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April 2, 2020
In this episode, the NPR team talks through the lastest weekly unemployment numbers report and what the government is doing to help those out of work.
April 1, 2020
In this episode, the team talks through the coronavirus outbreak response in Tennessee and Colorado as governors figure out the best way to combat the pandemic.
March 31, 2020
Should abortion count as an essential medical service during the coronavirus outbreak? States disagree, prompting court fights. And lawmakers differ on what a fourth round of rescue legislation should look like. This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and national correspondent Sarah McCammon.
March 30, 2020
In this episode, the NPR team discusses the latest White House coronavirus outbreak guidance, which extends social distancing measures through April.
March 27, 2020
A record number of Americans filed for unemployment benefits for the first time last week as the coronavirus hammered the economy. It's nearly five times the levels seen during the Great Recession. Plus, President Trump has hit his highest approval rating since becoming president – 47%, according to an average of the polls. That's an increase of nearly 3 points over the last two weeks. This episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, chief economic correspondent Scott Horsley, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.
March 26, 2020
In this episode, the NPR team breaks down how the coronavirus outbreak has changed the nature of running for office.
March 25, 2020
In this episode, the NPR team breaks down what is in the coronavirus emergency relief bill, which could pass the Senate as soon as Wednesday.
March 24, 2020
In this episode, the NPR team breaks down the last sticking points holding up a deal on a multi-trillion dollar coronavirus aid package.
March 23, 2020
In this episode, the NPR team discusses the tense Senate negotiations as the body attempts to pass a massive coronavirus aid package.
March 20, 2020
In this episode, the NPR team breaks down the draft stimulus package in the Senate and the allegations of financial impropriety against Sen. Richard Burr.
March 19, 2020
In this episode, the NPR team breaks down the announcement of possible treatments for the coronavirus and the severe economic impacts of the outbreak.
March 18, 2020
In this episode, the NPR team breaks down the latest measures proposed by Congress and the Trump administration to combat the spread and economic impacts of the coronavirus.
March 18, 2020
In this episode, the NPR team discusses how the coronavirus is impacting the primary calendar and Joe Biden's growing lead in the Democratic nominating contest.
March 16, 2020
In this episode, the NPR team talks about the new coronavirus advisory issued by the White House and how Tuesday's primaries will be shaped by the outbreak.
March 16, 2020
Former Vice President Joe Biden made big news, committing to have a woman as his running mate. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders said it would be his "strong tendency." Biden and Sanders started Sunday night's debate with an elbow bump and responded to the coronavirus crisis. They got into detailed arguments over their records on a range of issues, from bankruptcy to immigration.This episode: political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, political correspondent Asma Khalid, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.
March 13, 2020
President Trump declared a national emergency Friday afternoon amid growing concern about the coronavirus outbreak across the United States. The move, widely expected, frees up $50 billion for states to deal with the crisis. This week former Vice President Joe Biden and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders both criticized President Trump for his handling of the pandemic. The virus has now reshaped how candidates will campaign ahead of the next round of primaries only days away.This episode: Congressional correspondents Susan Davis and Kelsey Snell, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and political correspondents Scott Detrow and Asma Khalid.
March 12, 2020
Speaker Nancy Pelosi said the House will vote Thursday on a package of measures to address the coronavirus despite pushback from the top House Republican that the bill "comes up short." This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez.
March 12, 2020
In remarks from the Oval Office Wednesday night, President Trump announced actions aimed at curbing the spread and economic downfall of coronavirus, which the World Health Organization has classified as a pandemic. The efforts include a ban on travel from European countries to the United States in addition to proposals attempting to ease the financial strain on workers and businesses. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, science correspondent Richard Harris and chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley.
March 11, 2020
In this episode, the NPR team considers why Bernie Sanders is continuing his campaign despite facing long odds of winning the Democratic presidential nomination.
March 11, 2020
In this episode, the NPR team makes sense of decisive wins that all but assure Joe Biden the Democratic presidential nomination.
March 9, 2020
In this episode, NPR reporters discuss the stock slide that halted trading Monday and what is at stake in Tuesday's six primary contests, including Michigan.
March 6, 2020
In this weekly roundup episode, the NPR team talks about the Trump administration's response to the coronavirus and an abortion case before the Supreme Court.
