Top podcast episodes in Science

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A silver lining of social distancing: you may have more time and space to pursue the projects you've bookmarked on your web browser. Whether your goal is to build a barn door or to update your makeup routine, online tutorials have made it easier than ever to bring the world into your living room or kitchen or bedroom. But a curious thing can happen when we watch experts doing expert things. This week, we explore the dangers and the delights of vicarious living, with a favorite episode from 2019.
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A virus is more than a biological organism. It's a social organism. It detects fissures in societies and fault lines between communities. Historian Nancy Bristow shares the lessons about human behavior that we can take away from a century-old pandemic.
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A city council candidate says he's black. But his opponent accuses him of being a white man pretending to be black. If race is simply a social construct and not a biological reality, how do we determine someone's race? And who gets to decide? We tell the story of a man whose racial identity was fiercely contested... and the consequences this had on an entire city. | To learn more about this episode, subscribe to our newsletter. Click here to learn more about NPR sponsors.
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From the early days of this coronavirus outbreak, it’s looked like the disease is way worse for older people. But now we’re hearing more stories of younger folks getting really sick. What’s going on? Is this virus scarier for younger people than we thought? We hear from a Gen-Xer who landed in the hospital with Covid-19, and we talk to immunologist Professor Vincent Racaniello. Also: THE HIGHEST MOUSE! We’ve set up a voicemail to collect all of your questions about coronavirus. Or if you’re a healthcare worker with a personal story you want to share, please call ‪(774) 481-1238‬ and leave us a message. Here’s a link to our transcript: https://bit.ly/3dILR5i  And you can check out the video of the mouse that breaks the record for high-altitude living: https://go.unl.edu/f8tx. This episode was produced by Michelle Dang, Wendy Zukerman, Rose Rimler, Meryl Horn, Laura Morris, Meg Driscoll and Sinduja Srinivasan. We’re edited by Blythe Terrell and Caitlin Kenney. Fact checking by Lexi Krupp. Mix and sound design by Haley Shaw. Music written by Peter Leonard, Emma Munger, and Bobby Lord. A big thanks to all the researchers that we got in touch with for this episode, including Dr. Helen Petousis-Harris. Thanks also to Anna and Daniel Schuchman, Lauren Dulay, Maggie Kaltwasser, Adria Mallett, Holly Ryan, and Ash Tilbury. And special thanks to the Zukerman family and Joseph Lavelle Wilson.
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In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Matt Mullenweg about the evolution of distributed work. They discuss the benefits of working from home, the new norms of knowledge work, relevant tools and security concerns, the challenges for managers, the importance of written communication, the necessity of innovating in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, delivery networks as critical infrastructure, economic recovery, and other topics. SUBSCRIBE to gain access to all content on samharris.org/subscribe.
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It’s back to your regularly scheduled programming this week with an episode on schistosomiasis (aka bilharzia), that scourge both ancient and modern. We kick off the episode by walking you through the amazingly complex life cycle of these blood flukes and the myriad of symptoms they and their eggs can cause, including a “check out the reproductive output on this one!” moment.  We then trace its early appearances in mummies (of course) and ancient writings, following that up with an overview of how imperialism drove the field of tropical medicine in its early days. To wrap up this wormy episode, we discuss the current, staggering numbers on schisto around the globe.
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“The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few.” Neil deGrasse Tyson explores Star Trek and science fiction with Zachary Quinto (Spock), comic co-host Chuck Nice, and astrophysicist and StarTalk geek-in-chief Charles Liu, PhD.
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Nazi Germany tried to build a nuclear reactor. How evidence of that effort was almost lost to history.
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What if you had a superpower that allowed you to see part of the world that was to come? At the age of 60, a Scottish woman named Joy Milne discovers she has a biological gift that allows her to see things that will happen in the future that no one else can see. A look at how we think about the future, and the important ways the future shapes the present. | To learn more about this episode, subscribe to our newsletter. Click here to learn more about NPR sponsors.
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It sounds like a movie plot: police discover the body of a young man who's been murdered. The body tests positive for a deadly infectious disease. Authorities trace the killing to a gang. They race to find the gang members, who may also be incubating the virus. This week on Hidden Brain, we revisit our 2016 story about disease, panic, and how a public health team used psychology to confront an epidemic.
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Bedridden with illness, Maine writer Elizabeth Tova Bailey found an unlikely companion — a solitary snail a friend brought her from the woods.
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How Humboldt Squid Talk To Each Other In The Dark Cephalopods are masters of changing their bodies in response to their environments—from camouflaging to sending warning signals to predators. The art of their visual deception lies deep within their skin. They can change their skin to different colors, textures, and patterns to communicate with other animals and each other. But how does this play out in the darkness of the deep ocean? That’s the question a team of scientists studied in the deep diving Humboldt squid that lives over 2,000 feet beneath the ocean’s surface. Their results were published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Biologist Benjamin Burford, who is an author on that study, explains how Humboldt squid use a combination of skin color patterns and bioluminescence to send each other signals and what this might teach us about communication in the deep ocean. See a video and more photos of Humboldt squid communicating with each other from Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute.  Mapping The Microbiome Of Your Tongue Your mouth is home to billions of bacteria—some prefer to live on the inside of the cheeks, while others prefer the teeth, some the gums, or the surface of the tongue. Writing this week in the journal Cell Reports, researchers describe their efforts to map out the various communities of bacteria that inhabit the tongue.  In the average mouth, around two dozen different types of bacteria form tiny “microbial skyscrapers” on your tongue’s surface, clustered around a central core made up of individual human skin cells. The researchers are mapping out the locations of the tiny bacterial colonies within those skyscrapers, to try to get a better understanding of the relationships and interdependencies between each colony.  Jessica Mark Welch, one of the authors of the report and an associate scientist at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, talks about what we know about the microbiome of the human mouth, and what researchers would still like to learn. Rethinking Invasive Species With Pablo Escobar’s Hippos Colombia is home to an estimated 80 to 100 hippos where they’re an invasive species—hippos are native to Africa. But notorious drug lord Pablo Escobar brought four to the country as part of his private zoo. After his death in 1993, the hippos escaped to the wild where they thrived.  Some locals consider them pests, the government has mulled over getting rid of them, and recent studies have shown that their large amounts of waste is changing the aquatic ecology of Colombia. But new research has taken a different view, showing that even though hippos are invasive, they might be filling an ecological hole left by large herbivores killed off by humans thousands of years ago. Erick Lundgren, the study’s lead author and a Ph.D. student at the University of Technology in Sydney, Australia, talks about why we should stop thinking of the phrase “invasive species” as inherently bad, and what may be in store for the future of these hippos. 
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President Trump says an anti-malarial drug could be a “gift from god” for treating Covid-19. Does it really work? And is it dangerous? We talk to toxicologist Professor Daniel Brooks, infectious disease specialist Dr. Matthew Pullen, and microbiologist Professor Karla Satchell. Also: VAMPIRE BATS! We’ve set up a voicemail to collect all of your questions about Coronavirus. Or if you’re a healthcare worker with a personal story you want to share, please call ‪(774) 481-1238‬ and leave us a message. Here’s a link to our transcript: https://bit.ly/2xu4ER8 This episode was produced by Meryl Horn, Wendy Zukerman, Rose Rimler, Michelle Dang, Laura Morris, Meg Driscoll and Sinduja Srinivasan. We’re edited by Blythe Terrell and Caitlin Kenney. Fact checking by Eva Dasher. Mix and sound design by Peter Leonard. Music written by Peter Leonard, Emma Munger, and Bobby Lord. Thanks to the NBC News Archives. A big thanks to all the researchers that we got in touch with for this episode, including Professor Thomas Doerner, Dr Hue, Professor David Boulware, Dr. Anne Melzer. And special thanks to the Zukerman family and Joseph Lavelle Wilson.
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We know that we live in an ever-changing world, but one thing we often overlook is demographic change. Whether the world's population is growing or shrinking can affect many aspects of our lives, from the number of kids we have to the likelihood that we'll live to old age. This week on Hidden Brain, we explore how our planet's population is changing, and what that means for us in the century to come.
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These days, our newsfeeds are overloaded with stories of the coronavirus. This week, Science Friday continues to dig into the facts behind the speculation—the peer-reviewed studies and reports published by scientists investigating the virus. But what we know—and don’t know—about the new virus is changing daily, making it hard to keep up. Everyone, for example, wants to know more about possible therapies for treating COVID-19 patients. After President Trump publicly speculated about the tried and true antimalarial drug, hydroxychloroquine, his endorsement sent governors, doctors, and the worried public scrambling to get their hands on the drug. But is there any science to back-up this claim? And what about remdesivir, the antiviral drug that has been used to treat a handful of patients, and is now the subject of several new drug trials? Angela Rasmussen, associate research scientist and virologist at the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health joins Science Friday once again to break down the science behind the stories. As suspected and confirmed cases of COVID-19 skyrocket in the United States, testing availability remains limited, leaving people wondering if their cough is something to worry about. But testing isn’t just a balm for anxiety—public health officials need data about how far the new virus has spread to make decisions about how to best protect people, and where to send critical resources, like masks and gowns. Accurate information is the frontline of defense, but scientists still have pressing questions about the novel disease. For instance, how many people who are infected actually have symptoms? If you do have symptoms, how likely are you to get severely sick? Until we are able to test both healthy and symptomatic people at scale, citizen science can help fill the gaps in tracking who has COVID-19. And the public health team that launched Flu Near You to track seasonal flu symptoms is now doing just that: soliciting your symptoms in the Covid Near You project. Covid Near You co-founder John Brownstein of Boston Children’s Hospital explains what questions the project may help answer, and what trends Covid Near You will track—including why this data is so valuable to public health efforts. Sign up at www.covidnearyou.org to report how you’re feeling—whether you’re healthy or have symptoms.
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Cobalt has been hoodwinking people since the day it was pried from the earth. Named after a pesky spirit from German folklore, trickery is embedded in its name.   In 1940s Netherlands, cobalt lived up to its name in a big way, playing a starring role in one of the most embarrassing art swindles of the 19th century. It’s a story of duped Nazis, a shocking court testimony, and one fateful mistake. Want more Science Diction? Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts, and sign up for our newsletter. The infamous Han van Meegeren, hard at work. (Wikimedia Commons) Guest:  Kassia St. Clair is a writer and cultural historian based in London. Footnotes And Further Reading: For fascinating histories on every color you can imagine, read Kassia St. Clair’s The Secret Lives of Color. Thanks to Jennifer Culver for background information on the kobold. Read more about Han van Meegeren in The Forger’s Spell by Edward Dolnick and in the 2009 series “Bamboozling Ourselves” in the New York Times. Credits:  Science Diction is written and produced by Johanna Mayer, with production and editing help from Elah Feder. Our senior editor is Christopher Intagliata, with story editing help from Nathan Tobey. Our theme song and music are by Daniel Peterschmidt. We had fact-checking help from Michelle Harris, and mixing help from Kaitlyn Schwalje. Special thanks to the entire Science Friday staff.
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Who should wear masks? Do they even work? Epidemiologist Dr Celine Gounder returns to Science Rules to take questions from Bill Nye's listener mailbox, and to share her experience from the frontline at Bellevue Hospital in New York.
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To discuss the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, we are introducing Anatomy of a Pandemic, a series in which each episode tackles a particular aspect of COVID-19, from virus biology to clinical disease, from control efforts to epidemiological patterns, from vaccine development to mental health coping strategies during this uncertain time. And we’ve got a quarantini (and placeborita) recipe for each installment! In the first episode of this series, we tackle some of your questions about SARS-CoV-2, the virus that is responsible for COVID-19 (aka COronaVIrus Disease-2019). Our episode begins with a firsthand account from Tiziano, a schoolteacher in northeastern Italy who has been living under the strict movement restrictions imposed by the Italian government in an attempt to limit the spread of the disease. Then, we review some of the basics about SARS-CoV-2 and RNA viruses in general. To help us discern fact from fiction, we seek the expertise of a virologist, Dr. Angela Rasmussen (interview recorded March 15, 2020), who answers some of the listener-submitted questions about the virus itself. We wrap up the episode by discussing the top five things we learned from our expert. To help you get a better idea of the topics covered in this episode, we have listed the questions below: What are the origins of this virus? Where did it come from? How can we tell whether this virus originated from one spillover event or multiple? What do we know about the mechanism of how this virus causes disease in humans? Are there multiple strains of SARS-CoV-2, and how do different strains of virus affect disease severity?  Is there a risk of SARS-CoV-2 mutating into something more deadly?  What is Remdesivir and how does it work?  How does handwashing work to reduce transmission risk? How long can SARS-CoV-2 live on surfaces?  What is the minimum infective dose of SARS-CoV-2?
