Top podcast episodes in Documentary

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How do you actually make change in the world? For 126 years, Mississippi has had the Confederate battle flag on their state flag, and they were the last state in the nation where that emblem remained “officially” flying.  A few days ago, that flag came down. A few days before that, it coming down would have seemed impossible. We dive into the story behind this de-flagging: a journey involving a clash of histories, designs, families, and even cheerleading.  This episode was reported and produced by Shima Oliaee, with production assistance from Annie McEwen and Bethel Habte.  It was a collaboration between OSM Audio and Radiolab. You can check out upcoming releases from OSM at: https://www.osmaudio.com/ To read or listen to Kiese Laymon's memoir Heavy: https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Heavy/Kiese-Laymon/9781501125669. To visit the Hospitality Flag website: https://declaremississippi.com/.
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Christina Romer was a top White House economist during the Great Recession. As a researcher, she specializes in the Great Depression. She tells us what those disasters can (and can’t) teach us about the Covid crash.
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Former patients of Ike’s have been sharing more stories with Joe ever since the podcast came out. In this special update episode, we hear about Elizabeth Wurtzel, Nora McInerny, and a woman who says Ike put her life in one of his unpublished novels. Meanwhile, Marty's efforts to see Ike stripped of his medical license continue.
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Before she decided to become a poker pro, Maria Konnikova didn’t know how many cards are in a deck. But she did have a Ph.D. in psychology, a brilliant coach, and a burning desire to know whether life is driven more by skill or chance. She found some answers in poker — and in her new book The Biggest Bluff, she’s willing to tell us everything she learned.
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Jad gives a TED talk about his life as a journalist and how Radiolab has evolved over the years. Here's how TED described it:How do you end a story? Host of Radiolab Jad Abumrad tells how his search for an answer led him home to the mountains of Tennessee, where he met an unexpected teacher: Dolly Parton.Jad Nicholas Abumrad is a Lebanese-American radio host, composer and producer. He is the founder of the syndicated public radio program Radiolab, which is broadcast on over 600 radio stations nationwide and is downloaded more than 120 million times a year as a podcast. He also created More Perfect, a podcast that tells the stories behind the Supreme Court's most famous decisions. And most recently, Dolly Parton's America, a nine-episode podcast exploring the life and times of the iconic country music star. Abumrad has received three Peabody Awards and was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2011.
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Today we revisit our story on Facebook and its rulebook, looking at what’s changed in the past two years and exploring how these rules will impact the 2020 Presidential Election.  Back in 2008 Facebook began writing a document. It was a constitution of sorts, laying out what could and what couldn’t be posted on the site. Back then, the rules were simple, outlawing nudity and gore. Today, they’re anything but.  How do you define hate speech? Where’s the line between a joke and an attack? How much butt is too much butt? Facebook has answered these questions. And from these answers they’ve written a rulebook that all 2.2 billion of us are expected to follow. Today, we explore that rulebook. We dive into its details and untangle its logic. All the while wondering what does this mean for the future of free speech? This episode was reported by Simon Adler with help from Tracie Hunte and was produced by Simon Adler with help from Bethel Habte. Special thanks to Sarah Roberts, Jeffrey Rosen, Carolyn Glanville, Ruchika Budhraja, Brian Dogan, Ellen Silver, James Mitchell, Guy Rosen, Mike Masnick, and our voice actor Michael Chernus. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 
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The Karen, a white woman who surveys, inconveniences, and terrorizes, service workers and people of color is a relatively new term in the culture, but her character type has been with us for centuries. In this episode of Decoder Ring we explore the history of this type, from the code-names used during enslavement, to the contemporary menace of the COVID age. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts and bonus episodes of shows like Dear Prudence and Slow Burn. Sign up now to listen and support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Thanks to the pandemic, the telehealth revolution we’ve been promised for decades has finally arrived. Will it stick? Will it cut costs — and improve outcomes? We ring up two doctors and, of course, an economist to find out.
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If former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin’s case for the death of George Floyd goes to trial, there will be this one, controversial legal principle looming over the proceedings: The reasonable officer. In this episode, we explore the origin of the reasonable officer standard, with the case that sent two Charlotte lawyers on a quest for true objectivity, and changed the face of policing in the US. This episode was produced by Matt Kielty with help from Kelly Prime and Annie McEwen. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.  
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In June of 2019, Brandon Ogbunu got on stage and told a story for The Story Collider, a podcast and live storytelling show. Starting when he was a senior in college being shook down by a couple cops, Brandon tells us about navigating his ups and downs of a career in science, his startling connection to scientific racism, and his battle against biology's central dogma.  Brandon’s story was recorded by The Story Collider as part of the 2019 Evolution Meeting in Providence, Rhode Island. You can find the full episode and learn more about The Story Collider here. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.  
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Muscogee (Creek) Nation's reservation spans 11 counties across Eastern Oklahoma. This land is now at stake, and the tribe’s legal team headed to D.C. to make its case in front of the Supreme Court. Learn more: thislandpodcast.com
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The Supreme Court is about to make a decision that will determine the future of five tribes and nearly half the land in Oklahoma, and it all starts with a murder on the side of the road in 1999.  Learn more: thislandpodcast.com
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The latest rager going on in the media is the accusations that Wayfair is trafficking humans in their cabinets. Conspiracies are circulating that missing women and children are being placed in industrial cabinets and sold across the United States. Many people are investigating the links between the alleged Wayfair scandal and the details in the infamous Pizzagate scandal. We also use this episode to bring awareness to the child sex trade that is unfolding all over the country.***IF YOU OR SOMEONE YOU KNOW IS A VICTIM OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING, CALL 1 (888) 373-7888 National Human Trafficking Hotline*****Sponsors for this episode!!**Raycon!!For the BEST earbuds we’ve ever tried, go to buyraycon.com/brohio and you’re going to get 15% of the best earbuds on the market!!BetterHelpFor professional and trusted help for your mental health, try betterhelp.com/brohio for 10% off your first month!
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Episode 1: Debra Newell, an interior designer in Southern California, meets John Meehan on an over-50 dating site. His profile looks exciting: Anesthesiologist, divorced, Christian. She falls in love fast. But her children dislike him and warn her that his stories don’t add up. A psychologist advises Debra to set firmer boundaries with her kids, saying she has a right to be happy. Subscribe today so you don't miss an episode: https://smarturl.it/dirtyjohn Do you like the music from Dirty John? To find out more, as well as find other podcasts to listen to, go to Wondery.com
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It starts with a schoolyard fight that leads the Palm Beach police to a horrific discovery about Jeffrey Epstein. The evidence is clear. But it will take a newspaper investigation a decade later for the real story to be revealed. If you or someone you know is a victim of sexual assault, reach out for help. In the US, you can contact the National Sexual Assault Hotline by calling 1-800-656-HOPE. Or you can chat anonymously with a hotline staffer by messaging the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network at online.rainn.org. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Zip Recruiter - Try ZipRecruiter for free and let them find the right hire for you at ziprecruiter.com/as ThredUP - Get 30% off your first order at thredup.com/mme
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A Cherokee leader is murdered in 1839 for signing a treaty with the United States, but the promise he died for was broken. Learn more: thislandpodcast.com
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In this new addition to the Freakonomics Radio Network, co-hosts Stephen Dubner and Angela Duckworth discuss the relationship between age and happiness. Also: does all creativity come from pain? New episodes of "No Stupid Questions" are released every Sunday evening — please subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.
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The geography of this country was reshaped in the late 1800s and depending on who tells it, it's either a story of good intentions...or one of outright theft.
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A summer party. A stormy night. And a shocking revelation about Joe’s neighbor next door. The Shrink Next Door is presented by Brooklinen Get 10% of your first order plus free shipping when you use promo code THESHRINK at brooklinen.com Other sponsors include: Smile Direct Club - Get a $25 credit on your at home kit or book a free assessment at one of their locations, plus save $150 on your aligners when you visit smiledirectclub.com/podcast and use code SHRINK150 at checkout Better Help - Get 10% off your first month when you visit them at betterhelp.com/theshrink Ship Station - Get a 60-day free trial when you visit shipstation.com click the microphone at the top of the page, and enter code THESHRINK
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There are some very powerful groups set against Muscogee (Creek) Nation. Who are they? What's their motivation? And what arguments are they using to win their case in Court? Learn more: thislandpodcast.com
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Today, the Supreme Court made a historic ruling on the reservation status of Eastern Oklahoma. Rebecca Nagle is here to break down the decision, talk through the implications, and hey, celebrate a little. Because this win -- it’s huge.
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Millions and millions are out of work, with some jobs never coming back. We speak with four economists — and one former presidential candidate — about the best policy options and the lessons (good and bad) from the past.
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Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It’s a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.  
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Episode 2: After an intruder appears in John and Debra’s livingroom, John insists that they install security cameras. Debra begins to wonder whether he is spying on her. Her nephew, Shad, looks into John’s background and confronts him with what he finds. Debra’s vision of an idyllic marriage is shattered when she discovers a stash of paperwork in John’s home office. Subscribe today so you don't miss an episode: https://smarturl.it/dirtyjohn Do you like the music from Dirty John? To find out more, as well as find other podcasts to listen to, go to Wondery.com
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Episode 3: Debra grapples with the question, “Who did I marry?” The story of John’s mysterious past unfolds through the eyes of his sisters, his law-school housemate, his ex-wife, and an Ohio cop who hunted him. The origins of John’s nickname are revealed. Bed-ridden in an Orange County hospital, he pleads with Debra to take him back. Subscribe today so you don't miss an episode: https://smarturl.it/dirtyjohn Do you like the music from Dirty John? To find out more, as well as find other podcasts to listen to, go to Wondery.com
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In 2007, Bruce Robison’s robot submarine stumbled across an octopus settling in to brood her eggs. It seemed like a small moment. But as he went back to visit her, month after month, what began as a simple act of motherhood became a heroic feat that has never been equalled by any known species on Earth.  This episode was reported and produced by Annie McEwen.  Special thanks to Kim Fulton-Bennett and Rob Sherlock at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. And thanks to the Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra for the use of their piece, “Concerto for Bassoon & Chamber Orchestra: II. Beautiful.”  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.   If you need more ocean in your life, check out the incredible Monterey Bay Aquarium live cams (especially the jellies!): www.montereybayaquarium.org/animals/live-cams
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Episode 4: Debra is in hiding, living out of hotels and disguising herself with a wig. Debra fears she will meet the fate of her sister Cindi, who was killed by her husband as she tried to escape a bad marriage. John has explanations for the accusations against him. He weeps and apologizes. Three decades earlier, that had helped Cindi’s killer walk out of prison.  Subscribe today so you don't miss an episode: https://smarturl.it/dirtyjohn Do you like the music from Dirty John? To find out more, as well as find other podcasts to listen to, go to Wondery.com
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A murder case sparked an investigation into the treaty rights of five tribes. But another case -- a simple case about an adoption -- could actually dismantle America's tribes as we know them.
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Episode 5: John finds a lawyer and plots to unleash a blizzard of lawsuits against his enemies, with the aim of proving to Debra that he is the victim, in case after case. The lawyer believes her life is in danger. As her painful isolation from her family deepens, she secretly plans her escape from the marriage.  Subscribe today so you don't miss an episode: https://smarturl.it/dirtyjohn Do you like the music from Dirty John? To find out more, as well as find other podcasts to listen to, go to Wondery.com
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Tribes are asking that the Supreme Court keep the promises that it made to them, because what's lost when those promises are broken is much more than just land.
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Episode 6: Jacquelyn and Terra Newell suspect that John has been watching them. When Jacquelyn tells her mother that he is in town, her mother believes she is mistaken. Jacquelyn warns Terra to carry her pocket knife. But Terra is preoccupied by a country-music concert, and she is watching for the wrong car.  Subscribe today so you don't miss an episode: https://smarturl.it/dirtyjohn Do you like the music from Dirty John? To find out more, as well as find other podcasts to listen to, go to Wondery.com
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The college dropout who becomes a private school teacher. The teacher who becomes a Wall Street titan. That’s the myth of Jeffrey Epstein’s rise to wealth and power. But the truth is more complicated and nefarious. He may even be the mastermind behind one of the largest Ponzi schemes in U.S. history. That didn’t stop him from winning over one lonely billionaire in particular. If you or someone you know is a victim of sexual assault, reach out for help. In the US, you can contact the National Sexual Assault Hotline by calling 1-800-656-HOPE. Or you can chat anonymously with a hotline staffer by messaging the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network at online.rainn.org. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Simplisafe - Get free shipping and money back guarantee at simplisafe.com/mme Best Fiends - Download the game for free on the apple app store or google play
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A new psychiatrist. A fight between brother and sister. And bank robbery. It’s 1981, and Marty finds relief in the advice of a new psychiatrist, which shapes every part of his life.     The Shrink Next Door is presented by Brooklinen Get 10% of your first order plus free shipping when you use promo code THESHRINK at brooklinen.com Other sponsors include: Smile Direct Club - Get a $25 credit on your at home kit or book a free assessment at one of their locations, plus save $150 on your aligners when you visit smiledirectclub.com/podcast and use code SHRINK150 at checkout Better Help - Get 10% off your first month when you visit them at betterhelp.com/theshrink Ship Station - Get a 60-day free trial when you visit shipstation.com click the microphone at the top of the page, and enter code THESHRINK
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Covid-19 is the biggest job killer in a century. As the lockdown eases, what does re-employment look like? Who will be first and who last? Which sectors will surge and which will disappear? Welcome to the Great Labor Reallocation of 2020.
