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August 13, 2020
NSA and FBI release a detailed report on a GRU toolset. North Korea’s Operation Dream Job phishes in Israeli waters. CISA warns of COVID-19 loan relief scams. Malek Ben Salem from Accenture with highlights from their 2020 Security Vision report. Our guest is Mike Hamilton from CI Security, who clears the air on election security and the shift to absentee status. And crooks are using infection and job loss as retail phishbait. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/157
August 12, 2020
Regional rivals tussle in cyberspace, and governments have it out with dissidents and the opposition. Market penetration as an instrument of state power. TikTok gets more unwelcome scrutiny over its privacy practices. Joe Carrigan on a credential harvesting phishing scheme using Zoom as bait. Our guest is Avi Shua from Orca Security on accidental vulnerabilities. And suppressing creepware is apparently harder than it looks. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/156
August 11, 2020
Belarus shuts down its Internet after its incumbent president’s surprising, perhaps implausible, no...really implausible landslide reelection. Papua New Guinea undergoes buyer’s remorse over that Huawei-built National Data Centre it sprung for a couple of years ago. Versions of Chrome found susceptible to CSP rule bypass. Zoom is taken to court over encryption. Patch Tuesday notes. Ben Yelin looks at mobile surveillance in a Baltimore criminal case. Our guest is Alex Guirakhoo from Digital Shadows with a look at dark web travel agencies. And card-skimmers hit a university’s online store. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/155
August 11, 2020
The CyberWire's newest show is here - it’s called Word Notes, and it just launched today with 10 binge-able episodes. Think of it as your audio infosec glossary. It’s not an interview show, it’s just fun, informative, 2-3 minute podcasts that explain security terms, related concepts, and gives you a little bit of context. Be sure to subscribe to Word Notes wherever you get your podcasts to hear a new Word Note every Tuesday. 
August 10, 2020
The US Office of the Director of National Intelligence has released an appreciation of the goals of election interference among three principal US adversaries, Russia, China and Iran. Anomali offers a look at the ransomware-as-a-service market with its research on Smaug. The CyberWire’s Rick Howard continues his exploration of incident response. Andrea Little Limbago from Interos on cyber regionalism. And the tangles that need to be untangled in the TikTok affair, with a deadline looming less than a month from now. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/154
August 9, 2020
Cyber threat intelligence analyst Selena Larson takes us on her career journey from being a journalist to making the switch to industrial security. As a child who wrote a book about a green goldfish who dealt with bullying, Selena always liked investigating and researching things. Specializing in cybersecurity journalism led to the realization of how closely aligned or similar skills are required from an investigative journalist and a cyber threat intelligence analyst. Our thanks to Selena for sharing her story with us. 
August 8, 2020
“Cyberbunker” refers to a criminal group that operated a “bulletproof” hosting facility out of an actual military bunker. “Bullet Proof” hosting usually refers to hosting locations in countries with little or corrupt law enforcement, making shutting down criminal activity difficult. Cyberbunker, which is also known as “ZYZtm” and “Calibour”, was a bit different in that it actually operated out of a bulletproof bunker. In September of last year, German police raided this actual Cyberbunker and arrested several suspects. While most of the group's assets were seized during the initial raid, the IP address space remained and was later sold to Legaco Networks. Before being shut down, Legaco Networks temporarily redirected the traffic to the SANS Internet Storm Center honeypots for examination. Joining us on this week's Research Saturday from SANS Technology Institute is graduate student Karim Lalji and Dean of Research Johannes Ullrich to discuss their experiences.  The research and blog post can be found here:  Real-Time Honeypot Forensic Investigation on a German Organized Crime Network Cyberbunker 2.0: Analysis of the Remnants of a Bullet Proof Hosting Provider The CyberWire's Research Saturday is presented by Juniper Networks. Thanks to our sponsor Enveil, closing the last gap in data security.
August 7, 2020
President Trump issues Executive Orders restricting TikTok and WeChat in the US. A Chinese APT has been active in industrial espionage against Taiwan’s semiconductor industry. Intel sustains a leak of sensitive company intellectual property. Rewards for Justice communicated to Russian and Iranian individuals by text message. Coordinated inauthenticity from Romanian actors, probably criminals. Magecart moves to homoglyph attacks. Craig Williams from Cisco Talos on ransomware campaigns making use of Maze and Snake malware. Our guest is Monica Ruiz from the Hewlett Foundation Cyber Initiative on the potential for a volunteer cyber workforce. And, sorry Fort Meade--there are limits to telework. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/153
August 6, 2020
The US announces five new lines of effort for the Clean Network program, and none of them are exactly mash notes for Beijing. The US is also offering rewards of up to ten million dollars for information about foreign computer crimes aimed at interfering with US elections. Australia’s new cybersecurity strategy is out. Maze may have hit Canon. Rob Lee from Dragos addresses speculation of an ICS supply chain back door. Our guest is Theresa Lanowitz from AT&T Cybersecurity on 5G security threats to businesses. And a bail hearing is disrupted by Zoom-bombing. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/152
August 5, 2020
NSA, yes, NSA, has some privacy advice. Interpol offers its take on where cybercrime is going during the time of the pandemic. Iran’s Oilrig is getting clever with its data exfiltration. The FBI would like to know when you’re finally going to move on from Windows 7--like, c’mon people. Joe Carrigan looks at pesky ads from the Google Play store. Our guest is Bobby McLernon from Axonius on how federal cybersecurity is particularly vulnerable during the shutdown. And a not-guilty plea from one of the three alleged Twitter hackers, along with some notes on how whoever dunnit dunnit. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/151
August 4, 2020
The US attributes the Taidoor remote access Trojan to the Chinese government. Sources tell Reuters that documents used in an attempt to influence the last British general election were taken from the compromised email account of the trade minister. Pegasus spyware is found deployed against churchmen and political opposition figures in Togo. China denounces the American smash-and-grab of TikTok. Ben Yelin looks at international law and attribution. Our guest is Ameesh Divatia from Baffle on misconfigured databases being attacked within just hours after coming online. And the Blackbaud ransomware attack continues to affect new victims. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/150
August 3, 2020
Microsoft is in talks to acquire TikTok as the US hints that it may be considering action against other Chinese software companies. Three young men have been charged in the Twitter hack. An apparent distributed denial-of-service attack turns out to have been a glitch. We welcome Verizon’s Chris Novak to the show. Rick Howard talks incident response. And updates on the Garmin hack suggest shifts in the ransomware threat. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/149
August 2, 2020
Director of Security Engineering at Marketa and Host of Hacker Valley Studio podcast Chris Cochran describes his transitions throughout the cybersecurity industry, from an intelligence job with the Marine Corps, to starting the intelligence apparatus for the House of Representatives, then on to leading Netflix's threat intelligence capability. Chris points out that when pivoting to different roles and responsibilities, you must rely on your own strengths to move forward and bring value to your work. Our thanks to Chris for sharing his story with us.
