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1
This recording was made on a cold and clear spring morning at a campsite in the Ah Di Na Campground on the lower McCloud River in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest, Shasta County, California. With reduced air traffic during the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic there is no noise pollution on this recording, under what are normally busy skies. I hope you are doing alright wherever you are, and I hope this or any of my recordings can provide you with a bit of solace during this pandemic. Stay safe, good luck, and thank you for listening.. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
2
Bob and Bill are inspired by an Imago Ranger program (https://imagoearth.org/imago-rangers/) to do an episode on pillbugs. If you're a little stressed out go outside and find some of these guys. Our sources for this episode include: Imago Rangers Pillbugs https://imagoearth.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/Day-5_-Pillbugs.pdf Pillbugs and Sowbugs https://nature.mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/pillbugs-and-sowbugs-land-isopods 15 Facinating Facts About Pill Bugs https://www.thoughtco.com/fascinating-facts-about-pillbugs-4165294 Pillbug Project: A Guide to Investigation by Robin Burnett https://www.nsta.org/recommends/ViewProduct.aspx?ProductID=12142
3
It’s hard to step out your backdoor these days without being overwhelmed by birdsong. Spring is easing northward across the continent and with it, an increase in the activities of birds. Few people know this like ornithologist and author Donald Kroodsma, professor emeritus or ornithology at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and the author of a great many books on bird vocalizations. He joins host Nate Swick today to talk about his most recent book, Birdsong for the Curious Naturalist just in time for the annual explosion of birdsong in the northern hemisphere.  Also, is birding seeing a renaissance in the COVID era? And more Cedar Waxwing stories from our listeners. 
4
Bob has two large tuliptrees in his yard. Tune in to find out why these trees are so interesting. Our sources for this episode include: Tuliptree Profile https://www.thespruce.com/how-to-grow-tulip-trees-2132098 The Tuliptree http://www-pub.naz.edu/~treewalk/tuliptree/tuliptree.htm Facts About the Tuliptree https://www.gardenguides.com/113941-tulip-tree.html The Native Tree Society http://www.nativetreesociety.org/
5
Dr. Zach Bush is a renowned, multi-disciplinary physician of internal medicine, endocrinology, and hospice care, and an internationally recognized educator on the microbiome as it relates to human health. This conversation was recorded prior to the coronavirus pandemic but there are many crucial parallels that can be drawn between ecological health and human health, especially during this time, which makes this episode really pertinent and deeply profound. In part one of our two-part conversation, Dr. Bush sheds light on how the use of agrochemicals took over and became the norm in the field of agriculture; the ties between how we treat our soils and the consequential health impacts we then experience; and more.   Featured music: Mission to Earth by NYADO Episode notes: www.greendreamer.com/225 Weekly solutions-based news: www.greendreamer.com  Support the show: www.greendreamer.com/support  Instagram: www.instagram.com/greendreamerpodcast
6
Dr. Zach Bush is a renowned, multi-disciplinary physician of internal medicine, endocrinology, and hospice care, and an internationally recognized educator on the microbiome as it relates to human health. In this part 2 of our conversation (listen to part 1 in episode 225), Dr. Bush sheds light on how we can connect the dots between how we approach earth stewardship and how we approach health care; why taking probiotic supplements, while well-intentioned, may not actually take us closer to supporting an optimal, biodiverse microbiome; and more.   Featured music: Mission to Earth by NYADO Episode notes: www.greendreamer.com/226 Weekly solutions-based news: www.greendreamer.com  Support the show: www.greendreamer.com/support  Instagram: www.instagram.com/greendreamerpodcast
7
durée : 00:15:46 - Le virus au carré - par : Mathieu Vidard - Les virus ne sont pas tous nos ennemis, certains vivent sans tuer les êtres vivants qui les hébergent, et sont même favorables à leur hôte.
8
A springtime chorus of frogs at large and shallow Dry Lake in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest, Siskiyou County, California. I have a Facebook page for the podcast, search Sound By Nature to find it and see pictures from the area this episode was recorded, as well as some of the other areas I've recorded. While you're there, like and follow it to stay updated and see pictures from future recording outings. I'll be posting episodes on the page as well, please feel free to comment and tell me what you like or dislike about the podcast.  If you appreciate that this podcast is ad free and would like it to stay that way, please consider supporting it monetarily if you have the means. You can do so by going to my podcast page at anchor.fm/soundbynature and clicking support this podcast, or by clicking the support link at the end of this podcast description. I would very much like to continue to bring you unadulterated natural sounds recorded on location, and I would love to improve the sound quality to bring you quieter, more nuanced soundscapes.  Your support will help me do that. If you don't have the means for monetary support, you can also support the podcast by rating and reviewing it on Itunes, or just by telling a friend who would appreciate it. Thank you for your support, and thank you for for listening! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
9
The massive scope of the coronavirus pandemic is having some strange effects on the environment. For example, some sewer operators are reporting an increased rate of blockages caused by a pile up of those "flushable" sanitizing wipes everyone is using. On this episode of Parts Per Billion, we speak with California correspondent Emily C. Dooley about some of the strange environmental trends that have popped up in her state and elsewhere as a result of the pandemic and its economic aftermath.
10
On Our Latest Show: watching penguins from space; new bird fossil discoveries; good news from Chicago about Piping Plovers; and why mockingbirds flash their wings.