March 5, 2020
Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren ended her bid for the presidency on Thursday, marking the end of a campaign that once rocketed Warren to front runner-status. In her exit speech, Warren acknowledged "all those little girls who are gonna have to wait four more years" for a woman to have a shot at the presidency. Her exit raises questions about why, with a historic number of women running for president, the only seemingly viable candidates remaining are white men.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.
March 4, 2020
In this episode, NPR reporters analyze Super Tuesday results to understand the types of voters supporting the campaigns of Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders.
March 4, 2020
Joe Biden tops the polls in 8 states on Super Tuesday, including wins in Minnesota and Massachusetts. Bernie Sanders leads in 4 states, including California.
March 2, 2020
NPR's reporters have been following Democratic presidential hopefuls around the country for months. We check in with the team ahead of Tuesday's key primaries.
March 1, 2020
In his third presidential campaign in as many decades, Joe Biden has won his first state primary. Does he have the momentum to overcome Bernie Sanders on Tuesday?
February 28, 2020
As the stock market falls, how is Donald Trump responding to coronavirus? And here's what to know about Joe Biden's chances in tomorrow's South Carolina primary.
February 27, 2020
As part of our Where Voters Are series, NPR's Ari Shapiro and Colorado Public Radio's Bente Birkeland share their reporting from Pueblo, Colorado.Over the next several months, NPR will feature stories from eight communities around the country as our reporters embed in the community to report on the wide array of issues that will shape voters' choices this election cycle. This episode: congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, All Things Considered host Ari Shapiro, and Colorado Public Radio reporter Bente Birkeland.
February 26, 2020
While the Trump administration attempts to project an air of calm, government health officials warned the spread of coronavirus in the U.S. could be inevitable.
February 26, 2020
In a chaotic CBS debate in South Carolina, candidates of all stripes attacked Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders as he continues to pull away from the pack. He faced questions about his praise for educational advancements in Cuba under the Castro regime and the cost of his domestic policy proposals.Former New York City Mike Bloomberg once again faced criticism for his comments toward women. Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren accused him of telling an employee to terminate her pregnancy, which Bloomberg denies.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, demographics and culture correspondent Juana Summers, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.
February 24, 2020
Moderate presidential hopefuls face a collective action problem—each wants to see voters rally behind one alternative to Bernie Sanders, but (so far) none are willing to quit the race in order to make it happen.And while Joe Biden was once the uncontested front-runner in South Carolina, lavish spending by Tom Steyer and an uptick in attention from the Sanders campaign means that Biden's chances aren't what they once were. This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, senior political editor-correspondents Domenico Montanaro and Ron Elving.
February 23, 2020
Senator Bernie Sanders is the projected winner of the Nevada caucus, according the Associated Press."In Nevada, we have just put together a multi-generational, multiracial coalition, which is going to not only win in Nevada, it's going to sweep this country," Sanders boasted at a rally in San Antonio, Texas, shortly after news outlets reported his caucus win. Former South Bend, Ind., mayor Pete Buttigieg warned that nominating Sanders could cost Democrats seats in down-ticket races.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, campaign correspondents Asma Khalid and Scott Detrow.
February 21, 2020
As Nevada prepares for tomorrow's caucus, state party officials express confidence that it will run more smoothly that Iowa's caucus. Also, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has prioritized engaging Latino voters in the state and that effort appears to be paying off with younger voters there. This episode: congressional correspondent Scott Detrow and political reporters Claudia Grisales and Miles Parks.
February 20, 2020
Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg hit the campaign trail in Salt Lake City, Utah today after a debate performance that some say left him bruised. Meanwhile, Roger Stone — President Trump's longtime friend and political adviser — was sentenced to more than three years in prison amid uproar about what critics call Trump's interference in the justice system.This episode: Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
February 20, 2020
This is a special episode, recorded in front of a live audience at Kavli Theatre in Thousand Oaks, California. The cast recaps the ninth Democratic primary debate, in which candidates turned up the heat ahead of this weekend's Nevada caucuses. Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg — a newcomer to the 2020 debate stage — was a top target for attacks, from allegations of sexual harassment to his billionaire status.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, demographics and culture correspondent Juana Summers and senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
February 18, 2020
Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg will appear on Wednesday's debate stage in Nevada, after qualifying in this morning's NPR/PBS Newshour/Marist poll. He is likely to draw attacks from Democrats on stage for his campaign's unprecedented ad spending that enabled his rise in the polls.And Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders has opened up a double-digit lead in the Democratic nominating contest with 31% support nationally, up 9 points since December.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.