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COVID-19 Update; News Items: COV-2 Has Natural Origin, Snake Oil Kills, Fake Dead Sea Scrolls Revealed, Cannabinoids for Acute Pain, Why Do Females Live Longer; Who's That Noisy; Science or Fiction
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Plumage! Sexy dances! Feather heists! Possible holographic disco birds? Natural History Museum of LA ornithology curator Dr. Allison Shultz is a professional plumologist aka feather expert. We visit the museum’s collection of rare specimens and chat about everything from fossilized dinosaur feathers to silent owl flight to furry bird legs to why pigeons are so loud, peacock tails, down parkas, quill pens, heavy metal flautists, feather theives, pigments, flight feathers, Vantablack, if you can eat feathers and why birdwatching is like seeing tiny purple racoons zoom overhead.  Visit Dr. Allison Shultz’s website allisonshultz.com and follow twitter.com/ajshultz622 A donation went to: birdnet.com/oc Sponsor links: Kiwico.com/ologies; Dispea.com/ologies More links at alieward.com/ologies/plumology Transcripts & bleeped episodes at: alieward.com/ologies-extras Become a patron of Ologies for as little as a buck a month: www.Patreon.com/ologies OlogiesMerch.com has hats, shirts, pins, totes and STIIIICKERS! Follow twitter.com/ologies or instagram.com/ologies Follow twitter.com/AlieWard or instagram.com/AlieWard Sound editing by Jarrett Sleeper of MindJam Media & Steven Ray Morris Theme song by Nick Thorburn Support the show.
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I talk with physicist and historian David Kaiser about the confluence of physics, politics, and funding in the twentieth century.
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In 2009, an old man died in a California nursing home. His obituary included not just his given name, but a long list of the pseudonyms he'd been known to use. In this episode, which we originally released in 2019, we trace the life of Riley Shepard, a hillbilly musician, writer, small-time con man and, perhaps, a genius.
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The strange story of an unlikely crew of people who band together to take on one of our largest problems using nothing but whale sounds, machine learning, and a willingness to think outside the box. Even stranger, several of the world's most accomplished scientists seem to think they might have a good idea. | To learn more about this episode, subscribe to our newsletter. Click here to learn more about NPR sponsors.
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Welcome to what is possibly the most tense and uncomfortable summer program in America! The Boston-based program aims to teach the next generation the real truth about race, and may provide some ideas for the rest of us about the right way to confront someone to their face. | To learn more about this episode, subscribe to our newsletter. Click here to learn more about NPR sponsors.
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This marks the second installment in our Anatomy of a Pandemic series, in which we discuss the various aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic. In this second chapter, we explore what we currently know about the disease itself, from symptom progression to incubation period and the role that asymptomatic individuals play in the transmission of disease. Our firsthand account, told from the perspective of a respiratory therapist, illustrates the severity of this disease and the frightening, yet very real, prospect of running out of medical equipment, protective gear, and hospital beds. We then discuss what we currently know about COVID-19 from a clinical disease perspective. We are joined by Dr. Colleen Kraft (interview recorded March 19, 2020), whose voice you may recognize from our first episode on coronaviruses. She helps to break down some of the disease-related questions sent in by our listeners. We wrap up the episode by discussing the top five things we learned from our expert. To help you get a better idea of the topics covered in this episode, we have listed the questions below: What does "respiratory droplet" transmission mean, and how is this different from something with "airborne" transmission? (15:08) What are the symptoms of COVID-19? (16:48) How long is the disease course, and how does this vary between mild vs severe symptoms? (18:45) What does "supportive care" mean in the context of caring for people who fall severely ill from COVID-19? (19:40) How much does viral load correlate with the severity of symptoms? (20:47) What is the incubation period of this disease, how long do people remain infectious, and are asymptomatic people contributing to the spread of disease? (22:22)  What are the groups that are particularly at risk for severe disease? (24:00) Why do children seem to be more resistant to this infection? What about children who are immunocompromised, are they at risk? (27:40) What is the case fatality rate, and how might we expect it to change throughout the course of this pandemic? (29:09) Are there long term complications associated with COVID-19? (31:58) Is it possible to get re-infected if you get this virus and then recover? (32:54)
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Daniel Griffin MD joins TWiV from a hospital parking lot to provide updates on COVID-19 diagnostics, clinical picture, and therapeutics, and then the TWiV team continues coverage of the coronavirus pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2.
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The fourth installment of our Anatomy of a Pandemic series takes a look at some of the epidemiological characteristics of the COVID-19 pandemic. But first, we hear about the experience of Katie Burson, who was quarantined along with her family on the infamous Diamond Princess cruise ship in February 2020, when cases of COVID-19 were reported among guests. Then we review some of the disease ecology of the SARS-CoV-2 spillover event and walk through a timeline of the pandemic, which, we have to admit, is pretty chilling to hear. We are joined by Dr. Carlos del Rio (interview recorded March 20, 2020), who chats with us about updated estimates for the R0 of SARS-CoV-2, reasons for regional variation in case fatality rates, and what the deal is with the slow rollout of tests in the US. We wrap up again by going through the top five things we learned from our expert. To help you get a better idea of the topics covered in this episode, we have listed the questions below: Do we know what the R0 is for this virus? (27:44) Is there a risk for a second wave of infection in China or other places where the disease seems to be slowing down? (29:31) What are the stages of an epidemic curve and what does it mean to flatten that curve? (31:03) Are people who get infected able to be re-infected or are they immune? (32:45) What is the relative effect of social distancing vs herd immunity? (33:31) How can we convince people who can stay home to actually stay home? (34:40) What are the differences between populations that contribute to the differences in case fatality rate between China vs Italy vs South Korea, etc? (36:28) What might we see in terms of numbers of infections or how long the outbreak will last? What's the end game? (38:00) Should the measures that have been enacted in some parts of the US be happening even in places with fewer cases so far? (40:55) Is this virus likely to become well established and another 'seasonal' respiratory infection? (42:16) What's the deal with testing in the US? Why was rollout so slow at the beginning? (43:14) When should a person try to get tested if they suspect they're infected? (45:58) What has this outbreak taught us so far about our ability to respond to pandemics, and how can we do better moving forward? (46:36)
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Welcome to the third chapter of our Anatomy of a Pandemic series, in which we cover the many aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic. In this chapter, we discuss how epidemic control can be managed from the individual, state, and national levels, as well as the importance of international collaboration to prevent the uncontrolled spread of disease. We start off with a firsthand account from Dr. Colleen Kraft, featured in COVID-19 Chapter 2, who shares the challenges she faces on a daily basis during this crisis while acting as Associate Chief Medical Officer at Emory University Hospital. Then we review some of the terms you’ve probably seen all over the news lately, such as “flattening the curve” or “social distancing”. Dr. Krupita Kuppalli (interview recorded March 18, 2020) shares with us her expertise from a global health and pandemic preparedness perspective, and she answers some of your questions relating to the steps you can take to protect yourself, your loved ones, and your community. We wrap up again by going through the top five things we learned from our expert. To help you get a better idea of the topics covered in this episode, we have listed the questions below: Now that community transmission is established in the US, what can we do to slow it down? (18:05) Do we need to enact these control measures (social distancing, etc.) everywhere, even in places currently have low case numbers? (19:51) Are travel bans effective in slowing disease spread? (21:20) How can we tell if our control measures are working? (22:52) How soon do we expect to see the effect of these control measures? (24:00) There have been a lot of comparisons with seasonal influenza. How does COVID-19 compare to seasonal influenza and why are we taking such extreme measures to reduce the spread of this disease when we don't do so for seasonal influenza? (25:22) How well prepared was the US for this epidemic? (28:25) What have we learned so far to help us stop the spread of this pandemic and prepare for future pandemics? (31:19) What are the risks as this pandemic spreads to less well-resourced areas? (33:39)
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Welcome to Chapter 6 of our Anatomy of a Pandemic series exploring the world of COVID-19. If you have made it this far in the series, you might be feeling a bit overwhelmed by all of the information we’re throwing your way. You’re not alone. We were feeling a bit too deep down the rabbit hole as well. So we reached out to Rosemary Walker and Peter Rosencrans, two psychology doctoral students at the University of Washington to talk to us about the mental health impacts this pandemic has had and walk us through some coping strategies (interview recorded March 20, 2020). Hang in there, everyone. To help you get a better idea of the topics covered in this episode, we have listed the questions below: You are both in Seattle, which has been impacted longer than much of the US, so, how are you? (05:55) This is a brand new situation for all of us that's affecting so much more than our physical health.So what are we seeing in terms of some of the mental health outcomes? (09:21) What are some of the challenges that you, as mental health professionals, have faced so far and that you expect to appear in the future related to COVID-19? (15:59) What are some coping strategies that we could use to deal with some of these issues? (19:15) What are some resources for people who normally see a therapist, but who cannot now because of COVID-19? (31:43) How can we as individuals be good neighbors, community members, in this stressful time while still protecting our mental health? (36:50) Do you have any specific resources that our listeners could seek out? (41:09)
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Is it an Esport? Is it a “real” sport? Or is it a bit of both? Neil deGrasse Tyson and co-hosts Gary O’Reilly and Chuck Nice investigate drone racing and technology with world champion Paul “Nurk” Nurkkala and drone engineer Justin Pearce.
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Think about the last time you asked someone for something. Maybe you were nervous or worried about what the person would think of you. Chances are that you didn't stop to think about the pressure you were exerting on that person. This week, we explore a phenomenon that psychologists refer to as "egocentric bias," and look at how this bias can lead us astray.
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Chapter 5 of our Anatomy of a Pandemic series covering all things COVID-19 goes through some of the exciting developments in potential vaccines for this new virus. Starting us off is an anonymous account describing the challenges faced by someone in the US trying to get tested for COVID-19. Then we review some of the basics of vaccines - how they work, the different kinds, and some of the challenges in accelerating the vaccine development pipeline during a crisis such as this. We sought the expert knowledge of Dr. M. Elena Bottazzi (interview recorded March 17, 2020), who is part of a group that is currently working on developing a vaccine for SARS-CoV-2. She answers a number of your vaccine- and treatment-related questions and sheds some light on the prospects of vaccine development for this particular disease. We wrap up again by going through the top five things we learned from our expert. To help you get a better idea of the topics covered in this episode, we have listed the questions below: What makes this virus a good candidate for a vaccine? (11:05) Why is it more difficult these days to produce completely protective vaccines vs partially protective vaccines? (13:29) How is the vaccine that your group is working on made, what is its target and how does it work? (16:02) What is the timeline of vaccine development, testing, deployment, and how soon might we see an effective vaccine for SARS-CoV-2? (21:19) What steps of this development process can be shortened to get an 'early release' of a vaccine? (25:49) It seems we are better at developing vaccines than we are antivirals; why is this? (28:55)
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Healthcare workers across the U.S. are saying they don’t have enough protective gear to keep them safe against the coronavirus. They’re having to reuse masks, and they’re worried that they may have to resort to homemade cloth masks. Is all this safe? Plus, reports are saying that ibuprofen, the stuff in Advil, is making people with coronavirus sicker. But what does the science say? To find out we spoke to infectious disease expert Professor Raina MacIntyre, industrial hygienist Dr. Rachael Jones, public health researcher Professor Carlos Del Rio, and cardiologist Dr. Yogendra Kanthi.  Here’s a link to our transcript: https://bit.ly/3agVF4i Selected References The best study we could find on cloth masks: https://bit.ly/3bmRHaI  Study showing that N95 masks are best for healthcare workers: https://bit.ly/2xfvKLT  The Lancet letter theorizing about why ibuprofen might be risky: https://bit.ly/2QEDFt6    This episode was produced by Meryl Horn, Wendy Zukerman, Rose Rimler, Michelle Dang, Laura Morris and Sinduja Srinivasan. We’re edited by Blythe Terrell and Caitlin Kenney. Fact checking by Lexi Krupp. Mix and sound design by Catherine Anderson. Music written by Peter Leonard, Emma Munger, and Bobby Lord. A big thanks to all the researchers and healthcare workers that we got in touch with for this episode, including Professor Paul Little, Dr Kirsty Short, Siyab Panhwar, and Ayman Saeyeldin. And special thanks to Meg Driscoll, the Zukerman family and Joseph Lavelle Wilson.
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The coronavirus appears to be deadlier and more transmissible. What science tells us about how influenza and the coronavirus are alike — and different.
