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July 20, 2020
On this episode, Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto is joined by Dr. Mary Kite. Mary Kite received her B.A., M.S., and Ph.D. from Purdue University. A social psychologist, she is currently Professor of Social Psychology at Ball State University. Strongly committed to psychology education at all levels, she is Past-President of The Society for the Teaching of Psychology (STP, APA Division 2); she has held a number of other leadership roles for STP. She also chaired the APA Presidential Task Force on Diversity Education Resources and is Past President of the Midwestern Psychological Association. She is a Fellow of APA Divisions 2, 8, 9, 35, & 44 and of the Association for Psychological Science and the Midwestern Psychological Association. She maintains an active research program in the area of stereotyping and prejudice, including co-authoring The Psychology of Prejudice and Discrimination (3e) with Bernard Whitley, Jr.; Kite and Whitley also co-authored Principles of Research in Behavioral Science (4e). Recognitions include the Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching in Psychology from the American Psychological Foundation (2014) and a Presidential Citation from the Society for the Teaching of Psychology (2011). She was selected as a G. Stanley Hall Lecturer for the American Psychological Association in 2009 and was named a Minority Access National Role Model in 2007. Segment 1: External Validity [00:00-08:03] In this first segment, Dr. Kite discusses the importance of external validity in experimental research. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Kite, M. E., & Whitley, Jr., B. E.(2016). The psychology of prejudice and discrimination (3rd ed.). New York: Routledge. Kite, M. E., & Whitley, Jr., B. E. (2018). Principles of research in behavioral science (4th ed.). New York: Routledge. Darley, J. M., & Latané, B. (1968). Bystander intervention in emergencies: Diffusion of responsibility. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 8, 377-383. Piliavin, I. M., Rodin, J., & Piliavin, J. A. (1969). Good Samaritanism: An underground phenomenon? Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 13, 289-299. Ebbinghaus’ research on nonsense syllables Segment 2: Sampling [08:04-18:12] In segment two, Dr. Kite discusses sampling issues in quantitative research methods. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Arnett, J. (2008). The neglected 95%: Why American psychology needs to become less American. American Psychologist, 67, 602-614. Fraley, R. C. (2007). Using the Internet for personality research. In R. W. Robins, R. C. Fraley, & R. F. Krueger (Eds.), Handbook of research methods in personality psychology (pp. 130-148). New York: Guilford. Henrich, J., Heine, S. J. & Norenzayan, A. (2010). The weirdest people in the world? Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 33, 61-135. Henry, P. J. (2008). College sophomores in the laboratory redux: Influences of a narrow data base on social psychology’s view of the nature of prejudice. Psychological Inquiry, 19, 49-71. Kraut, R., Olson, J., Banaji, M., Bruckman, A., Cohen, J., & Couper, M. (2004). Psychological research online: Report of Board of Scientific Affairs’ Advisory Group on the conduct of research on the Internet. American Psychologist, 59, 105-117. Rosenthal, R., & Rosnow, R. L. (1975). The volunteer subject. New York: Wiley. Amazon Mechanical Turk Qualitrics To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
July 6, 2020
On this episode, Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto is joined by Patrick Aldrich. Patrick received his bachelor’s degree in Wildlife biology and a minor in Entomology from the University of California, Davis. After graduation, he spent 5 years in various field biology positions, studying a wide array subjects from Bowerbird mating systems in Australia to integrated pest management of ground squirrels in Northern California. He subsequently decided to return to school to pursue a PhD at the University of Hawaii, Manoa, where he studied the spatio-temporal variation of pollination networks in Hawaiian tropical dry forests. Following his graduate work, he was the project director for a project that used spatial analyses to study the random correspondence of fingerprint patterns. Through his work, he has acquired extensive experience in biostatistics. He is currently the data manager and statistician for the Oregon Quality Rating and Improvement System for early childhood and other projects at The Research Institute at Western Oregon University. He continues to apply parametric, non-parametric and likelihood methodologies to analyze various datasets associated with early childhood and educational research. Segment 1: Parametric vs. Non-parametric statistical tests [00:00-18:52] In this first segment, Patrick discusses the differences between parametric and non-parametric statistical tests and the best practices for using non-parametric tests. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: RIA # 91: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Dr. William D. Marelich on the Applied Quantitative Perspective Segment 2: Using non-parametric tests [18:53-33:31] In segment two, Patrick discusses how he uses non-parametric statistical tests in his research and how other researchers have used them. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Anderson, M. J. (2001). A new method for non-parametric multivariate analysis. Austral Ecology 26, 32-46. Oregon’s Quality Rating Improvement System (QRIS) Mann-Whitney U test Additional resources on non-parametric statistics: Wasserman, Larry (2007). All of nonparametric statistics. New York: Springer. Conover, W. J. (1999). Practical nonparametric statistics (3rd ed.). New York: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Siegel, S. & Castellan Jr., N. J. (1989). Nonparametric statistics for the behavioral sciences (2nd ed.). McGraw-Hill. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
June 22, 2020
n this episode, Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto is joined by Dr. William D. Marelich, a Professor of Psychology at California State University, Fullerton, and consulting statistician for Health Risk Reduction Projects, Integrative Substance Abuse Programs, Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles. His research interests and publications address decision-making strategies in health settings, patient/provider interactions, HIV/AIDS, and statistical/methodological approaches in experimental and applied research. Dr. Marelich is coauthor of the book “The Social Psychology of Health: Essays and Readings” and is an Editorial Board Member of the International Journal of Adolescence and Youth. He also has an interest in Sports Psychology with applications to baseball. Segment 1: Applied Quantitative Perspective [00:00-10:43] In this first segment, William discusses the applied quantitative perspective in research. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Marelich, W. D., & Erger, J. S. (Eds.). (2004). The social psychology of health: Essays and readings. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications. International Journal of Adolescence and Youth Segment 2: Key Quantitative Concepts [10:44-19:38] In segment two, William offers his perspective on key statistical concepts to understand for reading research reports and publications. Segment 3: On the Statistical Horizon [19:39-28:35] In segment three, William discusses statistical software and the concepts of p-hacking and p-curves. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: R (free statistical software) IBM SPSS  SAS Articles related to p-Curve and p-Hacking: Cumming, G. (2016). A primer on p-Hacking. MethodSpace. Retrieved from https://www.methodspace.com/primer-p-hacking/ Bruns S. B., & Ioannidis, J. P. A. (2016). p-Curve and p-Hacking in observational research. PLoS ONE 11(2): e0149144. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0149144 To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Ecampus or Oregon State University.
June 8, 2020
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Kevin Ahern, a Professor of Biochemistry/Biophysics who has taken a very non-traditional path to becoming a professor. A Beaver alum, Ahern received his Ph.D from OSU in 1986 and after post-doctoral work at UCSD, rejoined OSU as a business manager in 1989. Transitioning to the instructional ranks in 1995, Ahern served there until he was promoted from Senior Instructor to Professor in 2014, a rank he currently holds. Along the way, Ahern served as a scientific writer and editor with stints as contributing editor of Science Magazine, BioTechniques, and Genetic Engineering News. His YouTube instructional videos have over 4,000,000 views and his three open educational resource textbooks have saved students almost $50,000,000. Segment 1: Writing Creatively as a Researcher [00:00-11:58] In this first segment, Kevin shares about some of the creative writing he does as a scientist. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Science Magazine BioTechniques Genetic Engineering News Dr. Kevin Ahern’s YouTube channel and Metabolic Melodies Segment 2: Supporting Undergraduate Researchers [11:59-19:58] In segment two, Kevin shares his experience supporting undergraduate researchers. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: OSU’s STEM Leaders Program Segment 3: Best Practices with Mentoring Undergraduate Researchers [19:59-31:16] In segment three, Kevin describes some strategies for effectively mentoring undergraduate researchers. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Howard Hughes Medical Institute Entering Mentoring To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcastEmail: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Ecampus or Oregon State University.
May 26, 2020
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Laura Gogia. Laura Gogia, MD, PhD is an educational consultant, researcher, and designer specializing in program evaluation, digital learning, and higher education. She is the principal for Bandwidth Strategies, where she offers organizational development and creative support for institutions of higher and continuing education. She was formerly the associate director of the Grace E. Harris Leadership Institute at Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) and liaison for the Virginia Longitudinal Data System at the State Council for the Higher Education of Virginia (SCHEV). Gogia earned her doctorate (PhD) in Education Research and Evaluation and her Medical Degree (MD), both at VCU. Segment 1: Researching the Student Experience [00:00-09:30] In this first segment, Laura discusses some of the variables for researching student experience. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: American Association of Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) RIA # 19: Dr. Peter Felten on Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) Segment 2: Sensemaker as a Research Tool [09:31-19:32] In segment two, Laura describes uses of SenseMaker in research on student experience. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: SenseMaker Tableau Segment 3: Connected Learning and Learning Design [19:33-35:37] In segment three, Laura shares about her most recent research interests. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Ecampus or Oregon State University.
May 11, 2020
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. John Fritz, an Associate Vice President for Instructional Technology at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). Working within UMBC’s Division of Information Technology, John is responsible for UMBC’s focused efforts in teaching, learning and technology, including learning analytics. He is also responsible for tier 1 (basic) user support including knowledge management. Previously, John served as UMBC’s Director of News & Online Information, and has more than 10 years’ experience as a public information officer, writer and editor in three University of Maryland campuses. John holds a Ph.D in Language, Literacy and Culture from UMBC, a Master’s degree in English (with an emphasis in rhetoric and composition) from the University of Maryland, College Park, a bachelor’s degree in English and religion from Columbia Union College in Takoma Park, Maryland, and certificates in New Media Publishing from the University of Baltimore and Instructional Systems Design from UMBC. Segment 1: Faculty Course Design and Analytics [00:00-11:59] In this first segment, John shares about some of his research on Learning Management Systems (LMSs) In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Khan Academy Fritz, J., & Whitmer, J. (2017, February 27). Learning Analytics Research for LMS Course Design: Two Studies. EDUCAUSE Review Online. Retrieved from http://er.educause.edu/articles/2017/2/learning-analytics-research-for-lms-course-design-two-studies Segment 2: Adaptive and Personalized Learning [12:00-21:44] In segment two, John discusses the rise in adaptive and personalized learning platforms and what this means for research on student learning In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Barry Zimmerman Khan Academy Blackboard IMS Global Edwards, M., Ford, C., Fritz, J., Johnson, D., Pugliese, L., & Birk. (2017). From Adaptive to Adaptable: The Next Generation for Personalized Learning | IMS Global Learning Consortium. IMS Global. Retrieved from https://www.imsglobal.org/adaptive-adaptable-next-generation-personalized-learning Fritz, J. L. (2016). Using analytics to encourage student responsibility for learning and identify course designs that help (Ph.D.). University of Maryland, Baltimore County, United States — Maryland. Retrieved from http://umbc.box.com/johnfritzdissertation Fritz, J. (2013). Using analytics at UMBC: Encouraging student responsibility and identifying effective course designs (Research Bulletin) (p. 11). Louisville, CO: Educause Center for Applied Research. Retrieved from http://www.educause.edu/library/resources/using-analytics-umbc-encouraging-student-responsibility-and-identifying-effective-course-designs Segment 3: The Art and Science of Nudge Analytics [21:45-34:05] In segment three, John shares about a new interest area for him: nudge analytics. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Thaler, R. H., & Sunstein, C.R. (2008). Nudge. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press. Glenn, D. (2010, February 7). Struggling students can improve by studying themselves, research shows. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Albert Bandura Carol Dweck Collection of articles by and about UMBC’s use of analytics To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Ecampus or Oregon State University.
April 27, 2020
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Sarah Rose Cavanagh, an Associate Professor of Psychology and Associate Director of the D’Amour Center for Teaching Excellence at Assumption College and author of The Spark of Learning: Energizing the College Classroom with the Science of Emotion. Segment 1: Emotions and Teaching [00:00-12:53] In this first segment, Sarah discusses her research on emotions and teaching. Segment 2: Signing with a Literary Agent [12:54-23:52] In segment two, Sarah shares the process of signing with a literary agent. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Connect with Dr. Sarah Rose Cavanagh on Twitter: @SaRoseCav Cavanagh, S. R. (2016). The spark of learning: Energizing the college classroom with the science of emotion. Morgantown, WV: West Virginia University Press. Sambuchino, C. (2015). Get a literary agent: The complete guide to securing representation for your work. Blue Ash, OH: Writer’s Digest Books. RIA # 49: Dr. Therese Houston on Drawing Media Attention  Segment 3: Helping Students Manage Negative Emotion States [23:53-35:22] In segment three, Sarah discusses her most recent research project. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: See Dr. Sarah Rose Cavanagh’s faculty profile page for more about her current research projects Association for Psychological Science (APS) past and future conventions POD Network Conference To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
April 13, 2020
In this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Ben Hatton, an Assistant Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and cross-appointed to the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering (IBBME) at the University of Toronto (UofT). Dr. Hatton is an engineer who obtained his Ph.D. in 2005 from the University of Toronto in the area of nanomaterials synthesis by self-assembly. He has worked extensively on the design, fabrication and properties of nano- and microstructured surfaces, for biomaterial applications, and worked at Harvard University for 5 years (as a postdoc and research associate) before coming to UofT in 2012. Dr. Hatton currently has >40 peer review publications and >50 presentations and conference abstracts, and is focused on investigating the relationships between nanocomposite structure and nanomaterial surface design on bacterial contamination of biomaterial surfaces. The Hatton group works on the synthesis of drug-silica nanomaterials for drug release, non-adhesive and non-fouling biomaterials, and nano/micro scale topography effects on cell binding and surface reactions. Dr. Hatton has over 15 patents (and applications), from his research work at UofT and Harvard University. Segment 1: Researching in Different Environments [00:00-13:41] In this first segment, Ben shares about what he has learned from research in many different environments. Segment 2: Strategies for Creativity in Research [13:42-23:36] In segment two, Ben shares his favorite strategies for nurturing creativity in research. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Segment 3: More Strategies for Creativity in Research [23:37-35:15] In segment three, Ben shares additional strategies for nurturing creativity in research. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Johnson, S. (2010). Where good ideas come from: The natural history of innovation. New York: Riverhead Books. RIA # 10: Dr. Dannelle Stevens on Journaling Best Practices Materials Research Society (MRS) Conference To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Ecampus or Oregon State University.
