanel Pearls and Ice at Terlingua. “Dogs are our life! This page and our site brought to you by Cara Ryckman of Terlingua Chihuahuas. I strive to create a friendly, positive, free social experience for people who love purebred dogs! This site was created as a positive step in uniting the dog fancy and the general public in the hopes of preserving our heritage breeds for the future and bringing awareness to the predictability and dependability of purposefully-bred dogs and the fun of the purebred dog world. All are welcome!" https://dogpeoplelife.com Michelle Conroy - Applying a lifetime of knowledge to certify breeders Michelle Conroy with Willie, Caeruleus Winds of Fortune “After more than 30 years working with animals, we have seen a lot and we haven’t always liked what we saw. Bad breeding practices and low-quality rescue operations are gaining ground. Many buyers and adopters hold negative views of breeders, and that’s largely due to a lack of quality control across the industry. Here’s the truth: There are many quality breeders and fantastic rescues out there. The problem is that it’s almost impossible for buyers and adopters to identify them. From mountains of misinformation to practically zero credible resources for finding ethical breeders or rescues, the public struggles to figure out what’s what. We think it’s time for that to stop.” https://breedercertification.org/ Listen now to hear their stories. Then check out these amazing new resources. Join Laura in her ongoing initiative to build up and showcase other innovative folks in the sport. You, too, can support MORE dog people helping dog people. Listen to our previous episodes with OTHER great resources. 79 – Valerie Nunes-Atkinson Handling Seminars: Ready to Handle Like a Pro? 60 – National Purebred Dog Day: Susi Szeremy 91 – Dog Show Grooming, Poodle University, Online Handling and Allison Foley 201 – Exhibitor Education Courses Come Online | Pure Dog Talk
August 23, 2019
Ireland Designates “Heritage Status” for Native Dog Breeds Sean Delmar, president of the Irish Kennel Club and Kerry Blue Terrier breeder, has just achieved the holy grail of “heritage status” for the nine native Irish breeds. Heritage Status JULY 16, 2019 I am pleased to announce that the 9 Irish Breeds have been granted National Heritage status by the Minister. This is a wonderful step in the future protection and development of our amazing Irish Breeds and comes after many years of representations by those committed to Irish Breeds. On behalf of The Irish Kennel Club I would like to specifically acknowledge the commitment of the following who put there heart and soul into making this a reality. Cathy Delmar, Eddie Burke, Vincent Flannelly. Sean Delmar, President “I thought there was a chance these breeds could go out of existence,” Delmar said. “I thought the Government should take some responsibility. We wanted to convince them these dog breeds are part of the patchwork quilt of the Irish people.” This exciting success required a lot of initiatives over 10 years, Delmar noted. The small group of folks involved did demonstrations, paraded dogs at schools, had dogs on “chat shows” on TV. “We built up a portfolio so we had something to show the government, not just an idea,” Delmar said. “We created a heritage weekend revolving around dogs. Even hawking with setters in the midland bogs. People learned a lot about Irish breeds. The general populace is now more aware.” The Irish Kennel Club was only the national body that made the application. So much enthusiasm and work done was from a handful of devoted fanciers, Delmar said. “Dogs developed because of working ability originally,” Delmar observed. “Ireland has the Irish Wolfhound and Kerry Beagle, Red setter, Red and white setter and Water spaniel. In the terrier group we have Kerry Blue, Irish, Glen of Imaal, Soft Coated Wheaten.” Purebred dogs are history and art Wolfhounds are one of the ancient symbols of Ireland along with the shamrock and harp. Kerry beagle are a hunting pack unique to Ireland. During the potato famine in Ireland, ships carrying refugees to the US, took Kerry beagles with them. Delmar expects these dogs could be found behind coonhounds in the US. Romantic figures in Irish history hunted on horseback with hawks and setters, using nets before guns were invented. Delmar’s telling of the rich tapestry of Irish history, includes Grace O’Malley — one of the earliest known female pirates, born around 1530 in Ireland and growing up to lead a 20-ship fleet. Her contribution to the development of the Irish Water Spaniel was the connection to her incursions on the Iberian Peninsula. “We just undersell everything we do,” Delmar said. “We don’t spend enough time telling people that what you get with pedigree dogs is predictable qualities, predictable characteristics. Don’t get that in crossbreds. Can be great dogs. They might have one or two of the qualities. But it’s a lucky get. Like Forrest Gump’s box of chocolates.”
