Explore top podcasts in Documentary

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1
In June of 2019, Brandon Ogbunu got on stage and told a story for The Story Collider, a podcast and live storytelling show. Starting when he was a senior in college being shook down by a couple cops, Brandon tells us about navigating his ups and downs of a career in science, his startling connection to scientific racism, and his battle against biology's central dogma.  Brandon’s story was recorded by The Story Collider as part of the 2019 Evolution Meeting in Providence, Rhode Island. You can find the full episode and learn more about The Story Collider here. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.  
2
Millions and millions are out of work, with some jobs never coming back. We speak with four economists — and one former presidential candidate — about the best policy options and the lessons (good and bad) from the past.
3
If former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin’s case for the death of George Floyd goes to trial, there will be this one, controversial legal principle looming over the proceedings: The reasonable officer. In this episode, we explore the origin of the reasonable officer standard, with the case that sent two Charlotte lawyers on a quest for true objectivity, and changed the face of policing in the US. This episode was produced by Matt Kielty with help from Kelly Prime and Annie McEwen. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.  
4
Covid-19 is the biggest job killer in a century. As the lockdown eases, what does re-employment look like? Who will be first and who last? Which sectors will surge and which will disappear? Welcome to the Great Labor Reallocation of 2020.
5
Getting out of prison means freedom, but this liberation often comes with caveats. In our final episode of the season, three formerly incarcerated people describe the unwelcome surprises that were waiting for them on the other side of the gates. Plus, Ear Hustlers respond to the murder of George Floyd and recent protests. Thanks to Lt. Sam Robinson and Acting Warden Ron Broomfield for their support. Ear Hustle is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX. Find a full list of episode credits at earhustlesq.com.
6
Producer Tracie Hunte stumbled into a duet between Nina Simone and the sounds of protest outside her apartment. Then she discovered a performance by Nina on April 7, 1968 - three days after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Tracie talks about what Nina’s music, born during another time when our country was facing questions that seemed to have no answer, meant then and why it still resonates today.  Listen to Nina's brother, Samuel Waymon, talk about that April 7th concert here.
7
Covid has disrupted the most basic routines of our days and nights. But in the middle of a conversation about how to fight the virus, we find a place impervious to the stalled plans and frenetic demands of the outside world. It’s a very different kind of front line, where urgent work means moving slow, and time is marked out in tiny pre-planned steps. Then, on a walk through the woods, we consider how the tempo of our lives affects our minds and discover how the beats of biology shape our bodies. This episode was produced with help from Molly Webster and Tracie Hunte. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.  
8
The accidental futurist Kevin Kelly on why enthusiasm beats intelligence, how to really listen, and why the solution to bad technology is more technology.
9
In the U.S. alone, we hold 55 million meetings a day. Most of them are woefully unproductive, and tyrannize our offices. The revolution begins now — with better agendas, smaller invite lists, and an embrace of healthy conflict.
10
In 2007, Bruce Robison’s robot submarine stumbled across an octopus settling in to brood her eggs. It seemed like a small moment. But as he went back to visit her, month after month, what began as a simple act of motherhood became a heroic feat that has never been equalled by any known species on Earth.  This episode was reported and produced by Annie McEwen.  Special thanks to Kim Fulton-Bennett and Rob Sherlock at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. And thanks to the Indianapolis Chamber Orchestra for the use of their piece, “Concerto for Bassoon & Chamber Orchestra: II. Beautiful.”  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.   If you need more ocean in your life, check out the incredible Monterey Bay Aquarium live cams (especially the jellies!): www.montereybayaquarium.org/animals/live-cams
11
We are facing a crisis in America with enormous decisions facing all of us.  From the pandemic from China, to a government imposed shutdown, to the killing of George Floyd and the riots and chaos in our cities, we are living through a time of very dramatic change. In a series of episodes, I’ll discuss the challenges we face in America. In Part 1: The Role of the Radical Left.