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In episode 220 we talk with Wendy who has had some of the most dramatic experiences we've ever had shared on The Confessionals! She has been tormented by pure evil throughout her life and she shares all with us today including a time that entities came into her room, told her that they were taking her soul as they shoved their arms into her chest. If the paranormal isn't enough, Wendy shares a story of when she first got married and her new husband went off the deep end and almost killed her and those around them. BECOME A MEMBER AND GET ADDITIONAL SHOWS: https://www.theconfessionalspodcast.com/join Subscribe to our YouTube: https://bit.ly/2TlREaI Subscribe to the Newsletter: https://www.theconfessionalspodcast.com/the-newsletter Website: www.theconfessionalspodcast.com (http://www.theconfessionalspodcast.com/) Email: theconfessionalspodcast@gmail.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TheConfessionalsPodcast Twitter: @TConfessionals (https://twitter.com/TConfessionals) Tony's Twitter: @tony_merkel Show Intro INSTRUMENTAL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyub39AXxUw Show Intro FREE DOWNLOAD: https://bit.ly/2HxNcw3
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What’s the difference between a robot and an android? Should laws protect robots? Neil deGrasse Tyson explores the rise of robots with “I Am C-3PO” author and Star Wars actor Anthony Daniels, comic co-host Chuck Nice, and robot ethicist Kate Darling, PhD.
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Sleep paralysis is relatively common in the general population and yet the darker aspects of it continue to be taboo in modern clinical research. On this episode we discuss the work of sleep paralysis experiencer and psychologist Stan Gooch and his controversial ideas on the “second consciousness” that may escape the body and intrude upon our waking reality. Then for our Plus+ members, we continue our research into the strange figure known as Dellschau and what role he played in the great airship mystery. Links * Creatures from Inner Space * The Book of Dreams and Ghosts * Bizarre Encounters with the Demons That Come at Night * Sex and the Single Succubus: Real Encounters with Man-Hungry Demons * Strange Creatures That Shimmer Before Us * The Most Mysterious Of All Cats * Sleep Paralysis, Aliens & the Devil: What’s Going On? * Supernatural Invaders in the Dead of Night Plus+ Extension The extension of the show is EXCLUSIVE to Plus+ Members. To join, click HERE. * Secrets of Dellschau: The Sonora Aero Club * [(Charles Dellschau )] [Author: James Brett] [Mar-2013]
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In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris speaks about social contagion and about the importance of understanding one's own mind in an emergency. SUBSCRIBE to continue listening and gain access to all content on samharris.org/subscribe.
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When public health is threatened on a mass scale, we have a long history of working together to take on the challenge. On this new weekly series, Steven will speak with experts from the worlds of health and technology about how the current moment compares with past pandemics, and what the coming months might look like.  On this episode, Steven talks with Richard Florida, a bestselling author on cities and urban rebirth. The population density of cities has always been key to driving new ideas, new collaborations, and new social movements. But today, as the coronavirus spreads, that density is creating danger. How can cities protect their way of life, and how they can come out of this crisis even stronger than before? New episodes of “Fighting Coronavirus” will publish here every Tuesday, or you can listen and subscribe at https://wondery.com/shows/fighting-coronavirus/ Read Richard Florida and Steven Pedigo’s 10-Point Preparedness Plan for Cities.
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Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Chuck Nice investigate what we currently know about the Coronavirus (COVID-19) with Dr. Irwin Redlener, Director of the National Center for Disaster Preparedness.
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Hospitalization rates, exponential growth and flattening the curve – all these concepts are now part of our daily vocabulary. But understanding them properly takes some expertise. Bio-statistician Adam Kucharski joins Bill Nye to make sense of the data on COVID-19, and what to watch out for.
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There can be a lot of psychological noise involved in teaching. But what it we replaced all that mental clutter...with a click? This week, we bring you a 2018 episode exploring an innovative idea about how we learn. It will take us from a dolphin exhibit in Hawaii to a top teaching hospital in New York. It's about a method to quiet the noise that can turn learning into a minefield of misery.
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Many Americans feel an obligation to keep up with political news. But maybe we should be focusing our energies elsewhere. Political scientist Eitan Hersh says there's been a rise in "political hobbyism" in the United States. We treat politics like entertainment, following the latest updates like we follow our favorite sports teams. Instead, he says, we should think of politics as a way to acquire power and persuade our neighbors to back the issues we support.
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Butterflies are gross. Yes they are delightful and beautiful and part of any idyllic picnic-scape but lepidopterologist, TV host and jungle explorer Phil Torres is here to gossip about how shamelessly disgusting our favorite bugs actually are. Learn their secrets, their mating habits, how they turn themselves into goo and then into another creature, what moth os the most goth, what flowers to plant to attract them, the scariest thing about the jungle and what it feels like to help discover new species. Also butterflies get sloppy drunk and we talk all about it. For more info, see: Phil-Torres.com Follow Phil on Twitter and Instagram and TikTok More info on the COVID-19 volunteer scientist database: https://tinyurl.com/COVID19SciVolunteers  Follow Phil's inspiration, @AndyBugGuy, on Twitter Donations went to Xerces.org & MealsonWheelsAmerica.org Become a patron of Ologies for as little as a buck a month: www.Patreon.com/ologies OlogiesMerch.com has hats, shirts, pins, totes! Follow @Ologies on Twitter or Instagram Follow @AlieWard on Twitter or Instagram Transcripts & bleeped episodes at: alieward.com/ologies-extras Sound editing by Jarrett Sleeper of MindJam Media & Steven Ray Morris Theme song by Nick Thorburn More links at www.alieward.com/ologies/lepidopterologyencore Support the show.
47
The group Skype A Scientist has seen a surge in demand these last couple of weeks for its service of virtually connecting students to scientists.
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How we distinguish between real risks and fake fears is a complicated, but universal human challenge. Author David Ropeik gives listeners the tools to assess their own fears, and the risks they face. You can listen to ad-free new episodes of Science Rules! only on Stitcher Premium. For a free month of Stitcher Premium, go to stitcherpremium.com and use promo code ‘SCIENCE.’
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In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris and Paul Bloom speak about the psychology of adapting to the coronavirus pandemic, the disastrous analogy between coronavirus and flu, the political siloing of information, true and false concerns over "panic," pressuring China to close down their live animal markets, the economic implications and possible silver linings of the pandemic, what our response suggests about our ability to deal with climate change, Biden vs Sanders, the ethics of praising one's enemies, and other topics. SUBSCRIBE to continue listening and gain access to all content on samharris.org/subscribe.
50
We are inundated with decisions in the modern world. What to wear, what to buy, what to watch, where to work, what to eat, who to call, where to live, what to study, when to exercise, how much to save, etc. And every decision, no matter how small, requires mental effort. But when a particular option is suggested to us ahead of time, the cognitive load is much smaller. In this episode of Choiceology with Katy Milkman, we explore the subtle power of default options. We begin with a simple experiment, offering free hot chocolate to random college students. A small shift in the way we present the option of a whipped-cream topping leads to a measurable change in the students’ preferences. Next up, a rather more consequential example. It’s the story of the web browser wars in the mid-1990s. You’ll get an insider’s perspective on the epic battle between Microsoft’s Internet Explorer browser, and Netscape Communications’ Navigator browser. Netscape had a substantial head start in the browser space, pioneering many of the features we take for granted in web browsing today. But Microsoft employed a simple strategy to grow their user base for Internet Explorer and quickly gained market share. The end result of this strategy was a seismic shift in the industry. You’ll hear from Eric Sink, a lead developer on the Internet Explorer project. To examine the science behind defaults, Katy invited behavioral economist Shlomo Benartzi to join her to discuss the ways that choice architecture and defaults can have a major impact on our behavior, particularly around retirement savings programs. Finally, Katy offers practical advice on how to leverage defaults to reach your goals—and how to avoid the defaults that might trick you into less desirable options.
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As Covid-19 cases rise in the U.S., healthcare workers are already struggling to keep up. In a different kind of episode, we bring you an interview with Dr. Antoinette Ward, who is leading Covid-19 testing at a major hospital in Atlanta — and finding ways to treat the rapidly increasing number of patients. This interview comes from iHeartRadio’s The Women. For more stories from those on the front lines, listen here: http://bit.ly/TheWomenPodcast Here’s a link to the transcript: https://bit.ly/3bczJHW   This episode was mixed by Adriene Lilly and Peter Leonard. Special thanks to Sonya Green, Gail Reid, and Jen Shipon. Fact checking by Lexi Krupp.
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Ducks! Basically a joke of an animal, if we're being perfectly honest. They make silly noises, they waddle around, they are extremely cute and goofy looking, and they love to swim around in big piles of money!  And look, you might see the title and think 'a duck isn't science.' Well i've learned a thing or two from those eggheads on the science couch and I can definitely say that you are wrong! It turns out, everything is science! Seems like a cop out, but it's true. Anyway, we sincerely hope everyone out there is doing well and staying safe! Love you guys!  Follow us on Twitter @SciShowTangents, where we’ll tweet out topics for upcoming episodes and you can ask the science couch questions!  While you're at it, check out the Tangents crew on Twitter: Stefan: @itsmestefanchin Ceri: @ceriley Sam: @slamschultz Hank: @hankgreen If you want to learn more about any of our main topics, check out SciShowTangents.org!
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Everyone loves a good poop story, don’t they? We certainly hope so, because our good friend Katie shares a fantastic one to kick off our episode on lactose intolerance. In this episode, we explore what lactose is and the symptoms that lactose non-digesters experience when they eat some sneaky cheese or ice cream. Then we explain that this episode is actually flipped - turns out that not being able to digest lactose is the normal state, and those of us who can are actually the mutants! We trace the origins of this mutant allele and how the persistence of pastoralism spread milk drinking far and wide. Where do we stand with lactose intolerance today? Tune in for that answer and for an abundance of milk facts to arm yourself with for the next pub trivia night.
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I talk with cognitive scientist and psychologist Lera Boroditsky about how language shapes our thought, including how we conceive of space and time.
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George Noory and author John Hogue explore his research into the quatrains of Nostradamus, including one that predicted a "blood plague" and other current events that may be harbingers of a worldwide cataclysm. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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As new cases of coronavirus pop up across the United States, and as millions of people must self-isolate from family and friends at home, one place many are turning to for comfort and information is their news feed. But our regular media diet of politics, sports, and entertainment has been replaced by 24/7 coverage of the novel coronavirus pandemic. Nearly every outlet is covering the pandemic in some way—celebrities live streaming their self-quarantine, restaurants rolling out new health practices and food delivery options, educators and parents finding ways to teach kids at home. There’s an overwhelming number of ways the media has covered the virus. But on top of that, there’s also blatant misinformation about the virus distracting us from the useful facts. It’s all appearing in one big blur on Facebook or Twitter feeds. And it doesn’t help that nearly every few hours we’re getting important, and often urgent, updates to the evolving story. This week, guest host John Dankosky speaks with two scientists who can help fact-check your news feed. Angela Rasmussen, assistant research scientist and virologist at Columbia Mailman School of Public Health, and Akiko Iwasaki, professor of immunology at the Yale University School of Medicine give us a clearer picture of the coronavirus news this week. Poet Jane Hirshfield calls these “unaccountable” times. Crises in the biosphere—climate change, extinctions—collide with crises in human life. And in her new book Ledger she says she has tried to do the accounting of where we, human beings, are as a result. As a poet whose work touches on the Hubble telescope, the proteins of itch, and the silencing of climate researchers, Hirshfield talks with John Dankosky about the particular observational capacity of language, and why scientists and poets can share similar awe. Hirshfield is also the founder of Poets for Science, which continues a project to create a global community poem started after 2017’s March for Science. “When we introduced them in isolated pairs they formed relationships much faster, like college students in a dorm room,” Carter said to Science Friday earlier this week. “And when we introduced a bat into a group of three, that was faster than when we just put two larger groups together.” Carter has also studied how illness changes social relationships within a vampire bat roost. He found that if a baby bat gets sick, for instance, the mom won’t stop grooming or sharing food with their offspring. But that same bat will stop participating in some social behavior with a close roost-mate that isn’t family. Carter joins Science Friday guest host John Dankosky to talk about researching vampire bats, and what their response to illness tells us about our own time social distancing during the coronavirus outbreak. See more photos and video of social bat behavior below.
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Covid-19 acts in a way that scientists are still trying to figure out. In some people who are infected, symptoms are mild -- like a common cold. Some are completely fine. In others, the infection can be fatal, stopping the lungs from functioning and causing the body to shut down. So why are symptoms so mild in some people and deadly in others? It turns out there's a tipping point -- a moment where the virus moves from one part of the body to another -- that takes the infection from manageable to fatal.
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At the turn of the 19th century, Britons would stroll along the Yorkshire Coast, stumbling across unfathomably big bones. These mysterious fossils were all but tumbling out of the cliffside, but people had no idea what to call them. There wasn’t a name for this new class of creatures.  Until Richard Owen came along. Owen was an exceptionally talented naturalist, with over 600 scientific books and papers. But perhaps his most lasting claim to fame is that he gave these fossils a name: the dinosaurs. And then he went ahead and sabotaged his own good name by picking a fight with one of the world’s most revered scientists. Want more Science Diction? Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts, and sign up for our newsletter. Woodcut of the famous dinner inside of an Iguanodon shell at the Crystal Palace in 1854. Artist unknown. (Wikimedia Commons) Footnotes And Further Reading:  Special thanks to Sean B. Carroll and the staff of the Natural History Museum in London. Read an article by Howard Markel on this same topic. Credits:  Science Diction is written and produced by Johanna Mayer, with production and editing help from Elah Feder. Our senior editor is Christopher Intagliata, with story editing help from Nathan Tobey. Our theme song and music are by Daniel Peterschmidt. This episode also featured music from Setuniman and The Greek Slave songs, used with permission from the open-source digital art history journal Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide. We had fact-checking help from Michelle Harris, and mixing help from Kaitlyn Schwalje. Special thanks to the entire Science Friday staff.
