Teachers Aid
Teachers Aid
BAM Radio Network
Teachers Aid with Mandy Froehlich and Jon Harper. We've refocused the show on meeting some of the biggest unmet needs every educator has. If you are an educator who gives teaching your all, but still feels that you're not doing enough, this show is for you. Tune in to get social and emotional support for the very personal challenges teachers face. We promise you that you won't hear educators talking like this every day.
My School Is Providing Lots of Support, It’s Just Not the Support I Really Need
Virtually every school district and school administrator has been laser-focused on providing the support teachers need to navigate another disrupted school year. Yet many of us still feel unsupported. Why is there a disconnect? How can we better match what’s being done to what teachers need? Follow on Twitter: @jonHarper70bd @bamradionetwork @CHHCS @DorisASantoro Doris Santoro is Professor of Education at Bowdoin College. Professor Santoro is a philosopher of education who studies teachers’ moral and ethical concerns about their work. She is the author of Demoralized: Why Teachers Leave the Profession They Love and How They Can Stay and co-editor of Principled Resistance: How Teachers Resolve Ethical Dilemmas. Olga Acosta Price, Ph.D. is director of the Center for Health and Health Care in Schools at the George Washington University Milken Institute School of Public Health, and is associate professor in the Department of Prevention and Community Health at the University. She is a clinical psychologist with postdoctoral training in school mental health. Dr. Acosta Price has dedicated herself to promoting prevention and early intervention programs that address the mental health needs of children and their families and has developed, implemented and evaluated programs promoting mental health and resilience conducted in school and community settings.
Nov 9, 2021
12 min
How Are Others Managing the Increased Demands of Teaching When Their Tank Is Already on Empty?
Coming back to another disrupted school year has placed unexpected and unprecedented stress on teachers. In this episode, we check in to see what we can learn about how teachers are managing the increased demands of teaching when their emotional and mental tank is already on empty. Follow on Twitter: @TchrBreakroom @TishJennings @madeline_will @Jonharper70bd @bamradionetwork Monica Swift, M.Ed., is an educator with 20+ years of varied experience in the field of education. She currently serves as an intermediate literacy instructional coach and an elementary classroom teacher. Throughout her years in the profession, Monica has served in private, public, and post-secondary education as teacher, coach, consultant, trainer, researcher, education systems strategist, and more. Patricia (Tish) Jennings, M.Ed., Ph.D. is an internationally recognized leader in the fields of social and emotional learning and mindfulness in education and Professor of Education at the School of Education and Human Development at the University of Virginia. Her research places a specific emphasis on teacher stress and how it impacts the social and emotional context of the classroom, as articulated in her highly cited theoretical article "The Prosocial Classroom." She is the author of numerous peer-reviewed journal articles and chapters and several books: Mindfulness for Teachers: Simple Skills for Peace and Productivity in the Classroom, The Trauma-Sensitive School: Building Resilience with Compassionate Teaching, Mindfulness in the Pre-K-5 Classroom: Helping Students Stress Less and Learn More, part of Social and Emotional Learning Solutions, a book series by WW Norton of which she is editor. Her latest book, Teacher Burnout Turnaround: Strategies for Empowered Teachers, was released in December 2020. Madeline Will is a reporter for Education Week who covers the teaching profession. Before joining Education Week in 2016, she was the publications fellow for the Student Press Law Center. She graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2014.