March 30, 2020
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Gail Crimmins, who initially trained as a performer and worked as a performer, director and casting director in theatre, television and film in the UK for almost 10 years.  She subsequently taught Drama and Performance at universities and conservatoires before moving to Australia in 2008. Gail undertook her PhD study (an arts-informed narrative inquiry into the lived experience of women casual academics) alongside part-time teaching and fully committed mothering. She currently works as a Lecturer of Communication, coordinates a series of Communication Programs, and is the First Year Experience Lead for the School of Communication and Creative Industries, at the University of the Sunshine Coast in Queensland, Australia.  She undertakes arts-informed, narrative and auto-ethnographic research, predominantly though not exclusively, exploring the lived experience of women academics. Gail is a feminist researcher who seeks to illuminate the impacts of patriarchal structures on women’s lives and explore ways for women’s stories and voices to be heard. Segment 1: Arts-informed Research [00:00-16:38] In this first segment, Gail shares about how she got started with arts-informed research. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Cahnmann, M. (2006). Reading, living, and writing bilingual poetry as scholARTistry in the language arts classroom. Language Arts, 83(4), 342. Cole, A. L., & Knowles, G. J. (2008). Arts-informed research. In G. J. Knowles & A. L. Cole (Eds.) Handbook of the Arts in Qualitative Research. Perspectives methodologies, examples and issues (pp. 55-70). Los Angeles: Sage Publications. Nielsen, L. (2000). Academy performances, academy rewards. Teacher Education Quarterly, 27(2), 163-170. Nielsen, L. (2002). Learning from the liminal: Fiction as knowledge. Alberta Journal of Education Research 48(3), 206-214. Sikes, P. & Gale, K. (2006). Narrative Approaches to Education Research. Plymouth: University of Plymouth. Segment 2: Examples of Arts-informed Research [16:39-37:37] In segment two, Gail offers examples of her own work with arts-informed research. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Books: Cole, A. L., & Knowles, G. J. (2008). Arts-informed research. In G. J. Knowles & A. L. Cole (Eds.) Handbook of the Arts in Qualitative Research. Perspectives methodologies, examples and issues (pp. 55-70). Los Angeles: Sage Publications. Gee, J. P. (1990). Social linguistics and literacies (1st ed.). London, UK: Falmer Press. Gee, J. P. (2005). An introduction to discourse analysis theory and method (2nd ed.). London: Routledge.  Articles: Ewing, R., & Hughes, J. (2008). Arts-informed inquiry in teacher education: contesting the myths. European Education Research Journal, 7(4), 512–522. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.2304/eerj.2008.7.4.512 Gee, J. P. (1985). The narrativization of experience in the oral style. Journal of Education, 167(1): 9-35. Gee, J. P. (1991). A linguistic approach to narrative. Journal of Narrative and Life History 1(1):15-39. MacLure, M. (2013). The wonder of data. Cultural Studies ↔ Critical Methodologies, 13(4), 228–232. Ringrose, J. & Renold, E. (2014). ‘F**K Rape!’: Exploring affective intensities in a feminist research assemblage. Qualitative Inquiry 20 (6): 772–780. Sikes, P. & Gale, K. (2006). Narrative Approaches to Education Research. Plymouth: University of Plymouth. Resources authored by Dr. Gail Crimmins: Crimmins, G. (2018). Theatricalising narrative research on women casual academics. Palgrave studies in gender and education. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Crimmins, G. (2017). An emotional, physical and humanistic response to performed data. TEXT Special Issue, 38, 1-13. Retrieved from                                                                                  http://www.textjournal.com.au/speciss/issue38/Crimmins.pdf Crimmins, G. (2017). How an audience of scholars’ evaluated arts informed communication and verbatim theatre as media through which to communicate academic research. Applied Theatre Research. Connect with Dr. Gail Crimmins: GCrimmin@usc.edu.au Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-04:21]: Benefits of Arts-informed Research In this bonus clip, the following resource is mentioned: Carrigan, M. (2017, May 8). An interview with Patricia Leavy about research design in contemporary times. The Socialogical Imagination. Retrieved from http://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/19315 To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
March 16, 2020
On this episode, Katie is joined by Kris Shaffer, Ph.D., a data scientist with a background in computational musicology. Kris currently works as an Instructional Technology Specialist and Adjunct Instructor of Computer Science at the University of Mary Washington. He also does freelance work in web and social-media intelligence, and serves as a volunteer researcher for Data for Democracy. He is a Contributing Editor and Board member for Hybrid Pedagogy and the lead author and editor of Open Music Theory: an open-source, interactive textbook for undergraduate music theory courses. You can find him on the web at pushpullfork.com and github.com/kshaffer. Would you like to incorporate this episode of “Research in Action” into your course? Download the Episode 105 Instructor Guide (.pdf) or visit our Podcast Instructor Guides page to find additional information. Segment 1: Computational Musicology [00:00-10:42] In this first segment, Kris discusses his background in computational musicology. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Hybrid Pedagogy Open Music Theory Composer György Ligeti Million Song Dataset Segment 2: Open-source Software Development [10:43-20:50] In segment two, Kris shares about his motivations for creating open-source software. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Shaffer, K. (2013, May 23). Open-source scholarship. Retrieved from https://hybridpedagogy.org/open-source-scholarship/ Mozilla Android Find Dr. Shaffer on GitHub: github.com/kshaffer Domain of One’s Own and the University of Mary Washington For more on the Domain of One’s Own, check out RIA # 99: Dr. Jesse Stommel on Founding a Journal  Data for Democracy GitHub Segment 3: New Research Directions [20:51-33:30] In segment three, Kris shares about his most recent work on hate speech. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Data for Democracy Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-4:41]: The Relationship Between Mathematics and Music To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
March 2, 2020
On this episode, Katie is joined by Valerie Clayman Pye, an Assistant Professor of Theatre in the School of Performing Arts at LIU Post, where she teaches acting and voice and speech. She holds a PhD in Performance Practice, Drama and an MFA in Staging Shakespeare from the University of Exeter, where she worked with Shakespeare’s Globe and the Royal Shakespeare Company. Valerie’s research focuses on actor training pedagogy, facilitating performances of heightened text, and on practice-as-research (PaR). She writes about the intersection between text and performance and on the dynamics of performance at Shakespeare’s Globe. Her article, “Shakespeare’s Globe: theatre architecture and the performance of authenticity” was recently named one of the most-read articles in the journal Shakespeare in the last three years. She also holds an MFA in Acting from Brooklyn College. Valerie is a professional actor and director whose work has reached audiences in over twenty countries. As a voice and speech coach, Valerie has worked in theatre, film, and television coaching Academy, BAFTA, Emmy, and Golden Globe Award nominees. Her book, Unearthing Shakespeare: Embodied Performance and the Globe, was released by Routledge in January 2017. Show Notes Would you like to incorporate this episode of “Research in Action” into your course? Download the Episode 77 Instructor Guide (.pdf) or visit our Podcast Instructor Guides page to find additional information. Segment 1: Practice-as-Research [00:00-16:40] In this first segment, Valerie describes the methodology practice-as-research. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Pye, V. C. (2014). Shakespeare’s Globe: Theatre architecture and the performance of authenticity. Shakespeare, 10(4), 411-427. Pye, V. C. (2017). Unearthing Shakespeare: Embodied performance and the globe. New York: Routledge. Konstantin Stanislavski Segment 2: Engaging in Rigorous Practice-as-Research [16:41-34:13] In segment two, Valerie shares how researchers using practice-as-research ensure rigor. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Studies in Theatre and Performance Theatre Topics Theatre Survey Performance Research For more on journaling, listeners may want to refer back to these resources: RIA # 10: Dr. Dannelle Stevens on Journaling Best Practices Stevens, D. D., & Cooper, J. E. (2009). Journal Keeping: How to Use Reflective Writing for Learning, Teaching, Professional Insight and Positive Change. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing Nelson, R.(2006). Practice as research and the problem of knowledge. Performance Research 11(4), 105-116. Nelson, R. (and Ed.). (2013). Practice as research in the arts: Principles, protocols, pedagogies, resistances. Hampshire, UK: Palgrave Macmillan Freeman, J. (2010). Blood, sweat & theory: Research through practice in performance. UK: Libri Publishing. Practice as Research in Performance (PARIP) Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-3:39]: An Example of Practice-as-Research Bonus Clip #2 [00:00-02:29]: Valerie Defines the World Reflexive for Her Research To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Ecampus or Oregon State University.
February 17, 2020
On this episode, Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto is joined by Dr. Kathleen Preston, an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at California State University, Fullerton. Dr. Preston teaches several statistics courses including introductory, advanced, and multivariate statistics, as well as psychometrics, and structural equation modeling. She earned her Ph.D. in 2011 in quantitative psychology from UCLA. Her research interests are in using Item Response Theory, specifically the nominal response model, to develop and refine psychological measurement tools. Dr. Preston is co-director of the Fullerton Longitudinal Study where she applies advanced statistical techniques to long-term longitudinal data. Dr. Preston is considered an expert in statistical analysis using R programming and she has recently published a textbook on analyzing multivariate statistics using R. She has given numerous invited statistical presentations and workshops at national and regional conferences, universities, and federal government agencies. Segment 1: Psychometrics and Item Response Theory [00:00-20:11] In this first segment, Kathleen discusses psychometrics, and how she got interested in quantitative psychology; she explains item response theory and the nominal response model and their applications. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Item Response Theory Nominal Response Model Segment 2: Analysis of the Fullerton Longitudinal Study [20:12 -37:44] In segment two, Kathleen discusses the Fullerton Longitudinal Study, the benefits and drawbacks of the study and the statistical methods she employs in her research. In this segment the following resources are mentioned: Fullerton Longitudinal Study Some of Kathleen's publications on the nominal response model and the Fullerton Longitudinal Study: Preston, K., Parral, S., Gottfried, A.W, Oliver, P., Gottfried, A. E., Ibrahim, S. & Delany, D. (2015). Applying the Nominal Response Model Within a Longitudinal Framework to Construct the Positive Family Relationships Scale. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 75, 901-930. Preston, K. S. J., Gottfried, A. W., Park, J. J., Manapat, P. D., Gottfried, A. E., & Oliver, P. H. (2018). Simultaneous Linking of Cross-Informant and Longitudinal Data Involving Positive Family Relationships. Educational and Psychological Measurement, 78(3), 409–429. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
February 3, 2020
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. David J. Connor, a Professor Emeritus of Hunter College (Learning Disabilities Program) and the Graduate Center (Urban Education Program) of the City University of New York. He has taught in New York City for over thirty years, from high schoolers to doctoral students. Throughout his career, David has always been interested in issues of equality, particularly dis/ability and race. He is the author or editor of over a hundred articles and book chapters and nine books, most recent among them being DisCrit: Disability Studies and Critical Race Theory (2016) co-edited with Subini Annamma and Beth Ferri, Contemplating Dis/Ability in Schools and Society: A Life in Education (2018) and the second edition of Rethinking Disability: A Disability Studies Approach to Inclusive Practices (2019) co-authored with Jan Valle. He is currently working on two co-edited books. The first, with Beth Ferri, How Teaching Shapes our Thinking About Dis/abilities: Stories from The Field, consists of autoethnographic accounts about how initial teaching experiences influenced the research agendas of career-long educators. The second, with Subini Annamma and Beth Ferri, DisCrit Expanded: Inquiries, Reverberations & Ruptures, looks at new and innovative ways the theoretical framework of Disability Critical Race Theory is being used within the field of education. Segment 1:  Engaging in Disability Studies [00:00-14:27] In this first segment, David discusses his work in Dis/Ability Studies, including research projects, strategies, and theories used. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: David’s book, DisCrit--Disability Studies and Critical Race Theory in Education David’s book, Rethinking Disability: A Disability Studies Approach to Inclusive Practices Segment 2: Contemplating Dis/Ability In segment two, David discusses his book, Contemplating Dis/Ability in Schools and Society: A Life in Education. In this segment the following resources are mentioned: David’s book, Contemplating Dis/Ability in Schools and Society: A Life in Education RIA #79: Anne-Marie Dietering on Autoethnography Segment 3: Special Education and Disability Studies [26:02-34:30] In segment three, David provides his thoughts about Special Education as a field, including how Special Education relates to Dis/Ability Studies. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
January 21, 2020
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Ron Mize, an Associate Professor in the School of Language, Culture, and Society.  He previously taught International Relations, Sociology, Latino Studies, and Ethnic Studies at ITAM (Mexico City), Humboldt State University, Cornell University, University of Saint Francis-Fort Wayne, California State University-San Marcos, University of California San Diego, Southwestern College, Colorado State University and University of Wisconsin Rock County.  His scholarly research focuses on the historical origins of racial, class, and gender oppression in the lives of Mexicano/as residing in the United States. He is the author of over 50 scholarly publications, including four books. Segment 1: Researching Immigrant Labor [00:00-19:21] Segment 2: Researching Politicized or Controversial Topics [19:22-35:53] To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
January 6, 2020
On this episode, Katie offers a fond farewell as she transitions out of her role at Oregon State Ecampus and as the host of the "Research in Action" podcast. Katie's LinkedIn profile To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
December 30, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Michelle Covi, an assistant professor of practice at Old Dominion University in the Department of Ocean, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and a Virginia Sea Grant extension partner. She conducts research and outreach activities for climate adaptation and coastal resilience efforts for Virginia with an emphasis on Hampton Roads. Her research areas include sea level rise and resilience risk perception and communication, public participation in adaptation planning processes and engagement/outreach practices. She co-organizes the Hampton Roads Sea Level Rise/ Flooding Adaptation Forum, a quarterly meeting of adaptation stakeholders and co-chaired the Citizen Engagement Working Group of the Hampton Roads Intergovernmental Pilot Project. She completed her doctorate in Coastal Resources Management at East Carolina University, where her focus was on sea level rise risk communication and policy. She has a Masters degree in Marine Science from University of Georgia where she studied salt marsh ecology. Segment 1: Sea Level Rise Research [00:00-11:57] In this first segment, Michelle shares about her research on sea level rise. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Segment 2: Sea Level Rise Risk Preparation [11:58-23:20] In segment two, Michelle shares about her work with sea level rise preparation. Segment 3: Interdisciplinary Partnerships [23:21-35:59] In segment three, Michelle discusses the interdisciplinary nature of her work. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: ODU Resilience Collaborative Virginia Sea Grant To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
December 23, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Ludovico Cademartiri, who obtained a Laurea degree in Materials Science from the University of Parma in 2002 and a PhD in Chemistry from the University of Toronto in 2008 with Geoffrey A. Ozin. He was a NSERC Postdoctoral Fellow in the group of George M. Whitesides at Harvard University. His work spans materials chemistry, physical chemistry, molecular electronics, flame manipulation, plasma processing, polymers, and environments-by-design and has been recognized by national and international awards, most recently the Beckman Young Investigator Award, and the Plant Science Institute Faculty Fellow Award. He has been at Iowa State since 2012. Segment 1: Plant Research [00:00-12:12] In this first segment, Ludovico describes his research on plants. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Lind, K. R., Sizmur, T., Benomar, S., Miller, A., & Cademartiri, L. (2014). LEGO Bricks as building blocks for centimeter-scale biological environments: The case of plants. PLoS ONE 9(6): e100867. Segment 2: Using Plasmas for Nanostructure Processing [12:13-22:06] In segment two, Ludovico shares about some of his research on plasmas. Segment 3: Career Building Blocks [22:07-34:17] In segment three, Ludovico discusses the building blocks of his career. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
December 16, 2019
On this episode, Kaite is joined by Dr. Reem Hajjar, an Assistant Professor of Integrated Human and Ecological Systems in the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society at Oregon State University. She is an interdisciplinary social scientist, and studies the relationship between forests and livelihoods, and how various governance mechanisms and institutions (policies, norms, and markets) shape that relationship. Most of her work to-date has taken place in tropical and sub-tropical forests, with a recent extension into the Pacific Northwest of North America. Most recently, she's been working on projects related to community-based forest management in Mexico, global reviews on community forestry and small-scale forest enterprises, gendered impacts of land grabs in Ethiopia, impacts of forest policy changes in Ghana, and cattle sector certification in Brazil. Segment 1: Forestry Research [00:00-17:03] In this first segment, Reem describes the discipline of forestry. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: FoLIAGe Research group website Rights and Resources Initiative Segment 2: Researching Internationally [17:04-34:51] In segment two, Reem shares about her international research and when she decides to expand to a new research site. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Articles on community forestry in Brazil and Mexico: Hajjar, R., McGrath, D. G., Kozak, R. A., & Innes, J.L. (2011). Framing community forestry challenges with a broader lens: Case studies from the Brazilian Amazon. Journal of Environmental Management, 92, 2159-2169. Hajjar, R., Kozak, R. A., & Innes, J. L. (2012). Is decentralization leading to “real” decision-making power for forest-dependent communities? Case studies from Mexico and Brazil. Ecology and Society, 17(1), 12. Hajjar, R., Kozak, R. A., El-Lakany, H., & Innes, J. L. (2013). Community forests for forest communities: Integrating community-defined goals and practices in the design of forestry initiatives. Land Use Policy, 34, 158-167. Secondary-level institutions in Mexico: Hajjar, R., & Kozak, R. A. (2017). The evolution of forest producer associations and their current role in REDD+: Case studies from Quintana Roo, Mexico. Land Use Policy, 60, 373-383. Work in Ghana: Hajjar, R. (2015). Advancing small-scale forestry under FLEGT and REDD in Ghana. Forest Policy and Economics, 58(2015), 12-20. Hajjar, R. (2015). Researching the possible and likely implications of Ghana’s REDD+ and VPA plans on land and tree tenure reform. Report to FERN. Non-extractive research in Peru: Vasquez-Fernandez, A. M., Hajjar, R., Shuñaqui Sangama, M. I., Lizardo, R. S., Pinedo, M. P., Innes, J. L., & Kozak, R. A. (2017). Co-creating and decolonizing a methodology using indigenist approaches: Alliance with the Asheninka and Yine-Yami peoples of the Peruvian Amazon. ACME An International Journal for Critical Geographies, 17(3). Visit Dr. Reem Hajjar's publications page to see more. Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-04:38]: Learning Multiple Languages Bonus Clip #2 [00:00-05:41]: Extractive vs. Relational Research To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
