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January 25, 2020
President Trump "did absolutely nothing wrong," White House counsel Pat Cipollone said Saturday, as lawyers representing the president got their first shot to poke holes in the impeachment case made this week by Democrats.Saturday's proceedings, which lasted a little more than two hours, set up the White House arguments in the impeachment trial. The president's team told senators that the House managers selectively withheld evidence in their arguments against the president.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and justice correspondent Ryan Lucas.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 25, 2020
Democratic impeachment managers conclude their opening arguments Friday night in the Senate Impeachment trial. The president's defense team begins their arguments Saturday morning, a timeslot President Trump referred to as "Death Valley in T.V."And is the country more prepared for misinformation and election interference now than it was in 2016? NPR's Secure Your Vote series documents the progress and continuing challenges.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, political reporter Miles Parks, and Election Security editor Phil Ewing.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 24, 2020
On the second day of their opening arguments in the Senate impeachment trial, Democratic managers honed their case. They hope to persuade a narrow band of Republican senators to support the introduction of new evidence and witnesses.And some Republicans have begun to voice concerns about the White House legal team's approach to the trial. Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said he wants the team to respond directly to claims made by the Democratic side.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and congressional editor Deirdre Walsh.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 23, 2020
This is a special episode, recorded in front of a live audience at Drew University in Madison, New Jersey on Wednesday, January 22nd. As part of Drew Forum's Speakers Series, the cast breaks down everything you need to know about who's running for president, and how impeachment affects the race. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, senior political editor & correspondent Domenico Montanaro, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 23, 2020
As the third presidential impeachment trial in the country's history got underway, there was a lot that sounded familiar.House impeachment managers, led by California Democrat Adam Schiff, presented their case against President Trump, based on evidence gathered during the hearings in the House late last year. This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and Justice Department reporter Ryan Lucas. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 22, 2020
The first full day of the Trump impeachment trial has been dominated by partisan fighting over the rules of the proceedings.Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., released his resolution outlining the next steps, including a week of hours-long opening arguments, on Monday. By Tuesday, ahead of the debate, Senate leaders made additional changes to the trial timeline.Speaking on the Senate floor, McConnell called the resolution "a fair road map," that closely tracks precedents. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., called the rules "completely partisan." He said McConnell's resolution seems "designed by President Trump for President Trump." This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional correspondent Susan Davis and political reporter Tim Mak.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 20, 2020
Every political rally can be distilled to a few elements: the music, the stump, and the call to action. But each candidate's rallies look a bit different than those of their competitors.In this episode, NPR's Scott Detrow, Asma Khalid, and Don Gonyea talk through the rally styles of Joe Biden, Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders, and Pete Buttigieg.(We'll talk about President Trump's rallies in a later episode.)Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 17, 2020
President Trump has announced his legal team for the Senate impeachment trial—and it includes ghosts of impeachment past. And a non-partisan government watchdog says Trump broke the law by withholding aid money to Ukraine that had been appropriated by Congress. Also, one tortoise gets too much credit for reviving his species.This episode: White House correspondents Tamara Keith, Ayesha Rascoe, and Franco Ordoñez, Justice Department correspondent Ryan Lucas, and Senior Political Editor and Correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 16, 2020
This week, President Trump inked deals in the two trade spats that have helped to define presidency: The US-Mexico-Canada Agreement, an incremental upgrade of NAFTA; and, a so-called 'Phase One' deal to deescalate his trade war with China.It remains to be seen what, if any, impact the bilateral deals have on the U.S. economy, but it seems certain that the president will tout the agreements on the campaign trail—particularly in states with large agricultural and manufacturing sectors.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, Chief Economics Correspondent Scott Horsley, and National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 15, 2020
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi named seven Democratic members of Congress as the managers to argue the case for impeachment before the Senate."The emphasis is on litigators. The emphasis is on comfort level in the courtroom. The emphasis is making the strongest possible case to protect and defend our Constitution, to seek the truth for the American people," Pelosi said in a Wednesday press conference.As early as Thursday morning, the impeachment managers will read the House resolution that appointed them as well as the articles of impeachment in full – on the Senate floor. Later that day, the Senate will proceed to the articles at 1 p.m. – or sooner. This episode: White House correspondents Tamara Keith and Ayesha Rascoe, congressional correspondent Susan Davis.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 15, 2020
