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1
It’s split and lump season again. And that means Dr. Nick Block, professor of Biology at Stonehill College in Easton, Massachusetts and Secretary of the ABA’s Recording Standards and Ethics Committee, is back on the podcast. He joins host Nate Swick  to talk Northwestern Crow, Great White Heron, messy duck genetics, and scrub-less jays.  #BlackBirdersWeek was last week! Don't miss the Birding while Black panels. Session 1 and Session 2 can be found on Facebook.  ABA members are eligible for a 15% discount to Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Birds of the World subscription. Log into your ABA account to get the code.
2
On Our Latest Show: Saving grassland birds in Arkansas; a Hooded Warbler in Kentucky; and why not everybody loves House Wrens
3
David Sibley hardly needs an introduction to the ABA’s audience. He is the author and illustrator of what is the most popular field guide in North America, and the one simply known by his name - The Sibley Guide, now in its second edition. David has a new book out earlier this year, What It’s Like to Be a Bird: What Birds are doing and Why – from Flying to Nesting, Eating to Singing. It is a look at the fascinating behaviors and lives of our familiar birds, and, of course, a vehicle for David’s amazing artwork. He joins host Nate Swick to talk about his book, his art, and the benefits of birding alone.  Also, Nate talks about the racist attack on Christian Cooper, the incredible response that is Black Birders Week, and why the mostly White birding community needs to be paying attention.  ABA members are eligible for a 15% discount to Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Birds of the World subscription. Log into your ABA account to get the code.
4
This was recorded at a snowmelt stream near Porcupine Lake in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest, Siskiyou County, California. The lake sits on the east side of the Trinity Divide just off the Pacific Crest Trail. It's been really tough lately, and I hope that you are all doing alright. If you have children, give them a hug. If you don't have children, then hug your loved ones. If you don't have any loved ones, then hug yourself. Let's all try to remember that we're all human, and that we all bleed the same color. Try hard to commit small acts of kindness as often as possible, even to people you may disagree with. And be as compassionate as possible in as many ways possible. Human kindness may be the only thing that can save us. I love you all. Stay sound. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
5
Cristina Mittermeier (@mitty) is a photographer, conservationist, and marine biologist who founded the prestigious International League of Conservation Photographers and alongside her partner, Paul Nicklen, co-founded SeaLegacy—a nonprofit dedicated to protecting the ocean. Her latest project, Only One, will launch later this year! In this podcast episode, Cristina shares how the theme of ‘enoughness’ has shown up in different ways and evolved throughout her lifetime; how integrating the immeasurable sacred ecology into our work in sustainability—otherwise focused on the technical details and numbers denoting impact—might deepen our sense of connection and purpose to support our overarching goals; and more.   Support the show: www.greendreamer.com/support  Episode show notes: www.greendreamer.com/243 Featured music: The Fruitful Darkness by Trevor Hall Weekly solutions-based news: www.greendreamer.com  Instagram: www.instagram.com/greendreamerpodcast  
6
This episode was recorded at a secluded campsite in the Medicine Lake Highlands area of the Shasta-Trinity National Forest in Siskiyou County, California. The campfire popped, crackled, hissed, and roared while a tarp overhead provided shelter from passing rain and sleet showers, and the heavy water droplets dripping from the fir trees above. This was recorded during the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic. I hope this or any of my recordings are able to provide you with a little peace as this crisis continues. Thank you to everyone that has taken the time to rate and review the podcast, I really appreciate it. And thank you to my single supporter! Your generous support will go towards eventually purchasing higher quality microphones to improve the sound quality and enhance your listening experience. If anyone else would like to contribute, click the support link at the end of this description. Thank you everyone for listening. Stay sound.  --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
7
Reginaldo Haslett-Marroquin is the founder of Regenerative Agriculture Alliance, which is an ecosystem of industry leaders, farmer and public interest organizations, food sector businesses and cooperatives, tribes, and elected officials that are working together to scale up regenerative agriculture supply chains. He's also a lifetime Ashoka Fellow and the author of In the Shadow of Green Man, which tells the story of his life growing up in revolution-torn Guatemala and how it led him to his work in regenerative agriculture. In this part 2 of our conversation (listen to part 1 in episode 241), Reginaldo sheds light on the projects he has been working on to support regenerative agriculture; what we can do to help re-indigenize our perspectives and our food system; and more.   Featured music: The Fruitful Darkness by Trevor Hall Episode notes: www.greendreamer.com/242 Weekly solutions-based news: www.greendreamer.com  Support the show: www.greendreamer.com/support  Instagram: www.instagram.com/greendreamerpodcast
8
This episode was recorded on the shore of Lake McCloud in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest, Siskiyou County, California. I have a Facebook page for the podcast, search Sound By Nature to find it and see pictures from the area this episode was recorded, as well as some of the other areas I've recorded. While you're there, like and follow it to stay updated and see pictures from future recording outings. I'll be posting episodes on the page as well, please feel free to comment and tell me what you like or dislike about the podcast. If you appreciate that this podcast is ad free and would like it to stay that way, please consider supporting it monetarily if you have the means. You can do so by going to my podcast page at anchor.fm/soundbynature and clicking support this podcast, or by clicking the support link at the end of this podcast description. I would very much like to continue to bring you unadulterated natural sounds recorded on location, and I would love to improve the sound quality to bring you quieter, more nuanced soundscapes.  Your support will help me do that. If you don't have the means for monetary support, you can also support the podcast by rating and reviewing it on Itunes, or just by telling a friend who would appreciate it. Thank you for your support, and thank you for for listening! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
9
On our latest show: Lucy's Warblers in Arizona; why the Yellow-billed Cuckoo is known as the Rain Crow; and what to do if you find a baby bird.