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The accidental futurist Kevin Kelly on why enthusiasm beats intelligence, how to really listen, and why the solution to bad technology is more technology.
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The Supreme Court punted a decision on Carpenter v. Murphy to the next term. What does this mean for the tribes?
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Epstein is flying high when the press takes notice of his friendship with former President Clinton. When a magazine writer starts digging into Epstein’s past, she has no idea how far he’ll go to stop her from revealing his secrets. ”Muddy Water” is performed by Lucette. To hear more, subscribe to Real Crime Profile’s companion series, “Forensically Deconstructing Jeffrey Epstein.” If you or someone you know is a victim of sexual assault, reach out for help. In the US, you can contact the National Sexual Assault Hotline by calling 1-800-656-HOPE. Or you can chat anonymously with a hotline staffer by messaging the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network at online.rainn.org. Support us by supporting our sponsors! ThredUp — Get an extra 30% off your first order when you go to thredup.com/MME SimpliSafe — Visit SimpliSafe.com/MME to get free shipping and a 60-day risk-free trial
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In the final episode of the six-part series, Epstein eludes justice yet again and leaves behind a trail of unanswered questions. ”Muddy Water” is performed by Lucette. And subscribe to "American Scandal" to hear Lindsay Graham's interview with Vanessa Grigoriadis (The New York Times Magazine, Vanity Fair), who has written extensively about Jeffrey Epstein and the social circles he traveled in. To hear more, subscribe to Real Crime Profile’s companion series, “Forensically Deconstructing Jeffrey Epstein.” If you or someone you know is a victim of sexual assault, reach out for help. In the US, you can contact the National Sexual Assault Hotline by calling 1-800-656-HOPE. Or you can chat anonymously with a hotline staffer by messaging the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network at online.rainn.org. If you or someone you know is struggling with mental health, here are some additional resources: National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255. National Alliance on Mental Illness: 1-800-950-6264. Crisis Text Line: Text HOME to 741741 Support us by supporting our sponsors! Brooklinen — Get10% off and free shipping when you use promo code MME Brooklinen.com Ritual — Visit ritual.com/MME to try the reinvented multivitamin and get 10% off during your firs three months
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Our old friend Lulu Miller — former Radiolab producer, co-creator of Invisibilia — has been obsessed by the chaos that rules the universe since long before it showed up as a global pandemic, and a few weeks ago, she published a book about it. It’s called Why Fish Don’t Exist. It’s part scientific adventure story, part philosophical manifesto, part chest-ripped-open memoir. Jad called her up to talk about how an obscure 19th century ichthyologist with a checkered past helped her find meaning in the world, and what she means when she says fish aren’t real. You can buy Lulu's book Why Fish Don’t Exist here. This episode was produced by Pat Walters.  Special thanks to Pan•American. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.  
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Getting out of prison means freedom, but this liberation often comes with caveats. In our final episode of the season, three formerly incarcerated people describe the unwelcome surprises that were waiting for them on the other side of the gates. Plus, Ear Hustlers respond to the murder of George Floyd and recent protests. Thanks to Lt. Sam Robinson and Acting Warden Ron Broomfield for their support. Ear Hustle is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX. Find a full list of episode credits at earhustlesq.com.
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Jeffrey Epstein didn't just want money. He craved status. And to get it, he'd use his connections to one billionaire and the daughter of another. ”Muddy Water” is performed by Lucette. To hear more, subscribe to Real Crime Profile’s companion series, “Forensically Deconstructing Jeffrey Epstein.” If you or someone you know is a victim of sexual assault, reach out for help. In the US, you can contact the National Sexual Assault Hotline by calling 1-800-656-HOPE. Or you can chat anonymously with a hotline staffer by messaging the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network at online.rainn.org. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Brooklinen — Get 10% off and free shipping by using promo code MME at brooklinen.com Better Help — Get 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/MME
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A new figure appears at Marty’s office and imposes a new way of doing things at Marty’s business. The Shrink Next Door is presented by Brooklinen Get 10% of your first order plus free shipping when you use promo code THESHRINK at brooklinen.com Other sponsors include: Smile Direct Club - Get a $25 credit on your at home kit or book a free assessment at one of their locations, plus save $150 on your aligners when you visit smiledirectclub.com/podcast and use code SHRINK150 at checkout Better Help - Get 10% off your first month when you visit them at betterhelp.com/theshrink Ship Station - Get a 60-day free trial when you visit shipstation.com click the microphone at the top of the page, and enter code THESHRINK
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There are few musical moments more well-worn than the first four notes of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. But in this short, we find out that Beethoven might have made a last-ditch effort to keep his music from ever feeling familiar, to keep pushing his listeners to a kind of psychological limit. Big thanks to the folks at Brooklyn Philharmonic: Conductor Alan Pierson, Deborah Buck and Suzy Perelman on violin, Arash Amini on cello, and Ah Ling Neu on viola. And check out The First Four Notes, Matthew Guerrieri's book on Beethoven's Fifth. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 
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Producer Tracie Hunte stumbled into a duet between Nina Simone and the sounds of protest outside her apartment. Then she discovered a performance by Nina on April 7, 1968 - three days after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Tracie talks about what Nina’s music, born during another time when our country was facing questions that seemed to have no answer, meant then and why it still resonates today.  Listen to Nina's brother, Samuel Waymon, talk about that April 7th concert here.
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Jeffrey Epstein is out of jail and intent on rebranding himself. To shed the label of pedophile, he launches a PR offensive targeting the country’s premier institutions, scientists, and philanthropists. ”Muddy Water” is performed by Lucette. To hear more, subscribe to Real Crime Profile’s companion series, “Forensically Deconstructing Jeffrey Epstein.” If you or someone you know is a victim of sexual assault, reach out for help. In the US, you can contact the National Sexual Assault Hotline by calling 1-800-656-HOPE. Or you can chat anonymously with a hotline staffer by messaging the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network at online.rainn.org. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Best Fiends — Engage your brain with fun puzzles by downloading Best Fiends on the Apple App Store or Google Play Better Help — Get 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/MME
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The guest list for the Hamptons parties was filled with celebrities. But mingling among those guests were some of Ike’s patients. And not just Marty. The Shrink Next Door is presented by Brooklinen Get 10% of your first order plus free shipping when you use promo code THESHRINK at brooklinen.com Other sponsors include: Smile Direct Club - Get a $25 credit on your at home kit or book a free assessment at one of their locations, plus save $150 on your aligners when you visit smiledirectclub.com/podcast and use code SHRINK150 at checkout Better Help - Get 10% off your first month when you visit them at betterhelp.com/theshrink Ship Station - Get a 60-day free trial when you visit shipstation.com click the microphone at the top of the page, and enter code THESHRINK
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One day in 1961, the famous physicist Richard Feynman stepped in front of a Caltech lecture hall and posed this question to a group of undergraduate students: “If, in some cataclysm, all of scientific knowledge were to be destroyed, and only one sentence was passed on to the next generation of creatures, what statement would contain the most information in the fewest words?” Now, Feynman had an answer to his own question - a good one. But his question got the entire team at Radiolab wondering, what did his sentence leave out? So we posed Feynman’s cataclysm question to some of our favorite writers, artists, historians, futurists - all kinds of great thinkers. We asked them, “What’s the one sentence you would want to pass on to the next generation that would contain the most information in the fewest words?” What came back was an explosive collage of what it means to be alive right here and now, and what we want to say before we go. This episode was produced by Matt Kielty and Rachael Cusick, with help from Jeremy Bloom, Zakiya Gibbons, and the entire Radiolab staff.  Special Thanks to: Ella Frances Sanders, and her book, "Eating the Sun", for inspiring this whole episode. Caltech for letting us use original audio of The Feynman Lectures on Physics. The entirety of the lectures are available to read for free online at www.feynmanlectures.caltech.edu. All the wonderful people we interviewed for sentences but weren’t able to fit in this episode, including: Daniel Abrahm, Julia Alvarez, Aimee Bender, Sandra Cisneros, Stanley Chen, Lewis Dartnell, Ann Druyan, Rose Eveleth, Ty Frank, Julia Galef, Ross Gay, Gary Green, Cesar Harada, Dolores Huerta, Robin Hunicke, Brittany Kamai, Priya Krishna, Ken Liu, Carmen Maria Machado, James Martin, Judith Matloff, Ryan McMahon, Hasan Minhaj, Lorrie Moore, Priya Natarajan, Larry Owens, Sunni Patterson, Amy Pearl, Alison Roman, Domee Shi, Will Shortz, Sam Stein, Sohaib Sultan, Kara Swisher, Jill Tarter, Olive Watkins, Reggie Watts, Deborah Waxman, Alex Wellerstein, Caveh Zahedi.  
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Marty cleans house, and makes a call to someone he hasn’t seen in decades. The Shrink Next Door is presented by Brooklinen Get 10% of your first order plus free shipping when you use promo code THESHRINK at brooklinen.com Other sponsors include: Smile Direct Club - Get a $25 credit on your at home kit or book a free assessment at one of their locations, plus save $150 on your aligners when you visit smiledirectclub.com/podcast and use code SHRINK150 at checkout Better Help - Get 10% off your first month when you visit them at betterhelp.com/theshrink Ship Station - Get a 60-day free trial when you visit shipstation.com click the microphone at the top of the page, and enter code THESHRINK
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Detective novels. Personal memoirs. Patient notes. Marty spent hundreds of hours typing and re-typing them all, until he finally had enough. The Shrink Next Door is presented by Brooklinen Get 10% of your first order plus free shipping when you use promo code THESHRINK at brooklinen.com Other sponsors include: Smile Direct Club - Get a $25 credit on your at home kit or book a free assessment at one of their locations, plus save $150 on your aligners when you visit smiledirectclub.com/podcast and use code SHRINK150 at checkout Better Help - Get 10% off your first month when you visit them at betterhelp.com/theshrink Ship Station - Get a 60-day free trial when you visit shipstation.com click the microphone at the top of the page, and enter code THESHRINK
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Back in the 1950s, facing the threat of nuclear annihilation, federal officials sat down and pondered what American life would actually look like after an atomic attack. They faced a slew of practical questions like: Who would count the dead and where would they build the refugee camps? But they faced a more spiritual question as well. If Washington DC were hit, every object in the the National Archives would be eviscerated in a moment. Terrified by this reality, they set out to save some of America’s most precious stuff.  Today, we look back at the items our Cold War era planners sought to save and we ask the question: In the year 2020, what objects would we preserve now?  This episode was reported and produced by Simon Adler with editing from Pat Walters and reporting assistance from Tad Davis.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.  
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Chattel slavery in the United States, with its distinctive – and strikingly cruel – laws and structures, took shape over many decades in colonial America. The innovations that built American slavery are inseparable from the construction of Whiteness as we know it today. By John Biewen, with guest Chenjerai Kumanyika.    Key sources for this episode: The Racial Equity Institute Ibram Kendi, Stamped from the Beginning Nell Irvin Painter, The History of White People
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Growing up in Mankato, Minnesota, John Biewen heard next to nothing about the town’s most important historical event. In 1862, Mankato was the site of the largest mass execution in U.S. history – the hanging of 38 Dakota warriors – following one of the major wars between Plains Indians and settlers. In this documentary, originally produced for This American Life, John goes back to Minnesota to explore what happened, and why Minnesotans didn’t talk about it afterwards.   Image: The Minnesota State Seal, 1858   Key sources for this episode: Gwen Westerman, Mni Sota MakoceMary Wingerd, North Country: The Making of Minnesota
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David Gebel and Dominique Crisden have a couple of things in common: they both live in New York, they’re both gay, and they’re both HIV-positive. But David is in his 60s, and has been living with the disease since moving to New York in the ‘80s. Dominique, on the other hand, is only in his early 30s. From our friends at WNYC's “Nancy”, this episode features a very special conversation between David and Dominique about the similarities and differences in their experiences living with HIV. Special thanks to Krishna Stone at Gay Men's Health Crisis, an HIV/AIDS prevention, care, and advocacy organization in New York.  This episode was produced by Tobin Low, Kathy Tu and Matt Collette. Music in this episode by Jeremy Bloom and Alex Overington. Theme by Alexander Overington. Note: A version of this episode first ran on May 7, 2017. Support our work. Become a Nancy member today at Nancypodcast.org/donate.    
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Events of the past few years have turned a challenging spotlight on White people, and Whiteness, in the United States. An introduction to our series exploring what it means to be White. By John Biewen, with special guest Chenjerai Kumanyika.