Six Democratic presidential candidates debated on Tuesday night in Iowa, less than three weeks before the state's first-in-the-nation caucuses.It came up early: can a woman win? The candidates agreed that the answer is yes after Bernie Sanders denied Elizabeth Warren's accusation that he told her a woman couldn't win.And as the candidates debated trade, Sanders stood out as the only opponent of USMCA, the replacement for NAFTA.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political correspondents Scott Detrow and Asma Khalid, and political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 15, 2020
Six Democratic presidential candidates debated on Tuesday night in Iowa, less than three weeks before the state's first-in-the-nation caucuses.It came up early: can a woman win? The candidates agreed that the answer is yes after Bernie Sanders denied Elizabeth Warren's accusation that he told her a woman couldn't win.And as the candidates debated trade, Sanders stood out as the only opponent of USMCA, the replacement for NAFTA.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political correspondents Scott Detrow and Asma Khalid, and political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 13, 2020
New Jersey Senator Cory Booker has suspended his presidential campaign, citing a lack of money to run a winning campaign.Also, Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren expressed her frustration with Bernie Sanders' presidential campaign, after POLITICO reported that campaign volunteers were provided talking points attacking her.This episode: White House Correspondent Tamara Keith, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and demographics and culture correspondent Juana Summers.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 13, 2020
New Jersey Senator Cory Booker has suspended his presidential campaign, citing a lack of money to run a winning campaign.Also, Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren expressed her frustration with Bernie Sanders' presidential campaign, after POLITICO reported that campaign volunteers were provided talking points attacking her.This episode: White House Correspondent Tamara Keith, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and demographics and culture correspondent Juana Summers.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 11, 2020
This is a special episode, recorded in front of a live audience at the Harris Theater in Chicago, IL on Friday, January 10th. The cast breaks down everything you need to know about who's running for president, and how impeachment affects the race. This episode: political correspondent Asma Khalid, Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 10, 2020
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is expected to hand over articles of impeachment to the Senate next week and when the trial begins, Chief Justice John Roberts will be in the center chair. But how much power will he have? If past is prologue, the answer might be... not much. Plus, what Bill Clinton's impeachment might tell us about what to expect from the Senate trial. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg, and senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving.
January 9, 2020
The House is set to vote this evening on a resolution to limit President Trump's authority to strike Iran. President Trump is operating, like his recent predecessors, off of expansive war-making powers granted by Congress in the wake of the 9/11 attacks. Many lawmakers say it is time for Congress to claw back some of that authority, granted in part by the Constitution, but the politics of voting on warfare can be complicated.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 8, 2020
No casualties were reported after an Iranian missile strike on U.S. and coalition forces in Iraq on Tuesday night.On Wednesday morning, President Trump announced a new round economic sanctions against Iran in a televised address. He also called on NATO to become "much more involved in the Middle East process."Meanwhile, the impeachment process trudges onward in the Senate.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 7, 2020
President Trump's decision to kill a top Iranian general has split the Democratic field along familiar ideological lines. It remains to be seen how much the issue will ultimately matter to primary voters, something that will depend in part on whether the conflict between the United States and Iran continues to escalate.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, and National Political Correspondent Don Gonyea.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 6, 2020
Top House Democrat Nancy Pelosi called last week's drone airstrike against Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani "provocative and disproportionate."Iran says it will no longer honor its commitment to limit its enrichment of uranium, stepping away from a key component of the landmark nuclear deal it agreed to with six nations, including the United States, in 2015.This episode: congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Ayesha Rascoe, and National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 3, 2020
President Trump ordered a strike against a top Iranian military leader that seems likely to upset the balance between the Middle East and Washington, raising questions about what comes next.Also, the holiday break did not clarify what is to come in the impeachment process. Remarks from Senate leadership today indicated that the coming trial could proceed without a bipartisan deal on its format, a break from tradition.This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, Election Security editor Phil Ewing, and congressional correspondent Susan Davis.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 2, 2020
Julián Castro, who served as secretary of housing and urban development in the Obama administration , has ended his presidential campaign. Elements of his progressive campaign platform, including decriminalizing illegal border crossings, were adopted by other Democrats in the race.Also, President Trump and leading Democrats have previewed their fourth-quarter fundraising hauls. Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders' campaign announced it raised $34.5 million since October. Entrepreneur Andrew Yang raised $16.5 million, an increase over the roughly $10 million his campaign raised in the third quarter. This episode: campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