12
There are few musical moments more well-worn than the first four notes of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. But in this short, we find out that Beethoven might have made a last-ditch effort to keep his music from ever feeling familiar, to keep pushing his listeners to a kind of psychological limit. Big thanks to our Brooklyn Philharmonic musicians: Deborah Buck and Suzy Perelman on violin, Arash Amini on cello, and Ah Ling Neu on viola. And check out The First Four Notes, Matthew Guerrieri's book on Beethoven's Fifth. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate. 
13
Our old friend Lulu Miller — former Radiolab producer, co-creator of Invisibilia — has been obsessed by the chaos that rules the universe since long before it showed up as a global pandemic, and a few weeks ago, she published a book about it. It’s called Why Fish Don’t Exist. It’s part scientific adventure story, part philosophical manifesto, part chest-ripped-open memoir. Jad called her up to talk about how an obscure 19th century ichthyologist with a checkered past helped her find meaning in the world, and what she means when she says fish aren’t real. You can buy Lulu's book Why Fish Don’t Exist here. This episode was produced by Pat Walters.  Special thanks to Pan•American. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.  
14
Episode 1: Debra Newell, an interior designer in Southern California, meets John Meehan on an over-50 dating site. His profile looks exciting: Anesthesiologist, divorced, Christian. She falls in love fast. But her children dislike him and warn her that his stories don’t add up. A psychologist advises Debra to set firmer boundaries with her kids, saying she has a right to be happy. Subscribe today so you don't miss an episode: https://smarturl.it/dirtyjohn Do you like the music from Dirty John? To find out more, as well as find other podcasts to listen to, go to Wondery.com
15
Three university presidents try to answer our listeners’ questions. The result? Not much pomp and a whole lot of circumstance.
16
Events of the past few years have turned a challenging spotlight on White people, and Whiteness, in the United States. An introduction to our series exploring what it means to be White. By John Biewen, with special guest Chenjerai Kumanyika.
17
Chattel slavery in the United States, with its distinctive – and strikingly cruel – laws and structures, took shape over many decades in colonial America. The innovations that built American slavery are inseparable from the construction of Whiteness as we know it today. By John Biewen, with guest Chenjerai Kumanyika.    Key sources for this episode: The Racial Equity Institute Ibram Kendi, Stamped from the Beginning Nell Irvin Painter, The History of White People
18
For much of human history, people viewed themselves as members of tribes or nations but had no notion of “race.” Today, science deems race biologically meaningless. Who invented race as we know it, and why? By John Biewen, with guest Chenjerai Kumanyika.  Photo: The Monument to the Discoveries, Lisbon, Portugal. The highlighted figure in the center is an effigy of Gomes Eanes de Zurara. The figure at the top right is Prince Henry the Navigator. Photo by Harvey Barrison.
19
Back in the 1950s, facing the threat of nuclear annihilation, federal officials sat down and pondered what American life would actually look like after an atomic attack. They faced a slew of practical questions like: Who would count the dead and where would they build the refugee camps? But they faced a more spiritual question as well. If Washington DC were hit, every object in the the National Archives would be eviscerated in a moment. Terrified by this reality, they set out to save some of America’s most precious stuff.  Today, we look back at the items our Cold War era planners sought to save and we ask the question: In the year 2020, what objects would we preserve now?  This episode was reported and produced by Simon Adler with editing from Pat Walters and reporting assistance from Tad Davis.  Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.  
20
David Gebel and Dominique Crisden have a couple of things in common: they both live in New York, they’re both gay, and they’re both HIV-positive. But David is in his 60s, and has been living with the disease since moving to New York in the ‘80s. Dominique, on the other hand, is only in his early 30s. From our friends at WNYC's “Nancy”, this episode features a very special conversation between David and Dominique about the similarities and differences in their experiences living with HIV. Special thanks to Krishna Stone at Gay Men's Health Crisis, an HIV/AIDS prevention, care, and advocacy organization in New York.  This episode was produced by Tobin Low, Kathy Tu and Matt Collette. Music in this episode by Jeremy Bloom and Alex Overington. Theme by Alexander Overington. Note: A version of this episode first ran on May 7, 2017. Support our work. Become a Nancy member today at Nancypodcast.org/donate.    