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Joe Nocera shares some recent updates on the story with Laura Beil, host of “Dr Death.” The Shrink Next Door is presented by Brooklinen Get 10% of your first order plus free shipping when you use promo code THESHRINK at brooklinen.com Other sponsors include: Smile Direct Club - Get a $25 credit on your at home kit or book a free assessment at one of their locations, plus save $150 on your aligners when you visit smiledirectclub.com/podcast and use code SHRINK150 at checkout Better Help - Get 10% off your first month when you visit them at betterhelp.com/theshrink Ship Station - Get a 60-day free trial when you visit shipstation.com click the microphone at the top of the page, and enter code THESHRINK
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We’ll try anything to help our loved ones who are experiencing pain. John and Elaine both turn to a new medical treatment to help their mothers. But for one of them, it will go horribly wrong. For accurate information on stem cell treatments, visit www.isscr.org/about-stem-cells, a site maintained by the International Society for Stem Cell Research. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Simplisafe - Get FREE shipping and a 60-day risk free trial when you visit simplisafe.com/batch Quip - Get your first refill pack free when you visit getquip.com/badbatch ThredUp - Get 30% off your first order when you visit thredup.com/batch Noom - Start your journey today at noom.com/batch Better Help - Get 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/batch Verishop - Get 15% off your first purchase at verishop.com/badbatch
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For much of human history, people viewed themselves as members of tribes or nations but had no notion of “race.” Today, science deems race biologically meaningless. Who invented race as we know it, and why? By John Biewen, with guest Chenjerai Kumanyika.  Photo: The Monument to the Discoveries, Lisbon, Portugal. The highlighted figure in the center is an effigy of Gomes Eanes de Zurara. The figure at the top right is Prince Henry the Navigator. Photo by Harvey Barrison.
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“All men are created equal.” Those words, from the Declaration of Independence, are central to the story that Americans tell about ourselves and our history. But what did those words mean to the man who actually wrote them? By John Biewen, with guest Chenjerai Kumanyika.   Key sources for this episode: Nell Irvin Painter, The History of White People Ibram Kendi, Stamped from the Beginning The Racial Equity Institute
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As Covid-19 first spread through Chicago, the residents of Little Village faced another imminent crisis — the hastily-approved demolition of an old coal-fired power plant that left the neighborhood shrouded in dust during a pandemic lock-down. This week, reporter Jenny Casas tells the story of Kim Wasserman's decades-long fight for environmental justice in Little Village and the lessons it offers for protest movements sweeping the country.     You can read the full history of how Chicago's coal power plants were closed in Kari Lydersen’s book, "Closing the Cloud Factories: Lessons from the fight to shut down Chicago’s coal plants" as well as view the most recent coverage of the fallout from the implosion via Mauricio Peña on Block Club Chicago here.
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The Order is a stunning new action-packed thriller of high stakes international intrigue featuring the enigmatic art restorer and master spy Gabriel Allon. The Order is the 20th novel in the Gabriel Allon series. Newt’s guest is Daniel Silva, the award-winning, #1 New York Times bestselling author.
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Covid-19 has put emergency room doctors on the frontlines treating an illness that is still perplexing and unknown. Jad tracks one ER doctor in NYC as the doctor puzzles through clues, doing research of his own, trying desperately to save patients' lives.  This episode was produced by Jad Abumrad and Suzie Lechtenberg. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.  
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Adam Neumann had a vision: to make his startup WeWork a wildly successful company that would change the world. He convinced thousands of other people -- customers, employees, investors -- that he could make that dream a reality. And for a while, he did. Hewas one of the most successful startup founders in the world. But then, in the span of just a few months, everything changed. Foundering is a new serialized podcast from the journalists at Bloomberg Technology. This season, we’ll tell you the story of WeWork, a company that captured the startup boom of the 2010s and also may be remembered as a spectacular bust that marked the end of an era. Subscribe to Foundering now: https://smarturl.it/Foundering
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In the U.S. alone, we hold 55 million meetings a day. Most of them are woefully unproductive, and tyrannize our offices. The revolution begins now — with better agendas, smaller invite lists, and an embrace of healthy conflict.
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Humans have a built-in “negativity bias,” which means we give bad news much more power than good. Would the Covid-19 crisis be an opportune time to reverse this tendency?
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The story of Bhagat Singh Thind, and also of Takao Ozawa – Asian immigrants who, in the 1920s, sought to convince the U.S. Supreme Court that they were white in order to gain American citizenship. Thind’s “bargain with white supremacy,” and the deeply revealing results.
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When it comes to America’s racial sins, past and present, a lot of us see people in one region of the country as guiltier than the rest. Host John Biewen spoke with some white Southern friends about that tendency. Part Six of our ongoing series, Seeing White. With recurring guest, Chenjerai Kumanyika. Image: A lynching on Clarkson Street, New York City, during the Draft Riots of 1863. Credit: Greenwich Village Society of Historical Preservation. Shannon Sullivan’s books, Revealing Whiteness and Good White People.  Thanks to Chris Julin, whose 1991 NPR report on the Wisconsin fishing rights dispute we featured.
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In the months since “Dirty John” was released, more of John Meehan’s victims have told their stories. Carolina Miranda from the LA Times interviews Christopher Goffard, Debra and Terra Newell, and John Meehan’s first wife. Plus, a panel on coercive control and a special live performance by Tracy Bonham. Recorded live at the Ace Theatre. Thank you to our sponsors: Hunt A Killer - Get 10% your subscription when you use the code DIRTY JOHN at checkout when you visit www.huntakiller.com/dirtyjohn   Quip - Get free shipping and your first refill pack free when you buy a toothbrush at www.getquip.com/dirtyjohn
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When it comes to U.S. government programs and support earmarked for the benefit of particular racial groups, history is clear. White folks have received most of the goodies. By John Biewen, with Deena Hayes-Greene of the Racial Equity Institute and recurring series partner Chenjerai Kumanyika.
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Scientists weren’t the first to divide humanity along racial – and and racist – lines. But for hundreds of years, racial scientists claimed to provide proof for those racist hierarchies – and some still do.   Resources for this episode: Fatal Invention, by Dorothy Roberts The History of White People, by Nell Irvin Painter
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One of the most consistent questions we get at the show is from parents who want to know which episodes are kid-friendly and which aren’t. So today, we're releasing a separate feed, Radiolab for Kids. To kick it off, we're rerunning an all-time favorite episode: Space. In the 60’s, space exploration was an American obsession. This hour, we chart the path from romance to increasing cynicism. We begin with Ann Druyan, widow of Carl Sagan, with a story about the Voyager expedition, true love, and a golden record that travels through space. And astrophysicist Neil de Grasse Tyson explains the Coepernican Principle, and just how insignificant we are. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.      
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Three university presidents try to answer our listeners’ questions. The result? Not much pomp and a whole lot of circumstance.
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For hundreds of years, the white-dominated American culture has raised the specter of the dangerous, violent black man. Host John Biewen tells the story of a confrontation with an African American teenager. Then he and recurring guest Chenjerai Kumanyika discuss that longstanding image – and its neglected flipside: white-on-black violence.
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Breaking news in the case of Dr Isaac Herschkopf.
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More patients are getting sick. As people across the country start asking questions, John K scrambles to figure out what went wrong and to save his company.  For accurate information on stem cell treatments, visit the International Society for Stem Cell Research website. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Simplisafe - Get FREE shipping and a 60-day risk free trial when you visit simplisafe.com/batch Quip - Get your first refill pack free when you visit getquip.com/badbatch ThredUp - Get 30% off your first order when you visit thredup.com/batch Noom - Start your journey today at noom.com/batch Better Help - Get 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/batch Verishop - Get 15% off your first purchase at verishop.com/badbatch
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We revisit two topics we discussed with the great Rosemary Ellen Guiley: Time Slips and Angels. It is a special program as we pay tribute to the late great Rosemary Ellen Guiley. As we approach the one year anniversary of her passing, we felt moved to share some of our past interviews. Enjoy them and bless you Rosemary. You can find her books we discussed at Amazon: Slips in Time and Space Calling Upon Angels: How Angels Help Us in Daily Life Rosemary thanks for everything over the years. Godspeed. -BABBEL- Babbel is the best way to learn a language! With Babbel you can choose from 14 different choices, including, Spanish, French, Italian, and German. Right now, Babbel is offering our listeners three months free with a purchase of a three month subscription with promo code Jim  Go to Babbel.com and use promo code Jim to get in on that great deal! -GURU- Tune into this new podcast miniseries on the dark side of enlightenment. James Arthur Ray was an Oprah-endorsed self-help teacher who achieved fame, fortune, and influence. But friends and family members of his followers questioned his unorthodox methods, and tried to stop him. From Wondery, the makers of Dirty John, Dr. Death, and The Shrink Next Door comes a story about the dark side of enlightenment. Hosted by journalist Matt Stroud. Listen today at wondery.fm/paranormal_guru or wherever you get your podcasts.
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Hollywood loves stories about fugitives on the run, but in reality that lifestyle is anything but glamorous, especially for those who get pulled in along the way. One woman reflects back on six years spent on the lam in Mexico, after her husband was charged with murder and their family fled south. We’re nearing the end of our first-ever spring fundraiser, and we need your help. If you can spare a little to support the show, go to earhustlesq.com/donate. Thank you! Thanks to Lt. Sam Robinson and Acting Warden Ron Broomfield for their support. Ear Hustle is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX. Find a full list of episode credits at earhustlesq.com.
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Who is John K? Before he founded Liveyon he had quite a remarkable career. For accurate information on stem cell treatments, visit the International Society for Stem Cell Research website. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Simplisafe - Get FREE shipping and a 60-day risk free trial when you visit simplisafe.com/batch Quip - Get your first refill pack free when you visit getquip.com/badbatch ThredUp - Get 30% off your first order when you visit thredup.com/batch Noom - Start your journey today at noom.com/batch Better Help - Get 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/batch Verishop - Get 15% off your first purchase at verishop.com/badbatch
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For years, Myra Greene had explored blackness through her photography, often in self-portraits. She wondered, what would it mean to take pictures of whiteness? For her friends, what was it like to be photographed because you’re white? With another conversation between host John Biewen and series collaborator Chenjerai Kumanyika.
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John K. builds his company, and focuses on what he does best. A fleet of salesmen and doctors are selling a miracle, and they’re not necessarily sharing the whole story of the bad batch. For accurate information on stem cell treatments, visit the International Society for Stem Cell Research website. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Simplisafe - Get FREE shipping and a 60-day risk free trial when you visit simplisafe.com/batch Quip - Get your first refill pack free when you visit getquip.com/badbatch ThredUp - Get 30% off your first order when you visit thredup.com/batch Noom - Start your journey today at noom.com/batch Better Help - Get 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/batch Verishop - Get 15% off your first purchase at verishop.com/badbatch
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What will it take to make the United States a more fully-functioning democracy, and how can we, as citizens, bring about that change? By host and producer John Biewen, with series collaborator Chenjerai Kumanyika. Interviews with Michael Waldman, Jennifer Cohn, and Sanford Levinson. The series editor is Loretta Williams. Music by Algiers, John Erik Kaada, Eric Neveux, and Lucas Biewen. Music consulting and production help from Joe Augustine of Narrative Music.
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In 1919, a white mob forced the entire black population of Corbin, Kentucky, to leave, at gunpoint. It was one of many racial expulsions in the United States. What happened, and how such racial cleansings became “America’s family secret.” The history of Corbin as presented by the Corbin city government, with no mention of the 1919 racial expulsion.  Elliot Jaspin’s book, Buried in the Bitter Waters: The Hidden History of Racial Cleansings in America
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The concluding episode in our series, Seeing White. An exploration of solutions and responses to America’s deep history of white supremacy by host John Biewen, with Chenjerai Kumanyika, Robin DiAngelo, and Wiliam “Sandy” Darity, Jr.
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One in five Americans now has medical debt in collections and rising health care costs today threaten every small business in America. It’s time to challenge the medical establishment and require price transparency. Newt’s guest is Dr. Marty Makary from Johns Hopkins.
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The Kearns family funeral business was founded in New York City in the year 1900. Over 120 years, the family has seen a lot of history. Patrick Kearns and Paul Kearns-Stanley are the owners. After 4 months, they finally had a chance to reflect on the COVID-19 pandemic, and how it's looked from their corner of New York. They sat down together on a recent evening — at the end of a long work day — in their funeral home in Queens. This is our final installment of Hunker Down Diaries, at least for now. If you’ve enjoyed the series, tell a friend! And tag us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Music this week from Blue Dot Sessions and “Hunker Down” by Big Dudee Roo.
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Vials of stem cells are shipped around the country, but some of them are ticking time bombs. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Simplisafe - Get FREE shipping and a 60-day risk free trial when you visit simplisafe.com/batch Quip - Get your first refill pack free when you visit getquip.com/badbatch ThredUp - Get 30% off your first order when you visit thredup.com/batch Noom - Start your journey today at noom.com/batch Better Help - Get 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/batch Verishop - Get 15% off your first purchase at verishop.com/badbatch
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In a surprise twist, the Supreme Court announced that Carpenter v. Murphy will not be decided this term.
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In 2003, the word "metrosexual", meaning a well-groomed heterosexual man, exploded all over the English lexicon. It invaded the news, TV, and even American politics. On this episode of Decoder Ring we explore the origins of the metrosexual, and how trend forecasters, marketers, David Beckham, Sex and the City, and Queer Eye for the Straight Guy helped make the metrosexual possible. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts and bonus episodes of shows like Dear Prudence and Slow Burn. Sign up now to listen and support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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The Roswell Case is closed according to this week’s guest Thomas J. Carey…he says, the evidence is in and it is a cover up. You can find his book on the subject at Amazon: Roswell – The Ultimate Cold Case In part two, we talk with The Psychic Lawyer, Mark Anthony. You can find his website at evidenceofeternity.com Thanks Thomas & Mark! –MIRO– Miro is an online whiteboard that brings teams together – anytime, anywhere. Their infinite canvas is perfect for brainstorming, making mockups, organizing files, and managing complex projects. They even have templates to help you get started quickly. It’s great, you need to check it out today! Start collaborating for FREE when you sign up for an account at Miro.com/jim
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Elaine comes to terms with what happened. Other patients start to pick up the pieces too, and try to get justice. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Simplisafe - Get FREE shipping and a 60-day risk free trial when you visit simplisafe.com/batch Quip - Get your first refill pack free when you visit getquip.com/badbatch ThredUp - Get 30% off your first order when you visit thredup.com/batch Noom - Start your journey today at noom.com/batch Better Help - Get 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/batch Verishop - Get 15% off your first purchase at verishop.com/badbatch
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The U.S. spent the past few decades waiting for China to act like the global citizen it said it wanted to be. The waiting may be over.