December 9, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Ian E. Munanura, Ph.D., an Assistant Professor in the Department of Forest Ecosystems and Society at Oregon State University. He earned a Doctorate in Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management at Clemson University in South Carolina. He also earned a Master of Science degree in Tourism and Wildlife Conservation from the University of Kent in the United Kingdom. He teaches courses on ecotourism and sustainable communities, sustainable tourism planning, and a study abroad course on international perspectives of ecotourism and political ecology. His scholarship seeks to identify the human resilience and wellbeing constraints, which could create livelihood vulnerability, human dependence on forest resources for livelihoods, and loss of biodiversity. He also seeks to identify the potential of community-based tourism to mitigate human resilience and wellbeing constraints, which could influence biodiversity loss. His geographical area of scholarship interest is the Pacific Northwest, Southeast Asia, and East Africa. Previously, Dr. Munanura has worked in Rwanda as a field project director and country director for the Wildlife Conservation Society. He also led a $5 million project funded by the US Agency for International Development in Rwanda, designed to integrate and promote sustainable tourism, biodiversity conservation, human health, and economic development. Segment 1: Ecotourism [00:00-12:37] In this first segment, Ian shares about his research on ecotourism. Segment 2: Researching Rural Communities [12:38-24:59] In segment two, Ian discusses what led him to research rural communities. Segment 3: International Perspectives [25:00-33:37] In segment three, Ian shares about his international education has impacted his research. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Travel Oregon Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-7:03]: Tourism as a Way to Strengthen Emotional Well Being and Resilience To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
December 2, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Laurie Juranek, an Assistant Professor in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University. Dr. Juranek studies what the chemistry of seawater tells us about life and death in the ocean. Her research takes her from the warm, aquamarine waters off of Hawaii to the ice-covered Arctic Ocean. When not doing science, she enjoys vegetable gardening, cooking, and weightlifting. Segment 1: Life and Death in the Ocean [00:00-10:09] In this first segment, Laurie describes the research questions she explores in her study of life and death in the ocean. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Oregon Research Impacts Network (ORIN) Segment 2: Logistics of Researching in the Field [10:10-22:17] In segment two, Laurie shares some of the logistics of her research in the arctic. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: National Science Foundation (NSF) Segment 3: Broader Impacts of Researching in the Arctic [22:18-33:25] In segment three, Laurie discusses some of the ways she frames the broader impacts of her research, particularly for grant applications. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: S.T.E.M. COMPASS To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Ecampus or Oregon State University.
December 2, 2019
Take a listen to our December 2019 preview clips! To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
November 25, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Julie J. Park, an Associate Professor of Education at the University of Maryland, College Park. Her research addresses how race, religion, and social class affect diversity and equity in higher education, including the diverse experiences of Asian American college students. Her new book Race on Campus: Debunking Myths with Data (Harvard Education Press) uses social science data to challenge misconceptions surrounding race in college admissions and campus climate. She is also the author of When Diversity Drops: Race, Religion, and Affirmative Action in Higher Education (Rutgers University Press), an examination of how bans on affirmative action affect everyday student life. Currently an associate editor for the Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, her work has appeared in venues such as the Washington Post, Huffington Post, and the Chronicle of Higher Education. She recently served as a consulting expert on the side of Harvard in the case Students for Fair Admissions, Inc. v. Harvard. Segment 1: Race on Campus [00:00-12:42] In this first segment, Julie discusses her book Race on Campus. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Julie's book Race on Campus Julie's book When Diversity Drops: Race, Religion, and Affirmative Action in Higher Education Thomas J. Espenshade and Alexandria Walton Radford. (2009). No Longer Separate, Not Yet Equal: Race and Class in Elite College Admission and Campus Life.  Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Segment 2: Myths in Race on Campus [12:43-23:50] In segment two, Julie shares about some of the myths she discusses in her book. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Julie's book Race on Campus Mismatch by Richard Sander Julie's book When Diversity Drops: Race, Religion, and Affirmative Action in Higher Education Segment 3: Writing Op-Eds [23:51-36:11] In segment three, Julie shares about her experiences writing op-ed pieces. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: The Op-Ed Project Julie's work at The Huffington Post Julie's Washington Post piece: Park, J.J. (2015, January 4). The misleading lawsuit accusing Harvard of bias against Asian Americans. The Washington Post. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
November 18, 2019
Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-4:15]: Dane’s Background and Professional Pathway To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
November 18, 2019
On this episode, Mary Ellen is joined by Dane Skinner, a Research Analyst for Ecampus at Oregon State University. Prior to this position, Dane worked as a Data Scientist for the Oregon State Lottery. He completed his Masters in Math and Masters in Statistics at Oregon State University in 2016. When he's not working through data problems, he enjoys spending time with family, running through the trails of the MacDonald Forest, and building furniture. Segment 1: Forecasting with Data [00:00-15:31] In this first segment, Dane discusses data analysis for the Oregon Lottery and OSU Ecampus. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Time Series Analysis: http://www.statsoft.com/textbook/time-series-analysis Segment 2: Data Dashboards & Decision Making [15:32-29:05] In segment two, Dane discusses the advantages and disadvantages of data dashboards. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Shiny Storyboard: https://rmarkdown.rstudio.com/flexdashboard/layouts.html#storyboard Example: https://beta.rstudioconnect.com/jjallaire/htmlwidgets-showcase-storyboard/htmlwidgets-showcase-storyboard.html Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-4:15]: Dane’s Background and Professional Pathway To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
November 11, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Natalie Pope, the Otis Endowed Professor in Gerontology & Intergenerational Social Work and Director of Doctoral programs in the College of Social Work at the University of Kentucky. In 2010 Dr. Pope received her Ph.D. in Social Work at the University of Georgia with a concentration on qualitative research methods.  Dr. Pope’s program of research broadly focuses on older adults and their family caregivers. Specifically, her scholarship aims to address the following areas: 1) planning for future caregiving needs, 2) behavioral health of community-dwelling older adults, and 3) family caregiving across the life span. Her teaching in the college centers on clinical social work practice, Dr. Pope teaches courses on clinical social work practice, human behavior theory, and qualitative research methods. Segment 1: Young Caregivers [00:00-19:15] In this first segment, Natalie shares about some of her research on young caregivers. Segment 2: Foster Parent Mentoring [19:16-36:13] In segment two, Natalie discusses her research on foster parent mentoring and using dyadic analysis. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: These two papers talk about dyadic method specifically: Eisikovits, Z. & Koren, C. (2010). Approaches to and outcomes of dyadic interview analysis. Qualitative Health Research, 20(12), 1642-1655. doi:10.1177/1049732310376520 Manning, J. & Kunkel, A. (2015). Qualitative approaches to dyadic data analyses in family communication research: An invited essay. Journal of Family Communication, 15, 185-192. doi:10.1080/15267431.2015.1043434 This paper is an exemplar of dyadic analysis: Koren, C. (2011). Continuity and discontinuity: The case of second couplehood in old age. The Gerontologist, 51(5), 687-98. doi:10.1093/geront/gnr018 To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
November 4, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Qwo-Li Driskill, a (non-citizen) Cherokee Two-Spirit and Queer writer, activist, and performer also of African, Irish, Lenape, Lumbee, and Osage ascent. They are the author of Walking with Ghosts: Poems (Salt Publishing, 2005) and the co-editor of Sovereign Erotics: A Collection of Two-Spirit Literature (University of Arizona, 2011) and Queer Indigenous Studies: Critical Interventions is Theory, Politics, and Literature (University of Arizona, 2011). Their book Asegi Stories: Cherokee Queer and Two-Spirit Memory (University of Arizona 2016) was a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award in 2017. Segment 1: Indigenous & Two-spirit Studies [00:00-11:49] In this first segment, Qwo-Li shares about their research in indigenous and two-spirit studies. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Qwo-Li's books: Sovereign Erotics: A Collection of Two-Spirit Literature Queer Indigenous Studies: Critical Interventions is Theory, Politics, and Literature Asegi Stories: Cherokee Queer and Two-Spirit Memory Research is Ceremony by Shawn Wilson Segment 2: Research & Writing Poetry [11:50-22:38] In segment two, Qwo-Li shares about their experience using research to write poetry. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Walking with Ghosts: Poems Poetry for the People by June Jordan and edited by Lauren Muller The Practice of Poetry by Robin Behn Rhyme is Reason: A Guide to English Verse by John Hollander Segment 3: Developing a Poetry Collection [22:39-34:08] In segment three, Qwo-Li describes what makes a strong poetry collection. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
November 4, 2019
Take a listen to our November 2019 preview clips! To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
October 28, 2019
Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-2:29]: The Open Higher Ed Learning & Development Digital Library In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Open Higher Ed Learning & Development Digital Library Laura's blog post about this project To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
October 28, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Laura A. Pasquini, a Senior Lecturer with the Department of Learning Technologies in the College of Information at the University of North Texas in Denton, TX. As an early career scholar-practitioner, Dr. Pasquini’s teaching and research explore mentoring experiences, networked practices, online communities, student support/advising, digital professional identity development, and open online learning environments. She consults with various education institutions, non-profit and corporate associations on the stewardship of technology for designing networked learning, improving organizational culture, and enhancing open, collective projects. To encourage storytelling from peers, she co-hosts and produces two podcasts called, #InVinoFab and BreakDrink. To escape from her digital life, you can often find her running, doodling, playing ukulele, and hiking with her pup, Jack.   Segment 1: Researching support structures for learning [00:00-17:42] In this first segment, Laura describes some of her research on different support structures for learning outside of the traditional classroom space. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: The MBTI (Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) Creative Commons licensing Laura's research publications How Learners Overcome Challenges in Open Online Learning environments Mentoring Research — Doctoral Scholars & Higher Ed Professionals Higher Ed Podcast Project Networked Communities & Practice Netnography LeCompte, M. D., & Schensul, J. J. (1999). Designing and conducting ethnographic research (Vol. 1). Rowman Altamira. Schensul, S. L., Schensul, J. J., & LeCompte, M. D. (1999). Essential ethnographic methods: Observations, interviews, and questionnaires (Vol. 2). Rowman Altamira. LeCompte, M. D., & Schensul, J. J. (2012). Analysis and interpretation of ethnographic data: A mixed methods approach (Vol. 5). Rowman Altamira. Kozinets, R. V. (2015). Netnography: Redefined, 2nd Edition. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE. a previous RIA epsiode with Paul Eaton Connect with Laura Twitter LinkedIn Website Segment 2: Learning and development for higher education professionals [17:43-32:18] In segment two, Laura shares about some of the modalities that higher education professionals are using for their learning and development. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: a previous RIA episode with George Veletsianos Research Shorts videos/YouTube channel Laura helped to create to animate projects, ideas, and scholarship University of Minnesota Open Textbook Network Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-2:29]: The Open Higher Ed Learning & Development Digital Library In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Open Higher Ed Learning & Development Digital Library Laura's blog post about this project To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
October 21, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Margy Thomas, the founder of ScholarShape and the creator of the Build Your Story-Argument program. Margy founded ScholarShape in 2013 as an academic editing and writing consultation service, and through her years of helping hundreds of scholars develop their book and article manuscripts, she synthesized a unique framework for manuscript construction that is now the basis of the Build Your Story-Argument program where scholars hone their own Story-Argument models: flexible mental frameworks for navigating the process of writing and creating new knowledge in whatever forms and genres are relevant to the individual. The mission of the Build Your Story-Argument program is to put the benefits of developmental editing in scholars' own hands, in an accessible and self-directed form. Margy lives in Durham, North Carolina, with her son and their several imaginary pets. Segment 1: Developmental Editing [00:00-11:45] In this first segment, Margy shares about her work as a developmental editor. Segment 2: Building a Story-Argument [11:46-23:07] In segment two, Margy describes the elements of creating a story-argument. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Margy's website Margy's Build Your Story-Argument program Segment 3: Bringing Powerful Scholarship into Being [23:08-34:37] In segment three, Margy shares some of her broader philosophies of developmental editing and scholarly creation. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: The Artist's Way by Julia Cameron To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
October 14, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Sharla Berry, an Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Education at California Lutheran University. Her research explores education technology in K-20 contexts. She has published several peer-reviewed articles exploring how students and faculty cultivate learning communities in online programs. Dr. Berry also does research on the relationship between technology and college access. She is the author of Degree for Free: How to Save Time and Money on Your College Education. Segment 1: Cultivating Community Online [00:00-11:44] In this first segment, Sharla discusses some of her research on cultivating community online. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Some of Sharla's research on cultivating community online: Berry, S. (2019). The Offline Nature of Online Community: Exploring Distance Learners’ Extracurricular Interactions. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning. Berry, S. (2019). Teaching to Connect: Community-Building Strategies for the Virtual Classroom. Online Learning Journal. Berry, S. (2018). Building Community in an Online Graduate Program: Exploring the Role of an In-Person Orientation. The Qualitative Report. Berry, S. (2017). Student support networks in online doctoral programs: Exploring nested communities. International Journal of Doctoral Studies, 12, 33-48. Berry, S. (2017). Building Community in Online Doctoral Classrooms: Instructor Practices that Support Community. Online Learning Journal. Sundt, M., Berry, S., Ortiz, A. (2017). Using Data to Support Online Student Communities. New Directions for Student Services. Segment 2: College Access [11:45-23:15] In segment two, Sharla shares about her work on college access. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Degree for Free: How to Save Time and Money on Your College Education The Four-Hour Work Week by Tim Ferriss Segment 3: Taking a Critical Perspective on Technology [23:16-35:12] In segment three, Sharla discusses the importance of having a critical perspective on technology. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
October 7, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Emily Contois is Assistant Professor of Media Studies at The University of Tulsa. Her book, Diners, Dudes, and Diets: Gender and Power in U.S. Food Culture and Media, will be published with The University of North Carolina Press in 2020. It explores how the food, advertising, and media industries used the dude as a gender discourse to create male consumers for products socially perceived as feminine, such as cookbooks, diet sodas, and dieting programs. She is also co-editing a volume on food and Instagram with Dr. Zenia Kish. Dr. Contois completed her PhD in American Studies at Brown University with a Doctoral Certificate in Gender and Sexuality Studies. She also holds three master's degrees: an MA in American Studies from Brown, an MLA in Gastronomy from Boston University and an MPH focused in Public Health Nutrition from UC Berkeley. She is the author of more than twenty-five peer-reviewed articles, chapters, reference entries, and reviews. She is the Book Reviews Editor for Food, Culture, and Society and serves on the boards of the Association for the Study of Food and Society and H-Nutrition. She also writes for Nursing Clio, blogs at emilycontois.com, and is active on social media at @emilycontois. Segment 1: Food Studies [00:00-13:27] In this first segment, Emily talks about her research in food studies. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: You Are What You Post: Food and Instagram Segment 2: Public Scholarship [13:28-24:38] In segment two, Emily discusses her work as a public scholar. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Emily's blog Emily's Instagram account Emily's public writing Segment 3: Engaging the Visual in the Classroom [24:39-34:47] In segment three, Emily shares about some of her unique classroom projects. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Food Media syllabus Emily's unessay project debrief Emily on Twitter To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, post a comment below or contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