11
Every wonder about the stuff that washes up on a beech as the tide comes in and out? Doc Bruce from Sanibel Sea School explains why this is such an important place on a beach. Our sources for this episode include: Guest J. Bruce Neill (Doc Bruce), Co-Founder and Executive Director of Sanibel Sea School https://www.sanibelseaschool.org/
12
Ryland Engelhart is the co-owner of Cafe Gratitude and Gracias Madre and the co-founder of Kiss The Ground, which is a nonprofit that educates and advocates about the connection between soil, human, and planetary health. Kiss the Ground has multiple leadership education courses, including a soil advocacy training course and a regenerative gardening course. In this podcast episode, Ryland sheds light on what it means to not just lessen our environmental impact but to become healers and regenerators of life and biodiversity, which can help to reverse climate change; how Ryland embodies a deep, spiritual sense of gratitude and love through his restaurant businesses as well as his nonprofit focused on regenerating soil and supporting the circularity of life; and more.   Featured music: Mining for Steal by Fuchsia Episode notes: www.greendreamer.com/224 Weekly solutions-based news: www.greendreamer.com  Support the show: www.greendreamer.com/support  Instagram: www.instagram.com/greendreamerpodcast
13
This episode was recorded at midnight on a clear, moonless night beneath the Geminid Meteor Shower during high winds atop a forested ridge in the Klamath Mountains of Northern California. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
14
In March 2020 life has suddenly changed for all of us. The COVID-19 Pandemic has meant the closure of parks and reserves, self-isolation and social distancing.   The first part of this episode talks about some of the things we can do to stay in touch with nature with ideas for those who might be casual birding for the first time. If you want to avoid hearing about the current crisis, please jump to 11:30 to hear about our regular casual birding sightings. And the Last Call segment this week features dawn songs from my suburban garden. _________ Links: Latest advice on COVID-19 World Health Organisation RSPB Guide to Birdwatching Bird Academy The Cornell Lab All About Birds article about online resources Lev Parikian: Bird Song project Champions of the Flyway Hannah and Erik Go Birding Podcast and Global Women’s Big Day Vibrant Visionaries Tea and Strumpets Dan Rouse Webcams https://www.nottinghamshirewildlife.org/peregrine-cam https://www.rspb.org.uk/reserves-and-events/reserves-a-z/loch-garten/live-video-webcam/ For more about the birds mentioned in this episode, with videos and sound clips, visit the RSPB Bird guides: https://www.rspb.org.uk/birds-and-wildlife/wildlife-guides/bird-a-z/   The Casual Birder Podcast   https://casualbirder.com/   Don't miss an episode - subscribe to the show (Subscribing is free) Follow me on: Twitter Instagram or join the Facebook group   You can also follow me on Podchaser and leave a review if you enjoy the show.   Thank you to Randy Braun for designing the artwork for the show. The theme music is Short Sleeved Shirt by The Drones. Thanks to them for letting me use it. Check out their website at www.dronesmusic.net        
15
This was recorded on the cool, crisp morning of the Summer Solstice at my campsite in the Medicine Lake Highlands area of the Shasta-Trinity National Forest in Siskiyou County , California. In my opinion, there really aren't many things more comforting than sitting beside a warm campfire on a brisk mountain morning. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
16
durée : 00:16:50 - Le virus au carré - par : Mathieu Vidard - Mesure de santé publique nécessaire pour contenir l’épidémie, le confinement peut avoir un impact psychologique sur une grande partie de la population. Anxiété, troubles du sommeil, symptômes de stress-post-traumatique … Comment évaluer les risques sur la santé mentale ?
17
This episode was recorded on a clear and calm February morning at the Lower Klamath National Wildlife Refuge in Siskiyou County, California. Located on the border with California and Oregon, Lower Klamath NWR was established by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1908 as the first waterfowl refuge in the United States, and was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1965. From Wikipedia: "The refuge includes shallow freshwater marshes, open water, grassy uplands, and croplands that are intensively managed to provide foraging and breeding habitat for waterfowl and other animals. The market hunting of migratory birds in the late 19th century created the need for preservation and creation of a wildlife refuge."  There is a Facebook page for the podcast, search Sound By Nature to find it and see pictures from the area this episode was recorded, as well as some of the other areas I've recorded. While you're there, like and follow it to stay updated and see pictures from future recording outings. I'll be posting episodes on the page as well, please feel free to comment and tell me what you like or dislike about the podcast. Thanks to those of you who have already done so, your likes and comments are greatly appreciated! If you've ever wanted to be first at something, here's your chance! Be my first supporter! You can do so by going to my podcast page at anchor.fm/soundbynature and clicking support this podcast, or by clicking the support link at the end of this podcast description.  I would really like to continue bringing you natural sounds recorded on location, and I would love to improve the sound quality to provide you with quieter, more nuanced soundscapes.  Your support will help me do just that. If you don't have the means for monetary support, you can also support the podcast by rating and reviewing it on Itunes, or just by telling a friend who would appreciate it. Thank you for your support of any kind, and thank you for for listening! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
18
What are the most common habitat management mistakes? In this episode we visit with Deer Habitat guru, Dr. Craig Harper, of the University of Tennessee. Over his 20+ year career, Craig has worked all over the US helping hunters and managers create habitat for deer in forests and old fields. He is also the author of several books on food plots for deer and other wildlife.  Craig will share his insight into the most common mistakes he encounters, as well as strategies for success.
19
This week we find ourselves in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. You are missing one of your hosts, Darryl Pace for this show, but Byron is on hand with good friend and professional hunter, Devan Delange, for an informal chat with a brandy in hand. They talk about their hunting trip, along with a very heart felt event which took places, and give you an insight as to what they get up to on a personal trip and hunt away. This podcast is supported by the Scottish Associatation for Country Sports.
20
The world of bird rehabilitation is a unique aspect of the way that people interact with birds, and those that do the dirty work of helping wild birds get back to normal following scrapes with human things get an up close and personal look at birds that many of us just look at through binoculars or scopes. Birding Magazine Associate Editor Ioana Seritan does just that in her day job. She's a Wildlife Rehabilitation Technician at the International Bird Rescue in California’s Bay Area and she joins host Nate Swick to talk about bird rehab from the inside.  Also, the first of our Cedar Waxing stories and birding in the age of COVID-19. 
21
This week we collaborate with Corbin Maxey from Animals to the Max podcast to discuss the Netflix documentary Tiger King. This documentary highlights the issues with private ownership of big cats, like Tigers, in the United States. It is believed there are more tigers in private ownership within the United States than there are in the wild. We spend quite a while discussing not only the documentary, but focus own on big cat ownership and exploitation. Please considering supporting us at Patreon HERE. For one cup of "good" coffee a month you can support your favorite podcast and give back to conservation. We also offer bonus episodes and supporter only content. We also donate portions of what we raise to a conservation organization each month. We will be sending money to Australia for relief this month and have supported African Penguins, African Wild Dogs, White Sharks in recent months and many other species thanks to our donors.  Show notes HERE
22
In this episode, I interview Joe D’Angeli also known as New Jersey’s Batman. Joe has been working with bats for over 30 years and currently runs the Wildlife Conservation and Education Center in Garfield, New Jersey. http://www.njbatman.com We discuss the Coronavirus, why Joe believes he may have gotten it back in early January, and how bats are NOT to blame for the virus. We then discuss wet markets, wildlife trafficking, and zoonotic diseases. Other topics include Joe’s take on “Tiger King”, “Blackfish”, and the ethics of horse racing.
23
This recording was gathered in a stand of Quaking Aspen(populus tremuloides) in the Bigelow Meadow Botanical Area at the edge of Bigelow Meadow in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest, Siskiyou County, California. It was a sunny day with a gusty breeze at the cusp of summer and fall, with the leaves on the trees and brush just beginning to turn to their fall colors. I have a Facebook page for the podcast, search Sound By Nature to find it and see pictures from this recording outing, as well as some of the other areas I've recorded. While you're there, like and follow it to stay updated and see pictures from future recording outings. I'll be posting episodes on the page as well, please feel free to comment and tell me what you like or dislike about the podcast.  If you appreciate that this podcast is ad free and would like it to stay that way, please consider supporting it monetarily if you have the means. You can do so by going to my podcast page at anchor.fm/soundbynature and clicking support this podcast, or by clicking the support link at the end of this podcast description. I would very much like to continue to bring you unadulterated natural sounds recorded on location, and I would love to improve the sound quality to bring you quieter, more nuanced soundscapes.  Your support will help me do that. If you don't have the means for monetary support, you can also support the podcast by rating and reviewing it on Itunes, or just by telling a friend who would appreciate it.  Thanks for listening! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
24
Another edition in the Pandemic Personals I give you Lena Diaz is studying Bio-Engineering and is in her 2nd year for PhD candidacy. Her research focuses on disease detection and testing. Lena works and studies at the University of Hawai'i in Manoa. In...
