The Intelligence
The Intelligence
The Economist
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Get a daily burst of global illumination from The Economist’s worldwide network of correspondents as they dig past the headlines to get to the stories beneath—and to stories that aren’t making headlines, but should be.
Genocidal intent? Deserters recount Rohingya atrocities
Two Burmese soldiers have described in harrowing detail what has long been alleged: that the army targeted Muslim-minority Rohingya in a programme of ethnic cleansing. America’s Department of State has been hollowed out and wholly demoralised—and that has dire implications for global diplomacy. And a wildly popular Chinese television show reveals shifting mores for thirty-somethings. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer 
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Sep 10
22 min
Unpicking the thread: forced labour in Xinjiang
Sanctions are tightening around the Chinese province amid suspicions of forced labour. Western firms that are reliant on the region’s cotton and other commodities are in a bind. The pandemic has shown the merits of some governments’ digitised bureaucracies, but rushing the digital shift comes with risks. And how Canada’s border closures threaten a tiny town in remotest Alaska. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer 
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Sep 9
21 min
Subcontinental drift: India’s covid spike
A hurried lockdown early in the pandemic has cratered the country’s economy, and infection rates are now shooting up. More suffering lies ahead, on both counts. The United Nations peacekeeping mission in the Democratic Republic of Congo has failed for 20 years running, and now there is pressure for it to decamp. And the transatlantic tale of the baked bean. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer 
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Sep 8
20 min
Pact unpacked: wobbly Brexit talks
Negotiations on Britain’s post-Brexit relationship with Europe were floundering—even before revelations it may essentially rewrite parts of the last pact it struck. Since the space race’s early days, satellites have been involved in defence. Now a new threat looms: armed conflict between the satellites themselves. And a card game reveals the Lebanese people’s resilience and dark sense of humour. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer 
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Sep 7
20 min
Back to the future-planning: France
Alongside a green-minded, 100bn-euro stimulus, President Emmanuel Macron’s recovery plan borrows ideas from the post-war past to imagine a post-covid future. The mysterious arrest of Paul Rusesabagina, hero of the film “Hotel Rwanda”, shows just how far the country’s leaders will go to suppress dissent. And a careful, revealing study of nappy prices across Europe. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer 
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Sep 4
22 min
Rough seas and safe seats: Caribbean elections
The outcome of Jamaica’s election isn’t much in doubt. What’s uncertain is how the wider Caribbean can handle rock-bottom tourism and looming hurricane risks amid the pandemic. North Korea’s leadership at last admitted to the hardships of covid-19; the coming human cost could rival that of the famine in the 1990s. And why African countries put out so many unlikely stamps. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer 
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Sep 3
21 min
In a class, by themselves: pupils head back to school
Millions of schoolchildren are heading back to classes, many of them online. We examine the evidence on virtual learning and how it deepens inequalities. Dubai is a glittering financial hub, connecting the Middle East, Asia and Europe—but to keep its position it will have to shed its dirty-money reputation. And why the pandemic has readers pulling weighty classics from shelves. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer 
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Sep 2
21 min
Integration, differentiation: migrants in Germany
Five years ago, a vast wave of migrants and refugees began to spill into the country. We examine their fates amid a tangle of bureaucracy. Even for the uninfected, the coronavirus has caused widespread “collective trauma”; we ask about its effects and how to heal from it. And Palestinians sneak to the beach as security forces look the other way. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer 
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Sep 1
22 min
Ill be going: Abe Shinzo’s legacy
Japan’s longest-serving prime minister leaves behind a mixed bag of policy successes and shortcomings. We examine his legacy and ask what his successor faces. The annual meeting of central bankers in Jackson Hole—online, of course—revealed research suggesting today’s economic woes will ring down for decades to come. And the curious appeal of in-flight meals eaten on terra firma. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer 
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Aug 31
19 min
Shot down, in flames: Kenosha, Wisconsin
Another shooting of an unarmed black man by police has reopened wounds still not healed after George Floyd’s killing—and, like all else, the unrest is being politicised. Montenegro’s president is Europe’s longest-serving leader, but anti-government sentiment has mounted ahead of Sunday’s election. And a look back on the life of Julian Bream, who restored the reputation of the classical guitar. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer 
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Aug 28
20 min
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