August 1, 2020
NortonLifeLock Research Group (NRG) released a prototype browser extension called BotSight that leverages machine learning to detect Twitter bots in real-time. The tool is intended to help users understand the prevalence of bots and disinformation campaigns within their Twitter feeds, particularly with the increase in disinformation of COVID-19. Joining us on this week's Research Saturday to discuss this tool is Daniel Kats from NortonLifeLock Research Group. You can find the research here: Introducing BotSight Our thanks to Reservoir Labs for sponsoring this week's show.
July 31, 2020
An update on social engineering at Twitter. A quick look at the phishing kit criminal market. The European Union sanctions individuals and organizations in Russia, China, and North Korea for involvement in notorious hacking campaigns. North Korea’s North Star campaign is back and dangling bogus job offers in front of its marks. Deceptikons snoop into European law firms. Zully Ramzan from RSA on Digital Contact Tracing. Our guest is Tom Kellermann from Vmware Carbon Black on top financial CISOs analyzing the 2020 attack landscape. And both NSA and NIST have some advice on shoring up your security. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/148
July 30, 2020
Yesterday’s antitrust hearings in the US House of Representatives focus on Big Tech’s big data as something open to use in restraint of trade. And there are questions about community standards as well. The BootHole vulnerability may not represent an emergency, but it will be tough to fix. Android malware masquerades as COVID-19 contact-tracers. The FBI warns against Netwalker ransomware. China says it didn’t hack the Vatican. Justin Harvey from Accenture demystifies red teaming. Our guest is Christopher Ahlberg from Recorded Future on trends in threat intelligence. And somebody’s spoofing a British MP: he’s looking at you, Peoples Liberation Army. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/147
July 29, 2020
Alleged Russian influence operations described by US intelligence services. “Ghostwriter” targets the Baltic region with anti-NATO false narratives. Chinese intelligence is said to have compromised Vatican networks. Loss of customer PII seems the costliest kind of data breach. VPN bugs represent a risk to OT networks. Big Tech comes to Capitol Hill, virtually. Michigan’s online bar exam knocked offline, briefly, by a cyber attack. Joe Carrigan on password stealers targeting gaming. Our guests are Troy Smith and Mike Koontz from Raytheon on defending communications operations across cloud platforms. And a superseding indictment for two ex-Twitterati charged with snooping for Saudi Arabia. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/146
July 28, 2020
Cloudflare says that reported Ukrainian breaches aren’t its issue. Trend Micro describes a new and unusually capable strain of malware. Garmin is reported to have obtained a decryptor for WastedLocker ransomware. Third-party risk continues in the news, as do misconfigured databases that expose personal information. Huawei’s CFO alleges misconduct by Canadian police and intelligence agencies. Ben Yelin examines the EFF's online Atlas of Surveillance. Dave DeWalt with SafeGuard Cyber on the evolving threat landscape as folks return to the workplace. And the Twitter incident seems to have been a problem waiting to appear. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/145
July 27, 2020
A vigilante appears to be interfering with Emotet’s payloads. A fintech breach is blamed on a third-party service provider. A list of Cloudflare users is dumped online. There’s a going-out-of-business sale over at the Cerberus cybergang. Malek ben Salem from Accenture Labs on DeepFake detection. Our own Rick Howard gathers the Hash Table to sort some SOCs. And Garmin, restoring its services after last week’s attack, may have been the victim of Evil Corp’s WastedLocker ransomware. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/144
July 26, 2020
Privacy and data security lawyer, Dominique Shelton Leipzig shares that she has always wanted to be a lawyer, ever since she was a little girl. She talks about what her role is with clients in protecting and managing their data, sometimes adhering to up to 134 different data protection laws for global companies. Learn that not a lot has changed for an African-American woman partner at an Amlaw 100 firm as far as diversity during Dominique's career, and how Dominique suggests young lawyers should address those odds. Our thanks to Dominque for sharing her story with us. 
July 25, 2020
On April 29, 2020, the Salt management framework, authored by the IT automation company SaltStack, received a patch concerning two CVEs; CVE-2020-11651, an authentication bypass vulnerability, and CVE-2020-11652, a directory-traversal vulnerability. On April 30, 2020, researchers at F-Secure disclosed their vulnerability findings to the public, with an urgent warning for Salt users - patch now. Before the weekend was out, criminals were deploying malware and targeting vulnerable Salt installations, successfully affecting operations at Ghost, DigiCert, and LineageOS. The malware is a cryptominer, but there is an additional component, a Remote Access Tool written in Go called nspps. Researchers at Akamai have also observed in-the-wild attacks on Salt vulnerabilities.  Joining us on this week's Research Saturday is Larry Cashdollar, Senior Security Response Engineer at Akamai, to discuss this issue.  The research can be found here:  SaltStack Vulnerabilities Actively Exploited in the Wild The CyberWire's Research Saturday is presented by Juniper Networks. Thanks to our sponsor Enveil, closing the last gap in data security.
July 24, 2020
CISA and NSA warn of a foreign threat to US critical infrastructure. A look at what the Bears have been up to lately. The Blackbaud extortion incident shows its ripple effects. An awful lot of Twitter employees had access to powerful admin tools. China orders a US consulate closed in a tit-for-tat response to the closure of China’s consulate in Houston. Andrea Little Limbago on cyber in a re-globalized world system. Our guest is Dominique Shelton Leipzig from Perkins Coie LLP on the CA Consumer Privacy Act. And DJI drones may be a bit nosey. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/143
July 23, 2020
Twitter updates the news of last week’s incident: the attackers seem to have accessed some direct messages. France’s partial permission for Huawei to operate in that country now looks like a ban with a 2028 deadline. A quiet cryptominer. The cyber threat to British sport. Awais Rashid from the University of Bristol on cyber security and remote working. John Ford from IronNet Cybersecurity with updated 2020 predictions and cyber priorities. And bosses and employees see things differently, cyberwise. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/142
July 22, 2020
“Meowing” is now a thing: the automated discovery and wiping of exposed and unprotected databases. The US indicts two Chinese nationals on eleven counts of hacking and reports evidence that Chinese intelligence services are now using cybercriminals as contractors. Mike Schaub from CloudCheckr on why COVID-19 has ignited modernization projects for government agencies. Joe Carrigan on counterfeit Cisco routers. The US State Department tells China to close its consulate in Houston. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/141
July 21, 2020
The Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament has rendered its report on the Russian cyber threat. Trend Micro reports on the workings of the cyber criminal underground economy. Ben Yelin on U.S. Customs and Border Protection collecting license plate data. Our guest is Kevin O'Brien from GreatHorn on the role of business policies in security to keep users safe during high-risk events. And it turns out that Russia has no hackers whatsoever: Moscow’s Finance Minister says so, so you can take that to the bank. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/140
July 20, 2020
Notes on last week’s Twitter hack, and on the allure of original gangster and other celebrity usernames. Using marketing databases for intelligence collection. The US Government mulls a ban on TikTok. Johannes Ullrich from SANS on Google Cloud storage becoming a more popular phishing platform. Our own Rick Howard on security operations centers, and a preview of the latest episode of his CSO Perspectives podcast. And more reaction to alleged Russian and Chinese attempts to hack COVID-19 biomedical research. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/139
July 19, 2020
Computer security writer, podcaster and public speaker Graham Cluley describes learning to program on his own from magazines, creating text adventure games for donations, and his journey from programming to presenting and writing with a bit of tap dancing on the side. Along the way, Graham collaborated with others and learned to communicate so that all could understand, not just techies. Our thanks to Graham for sharing his story with us. 