August 22, 2019
Ireland Designates “Heritage Status” for Native Dog Breeds Sean Delmar, President Irish Kennel Club Sean Delmar, president of the Irish Kennel Club and Kerry Blue Terrier breeder, has just achieved the holy grail of “heritage status” for the nine native Irish breeds. Heritage Status JULY 16, 2019 I am pleased to announce that the 9 Irish Breeds have been granted National Heritage status by the Minister. This is a wonderful step in the future protection and development of our amazing Irish Breeds and comes after many years of representations by those committed to Irish Breeds. On behalf of The Irish Kennel Club I would like to specifically acknowledge the commitment of the following who put there heart and soul into making this a reality. Cathy Delmar, Eddie Burke, Vincent Flannelly. Sean Delmar, President “I thought there was a chance these breeds could go out of existence,” Delmar said. “I thought the Government should take some responsibility. We wanted to convince them these dog breeds are part of the patchwork quilt of the Irish people.” This exciting success required a lot of initiatives over 10 years, Delmar noted. The small group of folks involved did demonstrations, paraded dogs at schools, had dogs on “chat shows” on TV. “We built up a portfolio so we had something to show the government, not just an idea,” Delmar said. “We created a heritage weekend revolving around dogs. Even hawking with setters in the midland bogs. People learned a lot about Irish breeds. The general populace is now more aware.” The Irish Kennel Club was only the national body that made the application. So much enthusiasm and work done was from a handful of devoted fanciers, Delmar said. “Dogs developed because of working ability originally,” Delmar observed. “Ireland has the Irish Wolfhound and Kerry Beagle, Red setter, Red and white setter and Water spaniel. In the terrier group we have Kerry Blue, Irish, Glen of Imaal, Soft Coated Wheaten.” Purebred dogs are history and art Wolfhounds are one of the ancient symbols of Ireland along with the shamrock and harp. Kerry beagle are a hunting pack unique to Ireland. During the potato famine in Ireland, ships carrying refugees to the US, took Kerry beagles with them. Delmar expects these dogs could be found behind coonhounds in the US. Romantic figures in Irish history hunted on horseback with hawks and setters, using nets before guns were invented. Delmar’s telling of the rich tapestry of Irish history, includes Grace O'Malley -- one of the earliest known female pirates, born around 1530 in Ireland and growing up to lead a 20-ship fleet. Her contribution to the development of the Irish Water Spaniel was the connection to her incursions on the Iberian Peninsula. “We just undersell everything we do,” Delmar said. “We don’t spend enough time telling people that what you get with pedigree dogs is predictable qualities, predictable characteristics. Don’t get that in crossbreds. Can be great dogs. They might have one or two of the qualities. But it’s a lucky get. Like Forrest Gump’s box of chocolates.”
August 20, 2019
Dr. Adam King on Eye Emergencies in Dogs Dr. Adam King, DVM, is a veterinary ophthalmologist and a Havanese breeder of merit. He talks with host Laura Reeves about the various eye emergencies that can develop with our dogs. Corneal Ulcer Any corneal ulcer should heal in three days, King said. All dog owners, but particularly those of us who own brachycephalic breeds, should always have eye lubricant on hand, King recommended. He suggests OptixCare. “When in doubt, any time the dog is squinting, lubricate,” King said, “and have it seen by the vet quickly.” Any scratch on the eye, or corneal ulcer, needs a topical antibiotic, according to King. “If that ulcer gets infected, it can actually break the cornea down,” King warned. And, above all, *never* use steroid eye ointment without vet confirmation that there is no ulcer, King insisted. “Eyeballs are pretty tough until they aren’t,” King said. “Your dog can go from superficial ulcer to ruptured eye in less than 12 hours. It can be a very real emergency. Green/yellow discharge is bad. Anytime you see a pit or a divot on the cornea, that is very bad.” Glaucoma Researchers don’t have a great handle on the inheritance of glaucoma in many breeds, King noted. And because it generally affects middle age/older dogs it is difficult to diagnosis before the dogs have reproduced. Glaucoma, a disease in which the drain inside the eye is abnormal, is a bilateral disease, although it normally starts with one eye before the other, King said. “If the eye white is red and clear part is cloudy, it’s important to have the vet check intraocular pressure,” King noted. “The disease is treated by decreasing pressure in the eye using glaucoma medication to preserve vision.” Primary lens luxation also can cause glaucoma. But King said that DNA genetic testing can easily rule this disease out in a breeding program. Be sure to listen for more on cherry eye, entropion, ectropion and neonatal eye infections.