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On this special surprise episode of Next Question with Katie Couric, we’re sharing an unreleased interview Katie did back in February with H&R Block CEO Jeff Jones. The interview's release was held as Katie shifted her attention to the coronavirus pandemic. But the conversation — which was done in front of a live audience in our Manhattan offices (another world, right?) — is surprisingly relevant to issues we are grappling with right now, like how to create more inclusive work environments, and the need for companies to lead with purpose. Jeff also talks about being an “unimpressive” kid, how military academy changed the course of his life, and how persistence helped him land his dream job. Jeff ends the conversation with some thoughtful career advice. And a friendly reminder to our listeners, the new, extended tax deadline is just around the corner — July 15! Subscribe to Katie’s Couric’s morning newsletter, “Wake-Up Call,” on KatieCouric.com. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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More than a million people have caught Covid-19, and tens of thousands have died. But thousands more have survived and recovered. A week or so ago (aka, what feels like ten years in corona time) producer Molly Webster learned that many of those survivors possess a kind of superpower: antibodies trained to fight the virus. Not only that, they might be able to pass this power on to the people who are sick with corona, and still in the fight. Today we have the story of an experimental treatment that’s popping up all over the country: convalescent plasma transfusion, a century-old procedure that some say may become one of our best weapons against this devastating, new disease.   If you have recovered from Covid-19 and want to donate plasma, national and local donation registries are gearing up to collect blood.  To sign up with the American Red Cross, a national organization that works in local communities, head here.  To find out more about the The National COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma Project, which we spoke about in our episode, including information on clinical trials or plasma donation projects in your community, go here.  And if you are in the greater New York City area, and want to donate convalescent plasma, head over to the New York Blood Center to sign up. Or, register with specific NYC hospitals here.   If you are sick with Covid-19, and are interested in participating in a clinical trial, or are looking for a plasma donor match, check in with your local hospital, university, or blood center for more; you can also find more information on trials at The National COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma Project. And lastly, Tatiana Prowell’s tweet that tipped us off is here. This episode was reported by Molly Webster and produced by Pat Walters. Special thanks to Drs. Evan Bloch and Tim Byun, as well as the Albert Einstein College of Medicine.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.  
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“How attached are you to the idea of being white?” Chenjerai Kumanyika puts that question to host John Biewen, as they revisit an unfinished conversation from a previous episode. Part 7 of our series, Seeing White.
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Every season we answer questions from listeners in our Catch a Kite episode. This time around, formerly incarcerated people lend their experiences and lessons learned to a group of kids currently incarcerated at a juvenile facility in Madison, Wisconsin. We’re in the middle of our first-ever spring fundraiser. If you can spare a little to support the show, go to earhustlesq.com/donate. Thank you! And check out our new, limited-edition T-shirt, featuring an illustration by listener Anna Hicks. Thanks to Lt. Sam Robinson and Acting Warden Ron Broomfield for their support. Ear Hustle is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX. Find a full list of episode credits at earhustlesq.com.
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We speak with a governor, a former C.D.C. director, a pandemic forecaster, a hard-charging pharmacist, and a pair of economists — who say it’s all about the incentives. (Pandemillions, anyone?)
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A nation shaken by an unprecedented attack on the homeland immediately searches for ways to regain control.
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It began with a tweet: “EVERY DAY IS IGNAZ SEMMELWEIS DAY.” Carl Zimmer — tweet author, acclaimed science writer and friend of the show — tells the story of a mysterious, deadly illness that struck 19th century Vienna, and the ill-fated hero who uncovered its cure … and gave us our best weapon (so far) against the current global pandemic. This episode was reported and produced with help from Bethel Habte and Latif Nasser. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 
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As a former top adviser to presidents Clinton and Obama, he believes in the power of the federal government. But as former mayor of Chicago, he says that cities are where real problems get solved — especially in the era of Covid-19.
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Veteran journalist Joe Nocera’s neighbor in the Hamptons was a therapist named Ike. Ike counted celebrities and Manhattan elites as his patients. He’d host star-studded parties at his eccentric vacation house. But one summer, Joe discovered that Ike was gone and everything he’d thought he’d known about his neighbor -- and the house next door -- was wrong. From Wondery, the company behind Dirty John and Dr. Death, and Bloomberg, “The Shrink Next Door” is a story about power, control and turning to the wrong person for help for three decades. Written and hosted by Joe Nocera, a columnist for Bloomberg Opinion.
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Since the onset of the pandemic, we exist in a constant state of calculation, trying to define our own personal bubble. We’ve all been given a simple rule: maintain six feet of distance between yourself and others. But why six? Producer Sarah Qari uncovers the answer, and talks to some scientists who now say six might not be the right number after all.  This episode was reported and produced by Sarah Qari and Pat Walters. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.  
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The Other Latif Radiolab’s Latif Nasser always believed his name was unique, singular, completely his own. Until one day when he makes a bizarre and shocking discovery. He shares his name with another man: Abdul Latif Nasser, detainee 244 at Guantanamo Bay. The U.S. government paints a terrifying picture of The Other Latif as Al-Qaeda’s top explosives expert, and one of the most important advisors to Osama bin Laden. Nasser’s lawyer claims that he was at the wrong place at the wrong time, and that he was never even in Al-Qaeda. This clash leads Radiolab’s Latif into a years-long investigation, picking apart evidence, attempting to separate fact from fiction, and trying to uncover what this man actually did or didn’t do. Along the way, Radiolab’s Latif reflects on American values and his own religious past, and wonders how his namesake, a fellow nerdy, suburban Muslim kid, may have gone down such a strikingly different path.   Episode 6: Washington, D.C. Despite being cleared for transfer back to his family in Morocco in 2016, Abdul Latif Nasser remains stuck at Guantanamo Bay. Why? Latif talks to some of the civil servants actually responsible for Abdul Latif’s transfer and they tell him a dramatic story of what went on behind the scenes at some of the highest levels of government.  It’s a surprisingly riveting story of paperwork, where what’s at stake is not only the fate of one man, but also the soul of America.   This episode was produced by Sarah Qari, Annie McEwen, Suzie Lechtenberg, and Latif Nasser, and reported by Sarah Qari and Latif Nasser. Fact checking by Diane Kelly and Margot Williams. Editing by Jad Abumrad and Soren Wheeler. Original music by Jad Abumrad, Dylan Keefe, Alex Overington, and Amino Belyamani.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 
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In the American Revolution, the men who revolted were among the wealthiest and most comfortable people in the colonies. What kind of revolution was it, anyway? Was it about a desire to establish democracy—or something else? By producer/host John Biewen with series collaborator Chenjerai Kumanyika. Interviews with Davy Arch, Barbara Duncan, Rob Shenk, and Woody Holton. Edited by Loretta Williams. Music by Algiers, John Erik Kaada, Eric Neveux, and Lucas Biewen. Music consulting and production help from Joe Augustine of Narrative Music.
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The relationships between incarcerated people and the correctional officers who guard their prisons are often as bad as you might expect. But sometimes, they’re a lot more complicated. Find a full list of episode credits at earhustlesq.com, where you can also sign up for our newsletter or send a question (by postcard) that might get answered in a future episode. We particularly want to hear from incarcerated people and their families about how the coronavirus pandemic is affecting them. Information on how to get in touch is on our website. Ear Hustle is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX. Thanks to Lt. Sam Robinson and Acting Warden Ron Broomfield for their support, and to CBSi’s “The Lost Tapes” for sponsoring this episode.
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In a recent Radiolab group huddle, with coronavirus unraveling around us, the team found themselves grappling with all the numbers connected to COVID-19. Our new found 6 foot bubbles of personal space. Three percent mortality rate (or 1, or 2, or 4). 7,000 cases (now, much much more). So in the wake of that meeting, we reflect on the onslaught of numbers - what they reveal, and what they hide.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 
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Four women share their stories of loving incarcerated men, and the challenges they face in maintaining their relationships, staying hopeful about an eventual reunion, and carrying on with their lives on the outside. We just launched a month-long fundraiser. If you can spare a little to support the show, go to earhustlesq.com/donate. Thank you! And check out our new, limited-edition T-shirt, featuring an illustration by listener Anna Hicks. Ear Hustle is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX. Thanks to Lt. Sam Robinson and Acting Warden Ron Broomfield for their support.
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Have you ever had your tea leaves read? We talk with Sandra Mariah Wright and Leanne Marrama all about this ancient art. In part two, Steve Stockton joins us to talk about strange things in the woods! You can find both books we discussed on this episode at Amazon: Reading the Leaves: An Intuitive Guide to the Ancient Art and Modern Magic of Tea Leaf Divination Strange Things In The Woods: A Collection of Terrifying Tales Thanks Sandra, Leanne and Steve! –MIRO– Miro is an online whiteboard that brings teams together – anytime, anywhere. Their infinite canvas is perfect for brainstorming, making mockups, organizing files, and managing complex projects. They even have templates to help you get started quickly. It’s great, you need to check it out today! Start collaborating for FREE when you sign up for an account at Miro.com/jim
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Congress just passed the biggest aid package in modern history. We ask six former White House economic advisors and one U.S. Senator: Will it actually work? What are its best and worst features? Where does $2 trillion come from, and what are the long-term effects of all that government spending?
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When we face challenges in life, we seek answers from people we believe can help us. When tragedy strikes an exclusive retreat with a self-help superstar, many people are left to wonder: how far is too far? James Arthur Ray was an Oprah-endorsed self-help teacher who achieved fame, fortune, and influence. But friends and family members of his followers questioned his unorthodox methods, and tried to stop him. From Wondery, the makers of “Dirty John,” “Dr. Death,” and “The Shrink Next Door,” comes a story about the dark side of enlightenment. Hosted by journalist Matt Stroud. Listen today at wondery.fm/DirtyJohn_Guru
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One crime is treated differently than all others, both inside and outside prison. People who commit sex crimes against children are often ostracized, abused by fellow inmates, and deemed beyond rehabilitation. On this episode, we talk to victims and perpetrators about the causes for, and impacts of, these crimes. A note: This episode includes disturbing content that may not be suitable for all audiences. Please use discretion in listening. Ear Hustle is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX. Thanks to Lt. Sam Robinson and Acting Warden Ron Broomfield for their support.
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The Other Latif Radiolab’s Latif Nasser always believed his name was unique, singular, completely his own. Until one day when he makes a bizarre and shocking discovery. He shares his name with another man: Abdul Latif Nasser, detainee 244 at Guantanamo Bay. The U.S. government paints a terrifying picture of The Other Latif as Al-Qaeda’s top explosives expert, and one of the most important advisors to Osama bin Laden. Nasser’s lawyer claims that he was at the wrong place at the wrong time, and that he was never even in Al-Qaeda. This clash leads Radiolab’s Latif into a years-long investigation, picking apart evidence, attempting to separate fact from fiction, and trying to uncover what this man actually did or didn’t do. Along the way, Radiolab’s Latif reflects on American values and his own religious past, and wonders how his namesake, a fellow nerdy, suburban Muslim kid, may have gone down such a strikingly different path.   Episode 5: Cuba-ish Latif heads to Guantanamo Bay to try to speak to his namesake.  Before he gets there, he attempts to answer a seemingly simple question: why Cuba? Why in the world did the United States pick this sleepy military base in the Caribbean to house “the worst of the worst”?  He tours the “legal equivalent of outer space,” and against all odds, manages to see his doppelgänger… maybe. This episode was produced by Bethel Habte and Simon Adler, with Sarah Qari, Suzie Lechtenberg, and Latif Nasser. Help from W. Harry Fortuna and Neel Dhanesha. Fact checking by Diane Kelly and Margot Williams. Editing by Jad Abumrad and Soren Wheeler. Original music by Jad Abumrad, Simon Adler, Alex Overington, and Amino Belyamani. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 
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MYS107: In 1971, a shadowy group decided they needed to begin an investigation of the FBI, which they did with a burglary. Jimmy Akin and Dom Bettinelli ask who were these burglars, what FBI secrets did they discover, how did the FBI retaliate, and how did it shake up the FBI so that it’s never been the same. Get all new episodes automatically and for free: Subscribe using the RSS feed | Subscribe using Apple Podcasts | Subscribe using Google Podcasts | Subscribe using Stitcher | Subscribe by Email Help us continue to offer Jimmy Akin’s Mysterious World. Won’t you make a pledge at SQPN.com/give today? Links for this episode: * Betty Medsger’s book The Burglary * Tim Weiner’s book Enemies: A History of the FBI * Ronald Kessler’s book Secrets of the FBI * Gary Noesner’s book Stalling for Time: My Life as an FBI Hostage Negotiator * 1971 Documentary * FBI * J. Edgar Hoover * Citizens Commission to Investigate the FBI * Big Finish’s set of Doctor Who-themed audio plays, Missy, vol. 1 * Mark Wilson of Catholic Bard “Jimmy Akin’s Mysterious Interview” * Please spread the word about the podcast. Leave us a review on Apple Podcasts! * Purchase the books and other material from this and other episodes at the Mysterious World Bookstore. * Join the conversation at the Starquest Facebook page and the Jimmy Akin’s Mysterious World Facebook page. * Send your feedback or comments to mysterious@sqpn.com or send a tweet with the hashtag of #mysteriousfeedback Mysterious Headlines * Prosecutors Near Plea Deal for Golden State Killer * Another Attempt to Read the Voynich Manuscript * What If All Viruses Disappeared?