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Ian Lipkin joins Vincent to talk about his experience as a COVID-19 patient, and issues surrounding the disease and SARS-CoV-2 including limiting transmission, antivirals, vaccines, and much more.
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George Noory and financial expert Chris Duane discuss his theory that the coronavirus pandemic and stock market collapse are being exploited as a way to push hyperinflation and make paper money worthless. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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George Noory and an open lines caller discuss her theory that the coronavirus outbreak is actually a mind control experiment designed to create panic in the public and control their behavior. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
62
60 years ago this year, a young Jane Goodall entered the Gombe in Tanzania to begin observations of the chimpanzees living there. During her time there, Goodall observed wild chimpanzees in the Gombe making and using tools—a finding that changed our thinking about chimps, primates, and even humans. Now, Goodall travels the world as a conservationist, advocate for animals, and United Nations Messenger of Peace.  She joins guest host John Dankosky to reflect on her years of experience in the field, the scientific efforts she is involved with today, and the need for hope and cooperation in an increasingly connected but chaotic world.  Science has given us more than data. It’s also brought us words for everyday things or ideas—meme, cobalt, dinosaur. And there’s often a good story about how those words got into our common use. Take the word “vaccine,” the distant, but hoped-for solution to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. It turns out the word originates from vaccinae, relating to cows, because the smallpox vaccine was derived from cowpox, a related virus.  Science Friday word nerd Johanna Mayer joins John Dankosky to talk about the origins of the word “vaccine,” and how she sleuths the fascinating histories that she tells in her new podcast Science Diction. The first season of Science Diction is now available! Listen and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts!  
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Where is the line between what is real and what is imaginary? It seems like an easy question to answer: if you can see it, hear it, or touch it, then it's real, right? But what if this way of thinking is limiting one of the greatest gifts of the mind? This week, we meet people who experience the invisible as real, and learn how they hone their imaginations to see the world with new eyes.
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What is déjà vu and how does it relate to dreams and anxiety? Robert and Joe discuss what is known about this curious anomaly of memory on Stuff to Blow Your Mind. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Pluto may not be a planet, but it definitely exists. Not every case is so clear. The history of near-Earth astronomy contains many cases of bodies that may or may not have ever existed in the solar system we call home. In this episode of Stuff to Blow Your Mind, Robert Lamb and Joe McCormick take a journey through space to survey once-hypothetical bodies that took work to prove, once-imagined bodies that are now confirmed phantoms, and the unsolved mysteries where questions remain. (originally published 3/5/2019) Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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White dwarfs are usually about 60% the mass of the Sun, so it was a bit of a surprise when astronomers found one that was almost exactly twice that. What happens when white dwarfs merge?
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CALLING ALL OLOGISTS: If you’re a scientist who wants to help with the COVID-19 pandemic -- boy howdy have we got an episode for you. Dr. Mike Wells, a neurobiologist at Harvard University and the Broad Institute, knows we need tests in the U.S. and is coralling all the wonderful scientists willing to pitch in. He explains how testing for the SARS CoV-2 virus works, what other countries are doing, and even the book that inspired him to pursue science. Also: if you’re feeling helpless and want to help, Patrons give dozens of ideas on how to help those around you, and where to go for resources if you need help, and how to take care of your own mental and physical well being during an uncertain time. Also the album I’m listening to too much and how much toilet paper I have left.  To sign up -- or for access to the database -- click here: https://tinyurl.com/COVID19SciVolunteers  Follow Dr. Michael F. Wells at Twitter.com/mfwells5 A donation went to: LAFoodBank.org More health info at EndCoronavirus.org  Sign the petition for nurses’ protection Links to more articles + kid-friendly shows at alieward.com/ologies/handsondeck Have extra masks? Try the website www.mask-match.com Brainchildshow.com 100 Humans on Netflix  Transcripts & bleeped episodes at: alieward.com/ologies-extras Become a patron of Ologies for as little as a buck a month: www.Patreon.com/ologies OlogiesMerch.com has hats, shirts, pins, totes and STIIIICKERS! Follow twitter.com/ologies or instagram.com/ologies Follow twitter.com/AlieWard or instagram.com/AlieWard Sound editing by Jarrett Sleeper of MindJam Media & Steven Ray Morris Theme song by Nick Thorburn Support the show.
68
Neil deGrasse Tyson, comic co-host Chuck Nice, and theoretical physicist and author Brian Greene answer questions from our fans about string theory, the fabric of spacetime, interstellar travel, free will, and the meaning of life.
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Pediatric infectious disease physician and coronavirologist Mark Denison joins Vincent for a discussion of COVID-19 and SARS-CoV-2 with an emphasis on antiviral therapeutics.
70
Elizabeth Fisher, Professor of Neurogenetics at University College London, spent 13 years getting her idea – finding a new way of studying genetic disorders – to work. She began her research career at a time, in the 1980s, when there was an explosion of interest and effort in finding out what genes did what, and which of them were responsible for giving rise to the symptoms of various neurodegenerative conditions. Elizabeth has been particularly interested in those in which there are chromosomal abnormalities, like Down syndrome and Turner syndrome, as distinct from specific genetic disorders. Her work has helped in the understanding of what’s different about the genetic make-up of people with these conditions, and what new therapies might be developed in the future. Lizzie Fisher talks to Jim al-Khalili about how she was inspired to study genetics while standing on the red carpet, how she kept going during the 13 years it took to introduce human chromosomes into mice and why she's starting the process all over again.
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In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Amesh Adalja about the spreading coronavirus pandemic. They discuss the contagiousness of the virus and the severity of the resultant illness, the mortality rate and risk factors, vectors of transmission, how long coronavirus can live on surfaces, the importance of social distancing, possible anti-viral treatments, the timeline for a vaccine, the importance of pandemic preparedness, and other topics. SUBSCRIBE to continue listening and gain access to all content on samharris.org/subscribe.
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Pioneering ecologist Nalini Nadkarni takes us up into the canopy — the area above the forest floor — where she helped research and document this unexplored ecosystem.
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Daniel and Jorge answer questions from listeners, like you! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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The coronavirus pandemic is here, and in the U.S., this is starting to get very real. We talk to people in South Korea and Italy to see what life has been like for them. And we find out what the problem was with America’s tests — are they fixed now? And now that social distancing is on everyone’s mind, do we have evidence that it will really “flatten the curve”? We speak to public health expert Prof. Josh Sharfstein, virologist Prof. Vincent Racaniello, and epidemiologist Prof. Elizabeth Radin. Here’s a link to our transcript: https://bit.ly/2QmpJUf  Selected references: A look at what’s happening in Italy: https://bit.ly/3d56AA4 Josh’s paper on the testing debacle: https://bit.ly/2x3oT84  How different cities reacted to the 1918 flu pandemic: https://bit.ly/2waLYWk  This episode was produced by Wendy Zukerman, Michelle Dang, Meryl Horn, Sinduja Srinivasan, and Rose Rimler. We’re edited by Blythe Terrell and Caitlin Kenney. Fact checking by Lexi Krupp. Mix and sound design by Sam Bair. Music written by Peter Leonard, Emma Munger, and Bobby Lord. A big thanks to all the researchers we got in touch with for this episode, including Dr Neeltje van Doremalen, Prof. Nigel McMillan, Prof. Jeffrey Shaman, and Prof. Stephen Morse.   And special thanks to Salvatore Incontro, Gabriella Doob, the Zukerman family and Joseph Lavelle Wilson.
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Cliff Barackman and James "Bobo" Fay continue their discussion with Bigfoot Books owner and Bluff Creek Project member Steven Streufert!
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In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Scott Galloway about the connection between wealth and happiness. They discuss the problem of wealth inequality, the transfer of wealth from the young to the old, class warfare in Democratic politics, deficit spending, means testing Social Security, Bloomberg’s campaign and “stop and frisk,” breaking up big tech, privacy absolutism, meditation, mortality, atheism, and other topics. SUBSCRIBE to continue listening and gain access to all content on samharris.org/subscribe.
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A look at some of the ancient artworks and artifacts that the show Ancient Aliens gets totally wrong.
79
One episode wasn’t enough! Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Chuck Nice are back to answer more fan-submitted questions about black holes, dark energy, singularities, Hawking radiation, photons, and a lot more.
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In this episode, we right some wrongs. As we said in the beginning, given the fast pace we were bound to be wrong, and will be again. 1) New paradigm for COVID-19 patients 2) Procalcitonin: not as good as we thought 3) Malignant atelectasis and the crashing hypoxemia 4)SARS-COV-2 & DIC 5) Awake Proning / CPAP / Vent Splitting / Extubation 6) Ethical dilemmas
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Humans aren’t the only animals stressed-out by social distancing.  Narwhals send out echolocation clicks to locate their buddies and ease their loneliness.  And a plant about to be chomped by a caterpillar knows that the world can be a scary place.  In this episode, from dogs to narwhals to plants, we put aside human-centric stories to find out how other living creatures map their world, deal with stress, and communicate.  Guests: Alexandra Horowitz – Dog cognition researcher, Barnard College, and author of "Being A Dog: Following the Dog Into a World of Smell.” Susanna Blackwell – Bio-acoustician with Greeneridge Sciences Simon Gilroy – Professor of botany, University of Wisconsin, Madison
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We're directing our rational brains toward the subject of health and nutrition...with special guest and Licensed Dietitian Nutritionist Leah McGrath. (@InglesDietitian)Support our sponsors:The Great Courses Plus: http://www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/sethHarry's: http://www.harrys.com/thethinkingatheist
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The diets of coyotes varied widely depending on whether they were living in rural, suburban or urban environments--but pretty much anything is fair game.
84
George Noory and Layne Dolfin explore her work as a dream interpreter, explains the messages from the subconscious found in some common dreams, and why people have recurring dreams and nightmares. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
85
The bilateral organism crawled on the seafloor, taking in organic matter at one end and dumping the remains out the other some 555 million years ago.
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On this week’s show, host Joel Goldberg gets an update on the coronavirus pandemic from Senior Correspondent Jon Cohen. In addition, Cohen gives a rundown of his latest feature, which highlights the relationship between diseases and changing seasons—and how this relationship relates to a potential coronavirus vaccine. Also this week, from a recording made at this year’s AAAS annual meeting in Seattle, host Meagan Cantwell speaks with Alexandra Maertens, director of the Green Toxicology initiative at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, about the importance of incorporating nonanimal testing methods to study the adverse effects of chemicals. This week’s episode was edited by Podigy. Listen to previous podcasts. About the Science Podcast [Image: Let Ideas Compete/Flickr; Music: Jeffrey Cook]
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In this episode of the podcast, Sam Harris speaks with Nicholas Christakis about the coronavirus pandemic. They discuss the likely effects on society, proactive vs reactive school closures, community transmission, false comparisons between coronavirus and flu, the imperative of social distancing, the timeline of the pandemic, Trump’s political messaging, the widespread distrust of expertise, the importance of "flattening the curve" of the epidemic, the possible failure of our healthcare system, gradations of personal response to this threat, and other topics. SUBSCRIBE to continue listening and gain access to all content on samharris.org/subscribe.
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Benjamin Thompson, Noah Baker, and Amy Maxmen discuss efforts to develop treatments for COVID-19. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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At the beginning of the year, many of us make resolutions for the months to come. We resolve to work out more, procrastinate less, or save more money. Though some people stick with these aspirations, many of us fall short. This week, psychologist Wendy Wood shares what researchers have found about how to build good habits — and break bad ones.
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A listener recounts a terrifying phone call with a very cryptic a haunting message that will stay with her for life.
92
Michael Marshall, project director of the Good Thinking Society in the U.K., talks about flat earth belief and its relationship to conspiracy theories and other antiscience activities.
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The strong social distancing policies introduced by China seem to have been successful in stopping the spread of Covid 19. Without any effective drug treatments, reducing our number of contacts is the most effective way to prevent viral transmission. We also look at the similarities been policies in Russia and the US on how best to deal with the virus. In both cases there are contradictions and disagreements between medical professionals and politicians. And a warning from Polio, how vaccines may create problems when immunisation campaigns do not reach everyone. And If you've ever felt the urge to shop till you drop, then you may already know about some of the clever ways retailers convince us to consume. From flash sales to so-called unbelievable offers, there are a whole range of techniques aimed at encouraging us to flash the cash. Listener Mo works in marketing, so knows more than most about the tricks of the trade - but he wants CrowdScience to investigate how neuroscience is being used to measure our behaviour and predict what we’ll buy. Marnie Chesterton finds out how brain scans are being used to discover which specific aspect of an advertisement a person is responding to, and then she hears how this information is being used by companies who want to sell us more stuff. But there's also evidence to suggest we have less control over these decisions than we think, and that computers are getting closer to detecting our intention before we're even aware of it ourselves. And this could have huge implications for the way we shop. (Image: Getty Images)
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In the first Coronavirus Edition of Science Rules, Bill Nye takes on the topic of testing: the barriers, the breakthroughs and the big picture, with Harvard epidemiologist Dr Michael J Mina. Send Bill a voicemail about your experience in the pandemic, at (201) 472-0785.