10
The American Birding Podcast brings you This Month in Birding, a panel discussion covering the best bird news we might have missed here at the ABP for the last month. This episode features a panel of birding podcasts, Sean Milnes of Fowl Mouths Podcast and Sarah Bloemers and Mo Stych of Bird Sh't. It's a conversation that covers the gamut from Piping Plover love and the best birding clothes to Fast and the Furious and Samuel L. Jackson.  Links to topics discussed: AOS changes the name of The Auk Piping Plovers in Chicago What to Wear While Birding When You Want to Look Good Scientists Discover Why Some Birds Live Fast and Die Young Bird Diapers Gateway Arch Turns off its Lights for Birds ABA members are eligible for a 15% discount to Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Birds of the World subscription. Log into your ABA account to get the code.
11
Reginaldo Haslett-Marroquin is the founder of Regenerative Agriculture Alliance, which is an ecosystem of industry leaders, farmer and public interest organizations, food sector businesses and cooperatives, tribes, and elected officials that are working together to scale up regenerative agriculture supply chains. He's also a lifetime Ashoka Fellow and the author of In the Shadow of Green Man, which tells the story of his life growing up in revolution-torn Guatemala and how it led him to his work in regenerative agriculture. In this part 1 of our conversation (listen to part 2 in episode 242), Reginaldo sheds light on the dominant western culture's myopic view of poverty; why it's dangerous to presumptively want to help ‘lift’ materially poor communities out of economic poverty while holding an incomplete worldview that is not universal; what the coronavirus pandemic reveals about what wealth really means in the face of a crisis; and more.   Featured music: The Fruitful Darkness by Trevor Hall Episode notes: www.greendreamer.com/242 Weekly solutions-based news: www.greendreamer.com  Support the show: www.greendreamer.com/support  Instagram: www.instagram.com/greendreamerpodcast
12
Bob learns that you can see this frog in the winter!
13
The litigation over the toxic nonstick substances known as PFAS—or also known by their nickname "forever chemicals"—was already going to be pretty complicated. But now the pandemic has dialed that complexity up to a whole new level. On this week's episode of Parts Per Billion, reporter Ellen M. Gilmer talks about the delays these high stakes lawsuits have suffered in recent months and about whether one side in these types of disputes benefits more than the other when court deadlines get postponed. And to check out our new landing page that collects all of Bloomberg Law's reporting on PFAS, click here.
14
On Our Latest Show: The theme is Tree Swallows, with a review of the new book about them from Susan Richmond; a report about their behavior from Mike O’Connor; and a note about their nesting in our Talkin’ Birds Garden. Plus, we meet the feisty House Wren, and hear a Scarlet Tanager in an Audio Postcard from our Freya McGregor.