February 17, 2020
This President's Day we're bringing you a special episode from NPR's Throughline. It's a podcast that looks at the past in order to understand the present. This episode the team looks at the history of women running for president of the United State.There are more female candidates in this presidential campaign cycle than at any other time in American history. But women were running for the highest office before they could even vote. How three women ran and challenged the notion of who could and should be president of the United States. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
February 14, 2020
Attorney General William Barr asked President Trump to stop his social media commentary on Thursday after the flap over the case involving Trump's adviser Roger Stone. The next day Trump tweeted in response.Plus, with impeachment over Democrats and Republicans in Congress map out what future investigations may look like. This episode: political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, Justice correspondent Ryan Lucas, political reporter Tim Mak, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and Senior Political Editor and Correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
February 13, 2020
Joe Biden's theory of the case is that his current support among black voters will lead to success in Nevada and South Carolina. That, in turn, he hopes will propel him to victory in the Super Tuesday contests in early March.Michael Bloomberg, along with other candidates, hope to earn the support of black voters and erode Biden's base. For Bloomberg, his past remarks about black men and crime, "stop-and-frisk" policing, and housing discrimination could make that difficult.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, demographics and culture correspondent Juana Summers, and national political correspondent Don Gonyea.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
February 12, 2020
Hours after the Justice Department intervened to seek a shorter sentence for Roger Stone, the four federal prosecutors who secured his conviction withdrew from the case.Stone was convicted in November on charges of lying to Congress, obstructing its investigation and witness tampering. Judge Amy Berman Jackson has the ultimate authority to hand down the sentence in his case.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, Justice Department correspondent Ryan Lucas, and White House correspondent Tamara Keith.More from the NPR Politics Team:Scott Detrow on Short Wave, NPR's daily science podcast, talking about where leading Democratic presidential contenders stand on climate policy.Danielle Kurtzleben on NPR's Throughline, discussing the history of women running for president of the United States.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
February 12, 2020
Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has narrowly won the New Hampshire Democratic primary, as moderate voters split their voters between other candidates.Former South Bend, Ind., mayor Pete Buttigieg and Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar both had strong showings in New Hampshire. The state's electorate is considerably older and whiter than that of the nearly all of the remaining contests. Despite this result, both candidates face an uphill climb to the nomination because of a dearth of support from voters of color.Former Vice President Joe Biden and Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren both under-performed expectations. Neither secured any delegates in the state, with their vote totals falling below the necessary 15 percent threshold.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis and campaign correspondents Asma Khalid and Scott Detrow.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
February 10, 2020
In this special episode of The NPR Politics Podcast, Asma Khalid travels to candidate events around the state of New Hampshire and speaks with reporters from NPR and New Hampshire Public Radio about the themes of the race days before the first-in-the-nation primary.This episode: NPR correspondents Asma Khalid, Scott Detrow, and Mara Liasson; New Hampshire Public Radio reporters Lauren Choolijian, Sarah Gibson, and Casey McDermott. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
February 8, 2020
At the end of a busy week in American politics, seven Democrats took the stage in New Hampshire ahead of the state's Tuesday primary.Each candidate made the case for his or her own electability in a still-crowded field, a topic that remains top of mind for Democratic voters after a chaotic caucus in Iowa. In particular, they spoke at length about how their platforms would help Americans of color.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and campaign correspondents Scott Detrow and Asma Khalid.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
February 6, 2020
The impeachment trial is over, but there are still hard feelings between President Trump and Democratic leadership. Those tensions were on display today at the National Prayer Breakfast, during House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's weekly press conference and at President Trump's White House address on acquittal. This episode: Congressional correspondents Susan Davis and Kelsey Snell, and White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
February 6, 2020
Senators voted mostly along party lines this afternoon to acquit President Trump on two articles of impeachment. The White House called President Trump's acquittal a "full vindication and exoneration." But in a surprise decision, Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, joined Democrats to vote "guilty" on Article I.This episode, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
February 5, 2020
It was a highly partisan event. Trump touted his own accomplishments on issues like the economy and paid family leave, lowering the cost of health care, immigration and national security.It was punctuated by made-for-TV moments, including a surprise appearance by a soldier as his family was recognized for their sacrifice.Republicans present gave Trump repeated, resounding applause. After the conclusion of the remarks, Nancy Pelosi ripped up a copy of Trump's speech.This episode, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
February 5, 2020