January 1, 2020
In this special episode of The NPR Politics Podcast we sat down with New Hampshire Public Radio's political reporter Lauren Chooljian to talk about why New Hampshire's primary comes first in the presidential election and why that matters.Chooljian and her team explored the history and impact of the primary in NHPR's Stranglehold, and we deep dive on the key things she learned while digging into the history.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 31, 2019
In this special episode of The NPR Politics Podcast we sat down with Iowa Public Radio's lead political reporter Clay Masters to talk about why Iowa's caucus comes first in the presidential election and why that matters.Masters explored the history and impact of the caucuses in IPR's new podcast Caucus Land, and we deep dive on the key things he learned while hitting the road and following the 2020 presidential candidates.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 30, 2019
What are the most notable political moments of the last decade? The NPR Politics team sits down to discuss four of their picks: the rise of the Tea Party, the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, the elimination of the filibuster for judicial appointees, and the Access Hollywood tape.What stuck out to you this decade? Share and discuss with other listeners in our Facebook Group.This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson, and Senior Editor and Correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 27, 2019
This week, the NPR Politics Podcast investigates defining moments in the lives of four top Democratic presidential candidates to understand how those experiences shape their politics today.Elizabeth Warren did not begin her professional career as a progressive firebrand. In the 1980s, she was a moderate-minded academic and law professor at the University of Texas, just beginning to her research into Americans who have declared bankruptcy.Over time, that work changed Warren and cultivated that kinds of progressive economic ideals that define her presidential run today.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, and White House correspondent Tamara Keith.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 26, 2019
This week, the NPR Politics Podcast investigates defining moments in the lives of four top Democratic presidential candidates to understand how those experiences shape their politics today.Joe Biden's first attempt at running for president — during the 1988 election — ended so quickly that it was still 1987 when he dropped out. But that failure came at the same moment that Joe Biden won a major victory for Democrats: preventing President Reagan's Supreme Court nominee, Robert Bork, from being confirmed. This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, and White House correspondent Tamara Keith.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 25, 2019
This week, the NPR Politics Podcast investigates defining moments in the lives of four top Democratic presidential candidates to understand how those experiences shape their politics today.On December 10th, 2010, Bernie Sanders gave a marathon speech on the floor of the Senate protesting a tax deal negotiated between Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and then-Vice President Joe Biden. Sanders was upset that the package included tax cuts for high-income Americans.Though his speech failed to sway hearts and minds in the Senate — the deal passed with a bipartisan super-majority — but gained traction online and to helped establish Bernie Sanders as a progressive standard-bearer.This episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, and White House correspondent Tamara Keith. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 24, 2019
This week, the NPR Politics Podcast investigates defining moments in the lives of four top Democratic presidential candidates to understand how those experiences shape their politics today.In deep conversations in college dorms at the height of the Iraq war, Pete Buttigieg joined friends to create an informal group with a mission: rebuild a Democratic Party that would live up to progressive ideals.Now a top contender for the Democratic nomination, Buttigieg has cultivated a more moderate brand — and faces criticism from a new generation of college-aged activists.Read more: Pete Buttigieg Spent His Younger Days Pushing Democrats Off Middle GroundThis episode: campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, and White House correspondent Tamara Keith. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 23, 2019
Earlier this year, Ukraine elected a comedian as its new president, kicking off a wave of reform that swept the country. Just as Ukrainians felt as though they finally had a chance at ending corruption in their country, they found themselves embroiled in a corruption scandal here in the United States.NPR's Gregory Warner of the podcast Rough Translation joins the NPR Politics Podcast to share his reporting from Ukraine. He shares the story of one newly elected parliamentarian as he races to fix a broken system before time runs out.Listen to Part 1 and Part 2 of Rough Translation's mini series on Ukraine. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 20, 2019
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell are locked in a procedural fight over the format of President Trump's impeachment trial.The Senate was expected to begin the trial in January, but cannot do so until they have officially received the articles of impeachment from the House.After some Democrats expressed concerns that Senate Republicans would not conduct the trial in good faith, Pelosi has held off on transmitting the articles as senators negotiate the trial's format.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving. Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 20, 2019
The last Democratic presidential debate of 2019, sponsored by the PBS NewsHour and Politico, has concluded. After an hour without direct clashes, Sen. Elizabeth Warren attacked South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg over his willingness to hold fundraisers with wealthy donors. Buttigieg in turn accused Warren of hypocrisy, saying she raised money in a similar way while serving in the Senate.The candidates also differed sharply over health care, exposing the debates over pragmatism versus big ideas within the Democratic party. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, and political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 20, 2019