15
This episode was recorded on a clear and peaceful spring morning deep in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest in Siskiyou County, California. The campfire was set in a clearing amidst a stand of large old growth Ponderosa Pines at the edge of a lava flow near Porcupine Lake. Though it is called a lake on the map, it is really a small group of ponds and vernal pools just inside the edge of a lava flow which is part of a very large network of lava flows that stretches over 20 miles down the south flank of the Medicine Lake Volcano, a massive shield volcano. This was recorded during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. As this crisis wears on I really hope that this or any episode can provide you with a bit of solace during this stressful, anxious, and agonizing time. I hope that whatever your situation may be you are able to cope with the stresses of this new reality, and that you are getting help if you are having a hard time. Thank you to everyone who has taken the time to rate and review my podcast, and thank you all for listening. Stay sound. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
16
I recorded this during steady rain on the floor of an old growth forest in the mountains of Northern California. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
17
This episode was recorded at a campsite near the Cabin Creek Trailhead and the confluence of Cabin Creek and Squaw Valley Creek in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest, Shasta County, California. It was a cool day with passing clouds and thundershowers- a good day to sit beside a warm campfire. I have a Facebook page for the podcast, search Sound By Nature to find it and see pictures from the area this episode was recorded, as well as some of the other areas I've recorded. While you're there, like and follow it to stay updated and see pictures from future recording outings. I'll be posting episodes on the page as well, please feel free to comment and tell me what you like or dislike about the podcast. If you appreciate that this podcast is ad free and would like it to stay that way, please consider supporting it monetarily if you have the means. You can do so by going to my podcast page at anchor.fm/soundbynature and clicking support this podcast, or by clicking the support link at the end of this podcast description. I would very much like to continue to bring you unadulterated natural sounds recorded on location, and I would love to improve the sound quality to bring you quieter, more nuanced soundscapes.  Your support will help me do that. If you don't have the means for monetary support, you can also support the podcast by rating and reviewing it on Itunes, or just by telling a friend who would appreciate it. Thank you for your support, and thank you for for listening! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
18
I sit down with Merlin Becker, who previously worked for the GWCT at their model research farm in Scotland. We discuss methods of sustainable land management tackling a wide spectrum of topics: from the Otterburn research project to the use of fire for ecological sustainability; we delve into the crossover between traditional knowledge and science and talk through the new hare counting methodology, curlew conservation and raven control. https://www.thepacebrothers.com/intothewildernesspodcast
19
More than ever, birders are turning their attention to the birds immediately outside their front door, and for millions of North Americans there is scarcely a more ubiquitous bird than the feral Rock Pigeon. But that humble Rock Pigeon can provide some interesting insights into how natural selection is impacted by the urban environment. In fact, that is the work of Elizabeth Carlen, a PhD candidate at Fordham University in New York City and the lead author of a recent article in Evolutionary Applications that looks at genetic connectivity of Rock Pigeons populations in various cities in the Northeast United States. She joins host Nate Swick to talk about the unique issues with studying urban Rock Pigeons.   Also, Nate sings the praises of his Fantasy Birding yard squad, and talks about the birding that has kept him sane in a COVID-19 world.  ABA members are eligible for a 15% discount to Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Birds of the World subscription. Log into your ABA account to get the code.
20
Bronson and Steve have a conversation with Donnie Draeger to discuss the topic of culling. Two concepts are discussed in our conversation 1) culling to improve genetics, and 2) culling to manage the buck population to maintain a proper density and conserve food.
21
Bill reveals something he learned in school. Green frogs can be blue!  Our sources for this episode include: Green Frog https://animals.net/green-frog/ Northern Green Frog http://www.rosamondgiffordzoo.org/assets/uploads/animals/pdf/NorthernGreenFrog.pdf Northern Green Frog https://www.cbf.org/about-the-bay/more-than-just-the-bay/chesapeake-wildlife/northern-green-frog-at-home-in-the-bog.html
22
Welcome to the new weekly American Birding Podcast! Jennifer Ackerman is the New York Times best-selling author and essayist who wrote The Genius of Birds and a great many other science books. Her newest, out this week, is The Bird Way: A New Look at how Birds Talk, Work, Play, Parent, and Think. It's a companion to that much loved earlier book, exploring the many creative, novel, and bizarre ways in which birds approach problems that they face and what they says about bird cognition and intelligence. Also, a Cedar Waxwing story from Karina Li of Big Sky, Montana. ABA members are eligible for a 15% discount to Cornell Lab of Ornithology's Birds of the World subscription. Log into your ABA account to get the code.
23
On Our Latest Show: Orioles — Baltimore and Bullock’s; a Dawn Chorus audio postcard; and the joys of mealworms.