July 18, 2020
Researchers at Symantec spotted a Sodinokibi targeted ransomware campaign in which the attackers are also scanning the networks of some victims for credit card or point of sale (PoS) software. It is not clear if the attackers are targeting this software for encryption or because they want to scrape this information as a way to make even more money from this attack. Joining us in this week's Research Saturday to discuss the report is Jon DiMaggio of Symantec.  The research can be found here:  Sodinokibi: Ransomware Attackers also Scanning for PoS Software, Leveraging Cobalt Strike Thanks to our sponsor, Reservoir Labs. 
July 17, 2020
The Twitter hack is looking more like high-grade, low-end crime. It also worries people over the disinformation potential it suggests. People care, they really do, that someone hacked COVID-19 biomedical research (we’ll explain). Australia joins the UK, Canada, and the US in blaming Russia for Cozy Bear’s capers. Russia says it didn’t do nothin’. Rob Lee from Dragos with thoughts on the Ripple 20 vulnerabilities on industrial control systems. Our guest is Sal Aurigemma from University of Tulsa on fake ANTIFA twitter accounts. And CISA’s serious about getting the Feds to apply Tuesday’s Windows patch. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/138
July 16, 2020
Twitter sustained a major incident in which celebrity accounts were hijacked yesterday. It seems to have been a social engineering caper, but it’s motivation, nominally financial, remains unclear. British authorities call out Russia for an influence campaign mounted during last year’s elections. Cozy Bear is back, and sniffing for COVID-19 biomedical intelligence. Craig Williams from Cisco Talos on Dynamic Data Resolver, a plugin that makes reverse-engineering malware easier. Our guest is Ashlee Benge, formerly from ZeroFox, on emerging and persistent digital attack tactics facing the financial services industry. And Chinese intelligence services are spearphishing Hong Kong Catholics. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/137
July 15, 2020
A 2018 Presidential finding authorized extensive CIA cyber operations against Russia, China, Iran, and North Korea. Wattpad may have been breached. The SEC asks its registrants to take steps to protect themselves against ransomware. Free VPNs’ databases found exposed. Joe Carrigan on privacy vs. security on Android devices. Our guest is Chris Deluzio from Pitt Cyber on election security. And Beijing woofs in the direction of London over the UK’s Huawei ban. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/136
July 14, 2020
The British Government decides to ban Huawei. More on the malware associated with Golden Tax software package. The Molerats appear to be behind some spyware misrepresenting itself as a secure chat app. The Porphiex botnet is back distributing a new ransomware strain. The odd case of the Data Viper breach. Ben Yelin tracks a ruling from the DC circuit court on the release of electronic surveillance records. Our guest is Ann Johnson from Microsoft discussing her keynote at RSA APJ, The Rise of Digital Empathy. And SAP has a patch out--if you’re a user, CISA advises you to take this one seriously. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/135
July 13, 2020
President Trump says he authorized US Cyber Command’s retaliation against Russia’s Internet Research Agency for midterm election meddling. North Korean financially motivated hacking as a sign of internal power dynamics. TrickBot accidentally deploys a new module. TikTok, privacy, and security. LinkedIn hacker convicted. Justin Harvey from Accenture on what should and shouldn’t go in emails. Our guest is Matt Davey from 1password on the under-celebrated role of IT in the work from home transition. And advice to alleged criminals on the lam: give ‘em a low silhouette. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/134
July 12, 2020
Cybersecurity and disinformation researcher Bilyana Lilly shares her career path from studying where she was always a foreigner to an expert on the Russian perspective. While studying international law in Kosovo, Bilyana realized there are no winners in war. Through her work, she hopes to bring a greater understanding of Russia's strategic thinking. Our thanks to Bilyana for sharing her story with us.
July 11, 2020
Built into virtually every hardware device, firmware is lower-level software that is programmed to ensure that hardware functions properly. As software security has been significantly hardened over the past two decades, hackers have responded by moving down the stack to focus on firmware entry points. Firmware offers a target that basic security controls can’t access or scan as easily as software, while allowing them to persist and continue leveraging many of their tried and true attack techniques. Joining us on this week's Research Saturday is Maggie Jauregui, security researcher at Dell, to discuss this issue.  The research can be found here:  Three firmware blind spots impacting security The CyberWire's Research Saturday is presented by Juniper Networks. Thanks to our sponsor Enveil, closing the last gap in data security.