25
Our first guest - Mr. Scott Borden!  Scott is a long time reptile keeper who has worked with some amazing species including Scrub Pythons, Morelia, Liasis, and more.  We chat with him about that, and much more including his Honeymoon trip to Costa Rica!...
26
Resurrecting the old Reptile Talk podcast Jeremy had started with Steven Tillis over 7 years ago on Blog Talk Radio.  Rob and I share our history and come up in the reptile industry!  From the very beginning of our journeys to now - we tell it all in...
27
Bill explains the many wonders of the land down under. Related: Through the Eyes of Nature Guys (http://natureguys.org/travel/)  
28
I recorded this during steady rain on the floor of an old growth forest in the mountains of Northern California. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
29
Join Ellen and special guest Tyus Williams for a review of the strikingly striped tiger! In this episode, we basically just gush about how amazing tigers are for an hour. It's wonderful.
30
Bill says Africa is number one on his places to explore. Tune in to find out how a trip to Africa might change your life.  Related episodes: Through the Eyes of Nature Guys (http://natureguys.org/travel/)
31
Bob has a conversation with Chris from Imago about how nature can help us deal with the coronavirus. Organizations mentioned in this podcast include: Imago - https://imagoearth.org/ J.N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge - https://www.fws.gov/refuge/jn_ding_darling/ Sanibel Sea School - https://www.sanibelseaschool.org/ The Arc of Appalacia - https://arcofappalachia.org/
32
Forest management matters! Steve, Marcus, and Bronson discuss how forest management affects where deer spend time. Want to draw more deer to your property? Want deer to spend more time on your property? Manage the forest on your property to produce food and cover. 
33
Today on The Checking In Podcast we are Featuring our Special Guest Chewy!! Who is Chewy? Chewy is an OG Employee from the SnakeBytesTV Days!!
34
Of the 1116 species on the ABA checklist, around 50 are what we classify as “non-native”. These are species from other parts of the world introduced either to the North American mainland or, frequently, to Hawaii. The ABA has always tried to keep track of those non-native species through our checklist committee, and whether or not these populations can be counted on an ABA list is always a hot topic. ABA Checklist Committee chair Peter Pyle of the Institute for Bird Populations at Point Reyes, California, joins host Nate Swick to update birders on the status of many of these populations, and the weird circumstances that bring them to North America. 
35
This episode was recorded at a campsite near the Cabin Creek Trailhead and the confluence of Cabin Creek and Squaw Valley Creek in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest, Shasta County, California. It was a cool day with passing clouds and thundershowers- a good day to sit beside a warm campfire. I have a Facebook page for the podcast, search Sound By Nature to find it and see pictures from the area this episode was recorded, as well as some of the other areas I've recorded. While you're there, like and follow it to stay updated and see pictures from future recording outings. I'll be posting episodes on the page as well, please feel free to comment and tell me what you like or dislike about the podcast.  If you appreciate that this podcast is ad free and would like it to stay that way, please consider supporting it monetarily if you have the means. You can do so by going to my podcast page at anchor.fm/soundbynature and clicking support this podcast, or by clicking the support link at the end of this podcast description. I would very much like to continue to bring you unadulterated natural sounds recorded on location, and I would love to improve the sound quality to bring you quieter, more nuanced soundscapes.  Your support will help me do that. If you don't have the means for monetary support, you can also support the podcast by rating and reviewing it on Itunes, or just by telling a friend who would appreciate it. Thank you for your support, and thank you for for listening! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
36
I recorded this beside a spring in a small meadow along the Upper McCloud River on a beautiful partly cloudy spring morning in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest, Siskiyou County, California. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
37
Many states and provinces are increasingly interested in tackling a comprehensive survey of the birds in their regions. With the help help of technology, this ambitious undertaking is more achievable than ever. Maybe you’ve heard of Breeding Bird Atlases. Maybe you’ve participated in them in the past. But it’s easy to get involved with this important conservation and natural history initiative. Gabriel Foley is the atlas coordinator for the Maryland-DC Breeding Bird Atlas and he joins host Nate Swick to talk about what these atlases are trying to accomplish and how birders can get involved.  Also, Birding editor Ted Floyd recently returned from Mexico and thinks ABA birders should add it to their travel plans. 
38
A sunny morning at Fern Grotto Beach in Wilder Ranch State Park, Santa Cruz County, California. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
39
There are a number of issues to consider when answering the question about crossbreeding in the chameleon world. There are many strong opinions out there. I give my opinion, but also present the consideration so you can make your own decision.
40
This was recorded during a high spring tide at the north side of the boulder strewn cove where Partington Creek enters the ocean. There is a cave there that, as the waves rolled in and compressed the air within, created a pressurized blast of air as it escaped the temporarily submerged cave entrance. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
41
Environmental problems persist, so federal judges hearing environmental cases are struggling to make sure this litigation doesn't grind to a halt. On today's episode of Parts Per Billion, legal reporter Ellen M. Gilmer talks about the many virus-related delays in these cases and about one case over the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline in which a judge decided a hearing must go on. (Note: After the recording of this episode, the judge in the Dakota pipeline case issued a ruling. Visit news.bloombergenvironment.com for breaking news coverage.)
42
This episode was recorded at sunset during low tide in the intertidal zone at Sand Dollar Beach in the Big Sur region of Monterey County, California. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
43
by Bathsheba Demuth • The Svalbard Archipelago was uninhabited until humans came searching for resources. A historian follows their tracks. The original story, along with photos, can be found on hakaimagazine.com.
44
Mallards are a very common duck that are easy to find. Find out why Bill thinks they may be an invasive species.  Our sources for this episode include: Unflappable Facts About Mallards http://mentalfloss.com/article/78330/15-unflappable-facts-about-mallards Mallard duck facts http://www.softschools.com/facts/animals/mallard_duck_facts/587/ Mallard https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Mallard/lifehistory
45
The Burrowing Owl is one of the most unique owl species on the planet. Rather than nesting or living in trees, these owls find abandoned burrows from squirrels, prairie dogs and other species and claim them as their own. These charismatic birds are highly adapted to their life in the Americas.    Show notes HERE Please consider visiting our Patreon page HERE.
46
So you want to start a supplemental feeding program? You better listen to this episode. We again visit with deer biologist, Donnie Draeger, and discuss the pros and cons of supplemental feeding. Donnie and colleagues designed a study to determine exactly what impact a supplemental feeding program would have on antler size and body weight of free-ranging bucks. If you are expecting immediate results, and/or you only have a few feeders…don’t waste your time and money.