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In episode 218 we speak with two people that saw the COVID-19 virus explode right in front of their faces! First, on the show we have Brett joining us from Hong Kong! Being a U.S. citizen living in Hong Kong, Brett brings a clear and unique perspective as to what he lived through with the protests and the COVID-19 outbreak. He does not hold back in sharing what it was like living through these situations and what it’s like living inside a communist country. Later we are joined by Joe who is also an American citizen living in South Korea. Joe starts out by giving his American brothers and sisters a dire warning about COVID-19 and what it’ll do to us if we do not take every precaution possible. As the conversation unfolds Joe tells us the strategies South Korea has implemented to contain this virus better than almost any other country in the world!  BECOME A MEMBER AND GET ADDITIONAL SHOWS: https://www.theconfessionalspodcast.com/join Subscribe to our YouTube: https://bit.ly/2TlREaI Subscribe to the Newsletter: https://www.theconfessionalspodcast.com/the-newsletter Website: www.theconfessionalspodcast.com (http://www.theconfessionalspodcast.com/) Email: theconfessionalspodcast@gmail.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/TheConfessionalsPodcast Twitter: @TConfessionals (https://twitter.com/TConfessionals) Tony's Twitter: @tony_merkel Show Intro INSTRUMENTAL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyub39AXxUw Show Intro FREE DOWNLOAD: https://bit.ly/2HxNcw3
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Ed Yong, writer for The Atlantic, says the coronavirus has a few traits that seem to make it especially effective at infecting humans.
97
Bigfoot, little people, strange cryptids and giants.
98
Tracy 7 Jerry discuss the world famous Archer Ave in Chicago, Home of Resurrection Mary as well as several lesser known hauntings and legends.
99
What's the point of money? The answer might seem obvious: we need it to get paid for our work, and to buy the things we need. But there's also a deeper way to look at the role of money in our lives. This week we explore an anthropologist's take on the origin story of money. What if the cash and coins we carry are not just tools for transactions, but manifestations of human relationships?
100
Today Karen and Blake discuss "Screaming Skulls" - a surprisingly common yet particularly English kind of haunting. Karen has a new short story based on this legend.
101
Discover virtual particles with Daniel and Jorge Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
102
Sleeping late is more natural for some people. And that's okay. Plus, why sleep is so important for a healthy immune system.
103
Neil deGrasse Tyson and co-hosts Gary O’Reilly and Chuck Nice sit down with MLB legend Carlos Beltrán to explore his extraordinary career including his first experiences in the league, adapting to the Moneyball era, and life after baseball.
104
5-10 Years - Arsenic Based Life; News Items:Hoarders of the Pandemic, Evolution of Anxiety, Extreme Depth of Focus Lens, Predicting the Present; Who's That Noisy; Your Questions and E-mails: Neonatal Vitamin K; Science or Fiction
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A train ride home is anything but routine for one listener.
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Folks, it’s a megasode. Not one, but 4 ologists. “Coronavirus” is on everyone’s lips -- and some people’s hands -- but what is it? Where did it come from? How does it spread? How dangerous is it? What should we do? Who’s most at risk? Was it biowarfare? Do bats spread it? Should you wear a mask? Can we still smooch our dogs on the face? Do we need to doomsday prep? What’s it like to live in a leper colony? Alie sits down with Dr. Shannon Bennett: a microbiologist, a molecular epidemiologist, a virologist and the Chair of Science at the California Academy Science. She is deeply informed and warm and charming and patient. All these questions will be answered and your panic will be swapped out for informed, empowered action and compassion. You will also wash your hands a lot. Whether or not you bathe in whiskey is up to you.  Follow: Dr. Shannon Bennett at twitter.com/microbeexplorer and Instagram.com/microbeexplorer Listen to Chiropterology (BATS) with Dr. Merlin Tuttle Listen to Disasterology (EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT) with Dr. Samantha Montano  Listen to Disinfectiology (BLEACH) with Dr. Evan Rumberger  A donation went to: California Academy of Sciences  Sponsor links: Kiwico.com/ologies; HelixSleep.com/ologies; AurateNewYork.com/ologies More links at alieward.com/ologies/virology 100 Humans on Netflix  Transcripts & bleeped episodes at: alieward.com/ologies-extras Become a patron of Ologies for as little as a buck a month: www.Patreon.com/ologies OlogiesMerch.com has hats, shirts, pins, totes and STIIIICKERS! Follow twitter.com/ologies or instagram.com/ologies Follow twitter.com/AlieWard or instagram.com/AlieWard Sound editing by Jarrett Sleeper of MindJam Media & Steven Ray Morris Theme song by Nick Thorburn Support the show.
108
Could the Earth become a black hole? Does dark energy impact your life? Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Chuck Nice answer your fan-submitted questions on black holes, dark energy, and other mysteries of the universe. NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons and All-Access subscribers can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free. Thanks to our Patrons Ashod Kuyumjian, Tony Biell, Jon Emerson, Zap Andersson, and Ocean & Dylan McIntyre for supporting us this week. Image Credit: NASA, S. Gezari (The Johns Hopkins University), and J. Guillochon (University of California, Santa Cruz).
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It’s no secret that some animal species are highly intelligent – but can they “get” jokes? Can they laugh? Are laughter and intelligence even related? Learn about animal laughter in this classic episode of BrainStuff. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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At long last: an episode dedicated to veterinary medicine! Dr. Terrance Ferguson & Dr. Vernard Hodges have been friends for nearly 30 years and have co-owned their rural Georgia veterinary clinic, Critter Fixers, for over 20 years. The two wonderful buddies talk about getting accepted into vet school, caring for spiders & camels & lizards & toads & kittens & doggos, the weirdest things they’ve extracted from animal tummies, if our pets love us back, keeping kidneys healthy, grain-free diets, what to do if your (Alie’s) dog is plumping up by a few pounds, what they wish animal owners knew, when it’s time to let go vs. keep treating a pet, the daily rollercoaster of emotions that come with vet med -- and their charming, informative new show “Critter Fixers: Country Vets” on NatGeo Wild. Watch “Critter Fixers: Country Vets” on National Geographic  Their vet practice: critterfixerveterinaryhospital.com Follow Dr. Hodges & Dr. Ferguson A donation went to: ittakesavillagefoundation.com Sponsor links: betterhelp.com/ologies; Sakara.com/ologies; StitchFix.com/ologies More links at alieward.com/ologies/veterinarybiology 100 Humans on Netflix  Transcripts & bleeped episodes at: alieward.com/ologies-extras Become a patron of Ologies for as little as a buck a month: www.Patreon.com/ologies OlogiesMerch.com has hats, shirts, pins, totes and STIIIICKERS! Follow twitter.com/ologies or instagram.com/ologies Follow twitter.com/AlieWard or instagram.com/AlieWard Sound editing by Jarrett Sleeper of MindJam Media & Steven Ray Morris Theme song by Nick Thorburn Support the show.
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On episode 154 of SOMEWHERE IN THE SKIES, Ryan is joined once again by author and journalist, Mike Damante. They discuss the current global pandemic and then dive in to several articles over at Damante's website, PunkRockandUFOs.com. It's a laid back conversation in a stressful time for humanity. So sit back, relax, and let's talk UFOs!  Watch the video version of this episode right now on the YouTube channel!  Ryan will be tentatively speaking at Contact in the Desert this Spring. (Pending COVID-19 guidelines) For tickets, CLICK HERE Patreon: www.patreon.com/somewhereskies YouTube Channel: CLICK HERE Official Store: CLICK HERE Order Ryan's Book by CLICKING HERE Twitter: @SomewhereSkies Instagram: @SomewhereSkiesPod Watch Mysteries Decoded for free at www.CWseed.com SOMEWHERE IN THE SKIES is edited by Jane Palomera Moore Opening Theme Song, "Ephemeral Reign" by Per Kiilstofte SOMEWHERE IN THE SKIES is part of the eOne podcast network. To learn more, CLICK HERE
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Here are a few brief reports about science and technology from around the planet, including one about the discovery of an intact chicken egg dating to Roman Britain.
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Jeb and Blake discuss the real archaeology of Stonehenge in the final episode of Season One of In Search Of...
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How much do we value the human experience? On this episode we discuss the science of the “Winning Streak” and the idea that humans can predict random outcomes which may causes catastrophic results. Then for our Plus+ members, we talk about mad scientists, lost technologies and life before life encounters. Sponsor * Squarespace – Turn your ideas into a reality. Create a professional website with Squarespace. Use the offer code MU to get 10% off! Links * The Hot Hand: The Mystery and Science of Winning Streaks * Ben Cohen sports reporter Wall Street Journal * NBA Jam * Stephen Curry on Fire * AI-POWERED BASKETBALL Player Tracking Plus+ Extension The extension of the show is EXCLUSIVE to Plus+ members. To join, click HERE. * The Most Incredible and Mysterious Lost Inventions * Thermashield * The fleeting fame of Canadian Inventor Troy Hurtubise * Project Grizzly * Life Before Life
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I talk with paleontologist Neil Shubin about how evolution achieves dramatic transitions, from walking on land to flying through the air.
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What happens when you treat artificial intelligence with unconditional love?
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The weirdest things we learned this week range from tumbleweeds that terrorize entire towns to a tantalizing obstetrical secret. Whose story will be voted "The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week"? The Weirdest Thing I Learned This Week is a podcast by Popular Science. Share your weirdest facts and stories with us in our Facebook group or tweet at us! Click here to learn more about all of our stories! Follow our team on Twitter Rachel Feltman: www.twitter.com/RachelFeltman Sara Chodosh: www.twitter.com/schodosh Claire Maldarelli: www.twitter.com/camaldarelli Popular Science: www.twitter.com/PopSci Theme music by Billy Cadden: www.twitter.com/billycadden Edited by Jessica Boddy: www.twitter.com/JessicaBoddy --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/popular-science/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/popular-science/support
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A family is haunted by something that seems to mimic them, presenting them in two places at one time to each other.
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In 1967, an unlikely surgeon performs the first human heart transplant – and shocks the world. As others race to replicate his achievement, one surgical team makes a mistake that could spell the end of organ transplants in the United States. Support our sponsors! Policy Genius - In just a few minutes you can find your best price and apply at Policygenius.com. Peloton - Learn more about Peloton’s 30-Day Home Trial at onepeloton.com. SimpliSafe - Go to SimpliSafe.com/INNOVATIONS and you’ll get FREE shipping and a 60-day risk free trial.
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The Farm Crisis of the 1980s was a dark time for people working in food and agriculture. U.S. agricultural policies led to an oversupply of crops, price drops, and farms closures. At the same time, the rate of farmer suicide skyrocketed. The industry struggled, until organizations like Farm Aid and others popped up to give voice to the crisis. But farm advocates agree that farmers are in the middle of another period of hardship, one brought on by the same factors that caused the Farm Crisis in the 1980s. Farmers today are experiencing low crop prices, uncertain markets, and high farm debt. And this time around, there’s a greater awareness and stress about the impacts of climate change. So what will our response be to this latest crisis? How will farmers get the support they need—both economically and emotionally? State and regional organizations for farmers have been quick to restart the conversation around the importance of rural mental health, but funding has been slow to follow. In an unexpected twist, the Trump administration’s recent decision to move the U.S. Department of Agriculture from Washington, D.C. to Kansas City has been the source of some of this funding bottleneck. All the while, studies are reporting increasing rates of farmer suicides—mirroring the 1980s. Ira speaks with Katie Wedell, author of a recent article in USA Today on the latest farm crisis, as well as Roy Atkinson from the American Farm Bureau Federation about a recent poll looking at perceptions of rural mental health. They’re joined by Jennifer Fahy from Farm Aid, Brittney Schrick, assistant professor at University of Arkansas, and Jim Goodman, retired dairy farmer and farm advocate, to discuss the scope of the crisis and response. Today, the Isle of Sky in the west coast of Scotland is a lush island with towering sea cliffs and tourists taking in the picturesque landscape. But during the late Jurassic period 170 million years ago, there were diverse groups of dinosaurs roaming the land. In two different areas on the island, paleontologists were able to find footprints of three different types of dinosaurs. These tracks include the stegosaurus, which had not been previously found in this region. Their results were published in the journal PLOS ONE. Paleontologists Steve Brusatte and Paige Depolo, who are both authors on the study, describe why fossils and tracks from this period are difficult to find and what these footprints can tell us about the habitats of middle Jurassic dinosaurs and shed light on the evolution of the stegosaurus.  