24
This episode was recorded at midnight on a clear, moonless night beneath the Geminid Meteor Shower during high winds atop a forested ridge in the Klamath Mountains of Northern California. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
25
This recording was gathered in an ice cave on the south flank of the Medicine Lake Volcano in Siskiyou County, California. This ice cave isn't a cave made of ice, but a lava tube which has filled with ice over time. This happens because during winter cold, dense air settles into the cave and has no way to escape as it is heavier than warmer air and the cave has no outlet. Enough cold air collects in the cave that it remains freezing year round, and as water seeps down through the lava and enters the frigid depths of the cave it freezes, which has nearly filled the cave over time. If you'd like to see pictures of the ice cave in which this recording was gathered, check out my Facebook page for the podcast, Sound By Nature. Like, follow, and share it while you're there, and tell me what you think. I would appreciate some feedback as well as suggestions for future episodes. This was recorded during the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic. I hope this or any of my recordings are able to provide you with a bit of peace during this ongoing crisis. Thank you to everybody that has taken the time to rate and review the podcast, I really appreciate it. If you haven't already, please do so. And if you are able, you can support the podcast by clicking the support link at the bottom of the page. Thanks for listening. Stay sound.  --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
26
Bob has a conversation with Mark Kurlansky the award winning author of Salmon: A Fish, the Earth, and the History of Their Common Fate. Our sources for this episode include: Mark Kurlansky (visit his web site at http://www.markkurlansky.com/) Salmon: A Fish, the Earth, and the History of Their Common Fate by Mark Kurlansky The World Without Fish: How Kids Can Help Save the Oceans by Mark Kurlansky Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World by Mark Kurlansky
27
A beautiful, brisk, late autumn afternoon below the Upper Fall on the McCloud River in Northern California. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
28
Sunrise with the pounding surf at Panther Beach in Santa Cruz County, California. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
29
The American Birding Podcast brings you the first installation of This Month in Birding, a panel discussion covering the best bird news we might have missed here at the ABP for the last month.  In this episode, host Nate Swick is joined by #birdtwitter stars Nick Lund (@TheBirdist), Jordan Rutter (@JERutter) and Jason Ward (@JasonWardNY) to talk about COVID closures, celebrities in birding, predatory journals, and more.  Links to topics discussed: Stevie Nicks and White-winged Doves? Dan Baldasarre wonders "What's the Deal with Birds?" Breeding Bird Survey Canceled for 2020 The World's Ugliest Birds
30
To help us process our current events including the police brutality against Mr. George Floyd, which highlights the continued, institutionalized racism and injustice still embedded in our society today, we're bringing back this vital past conversation from EP179 & EP180. Mark Charles is a dual citizen of the United States and Navajo Nation and is running as an independent candidate for the President of the United States 2020. His vision is to build a nation where 'We The People' truly means All The People. If this episode moves you, please consider sharing it to help amplify Mark's message of how deep-rooted our systemic injustices are and what really needs to happen for us to find positive peace together.   Show notes: www.greendreamer.com/179 Featured music: The Fruitful Darkness by Trevor Hall Weekly solutions-based news: www.greendreamer.com  Support the show: www.greendreamer.com/support  Instagram: www.instagram.com/greendreamerpodcast
31
One of the most cryptic and incredible reptiles is the Uroplatus phantasticus also known as the satanic Leaf-tailed Gecko. Quite the dramatic name for such a cute finger perching gecko! Today I talk to Lawrence Erickson who has bred phantasticus for many years.
32
Springtime means the birds are gettin' busy, meaning lots of nest-building and egg-laying. Here are some of the weirdest nests and eggs in the birding kingdom.
33
On Our Latest Show: Keeping at-home kids busy with great Cornell Lab projects; the latest from the Talkin' Birds Book Nest; and why you should keep your bird feeders up through May.