July 10, 2020
Unpatched and beyond-end-of-life systems are (again) at risk. Conti ransomware appears to be steadily displacing its ancestor Ryuk in criminal markets. Are privacy laws as consumer friendly as they’re often taken to be? There may be some grounds for doubt. German security services warn of the espionage potential of Chinese companies’ data collection. Huawei skepticism grows in Germany, Canada, and the UK. Zully Ramzan from RSA on zero trust. Our guest is Conan Ward from QOMPLX on the unfortunate reality of cyber insurance in light of the 3rd anniversary of NotPetya. And Ray Hushpuppi says the Feds didn’t extradite him; they kidnapped him. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/133
July 9, 2020
Facebook takes down more coordinated inauthenticity. Preinstalled malware is found in discount phones available under the FCC’s Lifeline program. The Evilnum APT continues its attacks against fintech platforms and services. Joker Android malware adapts and overcomes its way back into the Play store. FreddieMac discloses a third-party databreach. Johannes Ullrich from SANS on defending against Evil Maids with glitter. Our guest is Rohit Ghai from RSA with a preview of his keynote, Reality Check: Cybersecurity’s Story. And the Royal Military College of Canada’s hack attack remains under investigation. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/132
July 8, 2020
The Natanz blast looks like traditional sabotage. CISA releases its strategy for securing industrial control systems. Authorities in Germany seize DDoSecrets’ server pursuant to a US request. Microsoft takes down COVID-19-themed BEC and phishing infrastructure. FBI Director denounces China’s cyberespionage. Joe Carrigan helps review personal privacy measures for ios and Android. Rick Howard speaks with Steve Moore from Exabeam with insights from a year spent interviewing CISOs. And some DDoS and ransomware attempts. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/131
July 7, 2020
Explosions at Iranian nuclear sites remain unexplained, but look increasingly like conventional sabotage as opposed to cyberattacks. The Cosmic Lynx gang sets a high bar for business email compromise. The Purple Fox exploit kit gets an upgrade. Ben Yelin describes a 5th amendment compelled decryption case that may be headed to the Supreme Court. Our guest is Hugh Thompson, Chairman of the RSA Conference Program, on the human element of cyber security and lessons learned shifting a conference online. And a network of coordinated inauthenticity and fictitious personae is found pushing an Emirati official line. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/130
July 6, 2020
An Iranian nuclear installation may have been hacked. Or maybe not, but in any case it was damaged. Huawei gets more skeptical looks. European police round up hundreds of online contraband dealers. Thomas Etheridge from CrowdStrike on the increased need for speed, scale, and remote investigative and recovery services. Our guest is Tobias Whitney from Fortress Information Security on the Asset to Vendor Network (A2V). And an accused Nigerian money-launderer (and an admitted influencer) is now in US custody, facing Federal charges. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/129
July 5, 2020
CEO Matt Devost, describes many firsts in his career, including hacking into systems on an aircraft carrier at sea. He shares how he enjoys solving hard problems and the red teamer perspective, and how he was able to translate those into a career. For those interested in cybersecurity, Matt advises opportunities for self-directed learning including heading down to your basement and building your own lab. Our thanks to Matt for sharing his story with us.
July 2, 2020
Evil Corp seems to have been shuffling through some newspaper sites. Don’t take the gangs’ communiqués at face value, but some appear to be trolling for unprotected MongoDB databases. A look at Taurus, an information-stealer being sold in criminal-to-criminal markets. Chinese law and online security. The EARN-IT Act is being debated. Justin Harvey on “Smishing”. Our guest is Jeff Styles from FireMon on COVID-19 increasing misconfiguration risks. And there’s trouble in Tilted Towers. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/128
July 1, 2020
EvilQuest ransomware found in pirated versions of Little Snitch app. Out-of-band patches from Microsoft and Oracle. Extensive Chinese surveillance of Uighurs described. Hong Kong and the world react to China’s new National Security Law. The US FCC finds both Huawei and ZTE are threats to national security. Joe Carrigan on password stealers that target gaming. Our guest is Kiersten Todt from the Cyber Readiness Institute on how COVID-19 has changed small business security and what to expect going forward. And Britain rethinks its position on Huawei and 5G infrastructure. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/127
June 30, 2020
NSA and CISA agree: take Palo Alto’s advisory about its PAN-OS operating system seriously. StrongPity is back and active against targets in Turkey and Syria. A big Bitcoin scam is using spoofed news outlets and bogus celebrity endorsements to lure victims. A large trove of PII has appeared in the dark web. Ben Yelin from UMD CHHS on whether or not the EARN IT Act violates the constitution, our guest is Brad Stone with Booz Allen Hamilton on how technology is changing the battlefield and why cyber is becoming so important in the DoD space. Finally, both Australia and India look to shore up their defenses against cyber threats from China. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/126
June 29, 2020
The University of California San Francisco pays Netwalker extortionists nearly a million and a half to recover its data. A Kashmir utility restores business systems after last week’s cyberattack. The website defacements in Ethiopia continue to look more like hacktivism than state-sponsored activity. Our own Rick Howard talks about wrapping up his first season of CSO Perspectives. Our guest is Sanjay Gupta from Mitek discussing how online marketplaces can balance security with biometrics. Data are exposed at an e-learning platform. Three prominent cyber-hoods go down in US Federal courts. And Lion says the beer is flowing, post ransomware. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/125
June 28, 2020
Vice President of Marketing, Kathleen Booth, shares her career path from political science and international development to marketing for a cybersecurity company. Early dreams of acting morphed into goals of making the world a better place. Chief marketer and podcaster Kathleen is doing just that. She shares how proving your worth can lead to success. Listen for Kathleen's advice on getting your foot in the door. Our thanks to Kathleen for sharing her story with us.
June 27, 2020
A new report examines how five related APT groups operating in the interest of the Chinese government have systematically targeted Linux servers, Windows systems and Android mobile devices while remaining undetected for nearly a decade. The report comes on the heels of the U.S. Department of Justice announcing several high-profile indictments from over 1,000 open FBI investigations into economic espionage as part of the DOJ’s China Initiative. Joining us in this week's Research Saturday to discuss the report is Eric Cornelius of Blackberry.  The research can be found here:  Decade of the RATs: Novel APT Attacks Targeting Linux, Windows and Android Thanks to our sponsor, Reservoir Labs. 
June 26, 2020
This is an extended interview of our conversation with Camille Stewart and Lauren Zabierek originally aired in our daily podcast 06/26/2020.  In response to anti-black racism and the deaths of countless black people, the country and the world are standing up against systemic racism in response. Many in the cybersecurity community have been searching for ways to amplify the voices of black and brown practitioners in the national security/foreign policy space. Inspired by the ShareTheMic campaign on Instagram, Camille Stewart  (@CamilleEsq on Twitter) and Lauren Zabierek (@LZXDC on Twitter)  have teamed up to launch the ShareTheMicInCyber Twitter campaign. On June 26, 2020, prominent members of the cybersecurity community will spend the day tweeting about a Black cybersecurity practitioner.  More info on Sharethemicincyber  Camille Stewart's essay 
June 26, 2020
Microsoft urges Exchange server patching. Sure it does your taxes, but it’s got another agenda, too: the GoldenSpy backdoor may be in your tax software if you do business in China. Magecart ups its game. DDoSecrets says they’re not going to roll over for Twitter’s “Nixonian” schtick. Camille Stewart from Google and Lauren Zabierek from Harvard’s Belfer Center on the #Sharethemicincyber event and why systemic racism is a threat to cybersecurity. Rick Howard wraps up cybersecurity canon week with guests Richard Clarke and Robert Knake, authors of The Fifth Domain. And there’s another unsecured Amazon S3 bucket, and this exposure could present a serious risk to some people who already have trouble enough. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/124 - More info on the #Sharethemicincyber event. - Camille Stewart's essay on systemic racism in cyber.