October 7, 2019
Take a listen to our October 2019 preview clips! To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
September 30, 2019
Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-04:49]: Stephania's Educational Background and Professional Pathway To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
September 30, 2019
On this episode, guest host Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto is joined by Stephania Fregosi, Sustainability Analyst at Portland Community College. In her role, Stephania completes greenhouse gas inventories, the Sustainability, Tracking, and Rating system report, does research, and provides other support for the college. She earned her Master’s Degree in Environmental Law from the Vermont Law School and her Bachelor of Arts in Environmental Studies from Oberlin College. Stephania has worked in a variety of sustainability roles including sustainability coordination, project management, environmental assessment, community development, and environmental education. She has a passion for social justice, equity, and inclusion and recently served on the Diversity & Inclusion Committee as part of the advisory board of the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education. Segment 1: Data use and Methods in Sustainability [00:00-16:47] In this first segment, Stephania discusses what data and methods she uses in her role as a sustainability analyst. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System (STARS) Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Economic Input-Output Life Cycle Assessment Segment 2: Analysis and Decision Making [16:48-35:38] In segment two, Stephania discusses data analysis and the role of data in her work. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: State Renewable Portfolio Standards Economic Input-Output Life Cycle Assessment Oregon Department of Environmental Quality Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Second Nature Climate Council Greenhouse Gas Protocol Sustainable Purchasing Leadership Council Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-04:49]: Stephania's Educational Background and Professional Pathway To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
September 23, 2019
Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-04:34]: Writing Collaboratively To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
September 23, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Nicola Ulibarri, an assistant professor of Urban Planning and Public Policy at the University of California, Irvine, where she leads an interdisciplinary research group that studies water and infrastructure management. Her group combines approaches from environmental planning, public administration, and water resource engineering to improve the interactions between people, infrastructure, and the environment.  In 2010, while doing her PhD at Stanford, Nicola collaboratively developed a workshop curriculum to enhance busy researchers’ creativity with design thinking, a human-centered approach to innovation. That team recently turned the curriculum into a book, Creativity in Research: Cultivate Clarity, Be Innovative, and Make Progress in your Research Journey (Cambridge University Press, 2019). The book presents key abilities that underlie creative research practice through a combination of scientific literature, vignettes, experiential exercises, and guided reflection. Segment 1: Benefits of Creativity in Research [00:00-18:59] In this first segment, Nicola shares about her recent book project on creativity and research. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Ulibarri, N., Cravens, A. E., Nabergoj, A. S., Kernbach, S., & Royalty, A. (2019). Creativity in research: Cultivate clarity, be innovative, and make progress in your research journey. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press. Creativity in Research website Getting Started with Design Thinking from the d.school at Stanford University Linder, K. (2016). The blended course design workbook: A practical guide. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing. "Research in Action" episodes related to creativity and research: RIA # 90: Dr. Ben Hatton on Creativity and Research RIA # 147: Christopher Plummer on Research and Creative Expression  Other "Research in Action" episodes mentioned in this episode: RIA # 1: Dr. Wendy Belcher on Writing Productivity RIA # 100: Dr. Wendy Belcher Returns to Celebrate 100 Episodes! Segment 2: Empirically-based Tools for Creativity [19:00-37:48] In segment two, Nicola discusses some of her favorite tools for strengthening creativity. Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-04:34]: Writing Collaboratively To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
September 16, 2019
On this episode, Dr. Katie Linder, Director of Research for Oregon State University Ecampus, is joined by the Ecampus Research Unit team to discuss logistics and tools used to conduct team-based research projects.   Segment 1: The Logistics of Team-based Research [00:00-19:18] In this first segment, the ECRU team shares about their approaches to team-based research. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: The Ecampus research unit team RIA episodes with guest host, Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto: RIA # 75: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto & Something New for RIA RIA # 91: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Dr. William D. Marelich on the Applied Quantitative Perspective RIA # 109: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto & Patrick Aldrich on Non-parametric Statistics RIA # 116: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto & Dr. Mary Kite on Validity, Sampling, and Meta-analysis RIA # 133: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Dr. M. Brooke Robertshaw on Effect Sizes RIA # 145: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Dr. Mimi Recker on Learning Analytics and Big Data RIA # 160: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Dr. Stephen Jenkins on Academic Advising Online RIA episode featuring the research unit's postdoctoral scholar, Dr. Rebecca Thomas: RIA # 136: Dr. Rebecca Thomas on Dissertation Writing Additional RIA episodes mentioned in this segment: RIA # 106: Ali Duerfeldt on Research Dissemination Plans Segment 2: Developing Systems for Team-based Research [19:19-38:47] In segment two, the ERCU team shares about some of their favorite tools and systems for conducting collaborative research. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Airtable Google Docs 1Password Ecampus Research Unit Online Teaching and Learning Research Seminars Current Projects To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
September 9, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Larry Rosen, Professor Emeritus and past chair of the psychology department at California State University, Dominguez Hills. He is a research psychologist recognized as an international expert in the "Psychology of Technology." Over the past 30-plus years, Dr. Rosen and his colleagues have examined reactions to technology among more than 100,000 people in the United States and in 22 other countries. His latest book, The Distracted Mind: Ancient Brains in a High-Tech World (MIT Press, 2016), won the PROSE Award for neuroscience. Dr. Rosen has been featured extensively in television, print, and radio media and has been a commentator on 60 Minutes, The Daily Show, Good Morning America, NPR, and CNN. Dr. Rosen has four children including one in the iGeneration, one in the Net Generation and two in Generation X and four grandchildren to watch growing up with technology. For fun he creates works of art from old computer technology, clocks and early rock and roll music. In his free time he enjoys reading international intrigue novels, fiddling with his newest geek toy, going to independent films, and trying to find ways to keep his Humanware safe from the technology vying for his attention. His website is DrLarryRosen.com   Segment 1: Technology and the Brain [00:00-18:53] In this first segment, Larry describes some of his research on the effect of technology on the brain. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Gazzaley, A., & Rosen, L. (2016). The distracted mind: Ancient brains in a high-tech world. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Learn more about Dr. Larry Rosen on his website: DrLarryRosen.com Weil, M. M., & Rosen, L. D. (1997). TechnoStress: Coping with technology @Work @Home @Play. New Jersey: Wiley. Segment 2: Multitasking in the Classroom [18:54-37:11] In segment two, Larry shares about his research study on multitasking in the classroom. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Disconnected: A Documentary National Sleep Foundation Functional Near-infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) Children and Screens Psychology of Technology Institute  To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
September 2, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Helen Kara, Director of We Research It Ltd, who has been an independent researcher since 1999 and writes and teaches on research methods. She is the author of Creative Research Methods in the Social Sciences: A Practical Guide (Policy Press, 2015). She is not, and never has been, an academic, though she has learned to speak the language. In 2015 Helen was the first fully independent researcher to be conferred as a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences. She is also a Visiting Fellow at the UK's National Centre for Research Methods. Her latest book is Research Ethics in the Real World: Euro-Western and Indigenous Perspectives (Policy Press, 2018). Segment 1: Research Ethics [00:00-20:58] In this first segment, Helen shares about her recent book on research ethics. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: We Research It Ltd Kara, H. (2015). Creative research methods in the social sciences: A practical guide. Bristol, UK: Policy Press. Kara, H. (2018). Research ethics in the real world: Euro-Western and indigenous perspectives. Bristol, UK: Policy Press. Segment 2: Researching Independently [20:59-35:31] In segment two, Helen shares about her experience being a long-term independent researcher. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Tumblr reddit To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
September 2, 2019
Take a listen to our September 2019 preview clips! To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
August 26, 2019
Bonus Clip [00:00-04:10]: Collaborative Research In this bonus clip, the following resources are mentioned: Trello Google Docs To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
August 26, 2019
In this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Paul William Eaton, an Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership at Sam Houston State University. Paul’s research interests include inquiries into digital technologies in education and human identity~subjectification~becoming; digital pedagogy and learning; postqualitative, complexivist, and posthumanist inquiry; and curriculum theorizing-philosophy in the realms of postsecondary education and student affairs. He serves as Assistant Editor for the Higher Education section of the Journal of Curriculum Theorizing and on the Editorial Review Board of the Journal Committed to Social Change on Race & Ethnicity. He is the co-author of Troubling Method: Narrative Research as Being (Peter Lang Press, 2018, with Petra Munro Hendry & Roland Mitchell). His research has appeared in the Review of Higher Education, International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, Thresholds in Education, and the Journal of Critical Scholarship on Higher Education & Student Affairs, among others. He received his Ph.D. from Louisiana State University in May 2015, his master’s degree from the University of Maryland College Park in 2005, and his bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota Twin Cities in 2002. Follow Paul on Twitter and Instagram @profpeaton. His blog is located at: https://www.profpeaton.com. Segment 1: Postqualitative, Complexivist, and Posthumanist Inquiry [00:00-17:40] In this first segment, Paul defines the terms he uses to describe his research. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Journal of Curriculum Theorizing Journal Committed to Social Change on Race & Ethnicity Hendry, P. M., Mitchell, R. W., & Eaton, P. W. (2018).Troubling method: Narrative research as being. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, Inc. Review of Higher Education International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education Thresholds in Education Journal of Critical Scholarship on Higher Education & Student Affairs Connect with Dr. Eaton: Website: https://www.profpeaton.com Twitter or Instagram: @profpeaton Gullion, J. S. (2018). Deffractive ethnography: Social sciences and the ontological turn. New York: Routledge. Jackson, A. Y, & Mazzei, L. A. (2012). Thinking with theory in qualitative research: Viewing data across multiple perspectives. New York: Routledge Segment 2: Research as Ontology [17:41-36:28] In segment two, Paul talks about his research as a way of life. Bonus Clip [00:00-04:10]: Collaborative Research In this bonus clip, the following resources are mentioned: Trello Google Docs To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
August 19, 2019
In this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Juliet Watson, the Deputy Director of the Unison Housing Research Lab and the Senior Lecturer in Homelessness in the School of Global, Urban and Social Studies at RMIT University in Australia. Juliet has extensive research, teaching, and practice experience in the areas of homelessness, gender-based violence, and youth. Her doctoral thesis won the biennial Australian Women’s and Gender Studies Association PhD Award in 2016. This research formed the basis for her book, Youth Homelessness and Survival Sex: Intimate Relationships and Gendered Subjectivities. Juliet was also the recipient of The Australian Sociological Association Award for the Most Distinguished Peer-Reviewed Article Published by an Early Career Researcher in 2017. Her current research centres on socio-cultural contexts and experiences of homelessness, social housing, gender-based violence, and poverty.  Segment 1: Researching Homelessness [00:00-12:25] In this first segment, Juliet describes her research on homelessness. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Australian Women’s and Gender Studies Association Watson, J. (2018). Youth homelessness and survival sex: Intimate relationships and gendered subjectivities. New York: Routledge. Segment 2: Pregnancy and Homelessness [12:26-24:05] In segment two, Juliet discusses her research on pregnancy and homelessness. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Launch Housing Segment 3: Researching Family and Domestic Violence [24:06-35:48] In segment three, Juliet shares about considerations when researching vulnerable populations. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
August 12, 2019
Bonus Clip [00:00-04:50]: Jay's Research Influences In this bonus clip, the following resources are mentioned: Rathje, W., & Murphy, C. (2001). Rubbish! The archaeology of garbage. Tuscon, AZ: The University of Arizona Press. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
August 12, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Jay Le Roux Dillon, a social scientist and founder of Alumni Identity Fundraising Consultants. His research and consulting practice help institutions identify ideal alumni donors through the lens of social psychology and data science. Dr. Dillon was previously director of alumni engagement at the University of San Francisco and executive director of alumni strategic initiatives at UCLA. He is dedicated to improving philanthropy in order to bring social justice and equity to education. He holds a doctorate in organization and leadership from USF and a master’s and bachelor’s degree in music from UCLA.  Segment 1: Research on Alumni [00:00-17:23] In this first segment, Jay describes what led him to researching alumni giving and identity. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Alumni Identity Segment 2: Alumni Engagement and Equity [17:24-31:45] In segment two, Jay discusses the relationship between alumni giving and equity. Bonus Clip [00:00-04:50]: Jay's Research Influences In this bonus clip, the following resources are mentioned: Rathje, W., & Murphy, C. (2001). Rubbish! The archaeology of garbage. Tuscon, AZ: The University of Arizona Press. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
August 5, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Sarah Vojnovich, a Master's student in the Department of Biomedical Sciences at Oregon State Unviersity. Sarah carries out infection studies with a bacterium, called Vibrio coralliilyticus, that infects corals and causes tissue necrosis by the release of a toxin. Current studies are typically done on coral fragments taken from the natural environment, but in order to help reduce wild coral takes, Sarah's research looks at the use of using anemones, Aiptasia pallida, as an alternative surrogate host species for future bacterial infection experiments with Vibrio coralliilyticus. Sarah also works as an Assistant for Academic Programs at the Hatfield Marine Science Center and helps coordinate undergraduate classes and internships. Segment 1: Researching Corals [00:00-11:40] In this first segment, Sarah shares about her research on corals. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) in Newport, Oregon Segment 2: Marine Science Outreach Education [11:41-21:43] In segment two, Sarah discusses her position at the Hatfield Marine Science Center. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) in Newport, Oregon HMSC Academic Programs Opportunities: Internships Classes HMSC Experiential Learning: Free-Choice Learning Free-Choice Learning Lab Segment 3: Sarah's Trip on a Research Vessel [21:44-33:25] In segment three, Sarah shares about her upcoming trip on an OSU research vessel. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) NOAA Ship Bell M. Shimada Research Expedition Social Media Platforms: Newportal Blog Hatfield Facebook Hatfield Instagram To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
August 5, 2019
Take a listen to our August 2019 preview clips! To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
July 29, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Ronald Kander, Founding Dean of Kanbar College of Design, Engineering & Commerce and Associate Provost for Applied Research at Jefferson (Philadelphia University & Thomas Jefferson University). Previously, founding Director of the School of Engineering at James Madison U, Professor of Materials Science at Virginia Tech, Senior Engineer of Polymer Physics at Dupont. BS (Carnegie Mellon) & PhD (U of Delaware) in Chemical Engineering. Segment 1: Research Retrospective [00:00-12:00] In this first segment, Ron reflects on what has contributed to his successful research career. Segment 2: Research Networking [12:01-22:33] In segment two, Ron offers tips for effective research networking. The Second City  Segment 3: Merging University Research Missions [22:34-33:50] In segment three, Ron discusses the recent merger of universities between Philadelphia University and Thomas Jefferson University. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Boyer, E. L. (1990). Scholarship reconsidered: Priorities for the professoriate. The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Ecampus or Oregon State University.