21
Growing up in Mankato, Minnesota, John Biewen heard next to nothing about the town’s most important historical event. In 1862, Mankato was the site of the largest mass execution in U.S. history – the hanging of 38 Dakota warriors – following one of the major wars between Plains Indians and settlers. In this documentary, originally produced for This American Life, John goes back to Minnesota to explore what happened, and why Minnesotans didn’t talk about it afterwards.   Image: The Minnesota State Seal, 1858   Key sources for this episode: Gwen Westerman, Mni Sota MakoceMary Wingerd, North Country: The Making of Minnesota
22
Episode 2: After an intruder appears in John and Debra’s livingroom, John insists that they install security cameras. Debra begins to wonder whether he is spying on her. Her nephew, Shad, looks into John’s background and confronts him with what he finds. Debra’s vision of an idyllic marriage is shattered when she discovers a stash of paperwork in John’s home office. Subscribe today so you don't miss an episode: https://smarturl.it/dirtyjohn Do you like the music from Dirty John? To find out more, as well as find other podcasts to listen to, go to Wondery.com
23
One day in 1961, the famous physicist Richard Feynman stepped in front of a Caltech lecture hall and posed this question to a group of undergraduate students: “If, in some cataclysm, all of scientific knowledge were to be destroyed, and only one sentence was passed on to the next generation of creatures, what statement would contain the most information in the fewest words?” Now, Feynman had an answer to his own question - a good one. But his question got the entire team at Radiolab wondering, what did his sentence leave out? So we posed Feynman’s cataclysm question to some of our favorite writers, artists, historians, futurists - all kinds of great thinkers. We asked them, “What’s the one sentence you would want to pass on to the next generation that would contain the most information in the fewest words?” What came back was an explosive collage of what it means to be alive right here and now, and what we want to say before we go. This episode was produced by Matt Kielty and Rachael Cusick, with help from Jeremy Bloom, Zakiya Gibbons, and the entire Radiolab staff.  Special Thanks to: Ella Frances Sanders, and her book, "Eating the Sun", for inspiring this whole episode. Caltech for letting us use original audio of The Feynman Lectures on Physics. The entirety of the lectures are available to read for free online at www.feynmanlectures.caltech.edu. All the wonderful people we interviewed for sentences but weren’t able to fit in this episode, including: Daniel Abrahm, Julia Alvarez, Aimee Bender, Sandra Cisneros, Stanley Chen, Lewis Dartnell, Ann Druyan, Rose Eveleth, Ty Frank, Julia Galef, Ross Gay, Gary Green, Cesar Harada, Dolores Huerta, Robin Hunicke, Brittany Kamai, Priya Krishna, Ken Liu, Carmen Maria Machado, James Martin, Judith Matloff, Ryan McMahon, Hasan Minhaj, Lorrie Moore, Priya Natarajan, Larry Owens, Sunni Patterson, Amy Pearl, Alison Roman, Domee Shi, Will Shortz, Sam Stein, Sohaib Sultan, Kara Swisher, Jill Tarter, Olive Watkins, Reggie Watts, Deborah Waxman, Alex Wellerstein, Caveh Zahedi.  
24
As the nation faces the dual brunts of the pandemic and the on-going brutality against black bodies, people more than ever are finding ways to “do the work” in their communities. This week our reporter Jenny Casas takes us to a neighborhood in Chicago where Mexican residents are confronting anti-black violence. Anjali Kamat reports a dispatch from her neighborhood in New York, one of the American epicenters of Covid-19 cases, Jackson Heights.  Read more coverage of what happened in Chicago from the South Side Weekly.
25
“All men are created equal.” Those words, from the Declaration of Independence, are central to the story that Americans tell about ourselves and our history. But what did those words mean to the man who actually wrote them? By John Biewen, with guest Chenjerai Kumanyika.   Key sources for this episode: Nell Irvin Painter, The History of White People Ibram Kendi, Stamped from the Beginning The Racial Equity Institute
26
Humans have a built-in “negativity bias,” which means we give bad news much more power than good. Would the Covid-19 crisis be an opportune time to reverse this tendency?