47
Part 2 of my interview with Animal Planet’s Large Predator Expert, Dave Salmoni!
48
Searching the desolate Templar citadel, the Cephalosquad find a mysterious vault and explore the secret staircase leading to the depths – will they discover what happened to the missing Templars?  Please support Dugongs & Seadragons on Patreon, if every subscriber gave us just $1 to $5 a month it will allow us to fully fund and support the podcast for the long-term:  https://www.patreon.com/DugongsAndSeadragons 
49
In this episode, I interview “Penguin Lady” Dyan Denapoli. She’s a penguin expert, TED speaker, and author. In the interview, Dyan goes into detail on how at the age of 30, she decided to drop everything and start working with penguins. It’s a really inspirational podcast that I know you’re going to love!
50
How is the global pandemic impacting local food systems? We interview @Hallie_Casey of Sustainable Food Center and On To Grow On podcast to find out. We discuss food supply chains, how local farmers’ markets are adapting, and who counts as “essential” workers during a Shelter in Place Order. Then we dig into a more fun topic: soil!  How do you know if your soil is healthy? What's the role of soil in regenerative agriculture? Lastly, we introduce a segment called the “Gardener’s Gauntlet,” in which we invite guests to spill their horticultural passions and peeves.  Mentioned in this episode:  The Essential Worker Travel Form letter from Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller, the Farm and Ranch Freedom Alliance, the Texas Nursery and Landscape Association, the SFC Farmers’ Markets, the USDA’s National Resources Conservation Service (NCRS), Texas Plant and Soil Lab, and One To Grow On’s series on organic agriculture. This one goes out to John Prine, who is battling the virus.  Drop us a line on our website or email info@horticulturati.com and find us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter!
51
The chameleon's eyes are one of the most significant gauges of chameleon health - both physical and emotional. Today I discuss what closed eyes can mean.
52
This episode was recorded on the high tide line just north of San Mateo Point, in south Orange County, near the border with San Diego County, California, at a spot known to surfer's as Cotton's. It was recorded at sunrise during peak high tide the day before the new moon, under mostly cloudy skies with a light offshore breeze. I have a Facebook page for the podcast, search Sound By Nature to find it and see pictures from the area this episode was recorded, as well as some of the other areas I've recorded. While you're there, like and follow it to stay updated and see pictures from future recording outings. I'll be posting episodes on the page as well, please feel free to comment and tell me what you like or dislike about the podcast. If you appreciate that this podcast is ad free and would like it to stay that way, please consider supporting it monetarily if you have the means. You can do so by going to my podcast page at anchor.fm/soundbynature and clicking support this podcast, or by clicking the support link at the end of this podcast description. I would very much like to continue to bring you unadulterated natural sounds recorded on location, and I would love to improve the sound quality to bring you quieter, more nuanced soundscapes.  Your support will help me do that. If you don't have the means for monetary support, you can also support the podcast by rating and reviewing it on Itunes, or just by telling a friend who would appreciate it. Thank you for your support, and thank you for for listening! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
53
Sunrise with the pounding surf at Panther Beach in Santa Cruz County, California. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
54
Australia's terrifying bushfires have made the climate emergency seem very real and very immediate. They've forced people everywhere to join the dots in ways previous 'yes obviously it's climate change' disasters haven't. Why? Does it really take a billion animals going up in smoke for people to give global apocalypse more than a passing thought? And is anything going to be different now, politically?Also this week, some truly biblical insect news from East Africa and a newspaper proving that, just occasionally, the least trusted profession can be a force for good.Sustainababble is your friendly environment podcast, out weekly. Theme music by the legendary Dicky Moore – @dickymoo. Sustainababble logo by the splendid Arthur Stovell. Ecoguff read out by Arabella.Love the babble? Bung us a few pennies at www.patreon.com/sustainababble.MERCH: sustainababble.teemill.comAvailable on iTunes, Spotify, Acast & all those types of things, or at sustainababble.fish. Visit us at @thebabblewagon and at Facebook.com/sustainababble. Email us at hello@sustainababble.fish.
55
The seasons are warming up for those of us in the Northern hemisphere and it is time to think about getting your chameleon some natural sunlight. I share some experience and advice to have that happen safely.
56
This episode was recorded on the shore of Lake McCloud in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest, Siskiyou County, California. I have a Facebook page for the podcast, search Sound By Nature to find it and see pictures from the area this episode was recorded, as well as some of the other areas I've recorded. While you're there, like and follow it to stay updated and see pictures from future recording outings. I'll be posting episodes on the page as well, please feel free to comment and tell me what you like or dislike about the podcast. If you appreciate that this podcast is ad free and would like it to stay that way, please consider supporting it monetarily if you have the means. You can do so by going to my podcast page at anchor.fm/soundbynature and clicking support this podcast, or by clicking the support link at the end of this podcast description. I would very much like to continue to bring you unadulterated natural sounds recorded on location, and I would love to improve the sound quality to bring you quieter, more nuanced soundscapes.  Your support will help me do that. If you don't have the means for monetary support, you can also support the podcast by rating and reviewing it on Itunes, or just by telling a friend who would appreciate it. Thank you for your support, and thank you for for listening! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
57
Meredith presents the Lion, Mike presents the Tiger.Animal Fan Club, like the rest the country, is swept up in TIGER KING mania. We even present a cover of a thrilling song about Tigers!Follow us on Instagram @AnimalFanClubPod .Send your Listener Feedbag Questions to: AnimalFanClubPod@gmail.com .Tell your friends!
58
Dr. Kris Nichols is the Chief Scientist at Pachaterrae and a world-renowned leader in the movement to regenerate soils for healthy food, healthy people, and a healthy planet. On this episode, Kris sheds light on the vital role of mycorrhizal fungi in indirectly supporting resilience against climate change; the importance of biodiversity in creating synergies that strengthen the health of our ecosystems; how soil microbiology impacts the bioavailability of the nutrients within our foods; and more.   Episode notes: www.greendreamer.com/141 Support the show: www.greendreamer.com/support Instagram: www.instagram.com/greendreamerpodcast
59
Following a comment on the COVID-19 pandemic, the Ocean and Climate David introduces Time magazine’s ‘Hero of the Planet Dr. Sylvia Earle along with Nick Landon, a second year cadet at one of our little known U.S. Maritime Academies. Rising Tide Podcast aims to give you information, inspiration, and motivation to tackle the challenges our oceans are facing. The oceans are rising, so are we! Learn more at bluefront.org
60
Episode Summary: On today’s episode of the EOC podcast we’re talking with the co-creators of the Endangered Species Print Project (ESPP), an ongoing print series focused on raising both awareness... Read more » The post EOC 043: The Endangered Species Print Project with Jenny Kendler and Molly Schafer appeared first on Wild Lens.