Pete Buttigieg, the former mayor of South Bend, Ind., is neck and neck with Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders in the Iowa caucuses, according to a partial release of results from the state Democratic Party. Even without final totals out of Iowa, candidates are looking towards New Hampshire where the first primary will be held in just one week. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political reporter Juana Summers, and senior editor and political correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
February 4, 2020
As problems with a mobile app through which vote tallies were transmitted electronically caused a delay in the reporting of Iowa caucus results on Monday night, Democratic candidates seized the moment to fire up their supporters.Several Democratic contenders delivered what sounded like victory speeches, even though state officials have not yet released vote totals.It is unclear when officials plan on announcing the results.This episode: White House Correspondent Tamara Keith, election security and voting reporter Miles Parks, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, and National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
February 3, 2020
The White House legal team and House managers made their closing arguments today in the Senate impeachment trial. With an acquittal looking almost certain after Friday's vote against witnesses and evidence, House managers asked Senators how they want their legacy remembered while the White House defense said to let the voters decide. All of this happened as Iowans prepare to caucus tonight, kicking off voting in the presidential primary. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and Congressional correspondent Susan Davis. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
February 3, 2020
In this special episode of the NPR Politics Podcast, Scott Detrow travels to candidate events around the state of Iowa days and speaks with our campaign reporters about the themes of the race in the days before the first-in-the-nation caucus.This episode: campaign correspondents Scott Detrow and Asma Khalid, senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro, and political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
February 1, 2020
This is a special episode, recorded in front of a live audience at Hoyt Sherman Place in Des Moines, IA on Friday, January 31. The cast breaks down everything you need to know about the upcoming Iowa caucuses and how impeachment is affecting the race. This episode: political correspondent Asma Khalid, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro and IPR's lead political reporter Clay Masters. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
February 1, 2020
The Senate adjourned for the weekend, but the impeachment trial of President Trump is not over. Senators voted not to hear from new witnesses on Friday — a move Minority Leader Chuck Schumer called it a "grand tragedy." This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional editor Deirdre Walsh, and Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell.
January 31, 2020
Close to a vote on whether to include witnesses, the White House legal team continued to defend its argument that the president sometimes has authority to ask foreign powers to investigate political rivals in the name of public interest.
January 30, 2020
The point was made by Alan Dershowitz, one of the president's attorneys: "If a president does something which he believes will help him get elected in the public interest, that cannot be the kind of quid pro quo that results in impeachment."Asked to respond, Impeachment Manager Adam Schiff was incredulous. "All quid pro quos are fine, it's carte blanche?" Schiff asked. "Is that really what we're prepared to say?"The question of whether witnesses will be included in the trail remains open. While Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell told Republicans on Tuesday that he didn't have to votes to block witnesses, Democrats still may not have enough support to subpoena former national security adviser John Bolton. Bolton reportedly claims in a forthcoming book that President Trump conditioned aid to Ukraine on an investigation that would likely benefit his reelection bid.This episode: White House correspondents Tamara Keith and Franco Ordoñez, and political reporter Tim Mak.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 28, 2020
President Trump's impeachment defense team concluded their arguments with time to spare Tuesday. White House counsel Pat Cipollone said the two articles of impeachment — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — "fall far short of any constitutional standard."Democrats continue to push for an agreement on witnesses; in particular, they hope to hear from former national security adviser John Bolton. According to a report in the New York Times, Bolton alleges in a forthcoming book that President Trump expressly linked aid to Ukraine to investigations into family of former Vice President Joe Biden.The impeachment trial will resume tomorrow afternoon, the beginning of a two-day question-and-answer period.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and congressional correspondents Susan Davis and Kelsey Snell.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 28, 2020
As President Trump's legal team continues their case for acquittal, a report in The New York Times about an alleged conversation between Trump and Bolton — contained in a draft of the former national security adviser's book manuscript — could change the equation for some senators who are undecided on calling witnesses.And, Joe Biden and Rudy Guiliani were both discussed at length today as the president's lawyers attempt to reframe and undercut the arguments made by Democratic House impeachment managers.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 25, 2020
President Trump "did absolutely nothing wrong," White House counsel Pat Cipollone said Saturday, as lawyers representing the president got their first shot to poke holes in the impeachment case made this week by Democrats.Saturday's proceedings, which lasted a little more than two hours, set up the White House arguments in the impeachment trial. The president's team told senators that the House managers selectively withheld evidence in their arguments against the president.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and justice correspondent Ryan Lucas.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 25, 2020