27
Episode 3: Debra grapples with the question, “Who did I marry?” The story of John’s mysterious past unfolds through the eyes of his sisters, his law-school housemate, his ex-wife, and an Ohio cop who hunted him. The origins of John’s nickname are revealed. Bed-ridden in an Orange County hospital, he pleads with Debra to take him back. Subscribe today so you don't miss an episode: https://smarturl.it/dirtyjohn Do you like the music from Dirty John? To find out more, as well as find other podcasts to listen to, go to Wondery.com
28
Covid-19 has put emergency room doctors on the frontlines treating an illness that is still perplexing and unknown. Jad tracks one ER doctor in NYC as the doctor puzzles through clues, doing research of his own, trying desperately to save patients' lives.  This episode was produced by Jad Abumrad and Suzie Lechtenberg. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.  
29
Artificial intelligence data systems can report real-time COVID-19 test results at the local, state and federal level.  Real-time data reporting may be crucial to tracking the spread of COVID-19. Newt’s guest is Dr. Mansoor Khan, CEO of Persivia.
30
Episode 4: Debra is in hiding, living out of hotels and disguising herself with a wig. Debra fears she will meet the fate of her sister Cindi, who was killed by her husband as she tried to escape a bad marriage. John has explanations for the accusations against him. He weeps and apologizes. Three decades earlier, that had helped Cindi’s killer walk out of prison.  Subscribe today so you don't miss an episode: https://smarturl.it/dirtyjohn Do you like the music from Dirty John? To find out more, as well as find other podcasts to listen to, go to Wondery.com
31
Hollywood loves stories about fugitives on the run, but in reality that lifestyle is anything but glamorous, especially for those who get pulled in along the way. One woman reflects back on six years spent on the lam in Mexico, after her husband was charged with murder and their family fled south. We’re nearing the end of our first-ever spring fundraiser, and we need your help. If you can spare a little to support the show, go to earhustlesq.com/donate. Thank you! Thanks to Lt. Sam Robinson and Acting Warden Ron Broomfield for their support. Ear Hustle is a proud member of Radiotopia, from PRX. Find a full list of episode credits at earhustlesq.com.
32
What will it take to make the United States a more fully-functioning democracy, and how can we, as citizens, bring about that change? By host and producer John Biewen, with series collaborator Chenjerai Kumanyika. Interviews with Michael Waldman, Jennifer Cohn, and Sanford Levinson. The series editor is Loretta Williams. Music by Algiers, John Erik Kaada, Eric Neveux, and Lucas Biewen. Music consulting and production help from Joe Augustine of Narrative Music.
33
When it comes to America’s racial sins, past and present, a lot of us see people in one region of the country as guiltier than the rest. Host John Biewen spoke with some white Southern friends about that tendency. Part Six of our ongoing series, Seeing White. With recurring guest, Chenjerai Kumanyika. Image: A lynching on Clarkson Street, New York City, during the Draft Riots of 1863. Credit: Greenwich Village Society of Historical Preservation. Shannon Sullivan’s books, Revealing Whiteness and Good White People.  Thanks to Chris Julin, whose 1991 NPR report on the Wisconsin fishing rights dispute we featured.
34
Episode 5: John finds a lawyer and plots to unleash a blizzard of lawsuits against his enemies, with the aim of proving to Debra that he is the victim, in case after case. The lawyer believes her life is in danger. As her painful isolation from her family deepens, she secretly plans her escape from the marriage.  Subscribe today so you don't miss an episode: https://smarturl.it/dirtyjohn Do you like the music from Dirty John? To find out more, as well as find other podcasts to listen to, go to Wondery.com
35
In 2003, the word "metrosexual", meaning a well-groomed heterosexual man, exploded all over the English lexicon. It invaded the news, TV, and even American politics. On this episode of Decoder Ring we explore the origins of the metrosexual, and how trend forecasters, marketers, David Beckham, Sex and the City, and Queer Eye for the Straight Guy helped make the metrosexual possible. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts and bonus episodes of shows like Dear Prudence and Slow Burn. Sign up now to listen and support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
36
One of the most consistent questions we get at the show is from parents who want to know which episodes are kid-friendly and which aren’t. So today, we're releasing a separate feed, Radiolab for Kids. To kick it off, we're rerunning an all-time favorite episode: Space. In the 60’s, space exploration was an American obsession. This hour, we chart the path from romance to increasing cynicism. We begin with Ann Druyan, widow of Carl Sagan, with a story about the Voyager expedition, true love, and a golden record that travels through space. And astrophysicist Neil de Grasse Tyson explains the Coepernican Principle, and just how insignificant we are. Support Radiolab today at Radiolab.org/donate.      