The last Democratic presidential debate of 2019, sponsored by the PBS NewsHour and Politico, has concluded. After an hour without direct clashes, Sen. Elizabeth Warren attacked South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg over his willingness to hold fundraisers with wealthy donors. Buttigieg in turn accused Warren of hypocrisy, saying she raised money in a similar way while serving in the Senate.The candidates also differed sharply over health care, exposing the debates over pragmatism versus big ideas within the Democratic party. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, campaign correspondent Scott Detrow, campaign correspondent Asma Khalid, and political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 19, 2019
For just the third time in American history, the House of Representatives has voted to impeach the president of the United States. The chamber approved both proposed articles of impeachment — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. Trump is accused of pressuring the president of Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joseph Biden, a political rival, and will soon face a trial in the Senate.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and National Political Correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 17, 2019
President Trump sent a six-page letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Tuesday, criticizing Democrats for the impeachment proceedings, which he calls "an unprecedented and unconstitutional abuse of power ... unequaled in nearly two and a half centuries of American legislative history."The letter came as the House of Representatives passed a $1.3 trillion bipartisan spending agreement ahead a Friday deadline to avoid a government shutdown.The measure includes funds to support election security and gun violence research, along with a 3.1% pay raises for service members and federal workers.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and Congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 16, 2019
New Jersey Democrat Rep. Jeff Van Drew is expected to switch parties and become a Republican. Democrats still appear to have more than enough support to impeach President Trump later this week.Also, a labor dispute at Loyola Marymount University may mean Democrats refuse to take the stage at a debate scheduled to be held at the university Thursday night. Culinary workers there are striking over what they see as an inadequate contract with the school's dining provider. The seven Democratic candidates who have qualified for the debate all said they will not cross a picket line.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Politics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 13, 2019
Despite partisan impeachment hearings, lawmakers reached a flurry of tentative deals on on Space Force, family leave for federal workers, and a multilateral trade package.On the campaign trail, candidates sparred over their past work in the private sector.This episode: political correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and senior editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Polititics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 12, 2019
Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee expect to give their final vote of approval on two articles of impeachment against President Trump Thursday night.The vote is expected after a day of partisan fighting, with Republicans advancing a series of doomed amendments in protest of a process they see as unwarranted. Democrats again insisted that the president must be removed from office for his behavior in the Ukraine affair.This episode: political correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional correspondent Kelsey Snell, and senior editor and correspondent Ron Elving.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Polititics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 11, 2019
Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday about his investigation into origin of the FBI's probe of the 2016 Trump campaign. His report, unveiled on Monday, substantiates Republican claims of numerous process issues within the bureau, though finds no evidence that the start of the probe was politically motivated.On the other side of the Capitol Building, the House Judiciary Committee will hold hearings on Wednesday night and Thursday to finalize the text of the two articles of impeachment against President Trump, ahead of a full House vote likely next week. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and Justice department correspondent Ryan Lucas.Connect:Subscribe to the NPR Polititics Podcast here.Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 10, 2019
House Democrats officially unveiled two articles of impeachment against President Trump at a press conference on Tuesday morning: abuse of power in the Ukraine affair and obstruction of Congress. The scope of the charges, which make only a passing reference to special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference, reveals the sway of Democrats' moderate members in shaping the impeachment process.Within hours of that announcement, Democratic leaders convened a second press conference, this time to unveil a deal with the White House on the United States-Mexico-Canada trade agreement — a major legislative priority for many moderates in the Democratic caucus.This episode: political correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and senior editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 9, 2019
In a hearing summarizing the findings of the impeachment inquiry so far, Democrats said they believe the case for removing President Trump from office is clear.And in a report released Monday afternoon, Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz found that the department's Russia investigation was "properly" predicated and conducted without political bias — but there were numerous problems with the surveillance of a junior campaign aide to Donald Trump.This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, election security editor Phil Ewing, and National Political correspondent Mara Liasson.