June 25, 2020
Akamai’s report on the record-setting DDoS attack it stopped this week. Glupteba GLOOP-tib-yeh and Lucifer malware strains described. Apple and Google move their defaults in the direction of greater privacy. The US designates Huawei and Hikvision as controlled by China’s military. A superseding indictment in Julian Assange’s case. The EU looks at GDPR and likes what it sees. REvil gets ready to sell stolen data. David Dufour from Webroot with tips on navigating new workplace realities. Our guest is David Sanger, author of The Perfect Weapon - War, Sabotage, and Fear in the Cyber Age. And the Navy recruiting campaign that wasn’t. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/123
June 24, 2020
Twitter permanently suspends DDoSecrets for violating its policy with respect to hacked material. DDoSecrets explains its thinking with respect to BlueLeaks. A quick look at a Hidden Cobra hunt. Sino-Australian dispute over hacking may be moving into a trade war phase. Lessons on election management. What do cybercriminals watch when they binge-watch? Joe Carrigan explains the Ripple 20 vulnerabilities. Cybersecurity Canon week continues with Joseph Menn, author of Cult of the Dead Cow: How the Original Hacking Supergroup Might Just Save the World. And some notes on the most malware-infested movie and television fan communities. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/122
June 23, 2020
International conflicts and disputes are attended by hacking in South Asia, Australia, and Africa. The US designates four Chinese media outlets as foreign missions, that is, propaganda outfits. Sodinokibi ransomware sniffs at paycard and point-of-sale systems. Ben Yelin on TSA’s facial recognition program. Cybersecurity Canon Week continues with our guest is Bill Bonney, Co-Author of CISO Desk Reference Guide. And Evil Corp is back, apparently because you just can’t keep a bad man down. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/121
June 22, 2020
BlueLeaks dumps stolen police files online. A report of spyware delivered via network injection. COVID-19 apps and databases are reported to have indifferent privacy safeguards, and there’s been one big recent leak. India and Australia both on alert for Chinese cyberattacks. Our own Rick Howard on intelligence operations. It’s cybersecurity Canon Week, our guest is Todd Fitzgerald, author of CISO Compass. And New Zealand piles on in the case of a Russian alt-coin baron. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/120
June 21, 2020
Johannes Ullrich relays his experiences from studying the hard sciences to his career shift to cybersecurity. Basic principles, superhero origin stories, physics labs and radiation all figure in. And there’s a lot in common with network security best practices. Have a listen to what Johannes has learned and what he hopes to impart on his students.  Our thanks to Johannes for sharing his story with us. 
June 20, 2020
Slack is a cloud-based messaging platform that is commonly used in workplace communications. Slack Incoming Webhooks allow you to post messages from your applications to Slack. Generally, Slack webhooks are considered a low risk integration. A deeper dive into webhooks shows that this is not entirely accurate.  Joining us in this week's Research Saturday is Ashley Graves from AT&T Cybersecurity's Alien Labs to discuss her research.  The research can be found here:  Slack phishing attacks using webhooks The CyberWire's Research Saturday is presented by Juniper Networks. Thanks to our sponsor Enveil, closing the last gap in data security.
June 19, 2020
A look at the “state-based cyber actor” the Australian government is concerned about. Some signs of Chinese retaliation for Five Eyes’ skepticism of Huawei. Johannes Ullrich explains malware triggering multiple signatures in anti-malware products. Our guest is Geoff White, author of Crime Dot Com, on how he tracked down the creator of the Love Bug. And an alert about the possibility of some COVID-19-themed fraud from the Lazarus Group. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/119
June 18, 2020
Sino-Indian conflict extends to cyberspace. InvisiMole connected to Gamaredon. Spyware found in Chrome extensions. Phishing around technical defenses (and some criminal use of captchas). The US Justice Department releases its study of Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. Zully Ramzan from RSA on privacy and security in a post-COVID world. Our guest is Michael Powell from NCTA on the importance of the UK cybersecurity sector. And Zoom decides to make end-to-end encryption generally available. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/118
June 17, 2020
Ripple20 vulnerabilities are reported in the IoT software supply chain. North Korean operators go for intelligence, but also for cash, and they’re phishing in LinkedIn’s pond. Sino-Indian tensions find expression in cyberspace. A long look at the Russian influence operation, Secondary Infektion. Joe Carrigan from JHU ISI on why older adults share more misinformation online. Our guest Will LaSala from OneSpan tracks the increase in online banking fraud during COVID-19. And the strange case of the bloggers who angered eBay may have more indictments on the way. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/117
June 16, 2020
What does Beijing want to know about US Presidential campaigns? Position papers, mostly. A redacted version of the CIA’s inquiry into the WikiLeaks Vault 7 material is out. That DDoS attack you read about on Twitter? Never happened. Former eBay employees face Federal charges of conspiracy to commit cyberstalking and witness tampering. Ben Yelin explains a judge refusing to sign off on a potential Facebook facial recognition settlement. Our guest is Randy Vanderhoof from the Secure Technology Alliance on mobile drivers licenses. And where would you store “niche” dating app material? In a misconfigured AWS S3 bucket. Where else? For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/116
June 15, 2020
A new Android spyware tool is deployed against China’s Uyghur minority. Anonymous claims it disrupted the Atlanta Police Department’s website yesterday to protest a police shooting. An apparently legitimate security firm has apparently been selling malware to criminals. Breachstortion joins sextortion as a criminal tactic. Craig Williams from Cisco Talos on Astaroth, an information-stealer that has been targeting Brazil, Our own Rick Howard on risk assessments. And why spelling always counts. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/115
June 14, 2020
Each week we step inside the diverse and fascinating worlds of cybersecurity professionals around the globe and hear their personal stories in their own words. This will be a regular feature in our daily feed, but it will also have it's own feed wherever all the fine podcasts can be found.  This week, we hear from Tom Quinn as he takes us from his first experience with modern computers in the military to his current role as a CISO. It's important to understand how the technology works, but it's also important to understand how people work. And, to make a difference. Our thanks to Tom for sharing his story with us. 
June 13, 2020
Proactive, efficient threat mitigation and risk management require understanding adversaries’ fundamental thought processes, not just their tools and methods. Cyber threat intelligence analysts combed through 15 years (2004 to 2019) of public sources that have documented the activities of one prolific threat actor, Russia’s military intelligence agency, the GRU. Analysis shows that the timing, targets, and impacts of this activity mirrored Russian strategic concerns about specific events and developments.  Joining us in this week's Research Saturday are Brad Stone & Nate Beach-Westmoreland from Booz Allen Hamilton to discuss their report and some of the 33 case studies presented in it. The research can be found here:  Bearing Witness: Uncovering the Logic Behind Russian Military Cyber Operations The CyberWire's Research Saturday is presented by GDIT. Thanks to our sponsor, Reservoir Labs. 