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In this podcast we cover the history of the turkey. This bird was transported from Mexico to Europe and then to North America. Join to find out how the wild turkey made it back from the brink of extinction. Our sources for this episode include: Why Are Wild Turkeys So Aggressive - https://www.bostonmagazine.com/news/2016/01/11/why-are-wild-turkeys-so-aggressive/ 9 Fun Facts about Turkeys - http://www.audubon.org/news/9-fun-facts-about-turkeys Have You Been Attacked by a Turkey - https://news.wgbh.org/post/have-you-been-attacked-turkey-heres-why Why Wild Turkeys Hate the Wild - https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2015/11/return-of-the-turkey/417648/
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In this episode, I share my thoughts on why I think a python swallowed a beach towel in a recent viral video. I also discuss how snakes can swallow prey 10X their size! Disclosure: They DON’T unhinge their jaws!!!!
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durée : 00:03:17 - La Transition - par : Hervé Gardette - La période de confinement perturbe notre façon de consommer. Certains comportements paraissent irrationnels. Les sciences cognitives permettent-elles de tous les expliquer ? - réalisation : David Jacubowiez
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Renowned British explorer, Levison Wood comes back on the show to talk about his new book, The Last Giants, chronicling the evolution and history of elephants, examining the challenges they face today through poaching, terrorism and land-use changes in Africa. We also find time to talk about how he is using his current time in isolation and shed some light on his photography process as a Leica Pro-Photographer.
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When we seek out to bird with others, it is to share in the joy of birds. Whether intended or not, along the way we build a sense of community. In order to appreciate that joy to its fullest, we shouldn’t have to worry about who we are or be second guessing our most basic actions around others in that community. And it's that concept, that birding is an extension of our true selves, that prompted the creation of Queer Birders of North America. A fellowship group for LGBT+ birders and allies, QBNA now host all sorts of events for all sorts of birders based on a shared interest in birds and a dedication to inclusivity.  QBNA leaders Jennifer Rycenga and Michael Retter join host Nate Swick to talk about why QBNA came about and why it's still essential.  Also, Nate rants a bit about the USFWS's proposed changes to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act and encourages you to leave a response to the rule change here. 
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Big Cats have been in the news lately with the Netflix documentary Tiger King. Thus, we decided to highlight one often forgotten, the Jaguar. This is the largest big cat in the Americas and like many of its relatives, it is trending towards extinction. These amazing cats survive in a variety of environments across many countries. We hope you enjoy learning about a loved species. Please considering supporting us at Patreon HERE. For one cup of "good" coffee a month you can support your favorite podcast and give back to conservation. We also offer bonus episodes and supporter only content. We also donate portions of what we raise to a conservation organization each month. We will be sending money to Australia for relief this month and have supported African Penguins, African Wild Dogs, White Sharks in recent months and many other species thanks to our donors.  Show notes HERE
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Almost everyone knows what a Robin looks like. Tune in to find out all about this very common bird.  Related episode: Sit Spot (http://natureguys.org/sit-spot/) Our sources for this episode include: Book “What the Robin Knows” by Jon Young http://birdlanguage.com/ American Robin https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/American_Robin/overview Fun Facts About American Robins https://www.thespruce.com/american-robin-facts-4143588 Robin Facts https://journeynorth.org/tm/robin/fact_page.html
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This was recorded on a clear summer night while paddling a canoe on Medicine Lake in Modoc National Forest, Siskiyou County, California. Medicine Lake lies in the caldera of the Medicine Lake Volcano, a shield volcano in the southern end of the Cascade Range. Remotely located, there is little or no light pollution to obscure the night sky, and as such the stars shone brightly on this moonless night. The air was still and the glassy surface of the lake perfectly reflected the stars above, which elicited the surreal sensation of paddling through the heavens. A Great Horned Owl called from the forest near the lakeshore. I have Facebook page for the podcast, search Sound By Nature to find it and see pictures from some of the areas I've recorded. While you're there, like and follow it to stay updated and see pictures from future recording outings. I'll be posting episodes on the page as well, please feel free to comment and tell me what you like or dislike about the podcast.  If you appreciate that this podcast is ad free and would like it to stay that way, please consider supporting it monetarily, if you have the means. You can do so by going to my podcast page at anchor.fm/soundbynature and clicking support this podcast, or by clicking the support link at the end of this podcast description. I would very much like to continue to bring you unadulterated natural sounds, and I would love to improve the sound quality to bring you quieter, more nuanced soundscapes. Your support will help me do that. If you don't have the means for monetary support, you can also support the podcast by rating and reviewing it on Itunes, or just by telling a friend who would appreciate it.   Thanks for listening! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
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This was recorded at dawn on the Summer Solstice at the edge of a large meadow in the Medicine Lake Highlands area of the Shasta-Trinity National Forest, Siskiyou County, California. It was a brisk mountain morning, and though it was the first official morning of summer, a light frost had settled upon the meadow, while lingering patches of snow dotted the dense surrounding forest. The recording starts just before the first birdsong of the morning and continues until a little after sunrise. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
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Welcome back to part two of my conversation with Mark Scherz as we get deep into the three newly described species that a team of scientists just described. Mark was part of that team and is giving us an insight into their findings. I invite you to sit back and get a guided tour of these species from one of the paper’s authors.
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Hey, what's up Plant People? I hope everyone is doing well during these wild times we're in. I can't wait for you to hear today's episode. My guest, Dr. Jessica Tullar Caroom, is an epidemiologist and public health professional, community activist and...
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Having successfully opened the door, the brave adventurers search the seemingly deserted Templar citadel for a clue to the whereabouts of the missing Matron Seatamer.   Please support Dugongs & Seadragons on Patreon, if every subscriber gave us just $1 to $5 a month it will allow us to full fund and support the podcast for the long-term:  https://www.patreon.com/DugongsAndSeadragons 
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I recorded this episode in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest in Siskiyou County, California on a warm late spring day just after noon as birds sang and thunderclouds drifted by. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
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Deep in the mountains of Northern California, Tom Neal Creek flows down a wild, rugged, densely forested canyon. Edged with moss and ferns, the crystal clear water tumbles over ancient sedimentary rock that form the many small waterfalls and cascades that line its course. I recorded this on a clear winter day beside the creek at a place that I found to have an unusual, albeit pleasing resonance. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
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A breezy sunset at Soberanes Point in Garrapata State Park, Monterey County, California. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
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It's pretty clear that the federal government is now out of the business of leading the way on climate change. Can America's CEO's fill this leadership vacuum? We speak with Dean Scott about what companies are doing to become more sustainable and whether you really can "do well by doing good."