July 22, 2019
On this episode, Dr. Katie Linder, Director of Research at Oregon State University Ecampus, offers some tips and strategies for establishing research goals in the New Year. Segment 1: What Makes a Good Research Goal? [00:00-10:41] In this first segment, Katie shares some ideas for setting research goals that are both reasonable and challenging. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Oregon State University Ecampus Research Unit's current projects Segment 2: Setting Yourself Up for Success [10:42-20:39] In segment two, Katie offers some tips for setting yourself up for success with accomplishing your research goals. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Rubin, G. (2015). Better than before. New York: Crown Publishing Group. Rubin, G. (2017). The four tendencies. New York: Harmony Books. RIA # 61: Dr. Jennifer Herman on Writing Retreats Segment 3: Strategies for Staying Accountable [20:40-32:01] In segment three, Katie discusses some strategies for staying accountable to your research goals throughout the year. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Listeners may want to check out some of the following RIA episodes related to writing groups: RIA # 1: Dr. Wendy Belcher on Writing Productivity RIA # 33: Dr. Inger Mewburn on Supporting & Training New Researchers RIA # 45: Dr. Monika Raesch, Dr. Frank Rudy Cooper & Dr. Pat Reeve on Writing Groups and the Importance of Self-reflection RIA # 61: Dr. Jennifer Herman on Writing Retreats Academic Ladder Medium (a blogging platform) Share your research goals with the RIA community! Find us on our Twitter page and use the hashtag #RIAResearchGoals To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Ecampus or Oregon State University.
July 15, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. John Nychka, Associate Professor, Chemical and Materials Engineering, Associate Dean of Teaching and Learning, Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research, Vargo Teaching Chair, and Adjunct Associate Professor in the School of Dentistry at the University of Alberta. John graduated from the University of Alberta in 1997 with a Bachelors of Science in Metallurgical Engineering, then went on to earn his Masters in Engineering from McMaster University in 1999 and his PhD from the University of California Santa Barbara in 2004. He stayed on at Santa Barbara as a post doc, and then moved to become an assistant professor in Chemical and Materials Engineering at the University of Kentucky from 2005 to 2007. In 2007 he returned home to Edmonton to join the University of Alberta. He teaches introductory materials engineering, communication, and capstone design courses, and his research is primarily about structural materials. Segment 1: Research on Materials [00:00-11:53] In this first segment, John shares about the different components of his research on materials. Segment 2: Materials at the Interface [11:54-21:16] In segment two, John describes the professional philosophy he uses to guide his research, teaching, and service. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Heath, C., & Health, D. (2007). Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die. New York: Random House. "Materials at the Interface" resources: YouTube channel flickr Segment 3: Failure in the Research Enterprise [21:17-34:40] In segment three, John shares about the importance of embracing failure as a researcher. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Carol Dweck Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-7:16]: John's CV of Failures In this bonus clip, the following resources are mentioned: Looser, D. (2015, October 18). Me and my shadow CV. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved from http://www.chronicle.com To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Ecampus or Oregon State University.
July 8, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Melanie Nelson, a project manager with more than 15 years of experience in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. She has a Ph.D. in biochemistry from The Scripps Research Institute and currently works for the scientific software company Dotmatics. Over the course of her career, she has managed projects and teams in small and mid-size biotech companies and served as a contractor and consultant for academics, government agencies, and large companies. She has a long-standing interest in techniques to improve time use and productivity, both for individuals and teams and is the author of Taming the Work Week: Work Smarter Not Longer and Navigating the Path to Industry: A Hiring Manager's Advice for Academics Looking for a Job in Industry. You can find her online at BeyondManaging.com and on Twitter at @melanie_nelson. Segment 1: Project Management for Researchers [00:00-12:39] In this first segment, Melanie shares some project management best practices for researchers. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Nelson, M. R. (2013). Taming the work week: Work smarter not longer. Irvine, CA: Xist Publishing. Nelson, M. R. (2014). Navigating the path to industry: A hiring manager's advice for academics looking for a job in industry. Annorlunda Enterprises. BeyondManaging.com Find Dr. Melanie Nelson on Twitter: @melanie_nelson Segment 2: Project Management with Collaborators [12:40-22:07] In segment two, Melanie shares strategies for managing team-based projects. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Trello Basecamp Asana Google Drive Dropbox Segment 3: Personal Time Management [22:08-34:52] In segment three, Melanie shares about some of her personal time management techniques. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Kanban RIA # 96: Dr. Rebecca Pope-Ruark on Agile Methodology Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-02:25]: Working with Disorganized Collaborators To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
July 1, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Raul Pacheco-Vega, an Assistant Professor in the Public Administration Division of the Center for Economic Teaching and Research (Centro de Investigacion y Docencia Economicas, CIDE) in Mexico. He is a specialist in comparative public policy and focuses on North American environmental politics, primarily sanitation and water governance, solid waste management, neoinstitutional theory, transnational environmental social movements and experimental methods in public policy. His current research programme focuses on the spatial, political and human dimensions of public service delivery. He is also Associate Editor of the Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences (JESS), and sits on the editorial board of Water International, Global Environmental Politics and several other journals. He is the creator of the weekly hashtag #ScholarSunday. Segment 1: The Global Politics of Sanitation [00:00-12:01] In this first segment, Raul shares about some of his research on the global politics of sanitation. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences (JESS) Water International Global Environmental Politics #ScholarSunday on Twitter Segment 2: Being an Actively Engaged Researcher [12:02-21:39] In segment two, Raul shares some of his strategies for being active at conferences and on social media. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Elinor Ostrom and Vincent Ostrom Long Range Climbing Committee for the International Studies Association Western Political Science Association Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences (JESS) Dr. Raul Pacheco-Vega on Twitter: @raulpacheco The creation of #ScholarSunday Segment 3: Working with Vulnerable Research Populations [21:40-35:01] In segment three, Raul shares his thoughts on the responsibilities of the researcher when working with vulnerable communities. Field Methods Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-3:16]: Dr. Pacheco-Vega's Work on Advancing Environmental Global Governance To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Ecampus or Oregon State University.
July 1, 2019
Take a listen to our July 2019 preview clips! To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
June 24, 2019
On this episode, Kaite is joined by Dr. Sarah Casey, who was awarded a PhD in Media, Communication, and Feminist Cultural Studies from Griffith University (2015). She lectures in Screen Media and Communication at the University of the Sunshine Coast, Australia. Sarah has published in the areas of Media Studies, Feminism, and Celebrity Studies, and she is particularly interested in digital feminist activism, as well as the role of popular media feminist celebrities in campaigns. Sarah is currently finalising a monograph entitled “Heroines'”, and is the co-author of Media and Society (with Michael O'Shaughnessy and Jane Stadler). Sarah leads the “Stories of Country Women” project that documents the lived experiences of women in drought-affected regions of outback Australia. Sarah is the Vice-President for the Australian Women’s and Gender Studies Association, the peak body for such research in Australia. Segment 1: Researching digital feminist activism [00:00-11:15] In this first segment, Sarah shares some examples from her research on digital feminist activism. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: O'Shaughnessy, M., Stadler, J., & Casey, S. (2016). Media and society. Cary, NC: Oxford University Press. Australian Women's and Gender Studies Association change.org Segment 2: Real Stories of Country Women Project [11:16-21:05] In segment two, Sarah shares about her current work on the Real Stories of Country Women Project. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Real Stories of Country Women Segment 3: The Australian Women's and Gender Studies Association [21:06-32:12] In segment three, Sarah shares about her work with the Australian Women's and Gender Studies Association. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Australian Women's and Gender Studies Association National Women's Studies Association change.org To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
June 17, 2019
Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-8:38]: Kevin's Most Recent Research Project Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
June 17, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Kevin Roessger, an assistant professor of adult and lifelong learning. He received his B.S. in psychology, M.S. in administrative leadership, and Ph.D. in adult and continuing education from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Dr. Roessger currently serves as co-editor of adult education's flagship research journal Adult Education Quarterly, as well as reviewer for the journals Adult Learning and Journal of Continuing Higher Education. He has published numerous articles and book chapters in the field’s most respected outlets, and is currently overseeing a grant from the Department of Corrections that examines the effect of correctional education programs on recidivism and post-release employment. Dr. Roessger’s research interests include reflective learning strategies and developing reflective skills in adult learners. Segment 1: Utilizing a content analysis methodology [00:00-19:01] In this first segment, Kevin shares about his experiences utilizing content analysis in his research. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Adult Education Quarterly Adult Learning Journal of Continuing Higher Education American Association of Adult and Continuing Education (AAACE) Segment 2: Researching Correctional Education Programs [19:02-37:06] In segment two, Kevin shares some of the logistics of researching correctional education programs. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Davis, L., Bozick, R., Steele, J. L., Saunders, J., & Miles, J. N. V. (2013). Evaluation the effectiveness of correctional education: A meta-analysis of programs that provide education to incarcerated adults (RR-266-BJA). Santa Monica, CA: Rand Corporation. Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-8:38]: Kevin's Most Recent Research Project Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
June 10, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Lauren Remenick, a doctoral candidate and research assistant in the Higher Education & Policy Studies PhD program at the University of Central Florida. In addition to her current research on textbook and academic authors with Dr. Kathleen P. King, Lauren's research interests include adult learning and nontraditional students in higher education. Lauren received her Master's degree in Forest Ecosystems & Society from Oregon State University and Bachelor's degree in Environmental Studies and Psychology from Elon University.  Segment 1: Researching Authors’ Experiences [00:00-11:18] In this first segment, Lauren shares about a qualitative research project focused on understanding academic authors' experiences. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Textbook & Academic Authors Association (TAA) Lamott, A. (1994). Bird by bird: Some instructions on writing and life. New York: Anchor Books. Cengage Cengage Unlimited Gray, T. (2010). Publish and flourish: Become a prolific scholar (2nd ed.). Las Cruces, NM: Teaching Academy, NMSU. Learn more about Dr. Kathleen P. King's books on her website: https://kpking.com/ Saldaña, J. (2016). The coding manual for qualitative researchers. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, Inc. RIA # 18: Dr. Tara Gray on Publish & Flourish RIA # 140: Dr. James Lang on Editing a Book Series RIA # 23: Dr. Janet Salmons on e-Research Segment 2: Barriers and Supports for Academic Authors [11:19-22:08] In segment two, Lauren offers some examples of barriers and support structures for academic authors. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: RIA # 140: Dr. James Lang on Editing a Book Series Textbook & Academic Authors Association (TAA) Segment 3: Authorship Identity Development [22:09-32:06] In segment three, Lauren shares what she has learned about the identity development of academic authors. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
June 3, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by two guests: Monica D.T. Rysavy (Reeshavee), Ph.D., is the Director of Institutional Research and Training and an Assistant Professor at Goldey-Beacom College in Wilmington, Delaware. In this role she leads all institutional research and data analysis projects for the College. Her office provides faculty and staff training support by developing new training offerings (asynchronous and synchronous face-to-face and online programs) on a variety of instructional technology, survey research, and data management, analysis, and interpretation topics.  Before transitioning to higher education, Monica worked as a high school business technology instructor in Delaware public schools. Monica earned her Ph.D. in Learning, Design, and Technology from The Pennsylvania State University and an Ed.D. in Education Leadership from Wilmington University. Russell Michalak (mi-ha-lik), MLIS, is the Director of the Library, Archives, & Learning Center and an Assistant Professor at Goldey-Beacom College in Wilmington, Delaware. He oversees the annual budget, supervises librarians and paraprofessionals, and manages the delivery of research, information, instructional services, the tutoring center, and archives. Before joining GBC, he worked in various roles at the Libraries of the Claremont Colleges, Duke University, and the University of Utah. Russell earned his MA in Library and Information Studies from the University of Wisconsin, Madison and a BA in History from Occidental College. Monica and Russell’s current collaborative research agenda focuses on information literacy-related topics, with an emphasis on utilizing online training modules to increase students’ information literacy skills, as well as academic library and institutional assessment. Segment 1: Working with a Research Partner [00:00-14:22] In this first segment, Monica and Rusty share how their research partnership came to be. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Rysavy, M. D. T., & Michalak, R. (Eds.). (2019). Onboarding 2.0: Methods of designing and deploying effective onboarding training for academic libraries. Hauppauge, NY: Nova Science Publishers, Inc. Airtable Segment 2: Choosing a Research Partner [14:23-36:03] In segment two, Rusty and Monica share their tips for choosing an effective research partner. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
June 3, 2019
Take a listen to our June 2019 preview clips! To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
May 27, 2019
Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-04:08]: Using Existing Data and Lessons Learned To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
May 27, 2019