December 6, 2019
Now that Speaker Pelosi has announced that the House will draft articles of impeachment, Democrats must decide how wide or narrow those articles will be. Plus, what does all the drama at the NATO summit say about the United States on the world stage? This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara, Keith, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, Congressional editor Deirdre Walsh, and senior political editor & correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 5, 2019
The Democratic Party faces the prospect of a debate in two weeks with only white candidates onstage. Earlier, they had the most diverse presidential candidate field in history. This episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, political correspondent Asma Khalid, and political reporter Juana Summers.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 4, 2019
A panel of four constitutional law scholars are trying to put the allegations against Trump in a historical and legal context. Three of the professors support impeachment, one is opposed. This episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, national security editor Phil Ewing, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 3, 2019
Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee unveiled the report summarizing their case for impeachment on Tuesday. Plus, California Sen. Kamala Harris is dropping out of the presidential race, citing a lack of funds. This episode: political correspondent Asma Khalid, political correspondent Scott Detrow, national security editor Phil Ewing, and senior editor & correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
December 2, 2019
House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff will reveal his findings in the impeachment probe, and the House Judiciary plans a hearing with experts on constitutional grounds for impeachment. This episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, political reporter Tim Mak, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
November 29, 2019
In this special collaboration with NPR's Life Kit the NPR Politics team breaks down what are key steps for running for office. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, political reporter Miles Parks, and editor & correspondent Ron Elving. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
November 29, 2019
In this special collaboration with NPR's Life Kit the NPR Politics team breaks down what are key steps for running for office. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, political reporter Miles Parks, and editor & correspondent Ron Elving. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
November 28, 2019
In this special collaboration with NPR's Life Kit the NPR Politics team breaks down how to get ready for election day. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, political reporter Miles Parks, and senior editor & correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
November 27, 2019
In this special collaboration with NPR's Life Kit the NPR Politics team breaks down what misinformation is and how you can spot it. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, political reporter Miles Parks, and national security editor Philip Ewing. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
November 26, 2019
Bloomberg announced his candidacy for the Democratic nomination, saying Trump "represents an existential threat to our country and our values." The businessman is a late entrant to a crowded field. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, political correspondent Scott Detrow, and political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
November 25, 2019
President Trump has repeatedly intervened on behalf of the Navy SEAL recently convicted of misconduct. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, Election Security editor Phil Ewing, and National Political correspondent Mara Liasson. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
November 22, 2019
After a full week jam-packed with impeachment inquiry hearings we look back at the major moments that shaped what will happen next. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspodent Franco Ordoñez, Congressional correspondent Claudia Grisales, and senior editor & correspondent Domenico Montanaro.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
November 21, 2019
In what may be the final day of public hearings, members of Congress heard from a former White House policy insider and a foreign service officer who said he overheard a call with President Trump. In this episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and justice correspondent Ryan Lucas. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
November 21, 2019
The big question of the night was whether or not Mayor Pete Buttigieg would take heat from other candidates after rising in the polls in Iowa. After discussion about policies that haven't received much attention at previous debates, the attacks came. In this episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, political correspondent Asma Khalid, political reporter Juana Summers, and senior editor & correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
November 21, 2019
The big question of the night was whether or not Mayor Pete Buttigieg would take heat from other candidates after rising in the polls in Iowa. After discussion about policies that haven't received much attention at previous debates, the attacks came. In this episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, political correspondent Asma Khalid, political reporter Juana Summers, and senior editor & correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
November 20, 2019
Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union, tied President Trump directly to conditioning a meeting with the Ukrainian president with "a public statement from President Zelenskiy committing to investigations of Burisma and the 2016 election." In this episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and Justice department correspondent Ryan Lucas.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