June 12, 2020
Twitter’s transparency efforts see through accounts being run by Chinese, Russian, and Turkish actors. Zoom is working to both comply with Chinese law and contain the reputational damage involved in doing so. Industrial firms recover from Ekans infestations. Caleb Barlow from CynergisTek on how hospital CISOs are dealing with the COVID-19 situation. Our guest is Ronald Eddings from Palo Alto Networks and the Hacker Valley Studio Podcast on strategies for finding and managing security architects. And it’s not Posh Spice who’s got the attention of Maze; it’s just her M&A advisors. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/114
June 11, 2020
The Gamaredon Group is back, and what’s their secret? Like Crazy Eddie’s, it’s volume! Doxing during times of unrest. Phoney contact-tracing apps are snooping on personal information in at least ten countries. Thanos is a criminal favorite in the ransomware-as-a-service market. Another skirmish in the Crypto Wars is brewing up on Capitol Hill. David Dufour from Webroot on how organizations can successfully navigate their new workplace realities. Our guest is Chester Wisniewski from Sophos on fleeceware apps found in the Apple app store. And no, really, Elon Musk is not on YouTube offering you Bitcoin. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/113
June 10, 2020
Notes on Patch Tuesday--it was a fairly big one this time. Honda continues its investigation of the incident it sustained over the weekend, and outsiders see it as a ransomware attack. Facebook is said to have developed a Tails zero-day to help the FBI with a notorious case. Crooks are turning to search engine optimization. IBM and Google cloud services recovered quickly from outages. You’re unlikely to get rich from a breach settlement. Joe Carrigan describes free online courseware aimed at Community College students. Our guest is Dennis Toomey from BAE on how financial institutions need to enact stronger cyber protocols as employees migrate to working from home. And BellTroX says, hey, it was just helping some private eyes. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/112
June 9, 2020
Commercialized hacking-for-hire is traced to an Indian firm, but it’s probably not an isolated problem. Ransomware shuts down Honda production lines in three continents. Criminals develop and distribute an anti-DDoS tool to help keep the dark web souks responsive and available. Ben Yelin revisits Twitter’s flagging or removing the U.S. President’s tweets. Our guest is Jeremy Oddo from The Third Floor to discuss cybersecurity in Hollywood during COVID-19. And researchers compile a menu of cyber contraband. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/111
June 8, 2020
South and Southwest Asian regional rivalries play out in cyberspace. Election interference could move from disruptive influence operations to actual vote manipulation. Someone is spearphishing leaders in Germany’s PPE task force. Nations move to restrict dependence on foreign companies in their infrastructure. Justin Harvey from Accenture on the train of thought behind breach disclosure. Our own Rick Howard on DevSecOps. And Washington State recovers some, but not all, of the unemployment funds lost to fraud. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/110
June 7, 2020
Introducing the newest podcast in the CyberWire family - Career Notes.  Each week we’re going to step inside the diverse and fascinating worlds of cybersecurity professionals around the globe and hear their personal stories in their own words. This will be a regular feature in our daily feed, but it will also have it's own feed wherever all the fine podcasts can be found.  Our thanks to Tracy Maleeff for sharing her story with us. 
June 6, 2020
Earlier this year, a Virgin Media database containing the personal details of 900,000 people was discovered to be unsecured and accessible online for 10 months. The breach was discovered by researchers at the security firm TurgenSec. This breach had major implications under GDPR.  Joining us in this week's Research Saturday are George Punter and Peter Hansen from TurgenSec to talk about the discovery of the breach.  The research can be found here:  Virgin Media Disclosure Statement & Resources The CyberWire's Research Saturday is presented by Juniper Networks. Thanks to our sponsor Enveil, closing the last gap in data security.
June 5, 2020
It’s mostly cyberespionage today, with an admixture of influence operations. Google has warned both major US Presidential campaigns that Chinese and Iranian intelligence services are after their staffers’ email accounts, so far apparently without much success. Russia, China, and Iran devote some purposive media attention to US civil unrest. Johannes Ullrich from SANS on malicious PowerPoint add-ins. Our guest is Bil Harmer from SecureAuth on credential carelessness. And Qatar’s rivals in the Gulf continue their information campaign against Doha: this time it’s bogus news of a coup. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/109
June 4, 2020
Nuisance-level hacktivism continues to surround US protests. The Higaisa APT is active in Southeast Asia. Goblin Panda is back, with USB-borne malware. A new strain of ransomware is described: “Tycoon.” The EU considers whether to sanction Russia over the GRU’s hack of Germany’s Bundestag. CISA launches a new public resource for cybersecurity. Zulfikar Ramzan from RSA on cybersecurity and digital risk in the context of pandemics. Our guest is Grant Goodes from GuardSquare on security of mobile app voting. And a Texas man pleads guilty to conspiracy to commit money-laundering in the course of a BEC scam. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/108
June 3, 2020
Protest groups sustain DDoS attacks, too. Old school denial-of-service afflicts police radio networks in Chicago: they’re being jammed with talk, music, and other noise. Influencers and wannabes continue to use unrest as an occasion for on-line branding. The Sodinokibi gang is selling data stolen in ransomware attacks, and Maze seems to be establishing a criminal cartel. Is email to voting what shadow IT is to the enterprise? Ben Yelin describes a federal case involving police screenshots of a suspects’ phone as evidence. Our guest is Steve Durbin from the Information Security Forum on the Threat Horizon 2022 report. And cybercrime for dummies. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/107
June 2, 2020
Unrest accompanied by misinformation, disinformation, and Anonymous theater. Booter hacktivism. Extremist inauthenticity. The Cyberspace Solarium Commission releases its white paper on the pandemic’s lessons for cybersecurity. Joe Carrigan unpacks Casio executing a DMCA takedown on a hardware hack. Our guest is Herb Stapleton from the FBI on the 20 year anniversary of the IC3. And the UK’s Test and Trace system is expected to be accompanied by a wave of fraud. Actually, that fraud has already begun. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/106
June 1, 2020
Hacking, and more claims of hacking, surround the unrest in Minnesota. Data breach at Amtrak Guest Rewards. More companies found port scanning. Four cybersecurity lessons from the pandemic. David Dufour from Webroot with an overview of online scams his team is tracking during COVID-19, Our own Rick Howard compares resiliency with business continuity. And a new 5G device is not only holographic, but quantum oscillatin’ too. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/105
May 31, 2020
In this episode of CyberWire-X, Rick Howard, the CyberWire’s Chief Analyst, interviews security thought leaders on the strategy and tactics to extend the security controls we’ve typically used to protect our handful of remote employees in the past to today, during the pandemic, that requires us to deploy flexible but equivalent controls at scale to everybody in the organization. Joining us is Bob Turner, CISO of the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Later in the program, we will hear from Mounir Hahad, the head of Threat Labs, and Mike Spanbauer, a security evangelist, at Juniper Networks, the sponsor of the show.   Thanks to our sponsor, Juniper Networks. 
May 30, 2020
Working with many different honeypot implementations, a security researcher did an experiment expanding on that setting up a simple docker image with SSH, running a guessable root password. The catch? What happened in the next 24 hours was unexpected. Joining us in this week's Research Saturday to talk about his experiment is Larry Cashdollar of Akamai.  The research can be found here:  A Brief History of a Rootable Docker Image Thanks to our sponsor, Reservoir Labs. 