Democratic impeachment managers conclude their opening arguments Friday night in the Senate Impeachment trial. The president's defense team begins their arguments Saturday morning, a timeslot President Trump referred to as "Death Valley in T.V."And is the country more prepared for misinformation and election interference now than it was in 2016? NPR's Secure Your Vote series documents the progress and continuing challenges.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, political reporter Miles Parks, and Election Security editor Phil Ewing.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 24, 2020
On the second day of their opening arguments in the Senate impeachment trial, Democratic managers honed their case. They hope to persuade a narrow band of Republican senators to support the introduction of new evidence and witnesses.And some Republicans have begun to voice concerns about the White House legal team's approach to the trial. Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said he wants the team to respond directly to claims made by the Democratic side.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and congressional editor Deirdre Walsh.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 23, 2020
This is a special episode, recorded in front of a live audience at Drew University in Madison, New Jersey on Wednesday, January 22nd. As part of Drew Forum's Speakers Series, the cast breaks down everything you need to know about who's running for president, and how impeachment affects the race. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, senior political editor & correspondent Domenico Montanaro, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 23, 2020
As the third presidential impeachment trial in the country's history got underway, there was a lot that sounded familiar.House impeachment managers, led by California Democrat Adam Schiff, presented their case against President Trump, based on evidence gathered during the hearings in the House late last year. This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and Justice Department reporter Ryan Lucas. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 22, 2020
The first full day of the Trump impeachment trial has been dominated by partisan fighting over the rules of the proceedings.Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., released his resolution outlining the next steps, including a week of hours-long opening arguments, on Monday. By Tuesday, ahead of the debate, Senate leaders made additional changes to the trial timeline.Speaking on the Senate floor, McConnell called the resolution "a fair road map," that closely tracks precedents. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., called the rules "completely partisan." He said McConnell's resolution seems "designed by President Trump for President Trump." This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional correspondent Susan Davis and political reporter Tim Mak.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 20, 2020
Every political rally can be distilled to a few elements: the music, the stump, and the call to action. But each candidate's rallies look a bit different than those of their competitors.In this episode, NPR's Scott Detrow, Asma Khalid, and Don Gonyea talk through the rally styles of Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders, and Pete Buttigieg.(We'll talk about President Trump's rallies in a later episode.)Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 17, 2020
President Trump has announced his legal team for the Senate impeachment trial—and it includes ghosts of impeachment past. And a non-partisan government watchdog says Trump broke the law by withholding aid money to Ukraine that had been appropriated by Congress. Also, one tortoise gets too much credit for reviving his species.This episode: White House correspondents Tamara Keith, Ayesha Rascoe, and Franco Ordoñez, Justice Department correspondent Ryan Lucas, and Senior Political Editor and Correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 16, 2020
This week, President Trump inked deals in the two trade spats that have helped to define presidency: The US-Mexico-Canada Agreement, an incremental upgrade of NAFTA; and, a so-called 'Phase One' deal to deescalate his trade war with China.It remains to be seen what, if any, impact the bilateral deals have on the U.S. economy, but it seems certain that the president will tout the agreements on the campaign trail—particularly in states with large agricultural and manufacturing sectors.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, Chief Economics Correspondent Scott Horsley, and National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 15, 2020
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi named seven Democratic members of Congress as the managers to argue the case for impeachment before the Senate."The emphasis is on litigators. The emphasis is on comfort level in the courtroom. The emphasis is making the strongest possible case to protect and defend our Constitution, to seek the truth for the American people," Pelosi said in a Wednesday press conference.As early as Thursday morning, the impeachment managers will read the House resolution that appointed them as well as the articles of impeachment in full – on the Senate floor. Later that day, the Senate will proceed to the articles at 1 p.m. – or sooner. This episode: White House correspondents Tamara Keith and Ayesha Rascoe, congressional correspondent Susan Davis.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 15, 2020
Six Democratic presidential candidates debated on Tuesday night in Iowa, less than three weeks before the state's first-in-the-nation caucuses.It came up early: can a woman win? The candidates agreed that the answer is yes after Bernie Sanders denied Elizabeth Warren's accusation that he told her a woman couldn't win.And as the candidates debated trade, Sanders stood out as the only opponent of USMCA, the replacement for NAFTA.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political correspondents Scott Detrow and Asma Khalid, and political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 15, 2020