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Hey Everyone! It’s Bridget Marquardt here with a brand new episode of Ghost Magnet! Today’s guest Barri Ghai is a professional paranormal investigator and TV presenter with over 15 years experience. He first became interested in the existence of ghosts from a very early age after personally experiencing supernatural activity. He’s now the star of a hit ghost hunting show in the UK, is married to a witch and and they have 7 girls! Much to unpack on this week’s episode of Ghost Magnet.
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The conservative, neoliberal counterrevolution in the face of expanding democracy in America: It started long before Donald Trump. Even before Ronald Reagan and his like-minded counterpart across the Atlantic, Margaret Thatcher.   By host and producer John Biewen, with series collaborator Chenjerai Kumanyika. Interviews with Nancy MacLean, Wendy Brown, and Rhon Manigault-Bryant.   The series editor is Loretta Williams. Music by Algiers, John Erik Kaada, Eric Neveux, and Lucas Biewen. Music consulting and production help from Joe Augustine of Narrative Music.
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In the summer of 1964, about a thousand young Americans, black and white, came together in Mississippi to place themselves in the path of white supremacist power and violence. They issued a bold pro-democracy challenge to the nation and the Democratic Party. Produced by John Biewen, with series collaborator Chenjerai Kumanyika. Interviews with John Lewis, Bob Moses, Unita Blackwell, Hollis Watkins, Dorie Ladner, and many others. The series editor is Loretta Williams. Freedom song recordings courtesy of Smithsonian Folkways. Other music by Algiers, John Erik Kaada, Eric Neveux, and Lucas Biewen. Music consulting and production help from Joe Augustine of Narrative Music.  Photo: A Freedom Summer worker in Mississippi, 1964. Photo by Steve Schapiro.
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آخر ماجراهای واقعی هیچ وقت به اندازه‌ی قصه روشن و مشخص بسته نمی‌شه. این هم شاید یکی از همون قصه‌ها باشه. ماجرای دندانپزشکی که به قتل متهم شد.
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Right now, at this very moment, all across the planet, there are 7.6 billion human beings eating, breathing, sleeping, brushing their teeth, walking their dogs, drinking coffee, walking down the street or running onto the subway or hopping in their car, maybe reading a summary of a podcast they’re about to hit play on … and the number is only going up. Everyday 386,000 babies are born (16,000 an hour). We’re adding a billion new people every 12 years. So here’s a question you’ve probably never thought about: Are there more people alive right now than have ever lived on the planet in history? Do the living outnumber the dead? Robert got obsessed with this odd question, and in this episode we bring you the answer. Or, well, answers. This episode was reported by Robert Krulwich and produced by Annie McEwen and Pat Walters, with help from Neel Dhanesha. Fact-checking by Michelle Harris. Music and mixing by Jeremy Bloom. Special thanks to Jeffrey Dobereiner. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 
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After the Civil War, a surprising coalition tried to remake the United States into a real multiracial democracy for the first time. Reconstruction, as the effort was called, brought dramatic change to America. For a while. Reported and produced by John Biewen, with series collaborator Chenjerai Kumanyika. The series script editor is Loretta Williams. Interviews with Victoria Smalls, Brent Morris, Eric Foner, Kidada Williams, Bobby Donaldson, and Edward Baptist. Music by Algiers, John Erik Kaada, Eric Neveux, and Lucas Biewen. Music consulting and production help from Joe Augustine of Narrative Music.  Photo: Historian Bobby Donaldson of the University of South Carolina, at the South Carolina State House, Columbia, SC. Photo by John Biewen.
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In the summer of 1787, fifty-five men got together in Philadelphia to write a new Constitution for the United States, replacing the new nation’s original blueprint, the Articles of Confederation. But why, exactly? What problems were the framers trying to solve? Was the Constitution designed to advance democracy, or to rein it in? By producer/host John Biewen with series collaborator Chenjerai Kumanyika. Interviews with Woody Holton, Dan Bullen, and Price Thomas. The series editor is Loretta Williams. Music by Algiers, John Erik Kaada, Eric Neveux, and Lucas Biewen. Music consulting and production help from Joe Augustine of Narrative Music.
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Should a nurse or doctor who gets sick treating Covid-19 patients have priority access to a potentially life-saving healthcare device? Americans aren’t used to rationing in medicine, but it’s time to think about it. We consult a lung specialist, a bioethicist, and (of course) an economist.
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This is a story about your butt. It’s a story about how you got your butt, why you have your butt, and how your butt might be one of the most important and essential things for you being you, for being human.  Today, reporters Heather Radke and Matt Kielty talk to two researchers who followed the butt from our ancient beginnings, through millions of years of evolution, and all the way to today, out to a valley in Arizona, where our butts are put to the ultimate test.   This episode was reported by Heather Radke and Matt Kielty and was produced by Matt Kielty, Rachael Cusick and Simon Adler. Sound design and mixing by Jeremy Bloom. Fact-checking by Dorie Chevlen. Special thanks to Michelle Legro. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 
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In the decades after America’s founding and the establishment of the Constitution, did the nation get better, more just, more democratic? Or did it double down on violent conquest and exploitation?   Reported, produced, written, and mixed by John Biewen, with series collaborator Chenjerai Kumanyika. The series editor is Loretta Williams. Interviews with Robin Alario, Edward Baptist, Kidada Williams, and Keri Leigh Merritt. Music by Algiers, John Erik Kaada, Eric Neveux, and Lucas Biewen. Music consulting and production help from Joe Augustine of Narrative Music.
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The Other Latif Radiolab’s Latif Nasser always believed his name was unique, singular, completely his own. Until one day when he makes a bizarre and shocking discovery. He shares his name with another man: Abdul Latif Nasser, detainee 244 at Guantanamo Bay. The U.S. government paints a terrifying picture of The Other Latif as Al-Qaeda’s top explosives expert, and one of the most important advisors to Osama bin Laden. Nasser’s lawyer claims that he was at the wrong place at the wrong time, and that he was never even in Al-Qaeda. This clash leads Radiolab’s Latif into a years-long investigation, picking apart evidence, attempting to separate fact from fiction, and trying to uncover what this man actually did or didn’t do. Along the way, Radiolab’s Latif reflects on American values and his own religious past, and wonders how his namesake, a fellow nerdy, suburban Muslim kid, may have gone down such a strikingly different path.   Episode 4: Afghanistan  Latif investigates the mystery around Abdul Latif’s classified time in Afghanistan. He traces the government’s story through scrappy training camps, bombed out Buddhas, and McDonald’s apple pies to the very center of the Battle of Tora Bora.  Could Abdul Latif have helped the most sought-after and hated terrorist in modern history, Osama bin Laden, escape? The episode ends with a bombshell jailhouse interview with Abdul Latif, the most reliable evidence yet of what was going on in this man’s mind in the months after 9/11. This episode was produced by Annie McEwen, Sarah Qari, Suzie Lechtenberg, and Latif Nasser. Fact checking by Diane Kelly and Margot Williams. Editing by Jad Abumrad and Soren Wheeler. With help from Neel Dhanesha, Kelly Prime, and Audrey Quinn. Original music by Jad Abumrad, Alex Overington, Annie McEwen, and Amino Belyamani.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 
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Rebecca Black's music video for Friday was Youtube's most watched video of 2011, thrusting the thirteen-year-old Rebecca into a very harsh spotlight. Dubbed "The Worst Music Video Ever Made" Friday was an almost universal object of derision. This is the story of how Friday came to be, and how nearly a decade after it went viral, it sounds so different than it did back then. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts and bonus episodes of shows like Dear Prudence and Slow Burn. Sign up now to listen and support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Katherine Knight grew up in a very rough household. She lacked the love and nurturing that a child deserved. She was known as a drunken abuser when she grew up. Often times abusing her husbands with weapons and even caving one of their skulls. It's what happened to her last husband, John Price, that has us so interested. Enjoy this Australian catastrophe.Check out The It List PodcastPROMOS!!:As always, out favorite sponsor, bluechew.com. Use the promo code "brohio" for your FREE!! FREE!! shipment.
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2020 was going to be a big year for Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky: With a valuation around $31 billion, Airbnb was going to go public on March 31. And then the pandemic hit. Within weeks, Airbnb was gutted and Brian was forced to lay off 25 percent of his staff. “It would have been so easy to just spiral,” Brian Chesky says. “But every moment is a moment for us to be doing something that’s defining, to make us better.” On this episode of Back to Biz with Katie and Boz, co-hosts Katie Couric and Bozoma Saint John talk to Brian about how he quickly pivoted his company and how travel will be forever changed. In the wake of the national anti-racism protests, Airbnb has also had to reckon with its record on discrimination. Brian Chesky shares his regrets on not doing more sooner on race and the steps the company is taking now to make the platform and the company more equitable.   Sign up for Katie Couric’s morning newsletter, “Wake-Up Call.” Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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As the Coronavirus pandemic locks down parts of America and the world, we revisit an episode from 2018, about how the San Quentin community manages a prison lockdown. During a San Quentin lockdown, the prison grinds to a halt, and men are confined to their cells 24 hours a day. What causes a lockdown, and how do guys survive the wait when boredom, uncertainty, hunger and isolation can push them over the edge? A heads-up: this episode contains discussion of suicide and self-harm — listener discretion is advised. You can reach out to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.
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“America” and “empire.” Do those words go together? If so, what kind of imperialism does the U.S. practice, and how has American empire changed over time?  By host and producer John Biewen, with series collaborator Chenjerai Kumanyika. Interviews with Nikhil Singh and Daniel Immerwahr. The series editor is Loretta Williams. Music by Algiers, John Erik Kaada, Eric Neveux, and Lucas Biewen. Music consulting and production help from Joe Augustine of Narrative Music.
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A true story about seduction, deception, forgiveness, denial, and ultimately, survival. Reported and hosted by Christopher Goffard from the L.A. Times. Premieres October 2nd. Subscribe today so you are the first to hear Dirty John when it comes out: https://smarturl.it/dirtyjohn
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The Other Latif Radiolab’s Latif Nasser always believed his name was unique, singular, completely his own. Until one day when he makes a bizarre and shocking discovery. He shares his name with another man: Abdul Latif Nasser, detainee 244 at Guantanamo Bay. The U.S. government paints a terrifying picture of The Other Latif as Al-Qaeda’s top explosives expert, and one of the most important advisors to Osama bin Laden. Nasser’s lawyer claims that he was at the wrong place at the wrong time, and that he was never even in Al-Qaeda. This clash leads Radiolab’s Latif into a years-long investigation, picking apart evidence, attempting to separate fact from fiction, and trying to uncover what this man actually did or didn’t do. Along the way, Radiolab’s Latif reflects on American values and his own religious past, and wonders how his namesake, a fellow nerdy, suburban Muslim kid, may have gone down such a strikingly different path.   Episode 2: Morocco Latif travels to Abdul Latif’s hometown of Casablanca, Morocco, to try and find out: was he radicalized? And if so, how? Latif begins by visiting the man’s family, but the family’s reaction to him gets complicated as Latif digs for the truth. He finds out surprising information on a political group Abdul Latif joined in his youth, his alleged onramp to extremism. Tensions escalate when Latif realizes he’s being tailed.  Read more about Abdul Latif Nasser at the New York Times’ Guantanamo Docket.  This episode was produced by Sarah Qari, Suzie Lechtenberg, and Latif Nasser. With help from Tarik El Barakah and Amira Karaoud. Fact checking by Diane Kelly and Margot Williams. Editing by Jad Abumrad and Soren Wheeler. Original music by Jad Abumrad, Alex Overington, and Amino Belyamani.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 
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Here's a simple question: When an animal disappears in the winter, where does it go? Oddly enough, this question completely stumped European scientists for thousands of years. And even today, the more we learn about the comings and goings of the animals, the deeper the mystery seems to get. We visit a Bavarian farm with an 11 year old, follow warblers and wildebeests around the world, and get a totally new kind of view of the pulsing flow of animals across the globe.   This episode was reported by Robert Krulwich and Jackson Roach and produced by Pat Walters, Matt Kielty, and Jackson Roach. Mix & original music by Jeremy Bloom.   Special thanks to Allison Shaw, David Barrie, Auriel Fournier, and Moritz Matschke. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.  And check out: The Truth about Animals by Lucy Cooke No Way Home: The Decline of the Great Animal Migrations by David Wilcove  The migration video Jad and Robert watch in this episode!