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Our trilogy on turkeys is complete. This episode includes the real story of Ben Franklin and turkeys. We also cover some problem wild turkeys in Rocky River. Note: Bill and Bob attempted to do this podcast in front of a live audience at the Amish Bird Symposium. Bob was a Turkey and forgot to press record! We have so much great information on the wild turkey that we decided to break it into three podcasts. Our sources for this episode include: Mail delivery halted in portion of Rocky River - https://localtvwjw.files.wordpress.com/2018/01/city-of-rocky-river.jpg?quality=85&strip=all&strip=all No, Ben Franklin Didnʼt Want a Turkey on the Great Seal - http://mentalfloss.com/article/53729/no-ben-franklin-didnt-want-turkey-greatseal Rocky River Wild Turkeys Captured - http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2018/02/aggressive_rocky_river_wild_tu.html
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Jeremy Flinn is graduate of the MSU Deer Lab and is now the Chief Marketing Officer for Stone Road Media, a company that represents many of the well-known brands in the hunting industry. We talk about the influence "brand-name" hunters have on the education of the hunting public and how Jeremy is working to insure accurate, biologically sound information is being distributed. We also talk about habitat management differences in the Northeast, Southeast and Midwest, and how Jeremy uses biological knowledge about buck movements, complimented with camera technology, to most effectively scout and harvest deer.  If you would like to reach out to Jeremy, you can find him at jeremy@stoneroadmedia.com.
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Having defeated the demon that was lurking in the cavern beneath the Templar citadel, the Cephalosquad investigate the mysterious portal. Will this give them a clue as to who is behind all of the attacks?   Please support Dugongs & Seadragons on Patreon, if every subscriber gave us just $1 to $5 a month it will allow us to full fund and support the podcast for the long-term:  https://www.patreon.com/DugongsAndSeadragons 
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It’s Startup meets YouTube meets Twitch meets National Geographic. You know what? To really understand you’re just going to have to check it out yourself! www.mammalz.com. Co-founders Rob Whitehair and Alex Finden (Happy birthday!) tell the story of how this brand new tech startup began, and what truly makes it a one-in-a-million platform. From the Mammalz Website:“Founded by wildlife filmmakers Rob Whitehair and Alexander Finden, Mammalz is the “Twitch for Nature”; an app- and web-based media streaming and social platform dedicated to nature storytelling and driven by community. Whether you are a professional media maker, scientist, educator, artist, writer, or one of over 600 million nature enthusiasts across the planet, Mammalz provides you with the tools to personalize your experience, share your love of nature, and truly make a difference. The Mammalz mission is to promote a greater global public understanding of nature and the environment while acting as a bridge between science, media makers, and the public. Rob Whitehair, Co-Founder and CEO Rob is a 20 year veteran of the natural history film industry. He is a multi-award-winning filmmaker, producer, and executive who has directed, produced and shot films for broadcast and theatrical markets worldwide. He is known throughout the industry for his vision, leadership, inspiration and his ability to take seemingly impossible ideas and turn them into a reality. Mammalz is the culmination of Rob’s dream to create a next-generation media platform that will connect people on a global scale through their love for nature. Alexander Finden, Co-Founder and COO Inspired by the underwater world, Alex is a highly creative, award-winning wildlife filmmaker, Divemaster, YouTube channel manager, Twitch content editor, and operational guru. He is known for being a master of details, turning ideas into actions, and keeping calm in the storm. Alex is fascinated with portable live-streaming technologies and plans to encourage outdoor streaming as one of the most popular content types on Mammalz.” Music used in today’s show, “Questing” and “Green Iver” from Ari de Niro on the Free Music Archive via Creative Commons Licensing.Real Mammalz audio from real Mammalz users: Day's Edge Productions, The Great Mexican Bird Resurvey Project. Ben Zino, How to find rare winter salamanders. Dusty Hulet, Friction Fire with Ford Thunder Erickson. Billy Heaney, In search of the killer whale. Kathryn Chalk, Ever seen a cricket present the weather forecast. Angus Hamilton, Stop, Drop and Roll! The Brookesia Chameleons of Madagascar. Jim Michael, A torrent of snow geese. Renee Sweaney, Our resident kestrals.
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I recorded this on a warm late spring afternoon as thunderstorms rumbled nearby at White Ridge Spring in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest, Trinity County, California. Located trailside on the Pacific Crest Trail, this beautiful spring is a convenient place to refill your water and take in the view of the Trinity Alps to the west, while also admiring the abundance of wild flowers and the odd looking California Pitcher Plant which grows in the pure and cold spring water as it cascades downslope from the spring.  --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
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Ami Vitale is an award-winning war correspondent turned conservation photographer, and her iconic images of animals like Sudan the Rhino adorn the pages of National Geographic and other top outlets often. But she's so much more than a woman with a camera, rather, she's a force of nature helping create change and grassroots conservation all over the world through her work, words, and advocacy. She joins the podcast to talk about the most inspiring and heartbreaking moments from her recent projects (don't miss the beautiful story at the end about the behavior of elephant orphans) and she shares where she finds her seemingly boundless energy and optimism. Here's this episode's top news items: Study declares ancient Chinese paddlefish extinct ‘Tainted timber’ from Myanmar widely used in yachts seized in the Netherlands New monkey discovered on “island” amid deforestation in Brazil Episode artwork of a panda keeper in China is courtesy of Ami Vitale. If you enjoy this show, please invite your friends to subscribe via Android, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, TuneIn, Spotify, Pandora, or wherever they get podcasts. Please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep this show growing, Mongabay is a nonproft media outlet and all support helps! See our latest news from nature's frontlines at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay. Feedback is always welcome: submissions@mongabay.com.
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Relax beside the cold, clear water of the upper McCloud River in Northern California on a late fall day. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
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An early morning near the marshy edge of Big Lake at Ahjumawi Lava Springs State Park in Shasta County, California. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
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We are making progress in our drive to determine the feeding schedule and husbandry to maintain healthy female veiled chameleons through their lives - especially including egg laying. By controlling their diet and conditions we can reign in their body's enthusiasm for making eggs. By providing greater than ideal conditions their body creates more eggs than are healthy. Today I share progress made by Mari Joki from Finland.
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A windy sunset with high, storm tossed surf at Scott Creek Beach in Santa Cruz County, California. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
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In this episode, Becky Tipton and Hank Will discuss how they make a profit on their homestead.  their expertise explores keeping bees, gardening, and livestock.   For links from this episode visit https://www.motherearthnews.com/podcast/urban-homesteading-for-profit-zepz1702zcbru
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Enjoy the soothing sound of Middle Fall on the McCloud River from the rocks beside the pool below the fall. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
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Sustainababble 3 then, and steam our underparts if it isn't a cracker. Dave and Ollie get reflective about the extent to which it's OK for people - in particular Americans - to treat scientific fact as an article of faith. While 'belief' in climate change is on the rise in the UK, what excuses can be found for fully half of the American public to think it's a wicked fantasy? They get their teeth into 'natural capital' - whatever the hell that means. And revel in the rise and rise of solar, which makes the Chancellor's underhand love-in with the frackers all the more galling. All this, and time to see how Ollie's prediction of a telling off for Cuadrilla went. Sustainababble is a weekly podcast for and by greeny types who don’t really know what’s going on. It comes out every Monday. Music by Dicky Moore from Bearcraft. Available on iTunes, Stitcher, Soundcloud, and here on the sustainababble website. Visit us at @thebabblewagon.