Six Democratic presidential candidates debated on Tuesday night in Iowa, less than three weeks before the state's first-in-the-nation caucuses.It came up early: can a woman win? The candidates agreed that the answer is yes after Bernie Sanders denied Elizabeth Warren's accusation that he told her a woman couldn't win.And as the candidates debated trade, Sanders stood out as the only opponent of USMCA, the replacement for NAFTA.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political correspondents Scott Detrow and Asma Khalid, and political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 13, 2020
New Jersey Senator Cory Booker has suspended his presidential campaign, citing a lack of money to run a winning campaign.Also, Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren expressed her frustration with Bernie Sanders' presidential campaign, after POLITICO reported that campaign volunteers were provided talking points attacking her.This episode: White House Correspondent Tamara Keith, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and demographics and culture correspondent Juana Summers.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 13, 2020
New Jersey Senator Cory Booker has suspended his presidential campaign, citing a lack of money to run a winning campaign.Also, Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren expressed her frustration with Bernie Sanders' presidential campaign, after POLITICO reported that campaign volunteers were provided talking points attacking her.This episode: White House Correspondent Tamara Keith, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and demographics and culture correspondent Juana Summers.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 11, 2020
This is a special episode, recorded in front of a live audience at the Harris Theater in Chicago, IL on Friday, January 10th. The cast breaks down everything you need to know about who's running for president, and how impeachment affects the race. This episode: political correspondent Asma Khalid, Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 10, 2020
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is expected to hand over articles of impeachment to the Senate next week and when the trial begins, Chief Justice John Roberts will be in the center chair. But how much power will he have? If past is prologue, the answer might be... not much. Plus, what Bill Clinton's impeachment might tell us about what to expect from the Senate trial. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg, and senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving.
January 9, 2020
The House is set to vote this evening on a resolution to limit President Trump's authority to strike Iran. President Trump is operating, like his recent predecessors, off of expansive war-making powers granted by Congress in the wake of the 9/11 attacks. Many lawmakers say it is time for Congress to claw back some of that authority, granted in part by the Constitution, but the politics of voting on warfare can be complicated.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 8, 2020
No casualties were reported after an Iranian missile strike on U.S. and coalition forces in Iraq on Tuesday night.On Wednesday morning, President Trump announced a new round economic sanctions against Iran in a televised address. He also called on NATO to become "much more involved in the Middle East process."Meanwhile, the impeachment process trudges onward in the Senate.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 7, 2020
President Trump's decision to kill a top Iranian general has split the Democratic field along familiar ideological lines. It remains to be seen how much the issue will ultimately matter to primary voters, something that will depend in part on whether the conflict between the United States and Iran continues to escalate.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, and National Political Correspondent Don Gonyea.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 6, 2020
Top House Democrat Nancy Pelosi called last week's drone airstrike against Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani "provocative and disproportionate."Iran says it will no longer honor its commitment to limit its enrichment of uranium, stepping away from a key component of the landmark nuclear deal it agreed to with six nations, including the United States, in 2015.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, and National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 3, 2020
President Trump ordered a strike against a top Iranian military leader that seems likely to upset the balance between the Middle East and Washington, raising questions about what comes next.Also, the holiday break did not clarify what is to come in the impeachment process. Remarks from Senate leadership today indicated that the coming trial could proceed without a bipartisan deal on its format, a break from tradition.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, Election Security editor Phil Ewing, and congressional correspondent Susan Davis.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 2, 2020
Julián Castro, who served as secretary of housing and urban development in the Obama administration , has ended his presidential campaign. Elements of his progressive campaign platform, including decriminalizing illegal border crossings, were adopted by other Democrats in the race.Also, President Trump and leading Democrats have previewed their fourth-quarter fundraising hauls. Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders' campaign announced it raised $34.5 million since October. Entrepreneur Andrew Yang raised $16.5 million, an increase over the roughly $10 million his campaign raised in the third quarter. This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 1, 2020
In this special episode of The NPR Politics Podcast we sat down with New Hampshire Public Radio's political reporter Lauren Chooljian to talk about why New Hampshire's primary comes first in the presidential election and why that matters.Chooljian and her team explored the history and impact of the primary in NHPR's Stranglehold, and we deep dive on the key things she learned while digging into the history.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 31, 2019