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The Other Latif Radiolab’s Latif Nasser always believed his name was unique, singular, completely his own. Until one day when he makes a bizarre and shocking discovery. He shares his name with another man: Abdul Latif Nasser, detainee 244 at Guantanamo Bay. The U.S. government paints a terrifying picture of The Other Latif as Al-Qaeda’s top explosives expert, and one of the most important advisors to Osama bin Laden. Nasser’s lawyer claims that he was at the wrong place at the wrong time, and that he was never even in Al-Qaeda. This clash leads Radiolab’s Latif into a years-long investigation, picking apart evidence, attempting to separate fact from fiction, and trying to uncover what this man actually did or didn’t do. Along the way, Radiolab’s Latif reflects on American values and his own religious past, and wonders how his namesake, a fellow nerdy, suburban Muslim kid, may have gone down such a strikingly different path.   Episode 3: Sudan Latif turns his focus to Sudan, where his namesake spent time working on a sunflower farm. What could be suspicious about that?  Latif scrutinizes the evidence to try to discover whether - as Abdul Latif’s lawyer insists - it was just an innocent clerical job, or - as the government alleges - it was where he decided to become an extremist fighter.   This episode was produced by Suzie Lechtenberg, Sarah Qari, and Latif Nasser. With help from Niza Nondo and Maaki Monem. Fact checking by Diane Kelly and Margot Williams. Editing by Jad Abumrad and Soren Wheeler. Original music by Jad Abumrad, Alex Overington, Jeremy Bloom, and Amino Belyamani.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 
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The Great Depression presented a crisis not only for the U.S. economy, but for American democracy. President Franklin Roosevelt wanted to save the nation’s system of government, and its economic system, while reforming both. What did the New Deal achieve, and not achieve? Reported and produced by John Biewen, with series collaborator Chenjerai Kumanyika. Interviews with Eric Rauchway and Cybelle Fox. The series editor is Loretta Williams. Music by Algiers, John Erik Kaada, Eric Neveux, and Lucas Biewen. Music consulting and production help from Joe Augustine of Narrative Music.  Photo: Men fighting during a strike at the Ford Motor Company in Dearborn, Michigan, 1937. Image courtesy of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum. As mentioned in the episode, an article by public historian Larry DeWitt examining the widespread assertion that the exclusion of some occupations from the original Social Security old-age pension program was insisted on by southern segregationists: https://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/ssb/v70n4/v70n4p49.html
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The Other Latif Radiolab’s Latif Nasser always believed his name was unique, singular, completely his own. Until one day when he makes a bizarre and shocking discovery. He shares his name with another man: Abdul Latif Nasser, detainee 244 at Guantanamo Bay. The U.S. government paints a terrifying picture of The Other Latif as Al-Qaeda’s top explosives expert, and one of the most important advisors to Osama bin Laden. Nasser’s lawyer claims that he was at the wrong place at the wrong time, and that he was never even in Al-Qaeda. This clash leads Radiolab’s Latif into a years-long investigation, picking apart evidence, attempting to separate fact from fiction, and trying to uncover what this man actually did or didn’t do. Along the way, Radiolab’s Latif reflects on American values and his own religious past, and wonders how his namesake, a fellow nerdy, suburban Muslim kid, may have gone down such a strikingly different path.   Episode 1: My Namesake We hear the evidence against Abdul Latif Nasser -- at least the evidence that has been leaked or declassified -- and we meet Shelby Sullivan-Bennis, his attorney, who contests more or less every government claim against him. Sullivan-Bennis walks us through the excruciating process that came close to releasing Abdul Latif Nasser in the waning days of the Obama administration, but fell apart at the last minute. He is now technically a free man -- he was cleared for transfer home in 2016 -- yet he remains stuck at Guantanamo Bay, thanks in part to a Presidential Tweet. Read more about Abdul Latif Nasser at the New York Times’ Guantanamo Docket.  This episode was produced by Annie McEwen, Latif Nasser, Sarah Qari, and Suzie Lechtenberg. Fact checking by Diane Kelly and Margot Williams. Editing by Jad Abumrad and Soren Wheeler. Original music by Jad Abumrad, Alex Overington, Annie McEwen, and Amino Belyamani.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 
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People fighting for more democracy in the United States often have to struggle against sexism and racism. In fact, those two struggles are often inseparable—certainly from the perspective of black women and some other women of color. Reported and produced by host John Biewen, with Season 3 co-host Celeste Headlee and Season 4 collaborator Chenjerai Kumanyika. Interviews with Glenda Gilmore, Ashley Farmer, Sandra Arrington, and Danielle McGuire. Music by Alex Weston, Evgueni and Sacha Galperine, and Eric Neveux. Music consulting and production help from Joe Augustine of Narrative Music.
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How well do the news media serve us as citizens, and what role does the notion of “objective,” or “neutral,” journalism play in the failings of American democracy? Story reported by Lewis Raven Wallace, with host/producer John Biewen and collaborator Chenjerai Kumanyika. Interviews with David Mindich, Nikole Hannah-Jones, and Kevin Young. The series editor is Loretta Williams. *The View from Somewhere *editor: Ramona Martinez. Music by Algiers, John Erik Kaada, Eric Neveux, and Lucas Biewen. Music consulting and production help from Joe Augustine of Narrative Music.
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In prison, almost everyone has a nickname, and whether true or not, nearly every nickname has a story behind it. If that story is good enough, it might just become the stuff of legend. Find a full list of episode credits at earhustlesq.com, where you can also sign up for our newsletter and get the details on our T-shirt design contest. Ear Hustle is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX. Thanks to Lt. Sam Robinson and Acting Warden Ron Bloomfield for their support of the new season, and to Native, Article, Sony Music Entertainment, Wrongful Conviction and Stanford Children’s Hospital for sponsoring this episode.
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We are beginning the next great space race. It’s the United States verses China, in a competition to be first to create systems for commercial space travel, the first to establish outposts on the moon, and ultimately the first to colonize other planets. Newt’s guest is Charles Miller, President of NexGen Space.
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Launching our Season 3 series, co-hosts John Biewen and Celeste Headlee look at the problems of male supremacy. And we visit Deep Time to explore the latest scholarship on how, when, and why men invented patriarchy. Featuring Meg Conkey of UC-Berkeley, Mel Konner of Emory University, and Lisa Wade of Occidental College. Music by Alex Weston, and by Evgueni and Sacha Galperine. Music and Production help from Joe Augustine at Narrative Music.
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En un abrir y cerrar de ojos, el mundo cambió. Gabriela Wiener vive con su familia en Madrid, una ciudad golpeada fuertemente por el Covid-19. Nada ha sido lo mismo desde que el virus llegó a la capital española, pero ella nunca se imaginó que tendría que experimentar sus consecuencias de primera mano.__Este es el último episodio de la temporada. Mucha gracias por escuchar, comentar y compartir nuestras historias. Desde ya estamos trabajando en la producción de la décima (¡!) temporada de Radio Ambulante. Mientras tanto, los invitamos a escuchar El hilo, nuestro nuevo podcast. Todos los viernes seguiremos publicando episodios para contar la historia detrás de las noticias más importantes de Latinoamérica. Y si quieren saber cómo va la producción de nuestra nueva temporada, recibir recomendaciones de lo que estamos escuchando, o enterarse de convocatorias y novedades, suscríbanse a nuestro boletín semanal. ¡Hasta pronto!
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On the occasion of his retirement as cohost of Radiolab, Robert sat down with Jad to reflect on his long and storied career in radio and television, and their work together over the past decade and a half. And we pay tribute to Robert, inspired by a peculiar tradition of his. This episode was produced by Matt Kielty. Sound design & mix by Jeremy Bloom. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 
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Team Nancy takes a final stroll down memory lane. Check out our open-sourced Queer Podcasts spreadsheet for more queer shows. To get you started, check out Afroqueer, History is Gay, LGBTQ&A, Flyest Fables, Making Gay History, Gender Reveal, and If These Ovaries Could Talk. Music in this episode by Jeremy S. Bloom, Josh Woodward (Once Tomorrow, Border Blaster), and Albert Behar. Theme by Alexander Overington.
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A group of friends from Portugal, led by Maria, plan their first trip abroad - a train trip to Italy. They find Leonardo, a host and a police officer with glowing reviews. But he's not who he seems and their trip takes a terrible turn. Need help? You're not alone. Confidential help is available for free. National Sexual Assault Hotline Call 1-800-656-4673 (HOPE) - 24 hours everyday. Support the show.
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At San Quentin Prison, the typical cell measures approximately 4’ x 9’ and contains a bunk bed, toilet, sink, two men, and their six cubic feet of belongings. In our first episode of Ear Hustle, hear stories of negotiating this space and the relationships that come with living in such close quarters. Ear Hustle is produced by Nigel Poor, Antwan Williams and Earlonne Woods. Thanks to additional storytellers in this episode: Ron Self (had cellie from hell), Eddie and Emile DeWeaver (brother cellies), Cleo Cloeman (Earlonne's former cellie), Sha Wallace-Stepter & Donte Smith (laughing cellies). Thanks also to Joshua Burton and David Jassy (also incarcerated at San Quentin) for contributing some of the music used throughout Cellies. And thanks to you for tuning into our first episode! Ear Hustle is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX. Thanks to sponsors Mail Chimp and Bombas for their support. Find out more (including where to send a postcard with any questions for the team) at earhustlesq.com. And be sure to follow, like & share us: @earhustlesq on Twitter @earhustlesq on Instagram Ear Hustle Podcast on Facebook.
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The story passed for years from tea sellers to rickshaw drivers to shopkeepers in Old Delhi. In a forest, they said, in a palace cut off from the city, lived a prince, a princess and a queen, said to be the last of a Shiite Muslim royal line. Some said the family had been there since the British had annexed their kingdom. Others said they were supernatural beings. It was a stunning and tragic story. But was it real? On a spring afternoon, while on assignment in India, Ellen Barry got a phone call that sent her looking for the truth. In Chapter 1, we hear of a woman who appeared on the platform of the New Delhi railway station with her two adult children, declaring they were the descendants of the royal family of Oudh. She said they would not leave until what was theirs had been restored. So they settled in and waited — for nearly a decade.
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In most American schools, children *hear about *democracy, but don’t get to *practice *it. What would a more engaged brand of civics education look like? Story reported by Ben James, with host John Biewen and collaborator Chenjerai Kumanyika. Interviews with Arielle Jennings, Hilary Moss, and Nikole Hannah-Jones. The series editor is Loretta Williams. Music by the Summer Street Brass Band, Algiers, John Erik Kaada, Eric Neveux, and Lucas Biewen. Music consulting and production help from Joe Augustine of Narrative Music. Photo: Stephen Buckley, Jelicity Mercado, Bella Goncalves, and Angelica Pareja, eighth-grade students at Pyne Arts Magnet School in Lowell, Massachusetts, with their award at Civics Day in Boston, December 2019.
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As the FDA cracks down on stem cell businesses, a flashy new commercial makes a splash, and it looks a whole lot like Liveyon. Is John K back?
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When we face challenges in life, we seek answers from people we believe can help us. When tragedy strikes an exclusive retreat with a self-help superstar, many people are left to wonder: how far is too far? James Arthur Ray was an Oprah-endorsed self-help teacher who achieved fame, fortune, and influence. But friends and family members of his followers questioned his unorthodox methods, and tried to stop him. From Wondery, the makers of “Dirty John,” “Dr. Death,” and “The Shrink Next Door,” comes a story about the dark side of enlightenment. Hosted by journalist Matt Stroud. Listen today at wondery.fm/TMME_guru.
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This hour we pull apart one sentence, written in the hours after September 11th, 2001, that has led to the longest war in U.S. history. We examine how just 60 words of legal language have blurred the line between war and peace.
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Judd Apatow is a comedy powerhouse in Hollywood. From “The 40-Year-Old Virgin” to “Knocked Up” and “This is 40,” Judd has altered the comedy-making template, finding the funny in relatable and vulnerable (even cringeworthy) characters and situations. But what about the responsibility that comes with that power? In this moment of national reckoning on race, what are leaders like Judd doing to lift up black voices and stories? On this episode of “Back to Biz with Katie and Boz,” co-hosts Katie Couric and Bozoma Saint John talk to Judd about how Hollywood can bring diversity to the big screen, the future of moviemaking — and going — in a social-distanced world, as well as his new movie. “The King of Staten Island,” starring Pete Davidson, is an incredibly personal story (based on Pete’s own life) about loss, trauma, and mental health, which Judd says is perfect for this moment. The movie is available to watch on demand.  Sign up for Katie Couric’s morning newsletter, “Wake-Up Call.” Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Deep fake videos have the potential to make it impossible to sort fact from fiction. And some have argued that this blackhole of doubt will eventually send truth itself into a death spiral. But a series of recent events in the small African nation of Gabon suggest it's already happening.  Today, we follow a ragtag group of freedom fighters as they troll Gabon’s president - Ali Bongo - from afar. Using tweets, videos and the uncertainty they can carry, these insurgents test the limits of using truth to create political change and, confusingly, force us to ask: Can fake news be used for good? This episode was reported and produced by Simon Adler. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 
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COVID-19 has forced many families to improvise childcare. For some, it's been like a four month long 'bring your child to work' day. Paul Montanaro runs a pizza shop in the Bronx. That's where his 11-year-old daughter Francesca has been spending her days since her school shut down in March. Both of Francesca's parents are essential workers - her mom is an ICU nurse at a hospital in Manhattan. For our Hunker Down Diaries series, we asked Francesca to keep an audio diary as she finished up 5th grade in the pizzeria. Music this week from Blue Dot Sessions and “Nunca Es Suficiente” by Los Angeles Azules and Natalia Lafourcade.
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For millennia, Western culture (and most other cultures) declared that men and women were different sorts of humans—and, by the way, men were better. Is that claim not only wrong but straight-up backwards? Co-hosts Celeste Headlee and John Biewen explore the current state of the nature-nurture gender debate, with help from Lisa Wade of Occidental College and Mel Konner of Emory University.   Music by Alex Weston, and by Evgueni and Sacha Galperine. Music and production help from Joe Augustine at Narrative Music.