Oct 26, 2021
12 min
SEL Watch: How to Approach Young Students Who May Be in Emotional Distress - Part II
In this segment, we follow up on our discussion on spotting elementary school students in distress and how to approach those who may be on the edge. Join us as we talk about the feelings that surface when a student is lost. Follow on Twitter: @sgthomas1973 @bamradionetwork @jonHarper70bd Lynsay Ayer, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist who conducts research on youth mental health. She is a member of the suicide prevention research team at the National Institute of Mental Health and is also a senior behavioral scientist at the RAND Corporation. Robert C. Schmidt, Ed.D, LCPC, NCC is a national speaker and consultant on building sustainable school mental health and suicide prevention programs centered on data collection, outcomes, quality of services, and student achievement. With interests embedded in research, Dr. Schmidt has published chapters in recognized books including the award-winning book by Dr. Kathryn Seifert, How Children Become Violent (2006) and Youth Violence (2011). He has led studies in the field of youth suicide, school mental health and was a contributor to Preventing Suicide: A Toolkit for High Schools: Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). In 2009 Dr. Schmidt published and is the author of the Risk Identification Suicide Kit (RISK) and in 2018 the RISK2, a suicide assessment instrument for ages 7-24. Dr. Schmidt previously worked at Johns Hopkins BayView Campus in Baltimore, Maryland and provided coverage to the Johns Hopkins Psychiatric Children’s Center, Baltimore Adolescent Treatment Program, Outpatient Clinic, and 24-hour Baltimore Child & Adolescent Crisis. Shawn Thomas is in her 20th year of teaching in the largest county in Georgia. She has taught Kindergarten, Second and Third Grade, and ESOL (English to Speakers of Other Languages) K-5.
Oct 21, 2021
11 min
Why Ignoring Learning Recovery Is a Privilege Many Students and Teachers Don't Have
We are still searching for an acceptable phrase to define what teachers around the world are doing this school term. Many are avoiding the term "learning recovery" like a carton of milk past the expiration date.  In this episode, we found out why ignoring, dismissing, or simply overlooking learning recovery is a privilege that many students and teachers simply don't have. Follow on Twitter: @RobertG_Jenkins@ISTE  @mrhooker @curriculumblog @sgthomas1973 @kylehamstra @bamradionetwork @jonHarper70bd Robert Jenkins is the global director of education for UNICEF. Robert joined the organization in 1995. He brings over 20 years of experience in international development and humanitarian programming in Africa, Asia and the Middle East. Prior to his current appointment, Mr. Jenkins served as the UNICEF Deputy Director, Division of Policy and Strategy in UNICEF Headquarters from 2009-2014. Mr. Jenkins earned a Doctor of Education Degree from the University of Bath and a Master’s Degree from the London School of Economics in the United Kingdom. Shawn Thomas is in her 20th year of teaching in the largest county in Georgia. She has taught Kindergarten, Second and Third Grade, and ESOL (English to Speakers of Other Languages) K-5. Carl Hooker has been a part of a strong educational shift with technology integration since becoming an educator.  From his start as a teacher to his current district technology leadership, he’s always had one common belief – the kids need to drive their own learning. He is a national faculty member at Future Ready Schools and an ISTE podcast host. Dr. Steven Weber serves as the Associate Superintendent for Teaching and Learning in Fayetteville Public Schools (Arkansas). During his career in public education, he has served as a teacher, assistant principal, principal, director of secondary instruction, and executive director of curriculum and instruction.  He has also served as a social studies curriculum coordinator with the Arkansas Department of Education and the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction. Kyle Hamstra is an Instructional facilitator at Westlake Middle school Apex, North Carolina.
Oct 5, 2021
26 min
SEL Watch:  How to Approach Young Students Who May Be In Emotional Distress
In this segment, we talk about spotting elementary school students in distress and how to approach those who may on the edge. Join us as we identify behavioral indicators and practical intervention strategies. Follow on Twitter:  @sgthomas1973 @bamradionetwork @jonHarper70bd @bamradionetwork Lynsay Ayer, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist who conducts research on youth mental health. She is a member of the suicide prevention research team at the National Institute of Mental Health and is also a senior behavioral scientist at the RAND Corporation. Robert C. Schmidt, Ed.D, LCPC, NCC is a national speaker and consultant on building sustainable school mental health and suicide prevention programs centered on data collection, outcomes, quality of services, and student achievement.  With interests embedded in research, Dr. Schmidt has published chapters in recognized books including the award-winning book by Dr. Kathryn Seifert, How Children Become Violent (2006) and Youth Violence (2011). He has led studies in the field of youth suicide, school mental health and was a contributor to Preventing Suicide: A Toolkit for High Schools: Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).  In 2009 Dr. Schmidt published and is the author of the Risk Identification Suicide Kit (RISK) and in 2018 the RISK2, a suicide assessment instrument for ages 7-24.  Dr. Schmidt previously worked at Johns Hopkins BayView Campus in Baltimore, Maryland and provided coverage to the Johns Hopkins Psychiatric Children’s Center, Baltimore Adolescent Treatment Program, Outpatient Clinic, and 24-hour Baltimore Child & Adolescent Crisis. Shawn Thomas is in her 20th year of teaching in the largest county in Georgia. She has taught Kindergarten, Second and Third Grade, and ESOL (English to Speakers of Other Languages) K-5.