August 19, 2019
Dr. Adam King on Eye Emergencies in Dogs Dr. Adam King, DVM, veterinary ophthalmologist. Dr. Adam King, DVM, is a veterinary ophthalmologist and a Havanese breeder of merit. He talks with host Laura Reeves about the various eye emergencies that can develop with our dogs. Corneal Ulcer Any corneal ulcer should heal in three days, King said. All dog owners, but particularly those of us who own brachycephalic breeds, should always have eye lubricant on hand, King recommended. He suggests OptixCare. “When in doubt, any time the dog is squinting, lubricate,” King said, “and have it seen by the vet quickly.” Any scratch on the eye, or corneal ulcer, needs a topical antibiotic, according to King. “If that ulcer gets infected, it can actually break the cornea down,” King warned. And, above all, *never* use steroid eye ointment without vet confirmation that there is no ulcer, King insisted. “Eyeballs are pretty tough until they aren’t,” King said. “Your dog can go from superficial ulcer to ruptured eye in less than 12 hours. It can be a very real emergency. Green/yellow discharge is bad. Anytime you see a pit or a divot on the cornea, that is very bad.” Glaucoma Researchers don’t have a great handle on the inheritance of glaucoma in many breeds, King noted. And because it generally affects middle age/older dogs it is difficult to diagnosis before the dogs have reproduced. Glaucoma, a disease in which the drain inside the eye is abnormal, is a bilateral disease, although it normally starts with one eye before the other, King said. “If the eye white is red and clear part is cloudy, it’s important to have the vet check intraocular pressure,” King noted. "The disease is treated by decreasing pressure in the eye using glaucoma medication to preserve vision." Primary lens luxation also can cause glaucoma. But King said that DNA genetic testing can easily rule this disease out in a breeding program. Be sure to listen for more on cherry eye, entropion, ectropion and neonatal eye infections.
August 16, 2019
Dog Shows Through the Eyes of Newbies I was honored to visit with four brand “newbies” recently in a panel discussion format. These folks shared truly valuable information about what got them started, what they love and even what they don’t. Huge thanks to listener Dr. Clifton Jamil Kenon Jr whose idea this was. The announcement on PureDogTalk’s FB page garnered 147 comments from folks who were so excited to share their experiences. I hope to make a continuing series of these types of conversations because the stories I received were so amazing. Kenon, Kristin Eberly, Neil Trilokekar and Kayla Croteau represent a wide spectrum of the dog fancy. They share their fascinating journeys into the sport of purebred dogs, talk about mentors, what they love and what has been frustrating in each of their individual experiences. Mentorship “Meet people where they are,” Kenon advises mentors and would be mentors. “Everyone comes to the table with their own goals. This is a sport that lends itself to diversity.” Kenon’s mentor, Susan Giles, visited with me on the podcast just recently. The best help Eberly found is from her handling class instructor, who she says offers “criticism wrapped in something positive.” Trilokekar said his mentors have encouraged him to study and think critically. “They share their knowledge without expecting me to be obedient,” he noted. Croteau said her mentor is always open to the silliest of questions and is always positive. Strongest encouragement * “Set your own goals,” Kenon said. “Celebrate the wonderful people who help you get there. Ignore the people who want sink everybody’s ship. Don’t go broke doing it. Have fun.” * “Don’t be afraid to ask for help,” Eberly offered. “Long time people in the breed can be intimidating. Those people will help you if you just ask.” * “Find your fascination,” Trilokekar encouraged. “So many facets you can be engaged by. Learn about history, and heritage of your breed. Go do other things with people when you’re at a dog show. Build a relationship. Never stop learning.” * “Coming in it was pretty terrifying,” Croteau opined. “Remember we’re all here because we love the dogs. Set small goals. Don’t just come to the show, show and go home. Hang out. Have an open mind and big ears.”
August 15, 2019
Dog Shows Through the Eyes of Newbies I was honored to visit with four brand "newbies" recently in a panel discussion format. These folks shared truly valuable information about what got them started, what they love and even what they don’t. Dr. Clifton Jamil Kenon Jr Huge thanks to listener Dr. Clifton Jamil Kenon Jr whose idea this was. The announcement on PureDogTalk’s FB page garnered 147 comments from folks who were so excited to share their experiences. I hope to make a continuing series of these types of conversations because the stories I received were so amazing. Kenon, Kristin Eberly, Neil Trilokekar and Kayla Croteau represent a wide spectrum of the dog fancy. They share their fascinating journeys into the sport of purebred dogs, talk about mentors, what they love and what has been frustrating in each of their individual experiences. Mentorship "Meet people where they are," Kenon advises mentors and would be mentors. "Everyone comes to the table with their own goals. This is a sport that lends itself to diversity." Kenon's mentor, Susan Giles, visited with me on the podcast just recently. Kristin Eberly The best help Eberly found is from her handling class instructor, who she says offers "criticism wrapped in something positive." Trilokekar said his mentors have encouraged him to study and think critically. "They share their knowledge without expecting me to be obedient," he noted. Croteau said her mentor is always open to the silliest of questions and is always positive. Kayla Croteau Strongest encouragement * "Set your own goals," Kenon said. "Celebrate the wonderful people who help you get there. Ignore the people who want sink everybody’s ship. Don’t go broke doing it. Have fun." * "Don’t be afraid to ask for help," Eberly offered. "Long time people in the breed can be intimidating. Those people will help you if you just ask." * Neil Trilokekar "Find your fascination," Trilokekar encouraged. "So many facets you can be engaged by. Learn about history, and heritage of your breed. Go do other things with people when you’re at a dog show. Build a relationship. Never stop learning." * "Coming in it was pretty terrifying," Croteau opined. "Remember we’re all here because we love the dogs. Set small goals. Don’t just come to the show, show and go home. Hang out. Have an open mind and big ears."