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We talk about winged cryptids with researcher and author Lon Strickler. In part two, we discuss how to transform your world by using the secret of the alchemist with Colm Holland. You can find the books we discussed on the show today at Amazon: Winged Cryptids: Humanoids, Monsters & Anomalous Creatures Casebook The Secret of The Alchemist: Uncovering The Secret in Paulo Coelho’s Bestselling Novel ‘The Alchemist’ Thanks Lon and Colm! -BABBEL- Babbel is the best way to learn a language! With Babbel you can choose from 14 different choices, including, Spanish, French, Italian, and German. Right now, Babbel is offering our listeners three months free with a purchase of a three month subscription with promo code Jim  Go to Babbel.com and use promo code Jim to get in on that great deal!
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The struggles against sexism and racism come together in the bodies, and the lives, of black women. Co-hosts Celeste Headlee and John Biewen look at the intersections between male dominance and white supremacy in the United States, and the movements to overcome them, from the 1800s through the 2016 presidential election. Guests include scholars Glenda Gilmore, Ashley Farmer, and Danielle McGuire. Music by Alex Weston, and by Evgueni and Sacha Galperine. Music and production help from Joe Augustine at Narrative Music.
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A few hundred years ago, the great thinkers of the Enlightenment began to declare that “all men are created equal.” Some of them said that notion should include women, too. Why did those feminists—most of them men, by the way—lose the fight? How did the patriarchy survive the Enlightenment? Co-hosts John Biewen and Celeste Headlee look into these questions, with historians Londa Schiebinger of Stanford and Toby Ditz of Johns Hopkins, and sociologist Lisa Wade of Occidental College. Music by Alex Weston, and by Evgueni and Sacha Galperine. Music and production help from Joe Augustine at Narrative Music.
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From a piece of the Wright brother's plane to a child’s sugar egg, today: Things! Important things, little things, personal things, things you can hold and things that can take hold of you. This hour, we investigate the objects around us, their power to move us, and whether it's better to look back or move on, hold on tight or just let go.
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Most people had never heard the name General Michael Flynn before he made a deal with Special Counsel Robert Mueller to plead guilty to a felony count of “willfully and knowingly” making false statements to the FBI. Why did Michael Flynn pose a threat to President Obama’s legacy and why was he made to pay for it? Newt’s guest is author, Lee Smith.
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The Other Latif Radiolab’s Latif Nasser always believed his name was unique, singular, completely his own. Until one day when he makes a bizarre and shocking discovery. He shares his name with another man: Abdul Latif Nasser, detainee 244 at Guantanamo Bay. The U.S. government paints a terrifying picture of The Other Latif as Al-Qaeda’s top explosives expert, and one of the most important advisors to Osama bin Laden. Nasser’s lawyer claims that he was at the wrong place at the wrong time, and that he was never even in Al-Qaeda. This clash leads Radiolab’s Latif into a years-long investigation, picking apart evidence, attempting to separate fact from fiction, and trying to uncover what this man actually did or didn’t do. Along the way, Radiolab’s Latif reflects on American values and his own religious past, and wonders how his namesake, a fellow nerdy, suburban Muslim kid, may have gone down such a strikingly different path. BONUS EPISODE Since we released the first episode of The Other Latif, we’ve been contacted by many new sources. Which is great! But it also means we need a little extra time to cobble together Episodes 5 and 6. So while we wait, Jad and Latif chat about Abdul Latif’s response to the series, a character who fell out of episode 4, and a tiny moment in Latif’s youth that helped put him on the path he’s on now. This episode was produced by Suzie Lechtenberg and Latif Nasser. Editing by Jad Abumrad and Soren Wheeler. With help from Sarah Qari. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 
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One woman’s fight against Silicon Valley’s racial pay gap. Plus, why it’s so hard for Black workers in tech to get ahead  
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Facts can be ignored by the powers that be and still ignite a movement. An interview with Tim Tyson, author of the new book, The Blood of Emmett Till. Tyson was the first historian or journalist to interview the former Carolyn Bryant, the woman in whose name Emmett Till was murdered in 1955.
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An 1839 assassination of a Cherokee leader. A 1999 small town murder. Two crimes collide in a Supreme Court case that will decide the fate of one man and nearly half of the land in Oklahoma. Hosted by Rebecca Nagle, Oklahoma journalist and citizen of Cherokee Nation, This Land traces how a cut and dry homicide opened up an investigation into the treaty rights of five Native American tribes. Tune in, beginning June 3rd to Crooked Media's 8-episode series to find out how this unique case could result in the largest restoration of tribal land in U.S. history.
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The #MeToo Movement has shed a harsh light on sexual harassment in the workplace. Just how bad, and how pervasive, is sexism on the job in the U.S., from day-to-day expressions of disrespect all the way to rape? Spoiler: It’s bad. Reported by Ibby Caputo. With researchers Hannah Riley Bowles of Harvard Kennedy School, Meg Bond of UMass Lowell, Peter Glick of Lawrence University, and Mily Treviño-Sauceda of Alianza Nacional de Campesinas. Thanks to Tena Rubio for production support. Voiceover by Ruxandra Guidi. Music by Alex Weston, Evgueni and Sacha Galperine, and Kevin MacLeod. Music and production help from Joe Augustine at Narrative Music.
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On April 5, 2015, cosmetic dermatologist to the stars Dr. Fredric Brandt is found hanging from an electrical cord at his home in Coconut Grove, Florida. Who or what led to his untimely demise? Zola: Sign up at Zola.com/baron to get your free personalized paper sample and use code SAVE50 to get 50% off save the dates. Best Fiends: Download free on the Apple App Store or Google Play. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
165
There is an urgent, specific danger facing our world today: nuclear weapons. In our first episode, producer and filmmaker Cynthia Lazaroff recounts the 40 minutes of terror she experienced during Hawaii’s nuclear missile false alarm in 2018. We also explore the history of nuclear false alarms with former Secretary of Defense Bill Perry, historian Taylor Downing, and writer Peter Anthony. Understanding why we are still at risk for these false alarms that could potentially trigger World War III is the first step in mediating the immediate risk and finding a new way forward.
166
It's February 2nd 1922, and all of Hollywood is about to wake up and learn that William Desmond Taylor, the most famous film director in town, was murdered in his home last night. The investigation will shine a light on some of Hollywood's most scandalous affairs, backroom deals, and underground drug dens. This real life Murder Mystery is one of the most iconic "whodunnit" cases of the 20th century that will leave you guessing and second guessing who killed William Desmond Taylor for weeks to come. Co-hosted by Tracy Pattin & James Remar Listen to Murder in Hollywoodland: wondery.fm/epsteinMiH.
167
How did poop get cute? On this episode of Decoder Ring we trace the rise of cute poop from the original Japanese poop emoji to more modern poop toys which rely on the Youtube algorithm to get seen and sold. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts and bonus episodes of shows like Dear Prudence and Slow Burn. Sign up now to listen and support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
168
Are some ideas so dangerous we shouldn’t even talk about them? That question brought Radiolab’s senior editor, Pat Walters, to a subject that at first he thought was long gone: the measuring of human intelligence with IQ tests. Turns out, the tests are all around us. In the workplace. The criminal justice system. Even the NFL. And they’re massive in schools. More than a million US children are IQ tested every year. We begin Radiolab Presents: “G” with a sentence that stopped us all in our tracks: In the state of California, it is off-limits to administer an IQ test to a child if he or she is Black. That’s because of a little-known case called Larry P v Riles that in the 1970s … put the IQ test itself on trial. With the help of reporter Lee Romney, we investigate how that lawsuit came to be, where IQ tests came from, and what happened to one little boy who got caught in the crossfire. This episode was reported and produced by Lee Romney, Rachael Cusick and Pat Walters. Music by Alex Overington. Fact-checking by Diane Kelly. Special thanks to Elie Mistal, Chenjerai Kumanyika, Amanda Stern, Nora Lyons, Ki Sung, Public Advocates, Michelle Wilson, Peter Fernandez, John Schaefer. Lee Romney’s reporting was supported in part by USC’s Center for Health Journalism. Radiolab’s “G” is supported in part by Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation initiative dedicated to engaging everyone with the process of science. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.
169
Tommy Shakur Ross grew up in South Central Los Angles in the 1980’s. As a boy, he was seduced by what he saw as the “glamour” of gang life. Thirty years later, he is still paying the price for giving his most to a gang that ultimately brought the kind of fame he wishes he’d never earned. Ear Hustle is produced by Nigel Poor, Antwan Williams and Earlonne Woods with consulting editor Curtis Fox, outside production advisor Pat Mesiti-Miller and executive producer Julie Shapiro. Thanks to Tommy Shakur Ross for telling his story. The excerpt from Larry Davis’s book, “America’s Conduct: Inner City Escort” was read by Joshua Burton. Additional music in this episode was provided by Jeff Atkins, who is also incarcerated at San Quentin. Find out more at earhustlesq.com where you can also find out how to send us a question (by postcard) that might get answered on a future episode. Ear Hustle is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX. Thanks to Mail Chimp and Bombas for supporting the show.
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Bad Batch premieres on October 23rd.
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This episode begins with a rant. This rant, in particular, comes from Dan Engber - a science writer who loves animals but despises animal intelligence research. Dan told us that so much of the way we study animals involves tests that we think show a human is smart ... not the animals we intend to study.  Dan’s rant got us thinking: What is the smartest animal in the world? And if we threw out our human intelligence rubric, is there a fair way to figure it out? Obviously, there is. And it’s a live game show, judged by Jad, Robert … and a dog. For the last episode of G, Radiolab’s miniseries on intelligence, we’re sharing that game show with you. It was recorded as a live show back in May 2019 at the Greene Space in New York City. We invited two science writers, Dan Engber and Laurel Braitman, and two comedians, Tracy Clayton and Jordan Mendoza, to compete against one another to find the world’s smartest animal. What resulted were a series of funny, delightful stories about unexpectedly smart animals and a shift in the way we think about intelligence across all the animals - including us. Check out the video of our live event here!  This episode was produced by Rachael Cusick and Pat Walters, with help from Nora Keller and Suzie Lechtenberg. Fact-checking by Michelle Harris and Dorie Chevlin. Special thanks to Bill Berloni and Macy (the dog) and everyone at The Greene Space. Radiolab’s “G” is supported in part by Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation initiative dedicated to engaging everyone with the process of science. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 
172
Juneteenth marks a triumphant moment for not just Black Americans, but all people who have sought liberation globally. On June 19th, Kai Wright hosted a special episode of “The Brian Lehrer Show” with a series of conversations about the history of the national holiday, classical music and Black politics - then and now. Guests include WQXR's Terrance McKnight, historian Dr. Daina Ramey Berry and calls from listeners about their family histories of emancipation.
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MYS106: St. Thomas Aquinas was one of the greatest intellects in Christian history. Jimmy Akin and Dom Bettinelli continue their discussion of the saint and what he had to say about hidden or “occult” mysteries such as astrology, crystal healing, amulets, demons, ghosts, and psychic powers. Get all new episodes automatically and for free: Subscribe using the RSS feed | Subscribe using Apple Podcasts | Subscribe using Google Podcasts | Subscribe using Stitcher | Subscribe by Email Help us continue to offer Jimmy Akin’s Mysterious World. Won’t you make a pledge at SQPN.com/give today? Links for this episode: * G. K. Chesterton’s book St. Thomas Aquinas * Jimmy Akin’s book Teaching With Authority * Alexander Boxer’s book A Scheme of Heaven * Jimmy Akin’s article St. Thomas Aquinas and the Occult * Catholic Encyclopedia article on St. Thomas Aquinas * Aquinas’s Summa Theologiae * Aquinas’s Letter on the Occult Workings of Nature * Supreme Court Will Soon Decide Whether To Reconsider Qualified Immunity | Cato @ Liberty * Police misconduct: Supreme Court may reconsider ‘qualified immunity’ * Please spread the word about the podcast. Leave us a review on Apple Podcasts! * Purchase the books and other material from this and other episodes at the Mysterious World Bookstore. * Join the conversation at the Starquest Facebook page and the Jimmy Akin’s Mysterious World Facebook page. * Send your feedback or comments to mysterious@sqpn.com or send a tweet with the hashtag of #mysteriousfeedback Mysterious Headlines * These Are ‘Glacier Mice,’ a Herd of Moving Moss Balls * Plague doctors: Separating medical myths from facts | Live Science
174
Several years after Janey was sexually assaulted by her former boyfriend, Mathew, she told some of her closest friends, and her mother, what Mathew had done. Janey was so troubled by her loved ones’ responses, or lack thereof, that she went back to them years later to record conversations about it all. In this episode: Janey’s story, and philosopher Kate Manne, who coined the term “himpathy” in her 2017 book, *Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny. *With co-hosts John Biewen and Celeste Headlee. To hear more of Janey Williams’ story and the conversations she had with friends, check out her podcast, "This Happened", available on most podcast apps and at thishappenedpodcast.com.  Music by Alex Weston, Evgueni and Sacha Galperine, and Kevin MacLeod. Music and production help from Joe Augustine at Narrative Music.