Oct 3, 2021
10 min
The Minimum Every Teacher Needs to Know About Critical Race Theory and the School Policies It Inspires
This term, many teachers, school leaders, students, and parents are going to be touched by the discussion seeping into schools around the United States. What is Critical Race Theory, and how did it get on the list of back-to-school things we all need to think about? In this episode, we invited three guests with specialized experience, knowledge, and insight to help us understand the basics. Follow on Twitter: @DrDorindaCA@JG4Justice @s_e_schwartz @jonHarper70bd @bamradionetwork Sarah Schwartz is a reporter for Education Week who covers curriculum and instruction. Before joining the staff, she was as an Education Week intern, covering education technology. She has also worked at a middle school in New York. Janel George is an Associate Professor of Law at Georgetown University Law Center. Her work and scholarship focus on racial stratification and inequality in U.S. education. She has written about the resegregation of public schools, discriminatory school discipline practices, Critical Race Theory, and resource equity. She has served as Legislative Counsel in both the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate, during which time her legislative portfolio included child welfare, civil rights, and education issues. As a civil rights attorney with the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc. (LDF), she worked with several campaigns and coalitions to leverage legislative and policy advocacy to advance equal educational opportunity. She also helped to advance the federal policy work of the Dignity in Schools Campaign, including securing provisions related to promoting positive and inclusive school climates in the federal Every Student Succeeds Act. She has also worked with non-profits on a variety of state and federal policy issues and has served as an adjunct professor at Georgetown Law and Georgetown University’s McCourt School of Public Policy. Dr. Dorinda Carter Andrews is an internationally renowned professor and the chairperson for the Department of Teacher Education at Michigan State University. Her research focuses on racial equity and justice in education and helping school leaders and youth develop and maintain culturally responsive learning environments. She has given two TEDx talks and is widely published on teacher education and culturally relevant teaching.
Aug 29, 2021
16 min
Getting Our Youngest Students Emotionally Ready for the School Year Ahead
Many students will be starting school for the first time this year and many will do so without the benefit of kindergarten or face-to-face learning. What special needs will our youngest students bring into the classroom, and what do we need to know to help them adjust? Follow on Twitter: @dubioseducator @drchriscip @madeline_will @Jonharper70bd @bamradionetwork Faige Meller taught for 38 years at the same school “The Center For Early Education” and that’s where she is a substitute teacher. She began teaching in 1977 in the preschool. In 1991 she became one of the kindergarten teachers. She taught kindergarten until retired in June 2015. She started subbing in 2016 and subbed in Toddlers, 3 and 4-year-old program, kindergarten, 1st and 2nd. She did a three-and-a-half-month sub position for a kindergarten teacher from January till April 17th — which included in the classroom and then remote learning. Christina Cipriano, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor at the Yale Child Study Center and Director of Research at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence (YCEI). Dr. Cipriano’s research focuses on the systematic examination of social and emotional learning (SEL) to promote pathways to optimal developmental outcomes for the traditionally marginalized student and teacher populations. Madeline Will is a reporter for Education Week who covers the teaching profession. Before joining Education Week in 2016, she was the publications fellow for the Student Press Law Center. She graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2014.