August 13, 2019
Falconry: Historic Relationship of Human, Dog and Bird of Prey Steve Layman, raptor expert, shares the fascinating history of falconry and its symbiotic relationship between man, dog and bird of prey. Natural history Layman, a zoologist who has worked with raptors and dogs for nearly 60 years, said that the teamwork between bird, handler and dog bridges the mists of time. “It’s a natural history moment,” said Layman, a noted speaker on the training of raptors. He uses operant conditioning methods to train the birds of prey to return to him. But he said the birds often help train the dogs. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JAcIqqqniYQ From Medieval Falconry: “Records of  …taking prey with a trained raptor…. have been found from as early as 2000BC. It is generally accepted that the origins of falconry began in China and Mongolia and then came to Europe later on. In the records of the Spanish Conquistadors, evidence was found to suggest that the Aztecs used trained hawks and falcons although whether this was for hunting no one knows. Aristotle also mentioned falconry twice between 384 and 322 BC. Falconry UK and the rest of Europe began in around 400 AD and quickly became extremely popular. At the time, falconry was less of a sport and more of a necessity than it is nowadays. The art of falconry was taken very seriously as birds of prey were one of the most sophisticated and highly sought after means of hunting for food. The techniques of falconry have stayed the same since the very early years. Medieval Falconry was much the same in practice as it is now and if you look at the picture from the 1240s you may well see that the perches, leashes, swivels and jesses are almost identical to the ones we use today.” More information: https://www.thefield.co.uk/gundogs/hawking-with-dogs-21578 http://www.pfht.org/falconry/dogs-in-falconry/  
August 12, 2019
Falconry: Historic Relationship of Human, Dog and Bird of Prey Steve Layman with a Siberian Goshawk. Steve Layman, raptor expert, shares the fascinating history of falconry and its symbiotic relationship between man, dog and bird of prey. Natural history Layman, a zoologist who has worked with raptors and dogs for nearly 60 years, said that the teamwork between bird, handler and dog bridges the mists of time. “It’s a natural history moment,” said Layman, a noted speaker on the training of raptors. He uses operant conditioning methods to train the birds of prey to return to him. But he said the birds often help train the dogs. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JAcIqqqniYQ From Medieval Falconry: “Records of ...taking prey with a trained raptor.... have been found from as early as 2000BC. It is generally accepted that the origins of falconry began in China and Mongolia and then came to Europe later on. In the records of the Spanish Conquistadors, evidence was found to suggest that the Aztecs used trained hawks and falcons although whether this was for hunting no one knows. Aristotle also mentioned falconry twice between 384 and 322 BC. Falconry UK and the rest of Europe began in around 400 AD and quickly became extremely popular. At the time, falconry was less of a sport and more of a necessity than it is nowadays. The art of falconry was taken very seriously as birds of prey were one of the most sophisticated and highly sought after means of hunting for food. The techniques of falconry have stayed the same since the very early years. Medieval Falconry was much the same in practice as it is now and if you look at the picture from the 1240s you may well see that the perches, leashes, swivels and jesses are almost identical to the ones we use today.” More information: https://www.thefield.co.uk/gundogs/hawking-with-dogs-21578 http://www.pfht.org/falconry/dogs-in-falconry/  
August 8, 2019
Susan Giles on the Lhasa Apso, Grooming Secrets and Breeding Susan Giles, Lhasa Apso breeder for 45 years, shares her grooming and breeding secrets, as well as the history of this ancient breed. The Lhasa Apso is thought to have been the alert dogs in Tibetan monastaries, where they would bark to alert their larger brethren, the Tibetan Mastiff. “These dogs are extremely intelligent,” Giles said. “They’ll make you think they don’t know anything. They are aloof with strangers. An independent breed, they’re not sitting on you or demanding.” Hair not fur Apsos have hair not fur, Giles noted, so owners don’t have hair shedding, or dander. Dogs kept in coat require maintenance, but she says brushing the coat is calming. “The important part is to stay on top of it,” Giles said. “They need to be brushed a couple times a week and, bathed each week. Texture and hardness of the coat depends how much brushing you’ll do. Clean coats are easy. Dirty coats mat.” The Lhasa Apso temperament, although aloof, can be sweet, Giles observed. “It’s all a matter of breeding,” Giles said. “A sharp temperament will take over in a pet home with growling and biting, if it’s sweet, it takes over by being cute.” A proper Lhasa Apso expression is like “looking into the eyes of a very old soul,” Giles said.