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Sunset in the intertidal zone at Pigeon Point in San Mateo County, California. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
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Burstarse Falls stands within the Castle Crags Wilderness Area just off the Pacific Crest Trail in Shasta County, California. Formed in the solid granite of the Castle Crags, its water tumbles over a precipice nearly 80 feet tall before continuing on down numerous smaller waterfalls and cascades. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
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Episode Summary: In this episode of the podcast we talk with the principal scientist and co-founder of the Wild Nature Institute (WNI), Monica Bond. Monica, along with WNI co-founder Derek... Read more » The post EOC 006: Conservation of Giraffes and other ungulates in Tanzania with Monica Bond appeared first on Wild Lens.
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durée : 00:03:03 - L'Édito carré - par : Mathieu Vidard - Les premières enquêtes montrent que la durée du confinement est un facteur de stress et une durée supérieure à 10 jours est prédictive de symptômes post-traumatiques, de comportements d’évitement et de colère...
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Reptiles and amphibians are hard to find, so how can you be sure you haven’t missed any? We explore some reptile detectives, some of which are good boys. The Species of the Bi-Week is coming at you from the rainforests of Sri Lanka. FULL REFERENCE LIST AVAILABLE AT: herphighlights.podbean.com Main Paper References: Boback, S. M., Nafus, M. G., Yackel Adams, A. A., & Reed, R. N. (2020). Use of visual surveys and radiotelemetry reveals sources of detection bias for a cryptic snake at low densities. Ecosphere, 11(1). https://doi.org/10.1002/ecs2.3000 Jean-Marie, B., Raphael, G., Fabien, R., Aurélien, B., Sébastien, C., Nicolas, B., & Xavier, B. (2019). Excellent performances of dogs to detect cryptic tortoises in Mediterranean scrublands. Biodiversity and Conservation, 28(14), 4027–4045. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10531-019-01863-z Species of the Bi-Week: Wickramasinghe, L. J. M., Vidanapathirana, D. R., Pushpamal, V., & Wickramasinghe, N. (2020). A new species of Dryocalamus (Serpentes: Colubridae) endemic to the rainforests of southwestern Sri Lanka. Zootaxa, 4748(2), 248–260. https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4748.2.2 Other Mentioned Papers/Studies: King cobra preprint: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.03.24.006676v1 Egg swallowing bridle snake: https://www.researchgate.net/figure/A-inserting-the-upper-jaw-from-the-punctured-point-of-the-shell-B-C-swallowing-the_fig1_327623312 Music: Intro/outro – Treehouse by Ed Nelson Other Music – The Passion HiFi, www.thepassionhifi.com
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Bob and Bill have a special guest that has a ton of experience and stories of Grizzly Bears in Alaska. We start out with five fun and informative questions for our live audience at Roads, Rivers and Trails (https://www.roadsriversandtrails.com/). Related: Through the Eyes of Nature Guys (http://natureguys.org/travel/) Our sources for this episode include: Brown Bear Fact Sheet https://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/bears-of-the-last-frontier-brown-bear-factsheet/6522/ Brown Bear Frequently Asked Questions https://www.nps.gov/katm/learn/photosmultimedia/brown-bear-frequently-asked-questions.htm Interesting Facts about Brown Bears http://justfunfacts.com/interesting-facts-about-brown-bears/
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Bill visits Florida and brings home some troublesome guests. Bob is busy moving some kayaks and discovers a very active buzzing insect nest. Join us to find out how we dealt with these challenges and get some tips on how to deal with some of natures more challenging creatures.
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I recorded this on the Winter Solstice at the confluence of a small cascading stream and the South Fork of the Sacramento River. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
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Shriek! One of us no longer works for an environmental charity. Is this the end? A more reflective / fewer-knob-jokes episode than usual. What happens when trying to change stuff gets all a bit bloody exhausting? How do we know whether anything we're doing is making the tiniest bit of difference? And - look, we KNOW it's a mid-life crisis, all right? Sustainababble is your friendly environment podcast, out weekly. Theme music by the legendary Dicky Moore – @dickymoo. Sustainababble logo by the splendid Arthur Stovell. Ecoguff read out by Arabella. Love the babble? Bung us a few pennies at www.patreon.com/sustainababble. MERCH: sustainababble.teemill.com Available on iTunes, Spotify, Acast & all those types of things, or at sustainababble.fish. Visit us at @thebabblewagon and at Facebook.com/sustainababble. Email us at hello@sustainababble.fish.
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In our second episode, we drill into the controversial world of fracking. What is it? Why don't people like it? What's going on in Lancashire?  And does the UK's biggest fracking firm sound like an evil lizard on purpose? There's talk of world leaders quaffing sturgeon while talking about how important it is not to wipe out endangered species, and momentary cheerfulness in the direction of the boss of the free world. And, is it really good enough to find climate science so complicated you rig up your own climate model on Microsoft Excel and get the Daily Mail to write about it? All this, and Dave leaning over Ollie whispering sweet frackings, all night. Sustainababble is a weekly podcast for and by greeny types who don’t really know what’s going on. It comes out every Monday. Music by Dicky Moore from Bearcraft. Available on iTunes, Stitcher, Soundcloud, and here on the sustainababble website. Visit us at @thebabblewagon.
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The question is - how to reduce the number of brood fowl, and still maintain a viable flock? How to breed, raise, and produce just enough offspring to keep the family going, well into the future?
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A beautiful, brisk, late autumn afternoon below the Upper Fall on the McCloud River in Northern California. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
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durée : 00:57:50 - De cause à effets, le magazine de l'environnement - par : Aurélie LUNEAU - Ou comment le génie du vivant et de la nature nous pousse à l'humilité - invités : Emmanuelle Pouydebat, Carina LOUART, Mathilde Gérard, Alex MacLean - Emmanuelle Pouydebat : Directrice de recherche au CNRS et au MNHN, spécialiste de l'évolution des comportements, Carina Louart : journaliste scientifique indépendante, Mathilde Gérard : Journaliste Le Monde, Alex MacLean : - réalisé par : Alexandra Malka
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In this episode, I have a round table discussion with Chris and Angie from the All Creatures Podcast about Netflix’s popular docu-series, ‘Tiger King’. It’s controversial and at times, the conversation gets heated, but more importantly, it’s a sound discussion and a good distraction during these trying times.