November 20, 2019
Four witnesses testified in the impeachment hearing. The first two were the first to testify with firsthand knowledge of the president's phone call with the Ukrainian president. The second two were called by Republicans to support their claims. In this episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, and national security editor Phil Ewing.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
November 18, 2019
More hearings in the impeachment hearing are slated for Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday of this week. The cast breaks down what to watch for each day. Plus, the democratic candidates face-off for the fifth time on the debate stage Wednesday night. In this episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, national security editor Phil Ewing, and political correspondent Scott Detrow.Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
November 15, 2019
Ambassador Marie Yovanovitch described a pressure campaign to oust her from Kyiv. President Trump tweeted negatively about her during her hearing; Rep. Adam Schiff called it "witness intimidation." Plus, two 2020 candidates throw their name into the ring. In this episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political correspondent Asma Khalid, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and senior editor & correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
November 14, 2019
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi believes that the impeachment inquiry currently underway has uncovered evidence that President Trump's actions amounted to bribery. In this episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, national political correspondent Mara Liasson, and editor & correspondent Ron Elving. Connect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
November 13, 2019
Mostly, the five hour hearing emphasized aspects of the narrative about the Ukraine affair that already have emerged from closed-door depositions. In this episode: Political correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and Justice Department correspondent Ryan Lucas. Related coverage: Impeachment Witness: Trump Asked Diplomat About Ukraine InvestigationsConnect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
November 13, 2019
Mostly, the five hour hearing emphasized aspects of the narrative about the Ukraine affair that already have emerged from closed-door depositions. In this episode: Political correspondent Asma Khalid, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and Justice Department correspondent Ryan Lucas. Related coverage: Impeachment Witness: Trump Asked Diplomat About Ukraine InvestigationsConnect:Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org.Join the NPR Politics Podcast Facebook Group.Subscribe to the NPR Politics Newsletter.Find and support your local public radio station.
November 12, 2019
After weeks of closed-door depositions, Democrats are planning open hearings this week about the Ukraine affair. Here's where the story stands — and what's coming next. This episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and Congressional reporter Claudia Grisales. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
November 11, 2019
The Trump campaign launched its "Black Voices for Trump" initiative in Atlanta last week, touting record low black unemployment and criminal justice reform. Experts say that while the push may not make a big difference among black voters, it could help to reassure suburban white voters concerned about Trump's rhetoric on race. This episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, political reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
November 9, 2019
This is a special episode, recorded in front of a live audience at the Warner Theater in Washington, DC on Friday, November 8th. The cast breaks down everything you need to know about who's running for president, and how impeachment affects the race. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political correspondent Scott Detrow, political correspondent Asma Khalid, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and senior editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
November 8, 2019
Despite Russia's high-profile interference in the last U.S. presidential election, pockets of the U.S. are experimenting with Internet voting ahead of the 2020 election. This episode: political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, political reporter Miles Parks, and election security editor Phil Ewing. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
November 7, 2019
Former Attorney General Jeff Sessions is expected to announce his bid for a Senate seat in Alabama despite no backing from the Republican establishment. This episode: political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and senior political editor and correspondent Ron Elving. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
November 6, 2019
Trump's campaign may be raising lots of money off impeachment, but it may not be firing up rural voters as Republicans thought it would. Plus, William Taylor, the top U.S. diplomat to Ukraine, told congressional investigators that President Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani was acting in the president's interests. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, justice correspondent Ryan Lucas, political reporter Jessica Taylor, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
November 5, 2019
Transcripts from four witnesses in the impeachment inquiry have been made public. The NPR Politics Podcast breaks down the key takeaways from the hundreds of pages of testimony. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, national security editor Phil Ewing, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
November 4, 2019