175
Radiolab creator and host Jad Abumrad spent the last two years following around music legend Dolly Parton, and we're here to say you should tune in! In this episode of Radiolab, we showcase the first of Jad's special series, Dolly Parton's America. In this intensely divided moment, one of the few things everyone still seems to agree on is Dolly Parton—but why? That simple question leads to a deeply personal, historical, and musical rethinking of one of America’s great icons.  We begin with a simple question: How did the queen of the boob joke become a feminist icon? Helen Morales, author of “Pilgrimage to Dollywood,” gave us a stern directive – look at the lyrics! So we dive into Dolly’s discography, starting with the early period of what Dolly calls “sad ass songs” to find remarkably prescient words of female pain, slut-shaming, domestic violence, and women being locked away in asylums by cheating husbands. We explore how Dolly took the centuries-old tradition of the Appalachian “murder ballad”—an oral tradition of men singing songs about brutally killing women—and flipped the script, singing from the woman’s point of view. And as her career progresses, the songs expand beyond the pain to tell tales of leaving abuse behind. How can such pro-woman lyrics come from someone who despises the word feminism? Dolly explains.     Check out Dolly Parton's America here at: https://www.wnycstudios.org/podcasts/dolly-partons-america 
176
After their harrowing trip to Padua, Maria and her friends discover there are other women who share their story. They want to do everything they can to protect other women from Leonardo. But Kate walks into the same trap. Need help? You're not alone. Confidential help is available for free. National Sexual Assault Hotline Call 1-800-656-4673 (HOPE) - 24 hours everyday. Support the show.
177
A very special midweek episode. Have you ever had your heart broken via a breakup? This is the episode for you. We also welcome our Patreon sponsor from the Moonlanding Hoax Episode, Brennan.
178
Do nations fight wars because men are naturally violent? Or do societies condition men to embrace violence so they’ll fight the nation’s wars? Along with co-hosts John Biewen and Celeste Headlee, this episode features reporting by Barry Lam of the Hi-Phi Nation podcast, with scholars Joshua Goldstein of American University, Tom Digby of Springfield College, and Graham Parsons of the United States Military Academy, aka West Point. Music by Alex Weston, and Evgueni and Sacha Galperine. Music and production help from Joe Augustine at Narrative Music. Song fragment, “Men,” by Loudon Wainwright III.
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American history—law, economics, culture—has built different notions of masculinity (and femininity) for people of varying races and ethnicities.  A trip through a century of pop culture and the stereotyped images that white supremacy has manufactured and attached to Asian and African American men. With scholars Tim Yu and Mark Anthony Neal and co-hosts John Biewen and Celeste Headlee. Music by Alex Weston, Evgueni and Sacha Galperine. Music and production help from Joe Augustine at Narrative Music.
180
More often than not, a fight is just a fight... Someone wins, someone loses. But this hour, we have a series of face-offs that shine a light on the human condition, the benefit of coming at something from a different side, and the price of being right. Special thanks to Mark Dresser for the use of his music.  
181
We eat eels in sushi, stews, and pasta. Eels eat anything. Also they can survive outside of water for hours and live for up to 80 years. But this slippery snake of the sea harbors an even deeper mystery, one that has tormented the minds of Aristotle and Sigmund Freud and apparently the entire country of Italy: Where do they come from? We travel from the estuaries of New York to the darkest part of the ocean in search of the limits of human knowledge. This episode was produced by Matt Kielty and Becca Bressler.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.  Further reading: Lucy Cooke's book The Truth about Animals! Chris Bowser's Eel Research Project
182
The 1998 romantic comedy You've Got Mail starring Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan is about the brutal fight between an independent bookstore, The Shop Around the Corner, and Fox Books, an obvious Barnes & Noble stand-in. On this episode of Decoder Ring we explore the real life conflict that inspired the movie and displaced independent booksellers on the upper west side of Manhattan. This conflict illustrates how, for a brief time, Barnes & Noble was a symbol of predatory capitalism, only to be usurped by the uniting force at the heart of the film: the internet. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
183
Looking good and feeling good matters just as much on the inside, as on the outside. But in prison, you can't just walk to the barbershop, or stop by the store for the products you need, to accomplish either. In this episode, guys share their favorite workarounds that help them feel more human in prison, both physically and mentally. Thanks to David Jassy, Wall Street, Jason Jones, Jesse Vasquez, Andres Yancey, Lady Jae, Eric Durr, Mesro Coles-El and Nicola Bucci for sharing their workarounds. This episode included music by David Jassy, Lee Jaspar (aka Matthew Lee Jasper) and Antwan Williams. Find out more about the show at earhustlesq.com, including how to send us a question (by postcard) that might get answered in a future episode. Ear Hustle is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX. p.s. Speaking of looking good…have you ordered your Ear Hustle t-shirt yet?
184
Congress approves extraordinary funding to secure the border in the name of national security—not thinking through the practical implications or unintended consequences.
185
Albert Einstein asked that when he died, his body be cremated and his ashes be scattered in a secret location. He didn’t want his grave, or his body, becoming a shrine to his genius. When he passed away in the early morning hours of April, 18, 1955, his family knew his wishes. There was only one problem: the pathologist who did the autopsy had different plans. In the third episode of “G”, Radiolab’s miniseries on intelligence, we go on one of the strangest scavenger hunts for genius the world has ever seen. We follow Einstein’s stolen brain from that Princeton autopsy table, to a cider box in Wichita, Kansas, to labs all across the country. And eventually, beyond the brain itself entirely. All the while wondering, where exactly is the genius of a man who changed the way we view the world?    This episode was reported by Rachael Cusick and Pat Walters, and produced by Bethel Habte, Rachael Cusick, and Pat Walters. Music by Alex Overington and Jad Abumrad.  Special thanks to: Elanor Taylor, Claudia Kalb, Dustin O’Halloran, Tim Huson, The Einstein Papers Project, and all the physics for (us) dummies Youtube videos that accomplished the near-impossible feat of helping us understand relativity. Radiolab’s “G” is supported in part by Science Sandbox, a Simons Foundation initiative dedicated to engaging everyone with the process of science. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 
186
Since the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis on May 25th, we have begun a new national dialogue about race relations and policing in America.  What do we need to do to come together as Americans to solve this crisis?  Newt’s guest is Gerard Robinson.
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Running a prison takes a lot of work, and not just by the staff running the place. At San Quentin inmates work regular jobs, earn pennies on the hour and often supplement their income with a side hustle. Find a full list of episode credits at earhustlesq.com, where you can also download and remix our theme song (do it!), sign up for our newsletter and order a T-shirt, sticker pack or mug. Ear Hustle is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX. Thanks also to Lt. Sam Robinson and Warden Ron Davis for their support of the show, and Article, Lantigua Williams & Co. and Native for sponsoring this episode.
188
“Firsts” in prison can be especially memorable: the first time you meet your cellie, or leave the prison for medical treatment, or run your first marathon. Alongside these tales, Adnan Khan shares the story of his first visit from his mom, 13 years after he was incarcerated. Thanks to Adnan Khan for sharing his story and Shane, Michael Thompson, Rahsaan Thomas, Jason Jones and Antwan Williams for also sharing their firsts. Ear Hustle is produced by Nigel Poor and Earlonne Woods. Outside producer Pat Mesiti-Miller comes inside to lead the sound design team. This episode includes music by David Jassy, Antwan Williams, Joshua Burton & Dwight Krizman Our story editor is Curtis Fox and executive producer for Radiotopia is Julie Shapiro. Find out more about the show at earhustlesq.com where you can also buy a brand new EH t-shirt! Ear Hustle is a proud member of Radiotopia from PRX. Eternal thanks to Lt. Sam Robinson and Warden Ron Davis for supporting the show, and to our sponsors Burrow and NECTAR Sleep.
189
A look into the final weeks and months of Dr. Brandt's life through the eyes of a beloved colleague. Best Fiends: Download free on the Apple App Store or Google Play. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
190
Coronavirus cases are on the rise across the country and the five largest clusters of the virus are in correctional institutions. This isn’t a surprise. Prisons are often overcrowded, social distancing is difficult, bathrooms and public spaces are shared by hundreds of inmates. Guards are constantly going in and out. In a pandemic, prison is probably the worst place a person could be. Robbie Pollock spent 8 years in New York state prisons. Recently, he spoke with his friend Moe Monsuri, who has been incarcerated since 2007. Monsuri is currently serving his time at Sing Sing, a maximum security prison in upstate New York, where four inmates have died of COVID-19. This story was produced by reporter Daniel Gross as part of our new series Hunker Down Diaries. You can find more of Daniel’s work at The New Yorker. Image by Acroterion. Music from Blue Dot Sessions.
191
In this special episode, host John Biewen and series collaborator Chenjerai Kumanyika discuss the coronavirus pandemic and how the crisis, and the nation’s response to it, echo themes we’re exploring in our Season 4 series on democracy in the United States. The season’s editor is Loretta Williams. Music by Lucas Biewen and Eric Neveux. Photo: Durham, North Carolina, mayor Steve Schewel announces a stay-at-home order on March 25. Photo by Julia Wall, courtesy of the News & Observer.
192
Perú fue el primer país de América Latina en decretar cuarentena general obligatoria. El gobierno reaccionó rápido, implementó medidas estrictas y contempló ayudas económicas que fueron ejemplares para la región. Entonces, ¿por qué se han disparado los casos de contagiados en el país? ¿Qué fue lo que falló? En el episodio de hoy, el economista Hugo Ñopo nos ayuda a responder esta pregunta y el periodista Jorge Carrillo nos cuenta la situación desesperada que se vive en algunos lugares de la Amazonía peruana.◎Este es un episodio de El hilo, el nuevo podcast de Radio Ambulante. Todos los viernes elegimos la noticia más relevante de América Latina y contamos la historia que hay detrás. Pueden suscribirse a El hilo en su app de podcasts favorita. La idea es servirles mejor en este periodo tan incierto.
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A peek behind the curtain and into Fredric Sheldon Brandt's challenging and formative years in post-World-War-II Newark, where his parents run a candy shop. Young Fred is exceptionally bright, but...different. BetterHelp: Get 10% off your first month at BetterHelp.com/baron. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
194
Sex trafficking crimes are hard to talk about. In this episode, Sara and LA share their individual experiences of being “in the life,” at the same time demonstrating the difficult, yet important work of restorative justice. Thanks to Sara Kruzan and Anthony Avil Scott (aka LA) for sharing their stories and for coming together to talk. You can read more about restorative justice and Sara’s work, here. Ear Hustle is produced by Nigel Poor and Earlonne Woods, with help from outside produce Pat Mesiti-Miller who also leads the sound design team. This episode was scored by David Jassy with contributions from Antwan Williams. Our story editor is Curtis Fox and executive producer for Radiotopia is Julie Shapiro. Big thanks to Lt. Sam Robinson and Warden Ron Davis for supporting the show. Thanks also to our sponsor NECTAR Sleep. Find out more about the show at earhustlesq.com, including how to send us a question (by postcard) that might get answered in a future episode. Ear Hustle is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX.
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The hole, the box, solitary confinement. It doesn’t matter what you call it; doing time in the SHU (Security Housing Unit) means you are alone and segregated from the general prison population. In this episode, four men who served between 8 and 28 years in the SHU share their memories of that time. Thanks to Armando Flores, Gus Lamumba Edwards, Richard Johnson and Isaac Flores for telling their stories, and to John YaYa Johnson for assisting with this episode. Ear Hustle is produced by Nigel Poor, Antwan Williams and Earlonne Woods with consulting editor Curtis Fox, outside production advisor Pat Mesiti-Miller and executive producer Julie Shapiro. Find out more about the show at earhustlesq.com, including how to send us a question (by postcard) that might get answered in a future episode. Ear Hustle is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX. Big thanks to Mail Chimp, Bombas and Casper for supporting the show.
196
Maria and her best friend Miriam find more survivors from all over the world. The women take comfort in one another. They decide they can't go it alone, though, and reach out to some scrappy Italian reporters for help. Need help? You're not alone. Confidential help is available for free. National Sexual Assault Hotline Call 1-800-656-4673 (HOPE) - 24 hours everyday. Support the show.
197
ماجرای ارون سوارتز (ارن شوارتز)، پسر اینترنت، پسر باهوش و خوش‌فکری که از کودکی مصمم بود دنیا را جای بهتری کند. منبع : Slate نویسنده: جاستین پیترز| ترجمه: هدیه کعبی | روایت: علی بندری | تدوین: امید صدیق‌فر | پوستر: مجید آب‌پرور موزیک‌ها: David Gilmour | Minus Pilots | Of the vine پادکست بی‌پلاس (پادکست دوم چنل‌بی) اسپانسرها : اینستاگرام رژین / سایت رژین
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Back in March, as the pandemic hit, many people across the country found themselves without a safety net. Naida Lavon was one of them. Naida is 67 and a former school bus driver. She was recently furloughed from her part time job at a rental car company. For the past few months, Naida’s been living in her car on the streets of Portland, Oregon. As part of our Hunker Down Diaries series, we bring you her story. Music this week from Blue Dot Sessions and “Home Again” by Michael Kiwanuka.
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Historically, death sentences in California have led to eventual execution by the state. But these days, public opinion and state protocol are in flux, and the future is uncertain for those on death row at San Quentin. Find a full list of episode credits at earhustlesq.com, where you can also sign up for our newsletter and order a T-shirt, sticker pack or mug. Ear Hustle is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX. Thanks to Lt. Sam Robinson and Warden Ron Davis for their support of the show, and Native, EPIX and BetterHelp for sponsoring this episode.
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