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A recently launched spacecraft called the Solar Orbiter, or SolO, is en route to the sun to capture images from angles we've never achieved before. Learn how this will help us learn new things about our star in today's episode of BrainStuff. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Our guest tries a practice to feel more connected to loved ones, and herself, while sheltering at home.
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Guest host Jimmy Church and UFO researcher Richard Dolan explore his theories as to when there could be disclosure of UFOs and alien life in the universe, how it will change society, and why there hasn't been a whistleblower revealing the truth yet. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Let's talk about heredity. Here's our 2018 chat with acclaimed science writer Carl Zimmer about his book “She Has Her Mother's Laugh: The Powers, Perversions, and Potential of Heredity.” Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Producer B.A. Parker started recording her calls with her father because she was concerned about the care at his nursing home. But the recordings gave her a window into something very different: their relationship. So she started recording her calls with her grandmother as well. A story of relationships told through the small recorded calls between people who love each other.
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In a fit of anger or in the grip of fear, many of us make decisions that we never would have anticipated. This week, we look at situations that make us strangers to ourselves — and why it's so difficult to remember what these "hot states" feel like once the moment is over.
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The oil and gas industry was headed for broke long before COVID-19. Now the Trump administration wants to use the pandemic to put it on life support, while the American Petroleum Institute uses it to get the industry's deregulation wishlist. Support our work: https://www.patreon.com/Drilled Read more: https://www.drillednews.com/post/will-pandemic-relief-become-a-petroleum-industry-slush-fund More from the ARO Working Group: https://www.arowatch.org/about-arowatch/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Food banks and pantries, community kitchens, and the like help feed millions -- but many more may need help during the novel coronavirus outbreak. Learn what these organizations are doing to keep up (and keep safe) in this episode of BrainStuff. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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For centuries, smallpox seemed unbeatable. People had tried nearly everything to knock it out—from herbal remedies to tossing back 12 bottles of beer a day (yep, that was a real recommendation from a 17th century doctor), to intentionally infecting themselves with smallpox and hoping they didn’t get sick, all to no avail. And then, in the 18th century, an English doctor heard a rumor about a possible solution. It wasn’t a cure, but if it worked, it would stop smallpox before it started. So one spring day, with the help of a milkmaid, an eight-year-old boy, and a cow named Blossom, the English doctor decided to run an experiment. Thanks to that ethically questionable but ultimately world-altering experiment (and Blossom the cow) we got the word vaccine. Want more Science Diction? Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts, and sign up for our newsletter. "The cow-pock - or - the wonderful effects of the new inoculation" by James Gillray in 1802, featured at the beginning of this episode. (Library of Congress) Footnotes And Further Reading:  Special thanks to Elena Conis, Gareth Williams, and the Edward Jenner Museum. Read an article by Howard Markel on this same topic. We found many of the facts in this episode in “Edward Jenner and the history of smallpox and vaccination” from Baylor University Medical Center Proceedings. Note: Most sources indicate that the figure in Gillray's "The cow-pock" cartoon is Edward Jenner, but there's been some debate. Other sources indicate that the figure could be George Pearson.  Credits:  Science Diction is written and produced by Johanna Mayer, with production and editing help from Elah Feder. Our senior editor is Christopher Intagliata, with story editing help from Nathan Tobey. Our theme song and music are by Daniel Peterschmidt. We had fact-checking help from Michelle Harris, and mixing help from Kaitlyn Schwalje. Special thanks to the entire Science Friday staff.
131
George Noory and author Thomas Kostigen explore his research into geoengineering, using technology to control the weather, and how it may help combat climate change but also could be used as a military weapon. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
132
As the first in a series on fighting the COVID-19 pandemic, Steven Johnson speaks with Dr. Bruce Gellin, president of Global Immunization at the Sabin Vaccine Institute in Washington D.C.. Dr. Gellin is also a former director of the National Vaccine Program at the Department of Health and Human Services, and led the creation of HHS’s first pandemic influenza preparedness and response plan. They talk about a very new and pressing challenge: how to speed up vaccine development for COVID-19. Support us by supporting our sponsors! ZipRecruiter - Try ZipRecruiter FOR FREE, at ZipRecruiter.com/AI.
133
The Moa of New Zealand were among the weirdest birds to ever live, and their history is full of evolutionary wonder, interspecies conflict, tragedy and scientific hope. In this Stuff to Blow Your Mind two-parter, Robert and Joe discuss the rise and fall of the great Moa. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
134
Our memories are easily contaminated. We can be made to believe we rode in a hot air balloon or spilled punch on people at a wedding—even if those things never happened. So how do we know which of our memories are most accurate? This week, psychologist Ayanna Thomas explains how memory works, how it fails, and ways to make it better.
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It's Blake here! I made a little cameo over at Hayley Stevens' podcast The Spooktator, joining Jeb Card (In ReSearch Of) to talk about the paranormal series HELLIER (Amazon, YouTube).  If you're not familiar with that show, it's an independent paranormal show that combines pretty much every kind of paranormal topic you can think of into a strange narrative about... you know what? Just check it out.
137
This year's unprecedented Australian bushfires are barely out, but the news has moved on. Now is the time to take a serious look at how fires are related to climate change, and the warning they carry for California, and beyond. You can listen to ad-free new episodes of Science Rules! only on Stitcher Premium. For a free month of Stitcher Premium, go to stitcherpremium.com and use promo code ‘SCIENCE.’
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The new coronavirus continues to spread around the world, and it’s already killed several people in the U.S. People are starting to worry that this will turn into a full-blown pandemic. So how many of us could ultimately get infected — and is it time to prepare for the worst? To find out, we talk to epidemiologists Dr. Cécile Viboud and Prof. Marc Lipsitch. Here’s a link to our transcript: https://bit.ly/2IjUqW0 and our Hand Washing Song: https://player.gimletmedia.com/7osxva Selected references: CDC’s FAQ Page: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html NEJM Editorial: https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMe2002387 Big report from the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention: https://bit.ly/32S4e2H This episode was produced by Michelle Dang, Wendy Zukerman, Meryl Horn, and Rose Rimler. We’re edited by Blythe Terrell, with editing help from Caitlin Kenney. Fact checking help from Michelle Harris. Mix and sound design by Peter Leonard. Music written by Peter Leonard, Emma Munger, and Bobby Lord. Translation by Lisa Wang. A big thanks to all the researchers we got in touch with for this episode, including Dr. Catharine Paules, Dr. Miriam Haviland, Professor Matthew R. McKay, Dr. Jason McLellan, Daniel Wrapp, Professor William Arthur Petri, Professor Li Min, Professor Xiaokun Li, and Professor Raina MacIntyre. And special thanks to the Zukerman family and Joseph Lavelle Wilson.
139
Let's talk about life beyond Earth's magnetosphere. Here's our 2018 chat with astronaut Dr. Jeff Hoffman. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
140
A look at some of the ancient sites and cities that the show Ancient Aliens gets totally wrong.
141
From its discovery only 30 years ago to the recent development of an effective treatment, the short life of the Hepatitis C virus certainly has been action-packed. This week, we take you through the biology of this deadly virus by exploring its cancer-causing qualities and pondering the plural of hepatitis. Then we take a stroll through the often bizarre and disturbing history of blood technology, discussing how a lack of sterilization and screening allowed for the proliferation of the Hepatitis C virus around the world. Finally we ask, “what’s going on in the world of Hepatitis C today?” Spoilers: it’s not all bad! As long as you can afford the treatment of course...
142
How do Scientists search for extraterrestrial life? If we discover aliens, what's our protocol for making contact? And if we do find them..will ET look like us? All these extraterrestrial related questions (and a whole lot more) are answered by our intrepid science reporters, Jeanna and Mindy.   Below you can find links to further reading on the topics discussed in this episode.   Mystery #1: How Do Scientists Search for Extraterrestrial Life? (https://www.livescience.com/59153-how-to-search-for-extraterrestrial-life.html)  Astronomers use sophisticated equipment to listen farther and peer deeper into the universe than ever before For an alien-seeking scientist, "life" means any living form including microbes on distant exoplanet    Mystery #2: If We Discover Aliens, What's Our Protocol for Making Contact? (https://www.livescience.com/19360-humans-discover-aliens.html) Life could theoretically exist on Mars, or on Europa, a moon of Jupiter,  The first reported flying saucer sighting was in 1947,    Interview with  Seth Shostak, a senior astronomer and Institute Fellow with the SETI Institute on the story: Is It Time To Rethink How We Search for Alien Life? (https://www.livescience.com/59547-future-con-rethinking-aliens.html)   NEWS UPDATE with Live Science reporter Stephanie Pappas: Could E.T. Have Bugged a Space Rock to Listen In on Earthlings? (https://www.livescience.com/alien-life-bugged-space-rock-co-orbitals.html)   Mystery #3: Will ET Look Like Us? (https://www.livescience.com/19283-aliens.html) Depictions of Aliens in popular culture have often been very humanlike in their appearance  In England references to little green men or children dates back to the 12th century green children of Woolpit.   Don’t forget to subscribe! You can find more answers to life’s little mysteries at the Live Science website (https://www.livescience.com/) and you can follow us on Twitter (https://twitter.com/LiveScience) and Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/livescience/) too. Tell us what your life’s little mysteries are at forums.livescience.com (https://forums.livescience.com/) .   Sponsors The Great Courses Plus (http://thegreatcoursesplus.com/llm)   Music by Chad Crouch - Algorithms Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/)
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Pamela and Fraser discuss the implications of COVID-19 and it's changes on the world, and what we all can do during this time.
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A little known geneticist in Seattle has become something of a CSI detective, unraveling the origins of Covid 19 in the U S. Could his research hold secrets to a better understanding of the disease? Some policymakers seem to think so. Plus: today's headlines.
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The number of people in the U.S. confirmed to be infected with the pandemic-level respiratory coronavirus continues to rise, even as testing and diagnosis capacity continues to lag behind other nations. In the meantime, epidemiologists are urging people all over the country to take actions that help “flatten the curve,” to slow the rate of infection so the number of cases don’t overwhelm the healthcare system and make the virus even more dangerous for those who get it. And the best methods to flatten that curve? Social distancing, which means limiting your exposure to other people, including large gatherings. And, when you can’t avoid other people, it means washing your hands diligently, disinfecting door knobs, and otherwise killing virus particles—which may survive up to three days on inanimate objects, depending on conditions. There are words we use every day for common things or ideas—meme, vaccine, dinosaur—but where did those words come from? Sometimes, there’s a scientific backstory. Take the word quarantine, now in the news due to widespread infection control measures. Did you know that it comes from quarantino, a 40-day isolation period for arriving ships—which originally was a trentino, a 30-day period, established in what is now Croatia in the plague-stricken 1340’s? Science Friday’s word nerd Johanna Mayer joins Ira to talk about the origins of the word quarantine, and how she flips through science history and culture to tell us these stories in her new podcast Science Diction. The first season of Science Diction is now available! Listen and subscribe wherever you enjoy your podcasts. In 2012, the FDA approved the drug Truvada, the brand-name HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) that HIV negative people can take to prevent contracting the virus. The patent for Truvada is due to expire, which would allow for more generic versions of the drug. But Gilead, the manufacturer of Truvada, is releasing a second brand name PrEP called Descovy.   Physician Rochelle Walensky, who is chief of the infectious disease division at Massachusetts General Hospital, is an author on a study in the Annals of Internal Medicine that weighed the financial and accessibility impact that this new drug will have for patients. 