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This recording was made at Brewer Creek on the east side of Mount Shasta in the Mount Shasta Wilderness, Shasta-Trinity National Forest, Siskiyou County, California. I gathered this recording from a boulder in the middle of the creek, well above treeline, just below where it surfaced from beneath an expansive snow field. The water cascaded through the scree, which had tumbled into its course, before disappearing beneath another snow field not far downstream. It was a beautiful, clear, warm, and sunny summer day. I recently created a Facebook page for the podcast, search for Sound By Nature to find it and see pictures from the area this episode was recorded. I will be posting pictures from future recording outings as well, so be sure to like and follow the page so you don't miss out.    If you appreciate that this podcast is ad free and would like it to stay that way, please consider supporting it monetarily, if you have the means. You can do so by going to my podcast page at anchor.fm/soundbynature and clicking support this podcast. I would very much like to continue to bring you unaltered natural sounds, and I would love to improve the sound quality to bring you quieter, more nuanced soundscapes. Your support will help me do that. If you don't have the means for monetary support, you can still support the podcast by rating and reviewing it on Itunes, or just by telling a friend who would appreciate it. Thanks for listening! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
106
Our Latest Show originates from Massachusetts Audubon’s 28th Annual Birders Meeting Event, with Chimney Swift researcher Dr. Margaret Rubega as our special guest, along with birding author Susan Edwards Richmond, and the Birdwatcher’s General Store’s Mike O’Connor.
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This was recorded along the stream below the uppermost of the Clear Creek Springs in the Mount Shasta Wilderness, Shasta-Trinity National Forest, Siskiyou County, California. It was a cold October afternoon, with patchy clouds offering only short bursts of warm sunlight and brief glimpses of the mountain looming above.  I have a Facebook page for the podcast, search Sound By Nature to find it and see pictures from the area this episode was recorded, as well as some of the other areas I've recorded. While you're there, like and follow it to stay updated and see pictures from future recording outings. I'll be posting episodes on the page as well, please feel free to comment and tell me what you like or dislike about the podcast.  If you appreciate that this podcast is ad free and would like it to stay that way, please consider supporting it monetarily if you have the means. You can do so by going to my podcast page at anchor.fm/soundbynature and clicking support this podcast, or by clicking the support link at the end of this podcast description. I would very much like to continue to bring you unadulterated natural sounds recorded on location, and I would love to improve the sound quality to bring you quieter, more nuanced soundscapes.  Your support will help me do that. If you don't have the means for monetary support, you can also support the podcast by rating and reviewing it on Itunes, or just by telling a friend who would appreciate it. Thank you for your support, and thank you for for listening! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
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Bobʼs neighbor Wayne had a simple question. Why do you have clover in your yard? Bob and Bill decided to do a podcast to explain to Wayne why we both keep and even plant clover in our yards. Our sources for this episode include: Advantages and Disadvantages of Clover Lawns https://dengarden.com/gardening/Clover-Lawns Establishing White Clover in Lawns http://versicolor.ca/lawnsoldsite/docs/clover.html Blades of glory: America's love affair with lawns https://theweek.com/articles/483762/blades-glory-americas-love-affair-lawns
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Children's author and illustrator Kate Pankhurst often finds herself addressing classrooms of kids, so she was completely at home chatting to Dave and Ol about her new book, Fantastically Great Women Who Saved The Planet.As the names suggests, the book bigs up a host of incredible women from around the world who have done more than most to stand up for mother Earth. Some are household names, but many aren't, despite their planet-saving (s)heroics.We ask Kate whether that's kinda the point of the book; that were our society and its cultural history somewhat less unequal, the legends of Wangari Maathai, Ingeborg Beling or the Chipko movement would be every bit as well known in classrooms as their male counterparts.Fantastically Great Women Who Saved The Planet is out now, published by Bloomsbury, and is the Booksellers Association children's indie book of the month for February.Sustainababble is your friendly environment podcast, out weekly. Theme music by the legendary Dicky Moore – @dickymoo. Sustainababble logo by the splendid Arthur Stovell. Ecoguff read out by Arabella.Love the babble? Bung us a few pennies at www.patreon.com/sustainababble.MERCH: sustainababble.teemill.comAvailable on iTunes, Spotify, Acast & all those types of things, or at sustainababble.fish. Visit us at @thebabblewagon and at Facebook.com/sustainababble. Email us at hello@sustainababble.fish.
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durée : 00:03:10 - La Transition - par : Hervé Gardette - Les sorties sont limitées pendant le confinement. Et si c'était l'occasion de redécouvrir notre environnement le plus proche ? Et d'en profiter pour caser du Guy Debord dans la chronique ? - réalisation : David Jacubowiez
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durée : 00:03:50 - La Transition - par : Hervé Gardette - Profusion de tribunes, appels à contributions pour préparer 'le monde d'après' : mais que faire de cette somme d'intelligences individuelles ? - réalisation : David Jacubowiez
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In this episode, Steve, Marcus and Bronson discuss why summer nutrition is so important for deer, and what are the management options you can use to improve summer nutrition.
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If you want to learn how to manage moist soil listen up
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Bob Cochran joins me for an introduction to the Helmeted Chameleon, Trioceros hoehnelii.
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The waste management industry is about to get a deluge of medical waste as the coronavirus pandemic ramps up in the U.S. This deluge is also coming at a time when many of its employees will likely be getting sick. On today's episode of Parts Per Billion, reporter Sylvia Carignan talks about how the industry is asking for some leniency from environmental regulators and about how that leniency could affect the environment.
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Christmas in October Bob and Bill invite some friends to share stories of Christmas Trees. Hope this episode brings a smile to your face! Our sources for this episode include: There are up to 25,000 bugs in the average Christmas tree https://www.mnn.com/your-home/at-home/stories/25000-bugs-christmas-tree What You Need to Know About Recycling Your Christmas Tree http://blog.davey.com/2013/12/what-you-need-to-know-about-recycling-your-christmas-tree/ A Toilet Brush Christmas? Invention of the Aluminum Tree http://patentplaques-blog.com/toilet-brush-inspired-artificial-christmas-trees/  
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Jason Bradford is the Board President of the Post Carbon Institute, an organization that provides individuals and communities with the resources needed to understand and respond to the interrelated ecological, economic, energy, and equity crises of the 21st century. In this podcast episode, Jason sheds light on why he believes the future is rural; why our perception that cites are more efficient and therefore better for the environment has been shortsighted; how we can re-ruralize without worsening urban sprawl or habitat loss; and more.   Featured music: Mining for Steal by Fuchsia Episode notes: www.greendreamer.com/221 Weekly solutions-based news: www.greendreamer.com  Support the show: www.greendreamer.com/support  Instagram: www.instagram.com/greendreamerpodcast
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Coming to you from the IWA Outdoor Classic, we catch up with Jim Shockey. Respected the world over for his story telling, experience and ethics, we delve into his on-going film projects and discus the future of hunting. One of the great ambassadors of our time, Jim reflects on how we must portray ourselves as a community of hunters into the future. A thought provoking, fascinating account from a living legend. podcast@paceproductionsuk.com www.thepacebrothers.com