017: Don’t bother trying to increase your child’s self-esteem
Published December 19, 2016
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27 min
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    Self-Esteem

    When I first started researching this episode I thought it would be a bit of a slam-dunk.  Self-esteem is a good thing, right?

    I was really surprised to find that there’s little evidence that self-esteem helps children to do better in school, or even be happier, so there's a good deal of disagreement among psychologists about whether encouraging self-esteem is necessarily a good thing.

    This episode digs into these issues to understand (as much as scientists currently can) the benefits of self-esteem - and what qualities parents might want to encourage in their children in place of self-esteem to enable better outcomes.  It also touches on our self-esteem as parents - because don't we all want to think that our child is just a little bit special, so we know we're good parents?



    References

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    Kutob, R.M., Senf, J.H., Crago, M., & Shisslak, C.M. (2010). Concurrent and longitudinal predictors of self-esteem in elementary and middle school girls. Journal of School Health 80(5), 240-248. DOI: 10.1111/j.1746-1561.2010.00496.x
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    Neff, K.D.
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