146
George Noory and Dr. Eric Cline explore his work studying archaeological digs to discover the ancient site Megiddo, that was fortified by King Solomon of the Bible, and how the collapse of that civilization may mirror a collapse of our modern society. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
147
Hannah Devlin speaks with Prof David Smith about the various ways in which clinicians can test whether or not someone is infected with Sars-CoV-2. And, following the recent announcement that the UK government has bought millions of antibody tests, explores what these might be able to tell us. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod
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Roy has possessed extraordinary abilities since he was young. He can both control and inadvertently affect things around him, and believes he has some truly untapped abilities yet to be discovered. Some he has purposefully locked away. What Roy discussed with me here, were a first. I encourage you to contact me through the website or directly through email shannon@intothefrayradio.com if you have any input on what's discussed here.   Get BEYOND THE FRAY: BIGFOOT on Kindle for $.99! (offer valid until March 26th) AND.... Sign up for a year of iNSIDER, and get a signed copy of WOOD KNOCKS: VOLUME 4! (limited number on hand) *offer for shipping of book valid in US ONLY   Watch On the Trail of UFOs! Amazon, Vimeo OnDemand, and smalltownmonsters.com   Purchase the Kindle edition of Ken Gerhard's, THE ESSENTIAL GUIDE TO BIGFOOT   The two Kickstarters I mentioned: Shadows in the Desert: High-Strangeness in the Borrego Triangle and Phantom Beast   If you love Bigfoot...pick up my new book! Co-authored with acclaimed and bestselling author, G. Michael Hopf! It is titled, BEYOND THE FRAY: BIGFOOT. And it is available NOW on Amazon. It includes some of the chilling accounts you know and love from my show, along with several documented for the first time, anywhere. Get the Kindle or the paperback. Get your copy and show it off...tag away! And please don't forget to leave a review once you're finished. If you'd like a signed and personalized copy, send $19.99 (free shipping within the U.S.) to beyondthefrayllc@gmail.com through Paypal. Be sure to include your address and any specific inscription instructions for your book! Also....you can pre-order BEYOND THE FRAY: PARAMALGAMATION on Amazon right now! Geoff and I have also created BEYOND THE FRAY PUBLISHING! Visit our website for information on getting YOUR book published with us. We focus on topics that fall into the paranormal, cryptid and true crimes genres, both fiction and non-fiction. Find us on Facebook and Instagram. Can't get enough iTF? Want to support the show, and get more content... Become an iNSIDER and get more, from well....the iNSIDE!  Only 4.99/month or 54.00 for an entire year. Click HERE to sign up!   Subscribe to iTF on YouTube! Have a story you’d like to share?  Please don’t hesitate to contact me HERE or via email, shannon@intothefrayradio.com   Follow iTF: Facebook: Join the interactive group and please hit that like, and share button, on the official iTF page  Twitter: Official iTF and  Shannon’s personal account Shannon's Instagram Various iNTO THE FRAY gear available at intothefrayradio.threadless.com   Subscribe to iNTO THE FRAY for free in Spotify, Overcast, iTunes, Stitcher, iHeartRadio and most ALL other podcatchers. If you enjoy the show, please take a moment to rate and review, as it helps others locate iNTO THE FRAY.  That means more encounter stories for you to enjoy! iNTO THE FRAY is proudly part of the KGRA Radio Network. Visit kgraradio.com for a complete list of live shows and rebroadcasts of your favorites like...Expanded Perspectives, The Gralien Report, Fade to Black...and more! You can also visit DarkMyths.org for even more options of Fortean, true crime and paranormal shows. All artwork and logos by Mister-Sam Shearon Music for this episode of iTF provided with permission by:  Tanek & Electus  
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Priors are what neuroscientists and philosophers call the years of experience and regularity leading up to the present. All the ways a ball has bounced, all the ways a pancake has tasted, the way the dogs in your life have barks, or bitten, or hugged you when you were sad -- these all shape the brain, literally. They form and prune our neural networks, so in situations that are uncertain, unfamiliar or ambiguous, we depend on those priors to help us disambiguate the new information coming into the brain via our senses. But what happens when we don't share those priors? This episode is about the science behind The Dress, why some people see it as black and blue, and others see it as white and gold. But it’s also about how the scientific investigation of The Dress lead to the scientific investigation of socks and Crocs, and how the scientific investigation of socks and Crocs may be, as one researcher told me, the nuclear bomb of cognitive neuroscience. - Show notes at: www.youarenotsosmart.com - Become a patron at: www.patreon.com/youarenotsosmart SPONSORS • Brooklinen: www.brooklinen.com -- Offer code: YANSS
150
A new CRISPR treatment could revolutionize care for diseases that we're previously off limits to this innovative gene-editing technique. In this case, a genetic form of blindness,
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Neuroscientist Adrian Owen has spent much of his career exploring what he calls ‘the grey zone’, a realm of consciousness inhabited by people with severe brain injuries, who are aware yet unable to respond to those around them. It's this inability to respond which has led doctors to conclude that they are unaware. In the late 1990's, Adrian started to question the assumption that they lacked awareness and a chance discovery set him on a novel path of enquiry - could some of these patients be conscious or aware even though they don’t appear to be? His research has revealed that some are, and he’s pioneered techniques to help them to communicate with the outside world. This emerging field of science has implications, not only for patients but, for philosophy and the law. A British scientist, Adrian now runs a research programme at the Brain and Mind Institute at Western University in Canada, dedicated to reaching people in this ‘grey zone’. Picture: Adrian Owen, BBC Copyright
152
George Noory and professional astrologer Mitchell Scott Lewis discuss his work exploring the astral charts of the financial markets that predicted the current economic collapse, as well his predictions for a Trump/Biden presidential election and whether the growing coronavirus pandemic will end soon. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
153
Cliff Barackman and James "Bobo" Fay bring on Bigfoot Books owner and Bluff Creek Project member Steven Streufert! During part one of their epic conversation, topics include: evaluating bigfoot-related claims, the ills of discussing bigfoot on the internet, the Bluff Creek Project's findings, and more!
154
The Moa of New Zealand were among the weirdest birds to ever live, and their history is full of evolutionary wonder, interspecies conflict, tragedy and scientific hope. In this Stuff to Blow Your Mind two-parter, Robert and Joe discuss the rise and fall of the great Moa. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
155
Six scientists give us a preview of where planetary science may be taken in the next 10 years by a new NASA decadal survey.
156
“Everyone procrastinates, but not everyone is a procrastinator,” quoth Dr. Joe Ferrari, a charming, hilarious expert on the subject. The research psychologist, author and DePaul University professor sits down for a truly delightful exploration of why we procrastinate, how prevalent it is, when it becomes harmful, some myths about procrastination, why it’s similar to gambling, how decision-making can feel paralyzing, how to trust your own abilities, and most importantly -- what to do if you’re a chronic procrastinator. Also: how and why you should embrace failure. Oh and a weird ASMR pencil trick.  Dr. Ferrari’s book “Still Procrastinating? The No Regrets Guide to Getting It Done”  A donation went to: www.vasculitisfoundation.org Sponsor links: stitchfix.com/ologies; sakara.com/ologies (code: ologies); hellofresh.com/ologies10 (code: ologies10) California Academy of Sciences on March 5; Natural History Museum of LA County March 6; SXSW EDU on March 11 More links at alieward.com/ologies/procrastination Transcripts & bleeped episodes at: alieward.com/ologies-extras Become a patron of Ologies for as little as a buck a month: www.Patreon.com/ologies OlogiesMerch.com has hats, shirts, pins, totes and STIIIICKERS! Follow twitter.com/ologies or instagram.com/ologies Follow twitter.com/AlieWard or instagram.com/AlieWard Sound editing by Jarrett Sleeper of MindJam Media & Steven Ray Morris Theme song by Nick Thorburn Jarrett & Dr. Nick’s Sunday livestreams: mixer.com/mygoodbadbrain Support the show.
157
Charis Krysher and Andrea Mosie, lunar curation processor and senior scientist specialist, respectively, discuss opening and processing Apollo 17 lunar samples that have been preserved for 47 years. HWHAP Episode 137.
158
Should college athletes be getting paid? Neil deGrasse Tyson and co-hosts Gary O’Reilly and Chuck Nice investigate this hotly debated question alongside author Ellen Staurowsky, EdD, and economist Andrew Zimbalist, PhD.
159
Sometimes the human mind goes to dark places… Sometimes those dark delusions… Turn into reality…
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What would drive someone to take another person's life? When researchers at the University of Chicago asked that question, the answer was a laundry list of slights: a stolen jacket, or a carelessly lobbed insult. It made them wonder whether crime rates could be driven down by teaching young men to pause, take a deep breath, and think before they act. In this 2017 episode, we go inside a program that teaches Chicago teens to do just that. We also explore what research has found about whether this approach actually works.
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Yep. Here it is. Let’s dive right in .. to poop. Hippo poop. Ferret poop. Octopoop. Dogs. Cats. Yours. The charming and informative Dr. Rachel Santymire -- aka Dr. Poop -- has a background in animal physiology and endocrinology and is elbow deep in dung as a research director at the Lincoln Park Zoo. Dr. Poop sits down with Alie to talk turds and how she uses poo to determine the health and stress of wild and captive animals, plus: poop vs. poo, why some animals poop pellets, middens, taking glitter pills, why the Bristol Stool Scale is “the best thing in the universe,” and why the Lincoln Park Zoo has 17 freezers full of dookie. You’re welcome.  A donation went to:  https://www.lpzoo.org Sponsor links: TakeCareOf.com (code: ologies50); betterhelp.com/ologies More links at alieward.com/ologies/scatology Transcripts & bleeped episodes at: alieward.com/ologies-extras Become a patron of Ologies for as little as a buck a month: www.Patreon.com/ologies OlogiesMerch.com has hats, shirts, pins, totes and STIIIICKERS! Follow twitter.com/ologies or instagram.com/ologies Follow twitter.com/AlieWard or instagram.com/AlieWard Sound editing by Jarrett Sleeper of MindJam Media & Steven Ray Morris Theme song by Nick Thorburn Support the show.
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Have you ever had a job where you had to stop and ask yourself: what am I doing here? If I quit tomorrow, would anyone even notice? This week on Hidden Brain, we revisit our 2018 conversation with anthropologist David Graeber about the rise of what he calls "bullsh*t jobs," and how these positions affect the people who hold them.
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If a pandemic ripped across the world, how bad would it really get? You’ve heard the horror stories, but you’ve never heard one like this. Dr. Anthony Fauci, who advises the President on emerging infectious diseases, helps us out. Check out the full transcript here: http://bit.ly/2M4Tlnt Selected references: The CDC’s history of the 1918 Pandemic: http://bit.ly/2AXiGJP Time-lapse tracking the transmission and evolution of H7N9: http://bit.ly/2B1nYnG CDC’s Pandemic Influenza Plan: http://bit.ly/2pVroFZ Institute for Disease Modeling’s flu pandemic death toll simulation: http://bit.ly/2M2ymSj Credits: This episode was produced by our senior producer Kaitlyn Sawrey, with help from Wendy Zukerman, Michelle Dang, Lexi Krupp, Rose Rimler and Meryl Horn. Special thanks to Frank Lopez. We’re edited by Caitlin Kenney and Blythe Terrell. Extra writing help from Kevin Christopher Snipes. Fact checking by Diane Kelly. Mix and sound design by Peter Leonard. Music written by Peter Leonard, Bobby Lord and Marcus Thorne Bagala. Comments and thoughts from Dr. Eric Toner, Dr. Demetre Daskalakis, Beth Maldin Morgenthau, Dr. Melvin Sanicas, Professor Michael Osterholm, Dr. Patrick Saunders Hastings, Rosemary Gibson, Thomas Bollyky, Dr. Ashleigh Tuite, Professor Stephen Morse, Dr. Lalitha Sundaram, Professor David N. Fisman, Lynette Brammer, Dr. Mohamed Naguib, Dr. Yeulong Shu, Dr. Dan Jernigan, Dr Kirsty Short, and special thanks to Bess Davenport at CDC. Death toll modeling came from the Institute for Disease Modeling, with valuable guidance from Dr. Mandy Izzo and Dr. Kurt Frey. Thanks to all our actors:Annabelle Fox as Mindy TuckermanCasey Wortmann as Dr Rosie MoralesWilliam Dufris as Dr UzdienskiDani Cervone as Dr Emily Ragus Jordan Cobb as the Triage NurseAlice Kors as the distressed MumRobin Miles as the NurseJonathan Woodward as Voiceover, 911 Operator, and Police OfficerIan Lowe as Emergency Services OfficerMatt Lieber as the PoliticianNewscasters include: Kaitlyn Sawrey, Renita Jablonski and Gabriel LozadaPlane landing voice over: Peter LeonardDirected by William Dufris with help from Wendy Zukerman, Kaitlyn Sawrey and Fred Grenhalgh. Recording by Fred Greenhalgh and Peter Leonard. Also thank you to all the Gimlet people who performed various drafts including Chad Chenail, Gabe Lozada, Jasmine Romero and MR Daniel. And a huge thank you to everyone who listened and gave comments - especially the Zukerman Family and Joseph Lavelle Wilson. Finally, a huge thank you to Jorge Just, Stevie Lane, Phoebe Flanigan, Chris Giliberti, Justin McGolrick and Katie Pastore. 
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By the early 1960s, surgeons have proven that it's possible to transplant kidneys and lungs. Now, with heart disease still the leading cause of death, they've set their sights on performing the first human heart transplant. But first, they've got to overcome the ethical, legal, and surgical challenges of removing a donor's heart before it stops beating for good.