34
This recording was made at Brewer Creek on the east side of Mount Shasta in the Mount Shasta Wilderness, Shasta-Trinity National Forest, Siskiyou County, California. I gathered this recording from a boulder in the middle of the creek, well above treeline, just below where it surfaced from beneath an expansive snow field. The water cascaded through the scree, which had tumbled into its course, before disappearing beneath another snow field not far downstream. It was a beautiful, clear, warm, and sunny summer day. I recently created a Facebook page for the podcast, search for Sound By Nature to find it and see pictures from the area this episode was recorded. I will be posting pictures from future recording outings as well, so be sure to like and follow the page so you don't miss out.    If you appreciate that this podcast is ad free and would like it to stay that way, please consider supporting it monetarily, if you have the means. You can do so by going to my podcast page at anchor.fm/soundbynature and clicking support this podcast. I would very much like to continue to bring you unaltered natural sounds, and I would love to improve the sound quality to bring you quieter, more nuanced soundscapes. Your support will help me do that. If you don't have the means for monetary support, you can still support the podcast by rating and reviewing it on Itunes, or just by telling a friend who would appreciate it. Thanks for listening! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
35
This was recorded along the stream below the uppermost of the Clear Creek Springs in the Mount Shasta Wilderness, Shasta-Trinity National Forest, Siskiyou County, California. It was a cold October afternoon, with patchy clouds offering only short bursts of warm sunlight and brief glimpses of the mountain looming above.  I have a Facebook page for the podcast, search Sound By Nature to find it and see pictures from the area this episode was recorded, as well as some of the other areas I've recorded. While you're there, like and follow it to stay updated and see pictures from future recording outings. I'll be posting episodes on the page as well, please feel free to comment and tell me what you like or dislike about the podcast.  If you appreciate that this podcast is ad free and would like it to stay that way, please consider supporting it monetarily if you have the means. You can do so by going to my podcast page at anchor.fm/soundbynature and clicking support this podcast, or by clicking the support link at the end of this podcast description. I would very much like to continue to bring you unadulterated natural sounds recorded on location, and I would love to improve the sound quality to bring you quieter, more nuanced soundscapes.  Your support will help me do that. If you don't have the means for monetary support, you can also support the podcast by rating and reviewing it on Itunes, or just by telling a friend who would appreciate it. Thank you for your support, and thank you for for listening! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
37
Deep in the mountains of Northern California, Tom Neal Creek flows down a wild, rugged, densely forested canyon. Edged with moss and ferns, the crystal clear water tumbles over ancient sedimentary rock that form the many small waterfalls and cascades that line its course. I recorded this on a clear winter day beside the creek at a place that I found to have an unusual, albeit pleasing resonance. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
38
Take a deep dive into the ocean this week and learn about the Sea Otter! You all have been BUGGING us to do them so we HOPE it was WORTH the WAIT.   We answer your tantalizing questions like: Do they really hold hands when they sleep? Are they the fluffiest animal in existence? Why are the males insane? What ON EARTH is spraint? Why can't I have an armpit pocket? and Are sea otters basically the dogs of the ocean?
39
Once called the lesser panda, cat-bear, bear-cat, Himalayan raccoon, fox bear or firefox, this week we discuss everything Red Panda. These have to be one of the most adorable carnivores around. Much similar to the Giant Panda, Red Pandas have the bodies of meat eaters but survive on a diet of bamboo. Sadly, Red Pandas are classified as Endangered with possibly as little as 2500 animals left.  For one cup of "good" coffee a month you can support your favorite podcast and give back to conservation. We also offer bonus episodes and supporter only content. We also donate portions of what we raise to a conservation organization each month.  We recently gave money to Global Conservation Force. While you will be supporting free education to the masses, we also will not be offering a post show podcast to Patreon members. Please considering supporting us at Patreon HERE. Thank you from the bottom of our hearts for listening.  Show notes HERE
40
In recent years it has seemed as though doing an ABA Area Big Year means that you have to write a book about it, but the form's roots can be traced to Roger Tory Peterson himself. What makes them so popular? Are they travelogue, sporting conquest, adventure, or some combination? Or is the appeal as simple as wish fulfillment? 10,000 Birds media reviewer Donna Schulman and Birding magazine media review editor Frank Izaguirre join host Nate Swick to talk about Big Year narratives and what makes them great in the first edition of the ABP Birding Book Club.  Also, the USFWS disappoints with new rules for the Duck Stamp.  ABA members are eligible for a 15% discount to Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Birds of the World subscription. Log into your ABA account to get the code.
41
I recorded this episode in the Shasta-Trinity National Forest in Siskiyou County, California on a warm late spring day just after noon as birds sang and thunderclouds drifted by. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/soundbynature/support
42
Rosalind Forbes Adam is the founder and project leader of the Woodmeadow Trust in York, formerly the Hagges Woods Trust. The idea of “raising tomorrow’s ancient woodland” was born from a question all husbands have surely asked their wives at some point - “do you want to make a wood?” The concept of the wood has changed since the idea first emerged. Rather than looking 400 years into the future, the aim now is to address something much more immediate - the catastrophic decline in biodiversity in the UK. In this episode, full of wonderful words of wisdom, find out how Ros hopes to create a link of habitat meadows between the River Ouse and the River Derwent, why wood meadows are not just beautiful, but ecologically practical, and learn how Ros is inspiring others to turn their fields or lawns into similarly “wild” environmental landscapes.For further information on this and other episodes, visit: http://www.treesacrowd.fm/woodmeadow-trust/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.