On this episode, guest host Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto, is joined by Stephen Jenkins. Stephen is the Interim Executive Director of University Housing and Dining Services at Oregon State University. He has 18 years of experience in higher education student affairs at several institutions. Stephen recently completed his Doctorate of Education in Educational Leadership - Post-secondary Education. For his dissertation, he studied the academic advising experiences and learning of online learners.   Segment 1: Academic Advising for Online Learners [00:00-11:19] In this first segment, Stephen shares about the background research on online academic advising. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Curry, R. F. (1997). Academic advising in distance education (Doctoral dissertation). The College of William and Mary in Virginia. Retrieve from https://www.learntechlib.org/p/118296/ Moore, M. G. (Ed.). (2013). Handbook of distance education (3rd ed.). New York: Routledge. Segment 2: Methodological Approach [11:20-23:19] In segment two, Stephen discusses the theoretical background and methodological approach. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Crookston, B. B. (1972). A developmental view of academic advising as teaching, Journal of College Student Personnel, 13(1), 12-17. O'Banion, T. (1994). An academic advising model. NACADA Journal, 14(2), 10-16. Smith, C. L., & Allen, J. M. (2006). Essential functions of academic advising: What students want and get. NACADA Journal 26(1), pp. 56-66. Segment 3: Overall Findings and Implications [23:20-38:50] In segment three, Stephen shares about his overall findings in his research on academic advising for online learners. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Smith, C. L., & Allen, J. M. (2006). Essential functions of academic advising: What students want and get. NACADA Journal 26(1), pp. 56-66. Moore, M. G. (Ed.). (2013). Handbook of distance education (3rd ed.). New York: Routledge. Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-04:08]: Using Existing Data and Lessons Learned To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
May 20, 2019
Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-02:25]: Storytelling and Research To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
May 20, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Reeves Shulstad, an Associate Professor in the Hayes School of Music at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC. She is a musicologist and is currently working on a book about microtonalist composer and early music performer Tui St. George Tucker. She teaches music history and special topics courses at ASU and has published on pedagogy. Segment 1: Researching Music [00:00-11:24] In this first segment, Reeves shares the different elements involved in researching music. Segment 2: Researching a Historical Figure [11:25-21:53] In segment two, Reeves discusses some of the benefits and challenges of researching a historical figure. Segment 3: Implementing Research in the Classroom [21:54-33:45] In segment three, Reeves shares about how she is using her research project in her teaching. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-02:25]: Storytelling and Research To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
May 13, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Steven Camicia, an associate professor of social studies education at Utah State University. His research focuses on curriculum and instruction in the areas of perspective consciousness and social justice as they relate to critical democratic education. The term “critical” modifies “democratic education” in order to focus upon the attributes of power, inclusion, and recognition in democratic education. He was awarded an American Educational Studies Association 2017 Critics' Choice Book Award for his book entitled, Critical Democratic Education and LGBTQ-Inclusive Curriculum: Opportunities and Constraints. In his book, he examines how the contexts in Utah and California might influence what can and cannot be said in classrooms about LGBTQ individuals and issues. His research has been published in scholarly journals such as Theory and Research in Social Education, The Social Studies, Social Studies Research and Practice, International Journal of Social Studies Research, Journal of Teaching and Teacher Education, the Journal of Public Deliberation, and the London Review of Education. He is a former associate editor of Theory and Research in Social Education. His research interests stemmed from his experiences as a former elementary school teacher.  Segment 1: Researching Democratic Education [00:00-13:50] In this first segment, Steven shares some of his projects focused on researching democratic education. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Butler, J. (2006). Precarious life: The powers of mourning and violence. New York: Verso. Camicia, S. P. (2007). Deliberating immigration policy: Locating instructional materials within global and multicultural perspectives. Theory and Research in Social Education 35(1), 96-111. Camicia, S. P. (2009). Teaching the Japanese American internment: A case study of social studies curriculum conflict and change. Journal of Social Studies Research, 33(1), 113-132. Camicia, S. P. (2012). An ethics of recognition in global and teacher education: Looking through queer and postcolonial Lenses. International Journal of Development Education and Global Learning, 4(1), 25-35. Camicia, S. P. (2016). Critical democratic education and LGBTQ-inclusive curriculum: Opportunities and constraints. New York: Routledge. Hess, D. E., & McAvoy, P. (2015). The political classroom: Evidence and ethics in democratic education. New York: Routledge. Mouffe, C. (2000). The democratic paradox. London: Verso. Parker, W. C. (2004). Diversity, globalization, and democratic education: Curriculum possibilities. In J. A. Banks (Ed.), Diversity and citizenship education: Global perspectives (pp. 433-458). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass Segment 2: Diversity, Inclusion and Social Justice [13:51-23:21] In segment two, Steven discusses how his research includes an emphasis on diversity, inclusion, and social justice. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Au, W. (2012). Critical curriculum studies: Education, consciousness and the politics of knowing. New York: Routledge. Banks, J. A. (1996). The cannon debate, knowledge construction, and multicultural education. In J. A. Banks (Ed.), Multicultural education, transformative knowledge, and action: Historical and contemporary perspectives (pp. 3-29). New York: Teacher College Press. Benhabib, S. (2002). The claims of culture: Equality and diversity in the global era. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press. Harding, S. (1995). “Strong objectivity”: A response to the new objectivity question. Synthese, 104(3), 331-349. Parker, W. C. (Ed.) (1996). Educating the democratic mind. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press. Camicia, S. P., & Knowles, R. T. (forthcoming). Education for Democracy: A Renewed Approach to Civic Inquiries for Social Justice. Charlotte, NC Information Age Publishing, Inc. Camicia, S. P. (forthcoming). LGBTQ Inclusion and Exclusion in State Social Studies Standards: Implications for Critical Democratic Education. Curriculum and Teaching Dialogue. Camicia, S. P. (forthcoming). Disturbing Democratic Education: Rethinking Power, Inclusion, and Recognition. Segment 3: Helping Students Understand Political Discourses [23:22-33:28] In segment three, Steven describes his most recent project on using social studies to help students engage in political debates and discussions. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Young, I. M. (2002). Inclusion and democracy. New York: Oxford University Press. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
May 6, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by two guests: Dr. Liz Gross is a data-driven researcher and scholar who specializes in creating entrepreneurial social media strategies in higher education. Her professional super power is to embolden colleges and universities and help them launch modern market research strategies using social listening. Teaching is Liz’s passion and she brings that to colleges and universities as the founder and CEO of Campus Sonar, a specialized social listening agency that matches high-value social media intelligence and engagement opportunities to organizational strategic initiatives. Segment 1: Social Listening [00:00-11:24] In this first segment, Liz and Amber define social listening. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Campus Sonar Segment 2: Research Skills for Social Listening [11:25-22:38] In segment two, Amber and Liz discuss the research skills that are needed for social listening. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Sandall, A. (2017, November 21). Psst: Students tell the internet (not you) why they drop out [blog post]. Retrieved from http://blog.campussonar.com/blog/why-they-drop-out Segment 3: Examples of Social Listening Research [22:39-35:29] In segment three, Liz and Amber share some examples of their work in social listening. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Brandwatch Find reports, case studies, and more on the Campus Sonar resources page To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
May 6, 2019
Take a listen to our May 2019 preview clips! To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
April 29, 2019
Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-02:05]: What's Next in Kevin's Research Pipeline To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
April 29, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Kevin Rose, an assistant professor of organizational leadership and learning at the University of Louisville. Before beginning his faculty role, he worked in various training and development areas including executive education and small business development. He is active in organizations such as the Academy of Human Resource Development and the American Association of Adult and Continuing Education. His research focuses on understanding and improving the lives of people at work, with emphasis on constructs such as organizational citizenship behaviors, leadership, and engagement,   Segment 1: Organizational Citizenship [00:00-17:15] In this first segment, Kevin shares about his research on organizational citizenship. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Academy of Human Resource Development American Association of Adult and Continuing Education Segment 2: Researching Military to Civilian Transitions [17:16-34:28] In segment two, Kevin discusses his recent work on military to civilian transitions. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Rose, K., Herd, A., & Palacio, S. (2016). Organizational citizenship behavior: An exploration of one aspect of cultural adjustment faced by U.S. Army soldiers transitioning from military to civilian careers. Advances in Developing Human Resources, 19(1), 14-24. Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-02:05]: What's Next in Kevin's Research Pipeline To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
April 22, 2019
Segment 1: Research lessons from past guests [00:00-16:10] In this first segment, Katie talks with past guests about the research lessons they have learned in the past year. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: RIA # 99: Dr. Jesse Stommel on Founding a Journal RIA # 104: Dr. Deborah Loewenberg Ball on Effective Teacher Education RIA # 115: Dr. Avi Kaplan on Methodological Diversity RIA # 117: Dr. Bastian Minkenberg on Genome Editing Segment 2: More research lessons from past guests [16:11-32:38] In segment two, Katie talks with more past guests about the research lessons they have learned in the past year. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: RIA # 133: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Dr. M. Brooke Robertshaw on Effect Sizes RIA # 138: Dr. Heather Corwin on Embodied Research RIA # 141: Dr. Gail Crimmins on Arts-informed Research RIA # 144: Dr. Kay Shattuck on Being a Research Director To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
April 15, 2019
Segment 1: Research lessons from past guests [00:00-16:55] In this first segment, Katie talks with past guests about the research lessons they have learned in the past year. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: RIA # 57: Dr. Carole Sargent on Publishing in Top Journals RIA # 65: Dr. Micky Lee on Balancing Research and Parenting RIA # 69: Dr. Tasha Wyatt on Unexpectedly Transitioning to a New Research Area RIA # 72: Dr. John Fritz on Researching Course Design and Analytics Ascione, L. (2018, July 23). Here's what makes students 200 percent more likely to pass. eCampus News. Retrieved from https://www.ecampusnews.com/ Hanks, M. (2018 November 26). UMBC partners with Blackboard, VitalSource on research to support student success. UMBC News. Retrieve from https://news.umbc.edu/ Harfield, T. (2018, July 12). Combining activity data from multiple sources to improve student success predictions. Blackboard Blog. Retrieved fromh ttps://blog.blackboard.com/ Nussbaumer Knaflic, C. (2015). Storytelling with data: A data visualization guide for business professionals. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Schaffhauser, D. (2018, August 9). Combining data from multiple digital learning tools produces better predictions. Campus Technology. Retrieved from https://campustechnology.com/Home.aspx Segment 2: More research lessons from past guests [16:56-36:28] In segment two, Katie talks with more past guests about the research lessons they have learned in the past year. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: RIA # 77: Dr. Valerie Clayman Pye on Practice-as-Research RIA # 81: Dr. Joanna Garner on Effective Presentation Slide Design The Barry Art Museum at Old Dominion University Visitor Reflection Studio Gallery Educator Programs RIA # 91: Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto and Dr. William D. Marelich on the Applied Quantitative Perspective RIA # 97: Dr. Bryan Alexander on Researching the Future The Future Trends Forum with Bryan Alexander To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
April 8, 2019
Segment 1: Research lessons learned [00:00-16:27] In this first segment, hear some research lessons learned from our past guests. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: RIA # 10: Dr. Dannelle Stevens on Journaling Best Practices Zotero RIA # 18: Dr. Tara Gray on Publish & Flourish  RIA # 20: Dr. Ana Spalding on Interdisciplinary Research Segment 2: More research lessons learned [16:28-34:56] In segment two, hear more research lessons learned from our past guests. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: RIA # 23: Dr. Janet Salmons on e-Research RIA # 31: Dr. Tracy Teal on Data Carpentry RIA # 33: Dr. Inger Mewburn on Supporting & Training New Researchers RIA # 40: Dr. Matt Bergman on Early-Career Research RIA # 52: Kevin Anselmo on Sharing Your Research in Traditional and Digital Media RIA # 53: Dr. Candice Foley and Nina Leonhardt on Teaching Research Methods RIA # 56: Dr. Kyle Niemeyer on Open Science To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
April 1, 2019
Bonus Clip [00:00-04:25]: How MJ's Research Fits into her Larger Career To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
April 1, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Mary Jane Curry, an associate professor in the Department of Teaching and Curriculum at the Warner Graduate School of Education at the University of Rochester. She has co-authored or co-edited six books, including Global Academic Publishing: Policies, Perspectives and Pedagogies (edited with Theresa Lillis, Multilingual Matters, 2018), A Scholar’s Guide to Getting Published in English: Critical Choices and Practical Strategies, (co-authored with Theresa Lillis, Multilingual Matters, 2013) and Academic Writing in a Global Context: The Politics and Practices of Publishing in English (co-authored with Theresa Lillis, Routledge, 2010). She has published articles in journals including English for Specific Purposes and the Journal of English for Academic Purpose. She is co-associate editor of the Brief Research Reports section of TESOL Quarterly and co-editor of the Multilingual Matters book series, Studies in Knowledge Production and Participation. She was awarded a Fulbright fellowship to Chile in 2014 and was Principal Investigator of a U.S. Department of Education National Professional Development Grant, Project CELLS: Western New York Collaboration for English Language Learner Success from 2012-2017. She is currently working on a book, AWK: Academic Writing Keywords: A Guide for Graduate Students, with a group of graduate students.   Segment 1: Researching Multilingual Scholars [00:00-18:51] In this first segment, MJ shares some examples of her research on multilingual scholars. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Curry, M. J., & Lillis, T. (Eds.). (2017). Global academic publishing: Policies, perspectives and pedagogies. Bristol, UK: St Nicholas House. Curry, M. J., & Lillis, T. (Eds.). (2013). A scholar’s guide to getting published in English: Critical choices and practical strategies. Bristol, UK: St Nicholas House. Multilingual Matters book series Lillis, T., & Curry, M. J.. (2010). Academic writing in a global context: The politics and practices of publishing in English. New York: Routledge. English for Specific Purposes: An International Research Journal Journal of English for Academic Purpose: The Official Journal of BALEAP TESOL Quarterly Segment 2: Conducting Longitudinal Research [18:52-37:25] In segment two, MJ discusses what she's learned about conducting longitudinal studies. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: NVivo Bonus Clip [00:00-04:25]: How MJ's Research Fits into her Larger Career To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
April 1, 2019
Take a listen to our April 2019 preview clips!  To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.  