All six U.S. Senators still running for president are backing the House's impeachment inquiry. But now that the lawmakers may be getting what they want, many political operatives see it as a train wreck for their presidential campaigns. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, political correspondent Asma Khalid, and political correspondent Scott Detrow. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
November 1, 2019
Sen. Elizabeth Warren released her plan to pay for single-payer health care without imposing new taxes on the middle class. Plus, Timothy Morrison verified to House investigators that President Trump leaned on Ukraine to launch investigations he thought might help him. He worried about blowback — but not legal implications. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, senior editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro, political correspondent Asma Khalid, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 31, 2019
The House of Representatives voted Thursday 232-196 to pass a resolution formalizing its impeachment inquiry into President Trump. Just two Democrats voted no. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional editor Deirdre Walsh, political reporter Miles Parks, and political reporter Tim Mak. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 30, 2019
It's an off, off, off election year, but some states will still be casting votes. NPR Politics breaks down the key races to watch. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political reporter Jessica Taylor, and senior editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 29, 2019
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says the House will vote this week on a resolution outlining the process for the next steps in the inquiry into President Trump. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 28, 2019
Investigators in the impeachment inquiry of President Trump hoped to talk to Charles Kupperman on Monday. But the former White House official failed to show up. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 27, 2019
Trump declared that U.S. forces have brought "the world's No. 1 terrorist leader to justice" and that no U.S. troops were killed or injured in the raid. Some experts fear the resurgence of the Islamic State now that Trump has announced a pullout of U.S. forces from Syria, with dozens of ISIS fighters escaping from Kurdish custody in the last month. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, national security editor Phil Ewing, and senior editor & correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 25, 2019
The justice department opens a criminal investigation into the basis of the Russia investigation. Plus, Mark Zuckerberg appears on Capitol Hill, and the House Ethics Committee investigates freshman representative Katie Hill. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, political correspondent Asma Khalid, justice correspondent Ryan Lucas, political reporter Tim Mak, and senior editor & correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 24, 2019
Democratic donors and activists worry that the party is going to nominate someone who can't win next year, and they're musing about who else could be out there. Newsflash: This is probably it. This episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, political correspondent Asma Khalid, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 23, 2019
President Trump says he is lifting sanctions on Turkey after the country agreed to what he called a permanent cease-fire in northern Syria, ending Turkey's military offensive that began after the U.S. pulled troops from the area. This episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, and national security editor Phil Ewing. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 22, 2019
Longtime U.S. diplomat William Taylor is testifying on Capitol Hill Tuesday as part of the House impeachment inquiry, and Democrats say his insight is bolstering their case against President Trump. This episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and justice correspondent Ryan Lucas. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 21, 2019
President Trump announced that he's dropping his plan to host next year's G-7 meeting of the leaders of the world's biggest economies at his Miami-area golf club. This episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, White House reporter Ayehsa Rascoe, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 18, 2019
This week Joe Biden's campaign released fundraising numbers that showed his campaign does not have much cash on hand, and Bernie Sanders was endorsed by Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. Plus, Trump passed his 1,000th day in office and proved he is more Trumpian than ever. This episode: Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political correspondent Asma Khalid, and editor correspondent Ron Elving. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 17, 2019
White House acting chief of staff Mick Mulvaney acknowledged on Thursday that President Trump expected concessions from Ukraine's president in exchange for engagement — but said that's just how business is done in diplomacy. Plus, ambassador Sondland testifies before Congress. This episode: political correspondent Asma Khalid, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, and justice correspondent Ryan Lucas. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 16, 2019
President Trump is defending his decision to pull U.S. troops out of Syria, saying, "They have a problem at the border; it's not our border," and that "they've got a lot of sand over there. There's a lot of sand they can play with." This episode: political correspondent Asma Khalid, political reporter Tim Mar, and national security editor Phil Ewing. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 16, 2019
Impeachment loomed large over the fourth Democratic presidential debate, but none of the candidates lingered on the topic. Instead Elizabeth Warren took fire as she continues rising in the polls. This episode: political correspondent Asma Khalid, political correspondent Scott Detrow, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and senior editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 16, 2019