May 29, 2020
NSA warns that the GRU’s Sandworm outfit has been actively exploiting a known vulnerability in Exim. Someone is attacking industrial targets in Japan and Europe using steganography and other evasive tactics. NTT Communications is breached, and Michigan State University sustains a ransomware attack. Ben Yelin unpacks the President’s executive order aimed at social media companies. Our guest is Vik Arora of the Hospital for Special Surgery on protecting health care organizations during COVID-19. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/104
May 28, 2020
Hackers-for-hire find criminal work during the pandemic. The US Department of Energy is said to have taken possession of a Chinese-manufactured transformer. US President Trump may be considering an Executive Order about the legal status of social media. Contact-tracing apps in France and the UK are scrutinized for privacy. Ben Yelin from with the latest iPhone cracking case between the FBI and Apple. Our guest is retired CIA master of disguise Jonna Mendez on her book The Moscow Rules. Canada’s Centre for Cyber Security assesses current risks, and Huawei’s CFO loses a round in a Vancouver court. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/103
May 27, 2020
Berserk Bear is back, and snuffling around Germany’s infrastructure. Two new Android issues surface. India opens up the source code for its COVID-19 contact-tracing app as such technological adjuncts to public health continue to arouse privacy concerns. [F]Unicorn poses as Italy’s Immuni app. An alleged FIN7 gangster is arrested. Australia’s Data61 urges companies not to scrimp on R&D. Joe Carrigan on Android mobile malware getting new features. Our guest is Frederick “Flee” Lee from Gusto on CCPA. And does your underwear come with a Faraday cage? We thought it might. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/102
May 26, 2020
Turla tunes its tools. The commodity Trojan AnarchyGrabber is now stealing passwords. A new iOS jailbreak has been released. The UK reconsiders its decision to allow Huawei into its 5G networks. A tech group lobbies the US House against warrantless inspection of searches. Remote work’s regulatory risk. COVID-19 conspiracy theories. Hackers say they’re vigilantes. Our own Rick Howard on intrusion kill chains, his latest episode of CSO Perspectives. Our guest is Nico Fischbach from Forcepoint on deepfakes expanding outside of disinformation campaigns to the enterprise. And too many remote workers appear to have too much time on their hands. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/101
May 23, 2020
In December 2019, the GOLD VILLAGE threat group that operates the Maze ransomware created a public website to name and shame victims. The threat actors used the website to dump data they exfiltrated from victims' networks before they deployed the ransomware. Secureworks Counter Threat Unit (CTU) researchers have observed several ransomware operators following suit. Joining us in this week's Research Saturday is Alex Tilley of SecureWorks' Counter Threat Unit.  The CyberWire's Research Saturday is presented by Juniper Networks. Thanks to our sponsor Enveil, closing the last gap in data security.
May 22, 2020
Indonesia’s election database has leaked, and PII is for sale in the dark web. Phishing campaigns abuse Firebase. The Shiny Hunters are selling Mathway user records. US agencies warn of COVID-19-themed criminal campaigns. Contact tracing technology hits a rough patch. Johannes Ullrich from SANS on phishing PDFs with incremental updates. Our guest is author Peter Singer on his new book, Burn-In. And what are you going to do when you return to the workplace? If, that is, you’ve left the workplace at all, and if you’re in fact ever going to return? For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/100
May 21, 2020
Website defacements in Israel may be hacktivist work. Iranian cyberespionage against Saudi Arabia and Kuwait. The latest evolution of ZeuS. The Winnti Group is still hacking, and it still likes stealing in-game commodities. Contact tracing during the pandemic proves harder than many thought it would be. Economic trends for the security sector as it prepares to emerge from the general state of emergency. Caleb Barlow wonders if GDPR may have unintended consequences for stopping COVID-19 scammers. Gabriel Bassett from Verizon on the 2020 DBIR. And if you’re looking for qualified workers, follow the layoff news. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/98
May 20, 2020
Cyber spies steal prototype missile data. Others hack into South Asian telecoms, and still others go after easyJet passengers’ travel data. Cyberattacks, misinformation, and cyber fraud continue to follow the COVID-19 pandemic. Joe Carrigan weighs in on the Thunderspy vulnerability. Our guest is James Dawson with insights on DMARK threats and why it’s worse during COVID-19. And think twice before you post, no matter how good or bad you think the beer is. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/98
May 19, 2020
Foreign intelligence services attribute a recent cyberattack on an Iranian port to Israeli operators. EasyJet discloses a breach of passenger information. Verizon’s annual Data Breach Report is out, and it finds more errors than it does exploits. A look at the Dark Web during the pandemic. US authorities warn local law enforcement to watch for misinformation-driven telecom vandalism. Ben Yelin explains why the ACLU is suing Baltimore over a surveillance plane. Our guest is Robb Reck from Ping Identity on a recent CISO Advisory Council meeting regarding the sudden shift to working from home. And REvil is still offering celebrity dirt for sale...if they’ve actually got any. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://www.thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/97
May 18, 2020
European supercomputers were hacked by cryptominers. UK electrical power distributor recovers from its cyberattack. A database containing personal data related to the EU Parliament is found exposed. REvil says it’s got the celebrity goods, but has yet to show its hand. The US and China move into a new round of trade and security conflict. Justin Harvey shares insights on how companies are adjusting to the new remote working environment and the impacts to their security posture. Our guest is Ehsan Foroughi from SecurityCompass on compliance issues. And catphishing with some pretty implausible impersonations of US Army generals. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/96
May 16, 2020
Section 52, CyberX’s threat intelligence team, has uncovered an ongoing industrial cyberespionage campaign targeting hundreds of manufacturing and other industrial firms primarily located in South Korea. CyberX has identified more than 200 compromised systems from this campaign, including one belonging to a multi-billion dollar Korean conglomerate that manufactures critical infrastructure equipment such as heavy equipment for power transmission and distribution facilities, renewable energy, chemical plants, welding, and construction. Joining us in this week's Research Saturday is Phil Neray, one of the authors of this report.  The research can be found here: Gangnam Industrial Style: APT Campaign Targets Korean Industrial Companies Thanks to our sponsor, Reservoir Labs. 