March 25, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Adam Stokes, Dr. Stokes is a Lecturer in the Institute for Integrated Micro and Nano Systems at The University of Edinburgh. He is PI of the Stokes Research Group, an interdisciplinary research laboratory and the Programme Director for MSc Electronics in The School of Engineering. Dr. Stokes holds degrees in engineering, biomedical science, and chemistry. Before joining the faculty at Edinburgh he was a Fellow in the George M. Whitesides group at Harvard University. Currently, he holds a prestigious appointment as a Member of The Royal Society of Edinburgh’s Young Academy of Scotland. Dr. Stokes’s research interests include: robotics, physical chemistry, electrical engineering, materials science, nanotechnology, optics, proteomics, and cell biology.   Segment 1: Bioinspired Engineering [00:00-12:36] In this first segment, Adam defines bioinspired engineering and shares examples from his work. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Stokes Research Group Segment 2: UK Robotics and Artificial Intelligence Hub [12:37-24:47] In segment two, Adam shares about a recent project related to offshore energy asset integrity management. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund Offshore Robotics for Certification of Assets Wyss Institute at Harvard Segment 3: Adam's Research Pathway [24:48-35:41] In segment three, Adam shares about his pathway to his current research work. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Whitesides Research Group Learn more about Dr. Stokes's projects at Stokes Research Group To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
March 18, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Bethany Simunich, the Director of Online Pedagogy and Research at Kent State University. She has many years of experience as both a face-to-face and online instructor, and has also held positions in educational technology, instructional design, and faculty development. Aligning with her interests in quality assurance in online education, Bethany has worked with Quality Matters for many years, including as a Senior Research Colleague, Master Reviewer, and workshop Facilitator, and also serves on the Quality Matters Academic Advisory Council. Currently, she is co-State Lead for the QM Ohio Consortium, as well as a QMC and Course Review Manager for Kent State. Bethany enjoys presenting workshops and seminars at universities and conferences on instructional design, online teaching, and conducting DL-focused research. Her professional and research interests include presence in the online classroom, peer evaluation of online teaching and design, and online student and instructor satisfaction and self-efficacy.  Segment 1: Researching Online Learning [00:00-16:49] In this first segment, Bethany shares about some of her current research interesting in the field of online teaching and learning. Segment 2: Research and Assessment [16:50-34:25] In segment two, Bethany discusses the relationship she sees between research and assessment. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Linder, K., & Dello Stritto, M. E. (2017). Research preparation and engagement of instructional designers in U.S. higher education. Corvallis, OR: Oregon State University Ecampus Research Unit. Quality Matters To learn more about Quality Matters, check out the following RIA episode: RIA # 144: Dr. Kay Shattuck on Being a Research Director To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
March 11, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Keith Leavitt, an Associate Professor in the College of Business and the Betty S. Henry Admundson Faculty scholar in Ethics at Oregon State University. His research interests include behavioral ethics, identity and situated judgment, and research methods. His work has been featured in over 200 major media outlets, and prominently on the front of his mother's refrigerator. In his spare time, he enjoys mountain biking, fly fishing, skiing, the occasional existential crisis, and trying to sneak inappropriately-placed messages in to his faculty profile. Segment 1: Researching Behavioral Ethics [00:00-12:12] In this first segment, Keith shares about his work researching behavioral ethics in the workplace. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Theranos Leavitt, K, Reynolds, S. J., Barnes, C. M., Schilpzand, P., & Hanna, S. T. (2012). Different hats, different obligations: Plural occupational identities and situated moral judgments. Academy of Management Journal, 55, 1316-1333. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology Segment 2: Researching Employee Sex Lives [12:13-23:34] In segment two, Keith shares about recent research he completed that received some media attention. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Leavitt, K., Wagner, D. T., Barnes, C. M., & Watkins, T. (2016). From the bedroom to the office: Workplace spillover effects of marital sexual activity. Academy of Management Proceedings 2016(1). Fottrell, Q. (2017, November 5). Regular sex at home leads to a more productive time at work. Market Watch. Retrieved from https://www.marketwatch.com/ Altmetric Segment 3: The Changing Nature of Work [23:35-36:26] In segment three, Keith shares about his interest in the changing nature of work as a function of automation. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Blake, J. (2016). Pivot: The only move that matters is your next one. New York: Penguin. Bolinger, A., Klotz, A., & Leavitt, K. (2018). Contributing from inside the outer circle: The identity-based effects of noncore role incumbents on group relational coordination and organizational climate. Academy of Management Review 43(4). To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
March 4, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Susanne Garvis, a professor of child and youth studies (early childhood) at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden and a guest professor at Stockholm University, Sweden. She is a mixed-methods researcher in the field of early childhood education and has been involved in national and international research projects, consultancy and work with governments, agencies and NGOs. Professor Garvis is the leader of the funded Nordic Systems Approach to Early Childhood research. Her research interests include, policy, quality and learning development with teachers, young children and their families. Segment 1: Researching Early Childhood [00:00-12:28] In this first segment, Susie shares about her research on early childhood education. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Nordic Early Childhood Systems Approach Research group RIA # 141: Dr. Gail Crimmins on Arts-informed Research Segment 2: Engaging in Cross-Cultural Research [12:29-22:18] In segment two, Susie discusses her experience researching in other countries. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: European Union grants Segment 3: Challenges and Issues in Early Childhood Education [22:19-34:12] In segment three, Susie shares some of the challenges early childhood educators face. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
March 4, 2019
Take a listen to our March 2019 preview clips!   To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
February 25, 2019
Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-06:11]: The Core Principle of Christopher's Work In this bonus clip, the following resources are mentioned: This American Life To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
February 25, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Christopher Plummer, Professor at Michigan Technological University. Christopher created the Sound programs at Michigan Technological University, which combine fundamental engineering and artistic course work with applied sound creation. He has long been a practicing sound designer with theatre designs at regional theaters and in New York, sound design for independent films, and PBS specials. In that work he has been keenly interested in how immersive sound and room acoustics can bypass our conscious awareness and impact our underlying emotional state. This work includes the way an electroacoustic system can help an opera singer touch an audience with their voice to how the acoustics of a room change the classroom dynamics of a pre-school. Recently, Christopher has been exploring the power of soundscapes through a National Endowment for The Arts funded project, "Listening to Parks." This project takes images and ambisonic recordings of the National Parks surrounding Lake Superior and creates a virtual retreat where the park experiences are shared through an immersive installation using 11 speakers and 6 screens to transport the audience. New programs continue to be developed for this system, most recently, "Shell Shocked," a virtual experience of World War I warfare as part of the Copper Country's remembrance of the 100 year anniversary of the Armistice. Segment 1: Sound Design and Composition [00:00-18:17] In this first segment, Christopher describes his work with sound design and music composition. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Keweenaw Soundscapes "Listening to Parks" Segment 2: Research and Creative Expression [18:18-37:03] In segment two, Christopher shares how his creative work impacts his research. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: National Institutes of Health (NIH) Sound Health Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-06:11]: The Core Principle of Christopher's Work In this bonus clip, the following resources are mentioned: This American Life To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
February 18, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Meghan Grace, a generational researcher, host of the podcast #GenZ, and the co-author of the books, Generation Z Goes to College and Generation Z Leads. Her third book, Generation Z: A Century in the Making, was just released. She and her co-author, Dr. Corey Seemiller have been studying Generation Z since 2014 and have conducted two original studies on Generation Z. Meghan's work with Generation Z focuses on utilizing generational research to influence individual practices and organizational strategies that promote empowering environments and experiences for members of Generation Z. Meghan has diverse experience working in higher education and student affairs with a background in program design and management, Greek organizations, leadership development, event planning, curriculum design, and research and assessment. Meghan holds her undergraduate degree in communication studies from Chapman University and a master’s in higher education from the University of Arizona. She is currently pursuing her doctoral degree at Vanderbilt University studying higher education leadership and policy and holds an assistantship in the Dean of Students Office of Assessment and Special Projects. Segment 1: What is Generation Z? [00:00-14:10] In this first segment, Meghan describes the characteristics of Generation Z. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: #GenZ Podcast Seemiller, C., & Grace, M. (2016). Generation Z goes to college. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. Seemiller, C., & Grace, M.(2017).  Generation Z leads. North Charleston, SC: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform. Seemiller, C., & Grace, M. (2019). Generation Z: A century in the making. New York: Routledge. Segment 2: Researching Generation Z [14:11-26:07] In segment two, Meghan shares about her current research projects focused on Generation Z. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Survey Monkey Qualtrics Segment 3: Writing Books Pre-Doctorate [26:08-37:48] In segment three, Meghan discusses how she got started with writing books before earning her EdD. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Seemiller, C., & Grace, M. (2019). Generation Z: A century in the making. New York: Routledge. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
February 11, 2019
Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-03:45]: Mimi Shares Resources for Learning More About Learning Analytics and Big Data In this bonus clip, the following resources are mentioned: Education Data Mining Conference Learning Analytics & Knowledge Conference Journal of Educational Data Mining (JEDM) Journal of Learning Analytics (JLA) Krumm, A., Means, B., Bienkowski, M. (2018). Learning analytics goes to school: A collaborative approach to improving education. New York: Routledge. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
February 11, 2019
On this episode, guest host Dr. Mary Ellen Dello Stritto is joined by Mimi Recker, a professor in the department of Instructional Technology and Learning Sciences at Utah State University. She holds a bachelor's degree in mathematics from the University of Pennsylvania. After a few years working as a software engineer in Silicon Valley (working on early Internet protocols), she earned her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley. Mimi worked for two years at the Georgia Institute of Technology and for four years at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand, before finally joining Utah State University in 1998. Mimi became Department Head of Instructional Technology & Learning Sciences in 2008, serving for 7 years. Her research focuses on helping the education sector take advantage of the benefits of cyber-learning and teaching. Over the years, this line of research, funded by the National Science Foundation and the Institute for Museum and Library Services, has involved a dynamic mix of faculty, post-docs, and graduate students from Utah State University, as well as colleagues from around the world. When not working, you might find her on skis, in a kayak, on a bike, or on a cliff, exploring the natural beauty around Logan. Segment 1: Learning Sciences and Analytics [00:00-19:10] In this first segment, Mimi discusses the field of learning sciences, learning analytics in higher education, and big vs. traditional data sets. Segment 2: Analyzing Big Data [19:10-35:06] In segment two, Mimi shares statistical approaches for analyzing big data sets and her research on LMS data. Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-03:45]: Mimi Shares Resources for Learning More About Learning Analytics and Big Data In this bonus clip, the following resources are mentioned: Education Data Mining Conference Learning Analytics & Knowledge Conference Journal of Educational Data Mining (JEDM) Journal of Learning Analytics (JLA) Krumm, A., Means, B., Bienkowski, M. (2018). Learning analytics goes to school: A collaborative approach to improving education. New York: Routledge. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
February 4, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Kay Shattuck, who has worked in adult education more than 30 years, focusing on online and distance education over the past few decades. She earned her doctorate at Penn State University under the guidance of Michael G. Moore. Kay was a member of the initial group of Maryland distance educators who developed what would become Quality Matters. Her earliest involvement in 2003 was in providing a review of the research and best practices literature and being part of the committee that developed the first QM iteration of standards of quality online course design. As QM's Director of Research, she continues to provide research support and direction for new QM tools and resources for the field. Her academic affiliation is with the lifelong learning and adult education program at Penn State where she taught online for many years. She is an associate editor of The American Journal of Distance Education. Kay developed and was editor of Assuring Quality in Online Education: Practices and Processes at Teaching, Resource, and Program Levels and authored “Teaching Online:  Who? What? When? Where? Why? How?“ a review of the faculty participation literature in the upcoming 4th edition of the Handbook of Distance Education. Segment 1: Quality Matters [00:00-15:09] In this first segment, In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: The American Journal of Distance Education Legon, R., & Garrett, R. (2018). The changing landscape of online education (CHLOE): A deeper dive. Quality Matters & Eduventures survey of chief online officers, 2018. Moore, M. G., & Diehl,W. C. (Eds.). (2019). Handbook of distance education (4th ed.). New York: Routledge. Shattuck, K. (2014). Assuring quality in online education: Practices and processes at teaching, resource, and program levels. Sterling, VA: Stylus. Eduventures Quality Matters (QM) QM Events QM Research Library ABCs of QM-Focused Research Segment 2: Being a Director of Research [15:10-36:31] In segment two, In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: The American Journal of Distance Education Zawacki-Richter, O., & Anderson, T. (2014). Online distance education: Towards a research agenda. Edmonton, AB: AU Press. Quality Matters (QM) QM Research Library To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
February 4, 2019
Take a listen to our February 2019 preview clips! To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
January 28, 2019
In this episode, Dr. Katie Linder, director of research at Oregon State University Ecampus, shares about the Report Reader Checklist, a new tool available from the Oregon State Ecampus Research Unit. Segment 1: Report Reader Checklist Origin Story [00:00-11:49] In this first segment, Katie shares about how the Report Reader Checklist came to be. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Report Reader Checklist EDUCAUSE UPCEA Online Learning Consortium (OLC) Quality Matters To learn more about past Oregon State Ecampus research reports, visit our current projects page. Segment 2: Report Reader Checklist Content [11:50-28:38] In segment two, Katie offers an overview of the Report Reader Checklist content. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: The six areas of the Report Reader Checklist: Context Methodology Sample Reporting Results Transparency Reader Experience Connect with the Oregon State Ecampus Research Unit! Email: ecresearchunit@oregonstate.edu Twitter: @ECResearchUnit To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
January 21, 2019