Impeachment loomed large over the fourth Democratic presidential debate, but none of the candidates lingered on the topic. Instead Elizabeth Warren took fire as she continues rising in the polls. This episode: political correspondent Asma Khalid, political correspondent Scott Detrow, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and senior editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 14, 2019
Impeachment looms over the latest Democratic presidential debate. Plus, Bernie Sanders takes the stage following a heart attack, and Elizabeth Warren continues rising in the polls. This episode: political correspondent Asma Khalid, political correspondent Scott Detrow, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 11, 2019
President Trump held his first rally since House Democrats escalated their impeachment inquiry. Plus, the growing divide between President Trump and many of his fellow Republicans over his decision to move U.S. troops in Syria out of the way of a Turkish incursion threatens his delicate alliance with the congressional GOP at a time when he needs their support more than ever. This episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe, political reporter Tim Mak, senior editor correspondent Domenico Montanaro, and justice correspondent Ryan Lucas. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 10, 2019
As Congress walks down the path of impeachment The NPR Politics Podcast takes a step back and compares this moment to past impeachment proceedings. They provide a road map while still remaining wildly different from each other. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and editor correspondent Ron Elving. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 9, 2019
The White House will not participate in Congress' ongoing impeachment inquiry, stepping up a political and legal standoff between the executive and legislative branches of government. This episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, national security editor Phil Ewing, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 8, 2019
The Trump administration has blocked Gordon Sondland, President Trump's ambassador to the European Union, from testifying before Congress on Tuesday. Sondland has been a key figure in the widening Ukraine scandal. This episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and White House Franco Ordoñez. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 7, 2019
Separation of church and state, immigration and questions about impeachment could be on the table this term, which starts Monday and will almost surely be a march to the right on flashpoint issues. This episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, editor correspondent Domenico Montanaro, and legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 4, 2019
Senior U.S. diplomats debated the propriety of a White House strategy aimed at pressuring Ukraine for political investigations in exchange for assistance and engagement with President Trump, new documents show. Plus, new fundraising numbers show Senator Elizabeth Warren on the rise. This episode: political correspondent Scott Detrow, justice correspondent Ryan Lucas, editor correspondent Domenico Montanaro, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and political reporter Tim Mak. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 3, 2019
President Trump now says China should investigate former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter. The president's remarks Thursday are a significant escalation of events in the Ukraine matter. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, Congressional correspondent Susan Davis, and White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 2, 2019
President Trump is ramping up his rhetoric as he attacks Democratic Representative Adam Schiff who is helping lead the impeachment inquiry. Plus, Senator Bernie Sanders undergoes a heart procedure and cancels all of his campaign events indefinitely. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political correspondent Asma Khalid, election security editor Phil Ewing, and national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
October 1, 2019
After the deadline for third quarter fundraising numbers passed last night, the numbers are rolling in. Senator Bernie Sanders logged $25.3 million while Mayor Pete Buttigieg announced a haul of $19.1 million. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben, and senior political editor and correspondent Domenico Montanaro. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
September 30, 2019
President Trump's White House is struggling with how to respond to the ever-growing Ukraine scandal as the House Democrats' impeachment inquiry is set to take depositions from key witnesses this week. This episode: White House correspondent Tamara Keith, political correspondent Scott Detrow, and justice correspondent Ryan Lucas. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
September 30, 2019
Starting today, the NPR Politics team will be in your ears each weekday afternoon to help you make sense of all the big political news coming out of Washington. NPR's best political reporters will be there to explain the latest developments on the path to impeachment, the road to the 2020 presidential election, and the Trump administration. They'll won't just tell you what happened. They'll tell you why it matters. Now every afternoon.
September 27, 2019
Americans are split, 49%-46%, on whether they approve of Democrats' impeachment inquiry into President Trump, and independents at this point are not on board, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist Poll finds. This episode: political correspondent Asma Khalid, congressional editor Deirdre Walsh, senior political editor Domenico Montanaro, and editor correspondent Ron Elving. Email the show at nprpolitics@npr.org. Find and support your local public radio station at npr.org/stations.
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