37
Scientists weren’t the first to divide humanity along racial – and and racist – lines. But for hundreds of years, racial scientists claimed to provide proof for those racist hierarchies – and some still do.   Resources for this episode: Fatal Invention, by Dorothy Roberts The History of White People, by Nell Irvin Painter
38
A summer party. A stormy night. And a shocking revelation about Joe’s neighbor next door. The Shrink Next Door is presented by Brooklinen Get 10% of your first order plus free shipping when you use promo code THESHRINK at brooklinen.com Other sponsors include: Smile Direct Club - Get a $25 credit on your at home kit or book a free assessment at one of their locations, plus save $150 on your aligners when you visit smiledirectclub.com/podcast and use code SHRINK150 at checkout Better Help - Get 10% off your first month when you visit them at betterhelp.com/theshrink Ship Station - Get a 60-day free trial when you visit shipstation.com click the microphone at the top of the page, and enter code THESHRINK
39
Episode 6: Jacquelyn and Terra Newell suspect that John has been watching them. When Jacquelyn tells her mother that he is in town, her mother believes she is mistaken. Jacquelyn warns Terra to carry her pocket knife. But Terra is preoccupied by a country-music concert, and she is watching for the wrong car.  Subscribe today so you don't miss an episode: https://smarturl.it/dirtyjohn Do you like the music from Dirty John? To find out more, as well as find other podcasts to listen to, go to Wondery.com
40
Football star Aaron Hernandez went from the bright lights of the Super Bowl to a convicted murderer in a few years. The Boston Globe’s Spotlight Team, best known for its investigation of the sexual abuse scandal inside the Catholic Church, takes a hard look at the crisis facing football through the lens of Aaron Hernandez’s life and terrible crimes. Subscribe today: http://wondery.fm/GladiatorBB
41
The story of Bhagat Singh Thind, and also of Takao Ozawa – Asian immigrants who, in the 1920s, sought to convince the U.S. Supreme Court that they were white in order to gain American citizenship. Thind’s “bargain with white supremacy,” and the deeply revealing results.
42
As the first woman to helm one of the big three Detroit automakers, GM CEO Mary Barra has learned a lot about creating a more diverse and equitable company. “The mindset people have to have is this is never done,” she says. “I look for the day when it doesn’t need special focus, but I think we’re a long way off from having leaders being very deliberate about creating diverse groups, diverse opportunities.” In this episode of Back to Biz with Katie and Boz, Mary Barra talks with co-hosts Katie Couric and Bozoma Saint John about the letter she wrote to her employees about George Floyd’s murder and the actions GM is taking to move the conversation forward. Barra also talks about the early successes of opening the GM facilities as well as the ways the pandemic has accelerated trends that may forever change the GM automobile.  Click here for a detailed list of anti-racist resources. Click here to sign up for Katie Couric’s morning newsletter “Wake-Up Call.” Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
43
Imara Jones joins us to talk about creating a truly inclusive Black Lives Matter movement, and getting back to the roots of Pride. — Imara Jones is an award-winning journalist, and the creator of TransLash, a multi-episode series about what it is like to be trangender, especially a trans person of color, at a time of social backlash.   Resources: — Trans Lifeline - Trans Lifeline is a grassroots hotline offering direct emotional and financial support to trans people in crisis - for the trans community, by the trans community. — The Okra Project - The Okra Project is a collective that seeks to address the global crisis faced by Black Trans people by bringing home-cooked, healthy, and culturally specific meals and resources to Black Trans People wherever we can reach them. — The Transgender District - The mission of the Transgender District is to create an urban environment that fosters the rich history, culture, legacy, and empowerment of transgender people and its deep roots in the southeastern Tenderloin neighborhood. — Trans Justice Funding Project - The Trans Justice Funding Project is a community-led funding initiative founded in 2012 to support grassroots, trans justice groups run by and for trans people.  Music in this episode by Jeremy S. Bloom and Josh Woodward ("20/20"). Theme by Alexander Overington. Support our work. Become a Nancy member today at nancypodcast.org/donate.
