072: Is the 30 Million Word Gap Real: Part II
Published September 3, 2018
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63 min
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    This episode revisits the concept of the 30 Million Word Gap concept, which we first covered in an interview with Dr. Doug Sperry a few weeks back.

    After she heard that I was going to talk with Dr. Sperry, Dr. Roberta Golinkoff - with whom we discussed her book Becoming Brilliant almost two years ago now - asked to come back on to present a rebuttal.  We're going to learn a lot more about the importance of child-directed speech!

    This episode serves two purposes: it helps us to understand another aspect of the 30 Million Word Gap, and it also demonstrates pretty clearly that scientists - both of whom have the best interests of children at heart - see very different ways of achieving that end.



    References

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    Washington, J.
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