Bonus Clip [00:00-05:10]: Guy Shares about a Tool for Assessing Teams In this bonus clips, the following resources are mentioned: MATRICx Lotrecchiano, G. R., Mallinson, T., LeBlanc-Beaudoin, T., Schwartz, L., Lazar, D., Falk-Krzesinski, H. (2016). Individual motivation and threat indicators of collaboration readiness in scientific knowledge producing teams: A scoping review and domain analysis. Heliyon 2(5), e00105. http://www.heliyon.com/article/e00105/pdf Mallinson, T., Lotrecchiano, G. R., Furniss, J., Schwartz, L., Lazar, D., Falk-Krzesinski, H. J. (2016). Pilot analysis of the motivation assessment for team readiness, integration, and collaboration (MATRICx) using rasch analysis. Journal of Investigative Medicine 64, 1186-1193. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
January 21, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Gaetano R. Lotrecchiano, EdD, PhD, an Associate Professor in the Department of Clinical Research and Leadership in the School of Medicine and Health Sciences. He is also the Associate Dean of Collaboration and Academic Innovation at the George Washington University. Dr. Lotrecchiano's work is dedicated to team and collaboration science. He is also the President Elect of the International Network for the Science of Team Science. Segment 1: Creating Effective Teams [00:00-20:53] In this first segment, Guy shares about how he began his research on creative effective teams. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: International Network for the Science of Team Science Salas, E., Shuffler, M. L., Thayer, A. L., Bedwell, W. L., Lazzara, E. H. (2014). Understanding and improving teamwork in organizations: A scientifically based practical guide. Human Resource Management,54(4), 599-622. Segment 2: Effective Collaboration in Teams [20:54-34:47] In segment two, Guy shares some tips and strategies for effective collaboration in teams. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Hall, K. L., Stokols, D., Stipelman, B. A., Vogel, A. L., Feng, A., Masimore, B., Morgan, G., Moser, R. P., Marcus, S. E., & Berrigan, D. (2012). Assessing the value of team science: a study comparing center-and investigator-initiated grants. American journal of preventive medicine, 42(2), 157-163. Bonus Clip [00:00-05:10]: Guy Shares about a Tool for Assessing Teams In this bonus clips, the following resources are mentioned: MATRICx Lotrecchiano, G. R., Mallinson, T., LeBlanc-Beaudoin, T., Schwartz, L., Lazar, D., Falk-Krzesinski, H. (2016). Individual motivation and threat indicators of collaboration readiness in scientific knowledge producing teams: A scoping review and domain analysis. Heliyon 2(5), e00105. http://www.heliyon.com/article/e00105/pdf Mallinson, T., Lotrecchiano, G. R., Furniss, J., Schwartz, L., Lazar, D., Falk-Krzesinski, H. J. (2016). Pilot analysis of the motivation assessment for team readiness, integration, and collaboration (MATRICx) using rasch analysis. Journal of Investigative Medicine 64, 1186-1193. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
January 14, 2019
Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-04:21]: Benefits of Arts-informed Research In this bonus clip, the following resource is mentioned: Carrigan, M. (2017, May 8). An interview with Patricia Leavy about research design in contemporary times. The Socialogical Imagination. Retrieved from http://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/19315 To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
January 14, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Gail Crimmins, who initially trained as a performer and worked as a performer, director and casting director in theatre, television and film in the UK for almost 10 years.  She subsequently taught Drama and Performance at universities and conservatoires before moving to Australia in 2008. Gail undertook her PhD study (an arts-informed narrative inquiry into the lived experience of women casual academics) alongside part-time teaching and fully committed mothering. She currently works as a Lecturer of Communication, coordinates a series of Communication Programs, and is the First Year Experience Lead for the School of Communication and Creative Industries, at the University of the Sunshine Coast in Queensland, Australia.  She undertakes arts-informed, narrative and auto-ethnographic research, predominantly though not exclusively, exploring the lived experience of women academics. Gail is a feminist researcher who seeks to illuminate the impacts of patriarchal structures on women’s lives and explore ways for women’s stories and voices to be heard.   Segment 1: Arts-informed Research [00:00-16:38] In this first segment, Gail shares about how she got started with arts-informed research. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Cahnmann, M. (2006). Reading, living, and writing bilingual poetry as scholARTistry in the language arts classroom. Language Arts, 83(4), 342. Cole, A. L., & Knowles, G. J. (2008). Arts-informed research. In G. J. Knowles & A. L. Cole (Eds.) Handbook of the Arts in Qualitative Research. Perspectives methodologies, examples and issues (pp. 55-70). Los Angeles: Sage Publications. Nielsen, L. (2000). Academy performances, academy rewards. Teacher Education Quarterly, 27(2), 163-170. Nielsen, L. (2002). Learning from the liminal: Fiction as knowledge. Alberta Journal of Education Research 48(3), 206-214. Sikes, P. & Gale, K. (2006). Narrative Approaches to Education Research. Plymouth: University of Plymouth. Segment 2: Examples of Arts-informed Research [16:39-37:37] In segment two, Gail offers examples of her own work with arts-informed research. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Books: Cole, A. L., & Knowles, G. J. (2008). Arts-informed research. In G. J. Knowles & A. L. Cole (Eds.) Handbook of the Arts in Qualitative Research. Perspectives methodologies, examples and issues (pp. 55-70). Los Angeles: Sage Publications. Gee, J. P. (1990). Social linguistics and literacies (1st ed.). London, UK: Falmer Press. Gee, J. P. (2005). An introduction to discourse analysis theory and method (2nd ed.). London: Routledge.  Articles: Ewing, R., & Hughes, J. (2008). Arts-informed inquiry in teacher education: contesting the myths. European Education Research Journal, 7(4), 512–522. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.2304/eerj.2008.7.4.512 Gee, J. P. (1985). The narrativization of experience in the oral style. Journal of Education, 167(1): 9-35. Gee, J. P. (1991). A linguistic approach to narrative. Journal of Narrative and Life History 1(1):15-39. MacLure, M. (2013). The wonder of data. Cultural Studies ↔ Critical Methodologies, 13(4), 228–232. Ringrose, J. & Renold, E. (2014). 'F**K Rape!’: Exploring affective intensities in a feminist research assemblage. Qualitative Inquiry 20 (6): 772–780. Sikes, P. & Gale, K. (2006). Narrative Approaches to Education Research. Plymouth: University of Plymouth. Resources authored by Dr. Gail Crimmins: Crimmins, G. (2018). Theatricalising narrative research on women casual academics. Palgrave studies in gender and education. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Crimmins, G. (2017). An emotional, physical and humanistic response to performed data. TEXT Special Issue, 38, 1-13. Retrieved from                                                                                  http://www.textjournal.com.au/speciss/issue38/Crimmins.pdf Crimmins, G. (2017). How an audience of scholars’ evaluated arts informed communication and verbatim theatre as media through which to communicate academic research. Applied Theatre Research. Connect with Dr. Gail Crimmins: GCrimmin@usc.edu.au Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-04:21]: Benefits of Arts-informed Research In this bonus clip, the following resource is mentioned: Carrigan, M. (2017, May 8). An interview with Patricia Leavy about research design in contemporary times. The Socialogical Imagination. Retrieved from http://sociologicalimagination.org/archives/19315 To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
January 7, 2019
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. James M. Lang, a Professor of English and the Director of the D’Amour Center for Teaching Excellence at Assumption College in Worcester, MA. He is the author of five books, the most recent of which are Small Teaching: Everyday Lessons from the Science of Learning (Jossey-Bass, 2016), Cheating Lessons: Learning from Academic Dishonesty (Harvard University Press, 2013), and On Course: A Week-by-Week Guide to Your First Semester of College Teaching (Harvard UP, 2008). Lang writes a monthly column on teaching and learning for The Chronicle of Higher Education; his work has been appearing in the Chronicle since 1999. His book reviews and public scholarship on higher education have appeared in a wide variety of newspapers and magazines, including the Boston Globe, Chicago Tribune, and Time. He edits a new series of books on teaching and learning in higher education for West Virginia University Press. He has conducted workshops on teaching for faculty at more than a hundred colleges or universities in the US and abroad, and consulted for the United Nations on the development of teaching materials for college faculty. In September of 2016 he received a Fulbright Specialist grant to work with three universities in Colombia on the creation of a MOOC on teaching and learning in STEM education. He has a BA in English and Philosophy from the University of Notre Dame, an MA in English from St. Louis University, and a Ph.D. in English from Northwestern University. Segment 1: Editing a Book Series [00:00-14:59] In this first segment, Jim shares about his experience editing a book series. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Lang, J. M. (2016). Small teaching: Everyday lessons from the science of learning. San Francisco, CA:Jossey-Bass. Lang, J. M. (2013). Cheating lessons: Learning from academic dishonesty. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press Lang, J. M. (2008). On course: A week-by-week guide to your first semester of college teaching. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. POD Network (conferences) RIA # 9: Dr. Kevin Gannon on Balancing Research, Teaching & Service RIA # 124: Dr. Sarah Rose Cavanagh on Emotions and Teaching Cavanagh, S. R. (2016). The spark of learning: Energizing the college classroom with the science of emotion. Morgantown, WV: West Virginia University Press. Segment 2: Choosing Which Books to Write Next [15:00-27:16] In segment two, Jim discusses how he chooses which book to write next. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Blog post on Dr. Jame's Lang's forthcoming book, Teaching Distracted Minds Schuman, R. (2018, November 4). The worst writing advice in the world. The Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved from https://www.chronicle.com/ Lang, J. M. (2016). Small teaching: Everyday lessons from the science of learning. San Francisco, CA:Jossey-Bass. Cavanagh, S. R. (2016). The spark of learning: Energizing the college classroom with the science of emotion. Morgantown, WV: West Virginia University Press. Segment 3: Writing as a Teacher [27:17-36:08] In segment three, Jim shares about his practical experience as a teacher impacts his writing. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
January 7, 2019
Take a listen to our January 2019 preview clips! To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
December 31, 2018
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Kevin Doxzen who received his PhD from the lab of Jennifer Doudna at UC Berkeley. Under Jennifer’s guidance, Kevin explored the structure and function of RNA and DNA binding proteins using x-ray crystallography. Following his PhD Kevin transitioned into his role as science communications specialist at the Innovative Genomics Institute. In this position, Kevin develops educational material and resources for scientists and the general public with the goal of communicating the latest genome engineering technology. Segment 1: Science Communication [00:00-11:47] In this first segment, Kevin describes the field of science communication. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Innovative Genomics Institute Segment 2: Science Communication Pathways [11:48-21:38] In segment two, Kevin shares how he entered into the field of science communication. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Jennifer Doudna Connect with Dr. Kevin Doxzen on Twitter: @kevdox Segment 3: Kevin’s Lab Experience [21:39-33:29] In segment three, Kevin shares about a typical day in the lab from his research experiences. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Oregon State University Ecampus or Oregon State University.
December 24, 2018
On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Stephanie Evergreen, an internationally-recognized data visualization and design expert. She has trained future data nerds worldwide through keynote presentations and workshops, for clients including Time, Adobe, Verizon, Head Start, American Institutes for Research, Rockefeller Foundation, Brookings Institute, and the United Nations. She writes a popular blog on data presentation at StephanieEvergreen.com. Her book, Effective Data Visualization, was published in Spring 2016. Her other book, Presenting Data Effectively: Communicating Your Findings for Maximum Impact, was just published in its second edition in June 2017. Both books hit #1 on Amazon bestseller lists. Segment 1: What is data visualization? [00:00-12:22] In this first segment, Stephanie defines data visualization. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: StephanieEvergreen.com Evergreen, S. (2016). Effective data visualization. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications. Evergreen, S. (2017). Presenting data effectively: Communicating your findings for maximum impact (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications. Stephanie Evergreen’s blog Evergreen Data Academy Segment 2: Common Mistakes with Data Viz (and Solutions!) [12:23-22:28] In segment two, Stephanie shares some common data viz errors and her recommendations for solutions. Segment 3: Creating a Positive Data Viz Culture [22:29-35:10] In segment three, Stephanie offers some ideas for how to create a positive organizational culture around data visualization. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: Evergreen Data Academy Stephanie Evergreen’s blog Chart Chooser cards Evergreen Data Scratch-off graphs SAGE Publications Evergreen Data Qualitative Chart Chooser Dr. Stephanie Evergreen’s books: Evergreen, S. (2016). Effective data visualization. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications. Evergreen, S. (2017). Presenting data effectively: Communicating your findings for maximum impact (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications. To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Ecampus or Oregon State University.
December 17, 2018
Bonus Clip [00:00-3:30]: Joanna’s Views on Slide Animations To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Ecampus or Oregon State University.
December 17, 2018
On this episode, Katie is joined by Joanna Garner. Dr. Garner is the Executive Director of The Center for Educational Partnerships at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, VA. Originally from the United Kingdom, Dr. Garner completed her Bachelors and Master’s degrees in Psychology at the University of Surrey before earning her doctorate in Educational Psychology at The Pennsylvania State University. Her work covers a range of topics pertaining to learning and identity development, particularly in relation to STEM education. Segment 1: Best Practices for Presentation Slide Design [00:00-15:14] In this first segment, Joanna shares some best practices to consider when designing presentation slides. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: How People Learn ebook RIA # 47: Michael Alley on Best Practices for Presenting Research Segment 2: Do’s and Don’ts of Slide Design [15:15-24:02] In segment two, Joanna shares some of her top do’s and don’ts of slide design. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: assertion-evidence.com Templates Engineering Ambassador  Segment 3: Joanna’s Current Research [24:03-34:08] In segment three, Joanna discusses some of her current research and favorite resources for effective slide design. Bonus Clip [00:00-3:30]: Joanna’s Views on Slide Animations To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Ecampus or Oregon State University.
December 10, 2018
In this episode from the archives, Dr. Katie Linder, director of the Ecampus Research Unit at Oregon State University, shares strategies to network with other researchers in a range of settings including conferences and social media. Segment 1: What Do You Want to Network About? [00:00-10:53] In this first segment, Katie shares some ideas to identity the people, methods, and themes you want to focus on for your networking efforts. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: AHEAD RIA # 42: Dr. George Veletsianos on Sharing Research Online  RIA # 63: Dr. Nyasha Junior on Text-based Research Segment 2: Networking Opportunities at Conferences [10:54-21:26] In segment two, Katie discusses some strategies for networking at conferences and in conference online back channels. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: LinkedIn Twitter RIA # 32: Dr. Tom Cavanagh and Dr. Kelvin Thompson on Keeping Up with Reading Virtually Connecting Segment 3: Networking Opportunities on Social Media [21:27-30:59] In segment three, Katie offers some tips for networking with other researchers online. In this segment, the following resources are mentioned: RIA # 54: Dr. Raul Pacheco-Vega on Being an Actively Engaged Researcher #ScholarSunday on Twitter Additional Twitter hashtags mentioned in this segment: #phdchat #ecrchat #prodchat TweetChat Facebook Instagram Dr. Nyasha Junior on Twitter and Instagram International Journal for Academic Development To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Ecampus or Oregon State University.
December 3, 2018
Bonus Clip #2 [00:00-06:39]: The Four Aces for Projecting Confidence To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast: Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu Voicemail: 541-737-1111 If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review. The views expressed by guests on the Research in Action podcast do not necessarily represent the views of Ecampus or Oregon State University.
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