August 8, 2019
Susan Giles on the Lhasa Apso, Grooming Secrets and Breeding Susan Giles, Lhasa Apso breeder for 45 years, shares her grooming and breeding secrets, as well as the history of this ancient breed. The Lhasa Apso is thought to have been the alert dogs in Tibetan monastaries, where they would bark to alert their larger brethren, the Tibetan Mastiff. “These dogs are extremely intelligent,” Giles said. “They’ll make you think they don’t know anything. They are aloof with strangers. An independent breed, they’re not sitting on you or demanding.” Hair not fur Apsos have hair not fur, Giles noted, so owners don’t have hair shedding, or dander. Dogs kept in coat require maintenance, but she says brushing the coat is calming. “The important part is to stay on top of it,” Giles said. “They need to be brushed a couple times a week and, bathed each week. Texture and hardness of the coat depends how much brushing you’ll do. Clean coats are easy. Dirty coats mat.” The Lhasa Apso temperament, although aloof, can be sweet, Giles observed. “It’s all a matter of breeding,” Giles said. “A sharp temperament will take over in a pet home with growling and biting, if it’s sweet, it takes over by being cute.” A proper Lhasa Apso expression is like “looking into the eyes of a very old soul,” Giles said.
August 6, 2019
Rescue Overreach: Ounce of Prevention Worth a Pound of Cure Dog Savvy Lawyer Jen Amundsen joins host Laura Reeves for a frank and, frankly, frightening conversation about what recourse we have as breeders if one of our dogs lands in a shelter or rescue which refuses to return it to us. What happens when a dog you bred or co-own winds up in a shelter or rescue, despite all your best efforts? It happens more often than many realize. Whether it is death of the owner, an escaped dog or any other series of events, shelters and rescues *should* return the dog to the breeder or co-owner but they are not necessarily legally required to do so. “If you don’t own the dog, you don’t have much legal recourse,” Amundsen said. “Assuming your contract requires a dog be returned to you, the contract is with the owner and is not enforceable against the shelter.” When the breeder has an ownership interest, she has some recourse, Amundsen noted, but it takes a *lot* of time, energy and money. Common sense steps * Microchip puppies before they leave. Register the microchips to yourself. * Co-own dogs – This requires thought about the balance of being seen as micromanaging new owners as well as questions of “ownership” numbers. * Contractual recommendations – include a clause that the owner must take steps to include ownership transfer back to breeder as part of will. * Talk puppy buyers through contract – it’s only as good as the party’s understanding of it. * Have a “read if dead or incapacitated” folder in case of emergency – keep *updated*. * Add a copy of the MAAP plan to puppy kit with every litter. * Talk to your neighbors and friends to make sure they know that there is a plan for the dogs. They don’t have to wind up in a shelter. * Follow up with previous puppy owners. * Preservation breeders provide lifetime support to owners. “It gives us peace of mind knowing we’ve done something, that we’ve done the maximum we can to be sure our dogs wind up where we want them to be,” Amundsen said.
