The Round Table: A Next Generation Politics Podcast
The Round Table: A Next Generation Politics Podcast
Next Gen Politics
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The Round Table provides a platform for conversation and engagement of civically-minded young people from different parts of the country. We strive to model civil dialogue across various divides--socioeconomic, racial, ethnic, political, and regional. We aim to challenge norms and represent all kinds of diversity--especially of perspective and ideas--enabling listeners to “hear” our thinking. The Round Table is 100% created and edited by young people committed to building a more just and joyous world.
It's A Shame Nothing’s Happening In The News…
At this week's Round Table, Eliza (our correspondent from Real Talk), Inica, Isaiah, and Madeline spoke with...each other. That’s right, no guests this week--by design!  Much as we love having amazing guests join us each week, we realized we don’t have enough opportunity to be in conversation with one another and plan to devote an episode to internal conversation every month or two.  This week, we spoke about the Vice Presidential Debate between Kamala Harris and Michael Pence, transparency in politics, and what impact Donald Trump’s COVID diagnosis will have on anything and anyone. Thanks for joining us! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nextgenpolitics/message
Oct 15
35 min
There’s a happy medium btw the Court being too loud or too quiet
Anna Salvatore is HS SCOTUS makes clear that there’s a balance btw the court being too loud—aka in the spotlight taking up every hour of our lives-and being too quiet—aka out of public view such that of people don’t understand what’s going on. Information about the Supreme Court is less widely available and understandable than what’s happening in Congress or the Oval Office so it requires a bit more of an effort to stay informed and engaged. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nextgenpolitics/message
Oct 13
48 sec
Young people don’t often think about SCOTUS-what can we do?
Anna Salvatore, founder of HS SCOTUS, explains why young people generally fail to regard the SCOTUS on the same level as other government branches but more importantly, she dives into what we can do as young people to improve on this matter. ---Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nextgenpolitics/message --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nextgenpolitics/message
Oct 11
49 sec
Teenagers should grow their understanding of the law
Anna Salvatore, the founder of HS SCOTUS, shares why it’s crucial for teenagers and young people as a whole to grasp a greater understanding of the law and our court system as she details how it directly impacts our everyday lives on a significant level. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nextgenpolitics/message
Oct 11
55 sec
My initial interest in the law was pretty random
Anna Salvatore, founder of HS SCOTUS, shared the “founding story” of her blog. It WASN’T because she came from a long line of lawyers or wanted to be a lawyer—she actually thought law was very boring, but she WAS interested in politics. One morning in study hall she stumbled upon an article about a Supreme Court immigration case. She read through the whole article—and was hooked! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nextgenpolitics/message
Oct 11
57 sec
RBG is Gone. Now What?
At this week's Round Table, Divya Ganesan,  our correspondent from Real Talk, Isaiah Taylor, Madeline Mayes, and Olivia Becker speak with Anna Salvatore, the 18 year old founder of HS SCOTUS, a blog she founded in early 2018 with the goal of analyzing Supreme Court cases that affect high schoolers. Anna founded her blog with the recognition that the judicial branch is the least understood part of our government, yet courts are relevant to EVERY aspect of our lives. Having Anna on in the wake of RBG’s passing and just days after the announcement of Amy Coney Barrett as the nominee to replace her made the conversation all the more fascinating. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did. Thanks for joining us! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nextgenpolitics/message
Oct 8
23 min
We have to be willing to reward people who aren’t pure
Peter Loge reminds us that If you’re a candidate, you’re going to behave in a way that’s going to help you get elected.You’re going to seek to pass legislation, raise money, be on TV to raise your profile. So if we want change, it entails changing the incentives. That means voting for people you may not agree with 100% because you think compromise is important. We have to be willing to vote for candidates who aren’t pure. If we want the world to be a better place, we need to reward people who are making it better. We can talk all we want about why isn’t it better and why isn’t discourse more civil, but unless people get rewarded for it, it’s not likely to happen. Telling is different than rewarding. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nextgenpolitics/message
Oct 8
58 sec
A lot of politics comes down to incentives
From Peter Loge’s perspective--not as an academic or as a professor--but as someone who has had to pay the bills by advising candidates and electeds on issues, is that a lot of it comes down to incentives. Nobody gets into politics because they like yelling at each other, or because they want to meet a lobbyist, or wear loafers. They get in because they want to make the world a better place and they care about issues. The problem is that we say we want more compromise, but that really means I want more people to agree with me. Politicians behave in a way that responds to electoral incentives because if they don’t, they lose their jobs. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nextgenpolitics/message
Oct 8
58 sec
Everyone in Washington is very smart and very important—just ask them!
Professor Peter Loge, who heads the Project on Ethics in Political Communication at George Washington University, makes clear that we don’t reason by facts, even though we often THINK we do. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nextgenpolitics/message
Oct 8
57 sec
Journalists Should Avoid Bias
In honor of our One Year Anniversary, we’re revisiting our archives and sharing some clips from our early episodes last year. Here, Professor Howard Schneider, founder of the Center for News Literacy, shares his thoughts about how journalists should avoid bias in the media. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/nextgenpolitics/message
Oct 8
50 sec
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