44
It starts with a schoolyard fight that leads the Palm Beach police to a horrific discovery about Jeffrey Epstein. The evidence is clear. But it will take a newspaper investigation a decade later for the real story to be revealed. If you or someone you know is a victim of sexual assault, reach out for help. In the US, you can contact the National Sexual Assault Hotline by calling 1-800-656-HOPE. Or you can chat anonymously with a hotline staffer by messaging the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network at online.rainn.org. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Zip Recruiter - Try ZipRecruiter for free and let them find the right hire for you at ziprecruiter.com/as ThredUP - Get 30% off your first order at thredup.com/mme
45
In 1919, a white mob forced the entire black population of Corbin, Kentucky, to leave, at gunpoint. It was one of many racial expulsions in the United States. What happened, and how such racial cleansings became “America’s family secret.” The history of Corbin as presented by the Corbin city government, with no mention of the 1919 racial expulsion.  Elliot Jaspin’s book, Buried in the Bitter Waters: The Hidden History of Racial Cleansings in America
46
For hundreds of years, the white-dominated American culture has raised the specter of the dangerous, violent black man. Host John Biewen tells the story of a confrontation with an African American teenager. Then he and recurring guest Chenjerai Kumanyika discuss that longstanding image – and its neglected flipside: white-on-black violence.
47
We speak with a governor, a former C.D.C. director, a pandemic forecaster, a hard-charging pharmacist, and a pair of economists — who say it’s all about the incentives. (Pandemillions, anyone?)
48
آخر ماجراهای واقعی هیچ وقت به اندازه‌ی قصه روشن و مشخص بسته نمی‌شه. این هم شاید یکی از همون قصه‌ها باشه. ماجرای دندانپزشکی که به قتل متهم شد.
49
A new psychiatrist. A fight between brother and sister. And bank robbery. It’s 1981, and Marty finds relief in the advice of a new psychiatrist, which shapes every part of his life.     The Shrink Next Door is presented by Brooklinen Get 10% of your first order plus free shipping when you use promo code THESHRINK at brooklinen.com Other sponsors include: Smile Direct Club - Get a $25 credit on your at home kit or book a free assessment at one of their locations, plus save $150 on your aligners when you visit smiledirectclub.com/podcast and use code SHRINK150 at checkout Better Help - Get 10% off your first month when you visit them at betterhelp.com/theshrink Ship Station - Get a 60-day free trial when you visit shipstation.com click the microphone at the top of the page, and enter code THESHRINK
50
Nancy Pelosi’s radical $3 trillion bill has many provisions in it, that if passed, would dramatically change our country. In this episode, Newt discusses the benefits it would provide to illegal immigrants including stimulus checks and the opportunity to vote in our elections. Part 3 of a special podcast series detailing Nancy Pelosi’s so called, HEROES Act.
51
The U.S. spent the past few decades waiting for China to act like the global citizen it said it wanted to be. The waiting may be over.
52
We’ll try anything to help our loved ones who are experiencing pain. John and Elaine both turn to a new medical treatment to help their mothers. But for one of them, it will go horribly wrong. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Simplisafe - Get FREE shipping and a 60-day risk free trial when you visit simplisafe.com/batch Quip - Get your first refill pack free when you visit getquip.com/badbatch ThredUp - Get 30% off your first order when you visit thredup.com/batch Noom - Start your journey today at noom.com/batch Better Help - Get 10% off your first month at betterhelp.com/batch Verishop - Get 15% off your first purchase at verishop.com/badbatch
53
As a former top adviser to presidents Clinton and Obama, he believes in the power of the federal government. But as former mayor of Chicago, he says that cities are where real problems get solved — especially in the era of Covid-19.