In this special episode of The NPR Politics Podcast we sat down with Iowa Public Radio's lead political reporter Clay Masters to talk about why Iowa's caucus comes first in the presidential election and why that matters.Masters explored the history and impact of the caucuses in IPR's new podcast Caucus Land, and we deep dive on the key things he learned while hitting the road and following the 2020 presidential candidates.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 30, 2019
What are the most notable political moments of the last decade? The NPR Politics team sits down to discuss four of their picks: the rise of the Tea Party, the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, the elimination of the filibuster for judicial appointees, and the Access Hollywood tape.What stuck out to you this decade? Share and discuss with other listeners in our Facebook Group.This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson, and Senior Editor and Correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 27, 2019
This week, the NPR Politics Podcast investigates defining moments in the lives of four top Democratic presidential candidates to understand how those experiences shape their politics today.Elizabeth Warren did not begin her professional career as a progressive firebrand. In the 1980s, she was a moderate-minded academic and law professor at the University of Texas, just beginning to her research into Americans who have declared bankruptcy.Over time, that work changed Warren and cultivated that kinds of progressive economic ideals that define her presidential run today.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, and White House correspondent Tamara Keith.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 26, 2019
This week, the NPR Politics Podcast investigates defining moments in the lives of four top Democratic presidential candidates to understand how those experiences shape their politics today.Joe Biden's first attempt at running for president — during the 1988 election — ended so quickly that it was still 1987 when he dropped out. But that failure came at the same moment that Joe Biden won a major victory for Democrats: preventing President Reagan's Supreme Court nominee, Robert Bork, from being confirmed. This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, and White House correspondent Tamara Keith.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 25, 2019
This week, the NPR Politics Podcast investigates defining moments in the lives of four top Democratic presidential candidates to understand how those experiences shape their politics today.On December 10th, 2010, Bernie Sanders gave a marathon speech on the floor of the Senate protesting a tax deal negotiated between Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and then-Vice President Joe Biden. Sanders was upset that the package included tax cuts for high-income Americans.Though his speech failed to sway hearts and minds in the Senate — the deal passed with a bipartisan super-majority — but gained traction online and to helped establish Bernie Sanders as a progressive standard-bearer.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, and White House correspondent Tamara Keith. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 24, 2019
This week, the NPR Politics Podcast investigates defining moments in the lives of four top Democratic presidential candidates to understand how those experiences shape their politics today.In deep conversations in college dorms at the height of the Iraq war, Pete Buttigieg joined friends to create an informal group with a mission: rebuild a Democratic Party that would live up to progressive ideals.Now a top contender for the Democratic nomination, Buttigieg has cultivated a more moderate brand — and faces criticism from a new generation of college-aged activists.Read more: Pete Buttigieg Spent His Younger Days Pushing Democrats Off Middle GroundThis episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, and White House correspondent Tamara Keith. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 23, 2019
Earlier this year, Ukraine elected a comedian as its new president, kicking off a wave of reform that swept the country. Just as Ukrainians felt as though they finally had a chance at ending corruption in their country, they found themselves embroiled in a corruption scandal here in the United States.NPR's Gregory Warner of the podcast Rough Translation joins the NPR Politics Podcast to share his reporting from Ukraine. He shares the story of one newly elected parliamentarian as he races to fix a broken system before time runs out.Listen to Part 1 and Part 2 of Rough Translation's mini series on Ukraine. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 20, 2019
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell are locked in a procedural fight over the format of President Trump's impeachment trial.The Senate was expected to begin the trial in January, but cannot do so until they have officially received the articles of impeachment from the House.After some Democrats expressed concerns that Senate Republicans would not conduct the trial in good faith, Pelosi has held off on transmitting the articles as senators negotiate the trial's format.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 20, 2019
The last Democratic presidential debate of 2019, sponsored by the PBS NewsHour and Politico, has concluded. After an hour without direct clashes, Sen. Elizabeth Warren attacked South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg over his willingness to hold fundraisers with wealthy donors. Buttigieg in turn accused Warren of hypocrisy, saying she raised money in a similar way while serving in the Senate.The candidates also differed sharply over health care, exposing the debates over pragmatism versus big ideas within the Democratic party. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, and political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 20, 2019
The last Democratic presidential debate of 2019, sponsored by the PBS NewsHour and Politico, has concluded. After an hour without direct clashes, Sen. Elizabeth Warren attacked South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg over his willingness to hold fundraisers with wealthy donors. Buttigieg in turn accused Warren of hypocrisy, saying she raised money in a similar way while serving in the Senate.The candidates also differed sharply over health care, exposing the debates over pragmatism versus big ideas within the Democratic party. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, and political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 19, 2019