August 5, 2019
Rescue Overreach: Ounce of Prevention Worth a Pound of Cure Jen Amundsen, Clumber Spaniel breeder and exhibitor, is the Dog Savvy Lawyer. Dog Savvy Lawyer Jen Amundsen joins host Laura Reeves for a frank and, frankly, frightening conversation about what recourse we have as breeders if one of our dogs lands in a shelter or rescue which refuses to return it to us. What happens when a dog you bred or co-own winds up in a shelter or rescue, despite all your best efforts? It happens more often than many realize. Whether it is death of the owner, an escaped dog or any other series of events, shelters and rescues *should* return the dog to the breeder or co-owner but they are not necessarily legally required to do so. "If you don’t own the dog, you don’t have much legal recourse," Amundsen said. "Assuming your contract requires a dog be returned to you, the contract is with the owner and is not enforceable against the shelter." When the breeder has an ownership interest, she has some recourse, Amundsen noted, but it takes a *lot* of time, energy and money. Common sense steps * Microchip puppies before they leave. Register the microchips to yourself. * Co-own dogs – This requires thought about the balance of being seen as micromanaging new owners as well as questions of “ownership” numbers. * Contractual recommendations – include a clause that the owner must take steps to include ownership transfer back to breeder as part of will. * Talk puppy buyers through contract – it's only as good as the party’s understanding of it. * Have a “read if dead or incapacitated” folder in case of emergency – keep *updated*. * Add a copy of the MAAP plan to puppy kit with every litter. * Talk to your neighbors and friends to make sure they know that there is a plan for the dogs. They don’t have to wind up in a shelter. * Follow up with previous puppy owners. * Preservation breeders provide lifetime support to owners. "It gives us peace of mind knowing we’ve done something, that we’ve done the maximum we can to be sure our dogs wind up where we want them to be," Amundsen said.
August 2, 2019
Breed Specific Anesthesia Fact and Fiction Dr. Marty Greer brings us information about breed specific anesthesia myths and realities to provide peace of mind and knowledge. “Everyone has an opinion and an experience,” Greer said. “Anesthesia is controlled death. We have to be respectful and appreciative of the advances in medicine. Your vet wants to know that you have the facts to have an informed conversation.” Modern anesthesia drugs are “So impactful in the ability to wander through the body surgically in a way we can cure things we never could before. It’s amazing,” Greer said. Breakthroughs in new drugs and monitoring equipment make today’s anesthetic procedures safer for all dogs. Nonetheless, certain groups of dogs have specific needs. Sighthounds Sighthounds, athletes that they are, boast only 17% body fat vs 35% body fat in most dogs, Greer said. This means the anesthesia drugs metabolize slower in their systems. Higher red blood cel count and lower albumin also changes the metabolism of drugs in sighthound breeds. The low body fat also means they can become hypothermic more easily. Toy breeds Greer noted that veterinary staff work harder at keeping toy dogs warm. They go so far as to use bubble wrap on the dogs legs, to help keep them warmer without a risk of thermal burns. The toy dogs’ small size can also mean a concern about blood sugar dropping during surgery. This means owners are encouraged to not withhold food for as long and staff carefully monitors glucose levels during surgery. Brachycephalic The airways in brachycephalic dogs are constructed differently, Greer said. They often have a narrow airway and a smaller trachea. The goal of the veterinary staff will be to get the  airway under control as soon as possible. Greer also recommends medications to dry up oral secretions so the dogs don’t aspirate. Giant breeds Greer’s recommendation for giant breed dogs is to give a lower dose of sedative before anesthesia. By using a combination of drugs, she is able to ensure that each drug can be administered at lower dose.
August 1, 2019
Breed Specific Anesthesia Fact and Fiction Dr. Marty Greer brings us information about breed specific anesthesia myths and realities to provide peace of mind and knowledge. "Everyone has an opinion and an experience," Greer said. "Anesthesia is controlled death. We have to be respectful and appreciative of the advances in medicine. Your vet wants to know that you have the facts to have an informed conversation." Modern anesthesia drugs are "So impactful in the ability to wander through the body surgically in a way we can cure things we never could before. It’s amazing," Greer said. Breakthroughs in new drugs and monitoring equipment make today's anesthetic procedures safer for all dogs. Nonetheless, certain groups of dogs have specific needs. Sighthounds Sighthounds, athletes that they are, boast only 17% body fat vs 35% body fat in most dogs, Greer said. This means the anesthesia drugs metabolize slower in their systems. Higher red blood cel count and lower albumin also changes the metabolism of drugs in sighthound breeds. The low body fat also means they can become hypothermic more easily. Toy breeds Greer noted that veterinary staff work harder at keeping toy dogs warm. They go so far as to use bubble wrap on the dogs legs, to help keep them warmer without a risk of thermal burns. The toy dogs' small size can also mean a concern about blood sugar dropping during surgery. This means owners are encouraged to not withhold food for as long and staff carefully monitors glucose levels during surgery. Brachycephalic The airways in brachycephalic dogs are constructed differently, Greer said. They often have a narrow airway and a smaller trachea. The goal of the veterinary staff will be to get the  airway under control as soon as possible. Greer also recommends medications to dry up oral secretions so the dogs don’t aspirate. Giant breeds Greer's recommendation for giant breed dogs is to give a lower dose of sedative before anesthesia. By using a combination of drugs, she is able to ensure that each drug can be administered at lower dose.