Aug 16, 2021
12 min
Why the Swell of Teacher Appreciation Faded: How to Get It Back and Make It Stick
A recent three-year study at the  Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence affirmed what most of us know -- Teachers feel deeply unappreciated and it's impacting our social-emotional well-being. In this episode, we zero in on the swell of teacher appreciation that was sparked by remote learning, why it faded, and how we can get it back and make it stick. Follow on Twitter: @marcbrackett @DrKpsychologist @MrJosephHamer @jonHarper70bd @bamradionetwork Marc Brackett, Ph.D., is the founding director of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence and a professor in the Child Study Center at Yale University. His research focuses on the role of emotional intelligence in learning, decision making, creativity, relationships, health, and performance. He has published over 150 scholarly articles, received numerous awards, and is featured regularly in popular media outlets such as the New York Times, Good Morning America, CBS This Morning, and The Today Show. Marc serves on a number of boards, including the Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning (CASEL), the nonprofit that founded the field of social and emotional learning (SEL). Marc also consults regularly with corporations including Facebook, General Electric, Google, Microsoft, and Pinterest on integrating emotional intelligence principles into employee training and product design, and is co-founder of Oji Life Lab, a digital emotional intelligence learning system for businesses. Marc is the author of Permission to Feel: Unlocking the Power of Emotions to Help our Kids, Ourselves, and our Society Thrive, published by Celadon (Macmillan), which is being translated into 15 languages. Jelena Kecmanovic, Ph.D.,  is the founding director of the Arlington/DC Behavior Therapy Institute and an adjunct professor of psychology at Georgetown University.  In addition to academic articles, she has written for the Washington Post, The Conversation, Psychology Today Magazine, and others. Joseph Hamer is a second and third-grade combination teacher in Wichita, Kansas. He’s passionate about empowering children to explore their greatest potential through the liberty found in social-emotional learning. Joseph co-authored the brand-new activity book called Brain Awakes: Empowering Children Through Breath, Balance, and Reflection.  Additionally, he hosts the “Cup of Joe” podcast where he interviews inspiring educators to discuss how we can cultivate a more connected and compassionate community of learners.
Aug 2, 2021
12 min
Why (and How) More Women Teachers Are Moving From Being Passive and Agreeable to Fierce and Tender
In general, as women are increasingly setting firmer boundaries, being fierce and tender is an emerging mantra among female teachers. In this episode, we talk about the sprouting new rules of being authentic in the school and classroom settings. Follow on Twitter: @jonHarper70bd @bamradionetwork @self_compassion @mrsmeganmorgan Kristin Neff, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Texas at Austin. She is a pioneer in the field of self-compassion research, conducting the first empirical studies on self-compassion over fifteen years ago. She has co-developed an empirically-supported training program called Mindful Self-Compassion, and is the author of the books Fierce Self-Compassion, Self-Compassion: The Proven Power of Being Kind to Yourself, Mindful Self-Compassion Workbook, and Teaching the Mindful Self-Compassion Program: A Guide for Professionals and founder of www.self-compassion.org. Megan Morgan is a School Administrative Manager for Davenport Community School District which means she supports her principal in being the educational leader of the school. Megan blogs about her journey as a wife, mom, teacher, and food adventurer at mrsmeganmorgan.wordpress.com.
Jul 27, 2021
10 min
This Crazy School Year Is Over: How Will You Make the Most of Your Summer Break?
Seeing the various ways teachers are spending the summer is always interesting. Some of us travel, some rest, some play. Others dive into projects, write books, or immediately start bulking up their skills for the next term.  On the heels of an extraordinarily demanding school year, we're checking in with our peers to see how they plan to make the most of the summer break? Follow on Twitter: @TchrBreakroom @drchriscip @kavithacardoza   @Jonharper70bd @bamradionetwork Monica Swift, M.Ed., is an educator with 20+ years of varied experience in the field of education. She currently serves as an intermediate literacy instructional coach and an elementary classroom teacher. Throughout her years in the profession, Monica has served in private, public, and post-secondary education as teacher, coach, consultant, trainer, researcher, education systems strategist, and more. Kavitha Cardoza is an award-winning journalist based in Washington, D.C. She covers education and poverty.  Christina Cipriano, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor at the Yale Child Study Center and Director of Research at the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence (YCEI). Dr. Cipriano’s research focuses on the systematic examination of social and emotional learning (SEL) to promote pathways to optimal developmental outcomes for the traditionally marginalized student and teacher populations.
Jul 7, 2021
14 min
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