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Let's talk about the love life of coral with "Sex in the Sea" author Dr. Marah J. Hardt. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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A new virus showed up in China late last year, and it’s making its way to other countries too. So what do scientists know about the virus so far? And how worried should we be? To find out we talk to infectious disease researchers Dr. Kristian Andersen and Dr. Catharine Paules, physician Dr. Hui, and director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Dr. Anthony Fauci. We did an episode on a *fictional* pandemic, which you can find here: https://gimletmedia.com/shows/science-vs/49hok3/pandemic  Check out the full transcript here: https://bit.ly/2S7JwXN Selected references: The WHO and the CDC are maintaining information centers that update regularly: https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019 and https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/index.html  Scientific journals The Lancet and the New England Journal of Medicine have taken down the paywall for papers related to the outbreak: https://www.thelancet.com/coronavirus and https://www.nejm.org/coronavirus  This episode was produced by Wendy Zukerman, Meryl Horn, Rose Rimler and Michelle Dang. We’re edited by Blythe Terrell and Caitlin Kenney. Fact checking by Lexi Krupp. Mix and sound design by Sam Bair. Music written by Peter Leonard, Emma Munger, and Bobby Lord. A big thanks to Dr. Paul Delamater, Dr. Vittoria Colizza, and Shan Li. Recording assistance from Margot Wohl and Randy Scott Carroll. Translation by Yuan Xue, John Deng, and Chiung H Chuang. And special thanks to Bobby Lord, the Zukerman family and Joseph Lavelle Wilson.
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It's a phrase we're hearing a lot now, social distancing. Practicing it is essential to slowing the spread of the coronavirus. But what does it look like in our daily lives?
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You hear the train barreling towards you and you're tied to the tracks. It's an impossible situation. Most people would panic, and then a tiny handful would think up improbable workarounds. This season on Invisibilia: inventors in desperate times.
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A TWiV foursome provides an update on the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, including antibody testing kits, FDA emergency approval of convalescent sera, and answer listener questions about the dangers of mail delivery and take out foods, decontamination of PPE, diagnostic testing, and much more.
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In this episode, we update you on: Transmission HFNC/CPAP Steroids? The fall of Kaletra Come take a listen. Know that we are all in this together.
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George Noory and retired US Army Major Ed Dames, the world's foremost remote viewing teacher, discuss his theory that biological warfare research in China may have escaped a lab and spread the coronavirus around the world, and that mutations to the virus could kill millions of people. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Alix presents a new episode from NPR's Rough Translation about residents of an immigrant neighborhood in Marseille, France who considered their local McDonalds to be a home of sorts, so when the owner tries to sell it, they take extreme measures to try and save it.
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Boys get the message at a young age: don't show your feelings. Don't rely on anyone. This week, we bring you a favorite 2018 episode about misguided notions of masculinity in the United States. We explore how these notions create stressed-out romantic relationships, physical health problems, and a growing epidemic of loneliness. Plus, we consider how we might begin to tell a different story about what it means to be a man.
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A century ago, organ transplants were the stuff of science fiction. But a handful of experimental surgeons believed that transplants were not just possible – they had the potential to save thousands of lives. Then, in 1954, a man agreed to donate his kidney to his twin brother – and one surgeon finally got his chance to prove the doubters wrong. Support us by supporting our sponsors! Wealthfront - Sign up for the Wealthfront Cash Account in less than 5 minutes by visiting wealthfront.com/AI. ZipRecruiter - To try ZipRecruiter for FREE, go to ZipRecruiter.com/AI.
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Escape the daily grind and immerse yourself in the natural world. Rich in imagery, sound, and information, BirdNote inspires you to notice the world around you. Join us for daily two-minute stories about birds, the environment, and more.
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How can we make sense of the scary reality we are all now living in? Where do pandemics come from? And why are they occurring more frequently? On this special episode, Bloomberg’s Jason Gale talks to some of the world’s most experienced pandemic experts to get their insights.
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On this bonus episode of SOMEWHERE IN THE SKIES, we hear from podcasters, researchers, listeners, and friends from across the United States and abroad as they share their personal thoughts, feelings, and experiences through the COVID-19 pandemic. Many find themselves out of work, self-quarantined, and even on city or state-wide lockdowns. How do they pass the time? What are they working on in terms of podcasting and researching? But most importantly, how can we lift each other up when we've been knocked down by these uncertain times? I hope you enjoy this compilation of stories and insights as we move forward here on the ground and continue looking up, somewhere in the skies. Sincere thanks to everyone who contributed to this episode. And special thanks to everyone who has stayed with us through all of this. Please be kind, be safe, and be well.  Ryan will be tentatively speaking at Contact in the Desert this Spring. (Pending COVID-19 guidelines) For tickets, CLICK HERE Patreon: www.patreon.com/somewhereskies YouTube Channel: CLICK HERE Official Store: CLICK HERE Order Ryan's Book by CLICKING HERE Twitter: @SomewhereSkies Instagram: @SomewhereSkiesPod Watch Mysteries Decoded for free at www.CWseed.com Opening Theme Song, "Ephemeral Reign" by Per Kiilstofte SOMEWHERE IN THE SKIES is part of the eOne podcast network. To learn more, CLICK HERE
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What better time to explore the world of coronaviruses than amidst an outbreak of the 2019 novel coronavirus that brings to mind memories of SARS and MERS? On this very special episode of This Podcast Will Kill You, we’ll take you through what we know about this diverse group of viruses, from the mild strains constantly circulating to the epidemic ones that make headlines with their lethality. Want to know how exactly these royal viruses make you sick? Or what went on during the 2002-2003 SARS epidemic? Don’t worry - we’ve got you covered. And to help us get a grasp on the current 2019-nCoV outbreak that’s got the world’s attention, we’ve brought on four experts from Emory University to give us the lowdown: Dr. Colleen Kraft, Dr. G. Marshall Lyon, Dr. Aneesh Mehta, and Dr. Carlos del Rio. *Please keep in mind, we recorded this episode on Sunday, Feb 2 and conducted the interviews between Jan 29 and 30, 2020. Since recording, the statistics on 2019-nCoV that we and our guests reported have changed as the epidemic continues to evolve. The figures are changing fast, but the basic info is still relevant. To follow the 2019-nCoV outbreak, our experts recommend the following as reliable sources of information: WHO 2019-nCoV website, especially the Situation Reports Map Dashboard of 2019-nCoV Cases by Johns Hopkins Center for Systems Science and Engineering CDC 2019-nCoV website And to learn more about the amazing work that our special guests do on the regular, follow them on Twitter! Colleen S. Kraft, MD, MSc (@colleenkraftmd) G. Marshall Lyon, MD, MMSc (@GMLyon3) Aneesh K. Mehta, M.D., FIDSA, FAST (@AneeshMehtaMD) Carlos del Rio, MD (@CarlosdelRio7)
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Many of us believe we know how we'd choose to die. We have a sense of how we'd respond to a diagnosis of an incurable illness. This week, we have the story of one family's decades-long conversation about dying. What they found is that the people we are when death is far in the distance may not be the people we become when death is near.
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By entering your health status, even if you're feeling fine, at COVIDNearYou.org, you can help researchers develop a nationwide look at where hotspots of coronavirus are occurring.
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Let's talk about alien philosophy. Here's our 2017 chat with Canadian author R. Scott Bakker, discussing his dark fantasy novels as well as his paper 'On Alien Philosophy,' published in the The Journal of Consciousness Studies. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Last week, we promised we’d tackle your coronavirus and associated Covid 19 questions and you came up trumps. So this week we’re be talking about the latest from the lockdown, why there are bottlenecks in the testing system, how long the virus lives on your door handles and whether your dog can spread coronavirus. Joining us to answer your questions are Jonathan Ball, Professor of Virology at the University of Nottingham, and BBC Radio Science presenter and reporter Roland Pease. On Monday evening, Prime Minister Boris Johnson told the British people to ‘stay at home’. How stringent is the UK’s lockdown compared to other countries, and is it likely to be effective? The only real way we can know about the incidence and prevalence of the coronavirus is to test. Listener Andrew in Didcot wants to know more about testing and when antibodies appear in us. We discuss how the current testing system works, and why there are limitations on testing. One question that lots of scientists have been asking is: can people with mild or no symptoms spread the coronavirus? And so we delve into the evidence for asymptomatic spreading. Listeners Eleanor and Andy have been wondering about passing the virus from person to surface to person. Roland Pease looks into the virus’ survival on surfaces and elsewhere, and asks how that might be affecting spread. Finally, reporter Geoff Marsh tackles a quandary facing dog owners: Is it safe to walk your pet? Can dogs spread the virus? Presenter: Marnie Chesterton Producers: Fiona Roberts and Jennifer Whyntie
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Do You Have The ‘Right Stuff’ To Be An Astronaut? If you’ve ever considered being an astronaut, this might be your chance to land that dream job. This week, NASA opened applications for a new class of astronaut candidates. It’s a full-time position based in Houston, Texas, paying over $104,000 per year. Job duties would include “conducting operations in space, including on the International Space Station (ISS) and in the development and testing of future spacecraft” and “performing extravehicular activities (EVA) and robotics operations using the remote manipulator system.” Please note that “substantial travel” is required.  How do you know if you have the ‘right stuff’ to apply?  Frank Rubio, a NASA astronaut who completed the most recent previous selection program in 2017, joins Ira to talk about what other qualities are valuable in an astronaut applicant—and the training program for those accepted.   Could A “Marsquake” Knock Down Your House? On April 6, 2019, NASA’s InSight Mars lander recorded a sound researchers had been waiting to hear for months. To the untrained listener, it may sound like someone had turned up the volume on the hum of Martian wind. But NASA researchers could hear the likely first-ever “marsquake” recorded by the mission. NASA’s InSight carries a suite of instruments to help study what’s happening deep within the Martian surface, including an ultra-sensitive seismometer (SEIS) for detecting suspected quakes on Mars. Now closing in on the end of it’s two-year primary mission, NASA scientists are studying the seismic data they’ve collected so far, comparing it to the well-known tectonic activity of Earth, and mapping out what to explore from here. Deputy principal investigator Suzanne Smrekar joins Ira to answer our pressing marsquake questions. New Insight Into Whales On The Go  Like the seasonal migrations of birds, whales are roamers. Every year, they travel thousands of miles, from the warm waters of the equatorial regions for breeding to the colder polar waters for feeding. But how do they find their way so consistently and precisely every year?  New research in Current Biology this month adds more weight to one idea of how whales stay on course: Similar to birds, whales may detect the Earth’s magnetic field lines. Duke University graduate student Jesse Granger explains why a strong connection between gray whale strandings and solar activity could boost the magnetoreception theory. Other research in Marine Mammal Science explores why whales leave the food-rich waters of the Arctic and Antarctic at all. Marine ecologist Robert Pitman of Oregon State University’s Marine Mammal Center explains why this annual movement may not be about breeding—but rather, allowing their skin to molt and remain healthy. 
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How did an ancient Roman harbor end up in ruins? Scientists realized the culprit was a long-forgotten natural disaster that left tell-tale geological clues -- and possibly an eyewitness account in an ancient religious text. But solving this mystery led to a bigger question: what if it happens again? For more information on this episode visit nationalgeographic.com/overheard
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Annie Duke was about to win $2 million. It was 2004, and she was at the final hand of the World Series of Poker Tournament of Champions. But as a woman at a table full of men, she wasn't sure she deserved to be there. In this week's Radio Replay, we tell the stories of two people who grappled with gender stereotypes on the job. Annie Duke shares her experiencing at the World Series of Poker, and then we hear the story of Robert Vaughan, a former Navy sailor who decided to pursue a new career as a nurse.
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For Anthony Almaraz, it wasn’t ever a struggle to believe in ghosts. The concept of the dead remaining close to the living wasn’t a foreign one.
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Hey gang, here’s another episode recorded before social distancing set in. We hope all of our listeners out there continue to stay safe and be well, and again, we are honored that you choose to spend some of this time with us. Thank you and enjoy the show! This episode has a little bit of everything: the French Revolution, haunted amulets, mummies (maybe??)... why, it's like a regular Night at the Museum! Have fun! Follow us on Twitter @SciShowTangents, where we’ll tweet out topics for upcoming episodes and you can ask the science couch questions!  While you're at it, check out the Tangents crew on Twitter: Stefan: @itsmestefanchin Ceri: @ceriley Sam: @slamschultz Hank: @hankgreen If you want to learn more about any of our main topics, check out scishowtangents.org!
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If you've ever felt the urge to shop till you drop, then you may already know about some of the clever ways retailers convince us to consume. From flash sales to so-called unbelievable offers, there are a whole range of techniques aimed at encouraging us to flash the cash. Listener Mo works in marketing, so knows more than most about the tricks of the trade - but he wants CrowdScience to investigate how neuroscience is being used to measure our behaviour and predict what we’ll buy. Marnie Chesterton finds out how brain scans are being used to discover which specific aspect of an advertisement a person is responding to, and then she hears how this information is being used by companies who want to sell us more stuff. But there's also evidence to suggest we have less control over these decisions than we think, and that computers are getting closer to detecting our intention before we're even aware of it ourselves. And this could have huge implications for the way we shop. Presented by: Marnie Chesterton Produced by: Marijke Peters (Photo:
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