July 30, 2019
Breeding for type, consistency while keeping a low COI Victor Stora, Shetland Sheepdog breeder, AKC/CHF Residency Recipient and Veterinary Geneticist at University of Pennsylvania, shares concrete information on breeding for type and consistency of style while keeping a low COI (Coefficient of Inbreeding). Stora observed that many breeders fall in to one of two categories. “People might fall in to health testing too much and losing type, or you have people ignoring health because they’re getting the type they want. The happy medium is where people should be,” Stora said. Health test all you want, Stora noted, but keep in mind it doesn’t mean the dogs are free of disease… just all the ones you can test for. What are the really bad diseases that affect a breed, he queried, adding that the more “lethal” diseases get higher priority. Health testing and COI are tools “Once you get to the point that you have the animals that you’ve screened, choose the ones that have the least problems health testing wise and are most like the type you desire,” Stora recommended. “Health testing is a tool, not a meter to eliminate animals because they don’t pass the bar.” He also strongly recommends incorporating carriers of some diseases in a breeding program. “If you eliminate carriers, assuming the carrier has no disease, you’re removing dogs that are healthy. You can zoom in *too* much on health testing, and lose what you had in the beginning.” We don’t have all the answers yet Stora also noted that the primary diseases we want to know about, epilepsy, cancer etc, we don’t have an answer and that they are likely environmental, plus genetic. When it comes to autoimmune disease, Stora said the breeder’s goal is to have more genetic variation to combat it. “Outcross to a point, line breed to a point. Watch what’s happening. If you don’t choose for fertility, you’re choosing against it. Fertility is a heritable trait,” Stora said. “Nobody got into this because it’s easy. It’s not.” Finally, Stora counseled to stop breeding affected dogs once the breed or line has started making headway against that disease. “If the disease is rare within a breed, never breed affected because you don’t have to. If it is common within the breed, you have to use affected,” Stora said. Our goals as breeders, Stora noted, should be to breed with knowledge, move with testing, breed away from disease state, lower the frequency you see the disease causative allele. Move toward a goal of no disease. Genetic Counseling link: https://cvm.ncsu.edu/genetic-testing-referral/
July 29, 2019
Breeding for type, consistency while keeping a low COI Dr. Victor Stora, veterinary medical geneticist, with some of his Shetland Sheepdogs. Victor Stora, Shetland Sheepdog breeder, AKC/CHF Residency Recipient and Veterinary Geneticist at University of Pennsylvania, shares concrete information on breeding for type and consistency of style while keeping a low COI (Coefficient of Inbreeding). Stora observed that many breeders fall in to one of two categories. "People might fall in to health testing too much and losing type, or you have people ignoring health because they’re getting the type they want. The happy medium is where people should be," Stora said. Health test all you want, Stora noted, but keep in mind it doesn’t mean the dogs are free of disease… just all the ones you can test for. What are the really bad diseases that affect a breed, he queried, adding that the more “lethal” diseases get higher priority. Health testing and COI are tools "Once you get to the point that you have the animals that you’ve screened, choose the ones that have the least problems health testing wise and are most like the type you desire," Stora recommended. "Health testing is a tool, not a meter to eliminate animals because they don’t pass the bar." He also strongly recommends incorporating carriers of some diseases in a breeding program. "If you eliminate carriers, assuming the carrier has no disease, you’re removing dogs that are healthy. You can zoom in *too* much on health testing, and lose what you had in the beginning." We don't have all the answers yet Stora also noted that the primary diseases we want to know about, epilepsy, cancer etc, we don’t have an answer and that they are likely environmental, plus genetic. When it comes to autoimmune disease, Stora said the breeder's goal is to have more genetic variation to combat it. "Outcross to a point, line breed to a point. Watch what’s happening. If you don’t choose for fertility, you’re choosing against it. Fertility is a heritable trait," Stora said. "Nobody got into this because it’s easy. It's not." Finally, Stora counseled to stop breeding affected dogs once the breed or line has started making headway against that disease. "If the disease is rare within a breed, never breed affected because you don’t have to. If it is common within the breed, you have to use affected," Stora said. Our goals as breeders, Stora noted, should be to breed with knowledge, move with testing, breed away from disease state, lower the frequency you see the disease causative allele. Move toward a goal of no disease. Genetic Counseling link: https://cvm.ncsu.edu/genetic-testing-referral/
July 26, 2019