May 15, 2020
More malware designed for air-gapped systems. A British utility sustains a ransomware attack. The US Cyberspace Solarium Commission sees lessons in the pandemic for cybersecurity. Contact-tracing technologies take a step back,maybe a step or two forward. Rob Lee from Dragos comparing the state of ICS security around the world, our guest is Ian Pitt from LogMeIn on lessons learned working remotely during COVID-19. Criminals increase ransomware attacks on hospitals, and swap templates to impersonate government relief agencies. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/95
May 14, 2020
ARCHER goes offline after a security incident. Scammers smish victims with bogus contact-tracing messages. Ramsay malware goes after air-gapped systems. Ako ransomware now places a surcharge on deletion of stolen data. Google boots creepware apps with the help of the CreepRank algorithm. Johannes Ullrich explains that when it comes to malicious binaries bypassing anti-malware filters, size matters. Our guest is Pat Craven, Director of the Center for Cyber Safety and Education on the security social media apps. And kooky 5G conspiracists go after cell towers in the US. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/93
May 13, 2020
Ransomware continues to steal personal information. Notes on Patch Tuesday--and please, by all means patch. The FBI says it’s investigating cyberespionage directed against COVID-19 researchers (and US officials see direct data corruption in espionage). And the AI doesn’t really know what to make of us any more. Joe Carrigan from JHU ISI on Twitter’s response to 5G related Coronavirus conspiracy theories, our guest is Chris Cochran from Netflix on the importance of personal health and safety. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/93
May 12, 2020
Unattributed cyberattacks in an Iranian port prompt speculation that a broader cyberwar in the Middle East may be in the offing. CISA releases malware analysis reports on North Korea’s Hidden Cobra. Astaroth malware grows more evasive (and it was already pretty good at hiding). Texas courts sustain a ransomware attack. COVID-19 espionage warnings are on the way. Twitter’s misinformation warning system. Ben Yelin describes a Fourth Amendment case on automated license plate reader (ALPR) databases. Our guest is Brian Dye from Corelight on dealing with encrypted traffic without compromising privacy. And taking down Plandemic’s trailer. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/newsletters/daily-briefing/9/92
May 11, 2020
A cyberattack with kinetic effect. Shiny Hunters post more stolen wares online. Thunderspy and evil maids. Some developing background to the US bulk power state-of-emergency Executive Order. Contact tracing apps: reliability, privacy, security, familiarity, and rates of adoption all raise questions. The economic consequences of the pandemic emergency. Caleb Barlow from CynergisTek on Alan Brunacini’s concept of an Incident Action Plan, our guest is James Yeager from CrowdStrike on their Global Threat Report. And the reappearance of the yellow press in social media. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/issues/issues2020/May/CyberWire_2020_05_11.html
May 11, 2020
This week's CSO Perspectives is the first in a series of shows about cybersecurity strategy. Rick Howard discusses the concept of first principles as an organizing principle and how the technique can be applied to cybersecurity to build a foundational wall of infosec practices that are so fundamental as to be self-evident; so elementary that no expert in the field can argue against them; so crucial to our understanding that without them, the infrastructure that holds our accepted best practice disintegrates like sand castles against the watery tide.
May 9, 2020
Multiple media reports have indicated that the United States’ (U.S.) 2020 general election could be targeted by foreign and domestic actors after the successful cyber and misinformation attacks during the 2016 general election. The responsibility of secure and ethical online campaigning has become a central issue in the 2020 election. In some cases, it has become part of candidate platforms. Joining us in this week's Research Saturday is Paul Gagliardi from Security Scorecard, discussing their recent report detailing the cybersecurity of the 2020 Presidential race.  The research can be found here: 2020 Democratic Presidential Candidates Get Smart to Cybersecurity Report The CyberWire's Research Saturday is presented by Juniper Networks. Thanks to our sponsor Enveil, closing the last gap in data security.
May 8, 2020
Naikon has returned from four years in the shadows to snoop around the shores of the South China Sea. Tencent trains censorship algorithms on WeChat. Snake ransomware is back, making its way through the healthcare sector. Seeing Charming Kitten's pawprints in World Health Organization networks. Voting security during (or even after) a pandemic. Malek Ben Salem from Accenture on their Technology Vision report, our guest is Thomas Rid from Johns Hopkins University on his book, Active Measures. And unemployed workers are offered gigs as money mules. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/issues/issues2020/May/CyberWire_2020_05_08.html
May 7, 2020
A new Monero miner is out and about. Hidden Cobra is pushing a RAT through a Trojanized two-factor authentication app. The rise and fall of a botnet. Markets, criminal and legitimate, react to the pandemic. Ransomware hits Taiwan. Remcos is resurgent. Michael Sechrist from BAH on where things are headed with ransomware, our guest is Rachael Stockton from LastPass on their Psychology of Passwords report. And, despite what you saw on Twitter when you were “doing your own research,” 5G does not cause COVID-19, and telecom repair crews are not agents of the Illuminati. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/issues/issues2020/May/CyberWire_2020_05_07.html
May 6, 2020
Facebook reports on the coordinated inauthenticity it took down in April. Investigations into COVID-19’s origins continue, as does medical espionage. Contact tracing’s challenges. Joe Carrigan from JHU ISI on recent flaws in antivirus products, our guests are Laura Deimling and Courtney Wandeloski from Down To Staff on interviewing tips for employees and hiring managers. And European police take down the BlackInfinity credential traffickers. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/issues/issues2020/May/CyberWire_2020_05_06.html
May 5, 2020
A pretty Fancy Bear hunt in Germany. A new IoT botnet surfaces. Cryptojackers exploit a Salt bug. Bribing an insider as a way to get personal data. The UK’s NCSC and the US CISA issue a joint warning about campaigns directed against institutions working on a response to COVID-19. Britain’s contact tracing app starts its trial on the Isle of Wight. Ben Yelin from UMD CHHS on AI inventions and their pending patents, our guest is Matt Glenn from Illumio on why companies should break up with their firewalls. And don’t get puppy scammed--you’re looking for wags in all the wrong places. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/issues/issues2020/May/CyberWire_2020_05_05.html
May 4, 2020
A US Executive Order on Securing the United States Bulk-Power System declares a state of emergency in electricity generation and distribution. China’s disinformation about COVID-19 may have begun in the earliest stages of the pandemic. Someone’s hacking for information on British biomedical research. Xiaomi seems very interested in users of its phones. Andrea Little Limbago on global privacy trends, our guest is Mathew Newfield from Unisys with insights on cybersecurity breaches. And the Love Bug’s creator is found. For links to all of today's stories check out our CyberWire daily news brief: https://thecyberwire.com/issues/issues2020/May/CyberWire_2020_05_04.html
May 2, 2020
Passwords are the traditional authentication methods for computers and networks. But passwords can be stolen. Biometric authentication seems the perfect solution for that problem. Our guest today is Craig Williams, director of Talos outreach at Cisco. He'll be discussing and providing insights into their report which shows that fingerprints are good enough to protect the average person's privacy if they lose their phone. However, a person that is likely to be targeted by a well-funded and motivated actor should not use fingerprint authentication. The research can be found here: Fingerprint cloning: Myth or reality? The CyberWire's Research Saturday is presented by Juniper Networks. Thanks to our sponsor Enveil, closing the last gap in data security.
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