For just the third time in American history, the House of Representatives has voted to impeach the president of the United States. The chamber approved both proposed articles of impeachment — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Trump is accused of pressuring the president of Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joseph Biden, a political rival, and will soon face a trial in the Senate.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 17, 2019
President Trump sent a six-page letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Tuesday, criticizing Democrats for the impeachment proceedings, which he calls "an unprecedented and unconstitutional abuse of power ... unequaled in nearly two and a half centuries of American legislative history."The letter came as the House of Representatives passed a $1.3 trillion bipartisan spending agreement ahead a Friday deadline to avoid a government shutdown.The measure includes funds to support election security and gun violence research, along with a 3.1% pay raises for service members and federal workers.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 16, 2019
New Jersey Democrat Rep. Jeff Van Drew is expected to switch parties and become a Republican. Democrats still appear to have more than enough support to impeach President Trump later this week.Also, a labor dispute at Loyola Marymount University may mean Democrats refuse to take the stage at a debate scheduled to be held at the university Thursday night. Culinary workers there are striking over what they see as an inadequate contract with the school's dining provider. The seven Democratic candidates who have qualified for the debate all said they will not cross a picket line.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 13, 2019
Despite partisan impeachment hearings, lawmakers reached a flurry of tentative deals on on Space Force, family leave for federal workers, and a multilateral trade package.On the campaign trail, candidates sparred over their past work in the private sector.This episode: political correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and senior editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Polititics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 12, 2019
Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee expect to give their final vote of approval on two articles of impeachment against President Trump Thursday night.The vote is expected after a day of partisan fighting, with Republicans advancing a series of doomed amendments in protest of a process they see as unwarranted. Democrats again insisted that the president must be removed from office for his behavior in the Ukraine affair.This episode: political correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Polititics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 11, 2019
Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday about his investigation into origin of the FBI's probe of the 2016 Trump campaign. His report, unveiled on Monday, substantiates Republican claims of numerous process issues within the bureau, though finds no evidence that the start of the probe was politically motivated.On the other side of the Capitol Building, the House Judiciary Committee will hold hearings on Wednesday night and Thursday to finalize the text of the two articles of impeachment against President Trump, ahead of a full House vote likely next week. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and Justice department correspondent Ryan Lucas.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Polititics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 10, 2019
House Democrats officially unveiled two articles of impeachment against President Trump at a press conference on Tuesday morning: abuse of power in the Ukraine affair and obstruction of Congress. The scope of the charges, which make only a passing reference to special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference, reveals the sway of Democrats' moderate members in shaping the impeachment process.Within hours of that announcement, Democratic leaders convened a second press conference, this time to unveil a deal with the White House on the United States-Mexico-Canada trade agreement — a major legislative priority for many moderates in the Democratic caucus.This episode: political correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and senior editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 9, 2019
In a hearing summarizing the findings of the impeachment inquiry so far, Democrats said they believe the case for removing President Trump from office is clear.And in a report released Monday afternoon, Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz found that the department's Russia investigation was "properly" predicated and conducted without political bias — but there were numerous problems with the surveillance of a junior campaign aide to Donald Trump.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, election security editor Phil Ewing, and National Political correspondent Mara Liasson.
December 6, 2019
Now that Speaker Pelosi has announced that the House will draft articles of impeachment, Democrats must decide how wide or narrow those articles will be. Plus, what does all the drama at the NATO summit say about the United States on the world stage? This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara, Keith, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, Congressional editor Deirdre Walsh, and senior political editor & correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 5, 2019
The Democratic Party faces the prospect of a debate in two weeks with only white candidates onstage. Earlier, they had the most diverse presidential candidate field in history. This episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, political correspondent Asma Khalid, and political reporter Juana Summers.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
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