Bill Shelton, chapter 3: Genetic bottlenecks, marketing, adaptability Renowned breeder and judge Bill Shelton and host Laura Reeves finish up their wide-ranging conversation on dog breeding and marketing in the 21st century. “How do we move the bar from healthier to typier to sounder? We have to breed,” Shelton said. “We have to be accountable for what we produce. But we have to breed. And we have to get the message out about how what we’re doing is producing healthier and happier dogs. How our ‘commodity’ is predictable.” Bottlenecks are something we may all have to deal with at some point, Shelton noted. He references the Dalmation outcross project in which Pointers were incorporated to eliminate a deadly disease. He also talks about the Basenji project, in which native dogs from Africa are incorporated in the gene pool, again to eliminate a heritable disease. Listen to my interview with Damara Bolte on this topic here. “It’s a heretic idea to many people, but it’s going to be something we all have to do at some point, because our dogs exist in closed gene pools,” Shelton said. “It goes back to the weaving of genes. You don’t eliminate bad genes, you introduce new good genes.” Additional resources: https://puredogtalk.com/busting-the-genetic-testing-myths-dr-jerold-bell/ https://puredogtalk.com/31-not-a-gene-poola-gene-puddle-betty-anne-stenmark-on-dandie-dinmont-terriers-2/ https://puredogtalk.com/77-one-breed-one-world-think-and-breed-global-with-doug-johnson-2/ https://puredogtalk.com/german-pinscher-all-purpose-robust-dog-for-active-owners-pure-dog-talk/ Doodles offer a lesson “How many people dislike labradoodles. Think back in the ‘70s when there were those dogs called Australian shepherds,” Shelton noted wryly. “People get upset because doodle breeders can sell their cross-bred dogs, when they (show breeders) can hardly sell dogs. Why? Because (show breeders) exist in a vacuum. They don’t advertise, they don’t promote their breeds, they don’t promote themselves, they don’t know how to do it. And then they say how bad AKC marketplace is. We want to show our dogs. But we don’t want to share them or market them.” No dog left behind Shelton espoused several outstanding marketing concepts, including making a dog’s microchip number its registration number. The public finds more value in the microchip than the registration number, he said. This plan would enable AKC to sell both more registrations and microchips and promote a campaign of “no dog left behind” because all purebred dogs would be registered and microchipped. The entire series If you missed the first two installments of this series, you can find them here and here.
July 25, 2019
Bill Shelton, chapter 3: Genetic bottlenecks, marketing, adaptability Renowned breeder and judge Bill Shelton and host Laura Reeves finish up their wide-ranging conversation on dog breeding and marketing in the 21st century. “How do we move the bar from healthier to typier to sounder? We have to breed,” Shelton said. “We have to be accountable for what we produce. But we have to breed. And we have to get the message out about how what we’re doing is producing healthier and happier dogs. How our ‘commodity’ is predictable.” Bottlenecks are something we may all have to deal with at some point, Shelton noted. He references the Dalmation outcross project in which Pointers were incorporated to eliminate a deadly disease. He also talks about the Basenji project, in which native dogs from Africa are incorporated in the gene pool, again to eliminate a heritable disease. Listen to my interview with Damara Bolte on this topic here. “It’s a heretic idea to many people, but it’s going to be something we all have to do at some point, because our dogs exist in closed gene pools,” Shelton said. “It goes back to the weaving of genes. You don’t eliminate bad genes, you introduce new good genes.” Additional resources: https://puredogtalk.com/busting-the-genetic-testing-myths-dr-jerold-bell/ https://puredogtalk.com/31-not-a-gene-poola-gene-puddle-betty-anne-stenmark-on-dandie-dinmont-terriers-2/ https://puredogtalk.com/77-one-breed-one-world-think-and-breed-global-with-doug-johnson-2/ https://puredogtalk.com/german-pinscher-all-purpose-robust-dog-for-active-owners-pure-dog-talk/ Doodles offer a lesson Shelton talks about the development of new breeds, including the Australian Shepherd. “How many people dislike labradoodles. Think back in the ‘70s when there were those dogs called Australian shepherds,” Shelton noted wryly. “People get upset because doodle breeders can sell their cross-bred dogs, when they (show breeders) can hardly sell dogs. Why? Because (show breeders) exist in a vacuum. They don’t advertise, they don’t promote their breeds, they don’t promote themselves, they don’t know how to do it. And then they say how bad AKC marketplace is. We want to show our dogs. But we don’t want to share them or market them.” No dog left behind Shelton espoused several outstanding marketing concepts, including making a dog’s microchip number its registration number. The public finds more value in the microchip than the registration number, he said. This plan would enable AKC to sell both more registrations and microchips and promote a campaign of “no dog left behind” because all purebred dogs would be registered and microchipped. The entire series If you missed the first two installments of this series, you can find them here and here.
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