Top podcast episodes in Daily News

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Harvey Weinstein was found guilty on Monday of two felony sex crimes, and he now faces a possible sentence of between five and 29 years. We asked the reporters who first broke the story about the accusations of sexual misconduct against Mr. Weinstein to explain to us what the jurors in his Manhattan trial were asked to do — and what it means that they did it. Guests: Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, investigative reporters for The New York Times and the authors of “She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Mr. Weinstein was found guilty of two felony sex crimes after a trial at which six women testified that he had sexually assaulted them.Sex crimes are notoriously difficult to litigate, often because the cases are so intricate. But for many, Mr. Weinstein’s trial was a crucial landmark in the effort to hold influential men accountable for sexual misconduct.Mr. Weinstein built a network of complicity that dozens of women say kept them silent for years.
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U.S. intelligence officials have concluded that the Russian government is attempting to interfere in the 2020 presidential race — but it is doing so by supporting two very different candidates. So why is Russia rooting for both President Trump and Senator Bernie Sanders? Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent and a senior writer at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Mr. Sanders was briefed on potential interference, and when details of the attempts emerged, he ratcheted up his attacks on Russia, warning President Vladimir V. Putin to stay out of the presidential election.Intelligence officials warned House lawmakers last week that Russia was interfering in the 2020 campaign to try to get the president re-elected. Mr. Trump was angry the intelligence briefing was held at all.What exactly do intelligence officials mean by “interference”? We don’t know, and officials can’t seem to agree on the scope of the meddling.
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In recent weeks, several of the largest and most profitable American companies have introduced elaborate plans to combat climate change. So why are they doing it now? And just how meaningful are their plans? Guest: Andrew Ross Sorkin, a financial columnist for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Laurence D. Fink, the founder of the world’s largest asset management company, sparked the shift toward climate-focused corporate policies in his annual letter to C.E.O.’s. Here’s what the letter said, and why it matters.Protecting the environment and tackling climate change have climbed the list of Americans’ political priorities this year as economic concerns have faded. But the issue is as partisan as ever.
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On the debate stage in Charleston, candidates went after Senator Bernie Sanders, painting his potential nomination as dangerous for the party and questioning his chances of winning against President Trump. “The Latest,” from the team behind “The Daily,” brings you the most important developments on today’s biggest news stories. You can find more information about it here.
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The World Health Organization is not yet declaring coronavirus a pandemic, despite fears over the virus spreading in new countries. Democratic presidential candidates take the debate stage in South Carolina tonight ahead of primaries in that state on Saturday. President Trump and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi are meeting in New Delhi to discuss trade, amid deadly protests in the Indian capital.
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Note: This episode contains strong language. Senator Bernie Sanders is a staunchly pro-union candidate. But he has found himself mired in an escalating battle over health care with the largest labor union in Nevada. With what some call “the best insurance in America” — the fruit of struggles including a six-year strike — members of the Culinary Workers Union have been reluctant to support Mr. Sanders’s “Medicare for All” plan. We went to Nevada to ask how what is effectively an anti-endorsement of Mr. Sanders from the union’s leaders may affect his support in the state’s caucuses on Saturday. Guests: Jennifer Medina, who is covering the 2020 presidential campaign for The Times traveled to Nevada with Clare Toeniskoetter and Austin Mitchell, producers for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Mr. Sanders, who is betting on the Latino vote to win the nomination, is trying to convince Nevada’s union members his policies are in their best interest. His rivals are trying to capitalize on the fight.The Nevada Democratic Party has been scrambling to put in effect safeguards in its caucuses to avoid the technical issues that created a debacle in Iowa. Here’s how the caucuses will work.
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While there are signs that the coronavirus epidemic in China is slowing down, outbreaks in other parts of the world including Iran, Italy, and South Korea are raising alarm. After Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders' decisive victory in the Nevada Democratic caucuses, Democratic presidential candidates are looking ahead to South Carolina's primary. President Trump visits India and appears at a rally in the Indian state of Gujarat.
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Yesterday on “The Daily,” we heard about the government’s failure to crack down on the explosive growth of child sexual abuse imagery online. In the second half of this series, we look at the role of the nation’s biggest tech companies, and why — despite pleas from victims — the illicit images remain online. Guest: Michael H. Keller, an investigative reporter at the The New York Times, and Gabriel J.X. Dance, an investigations editor for The Times, spoke with the mother and stepfather of a teenager who was sexually abused as a child. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: The tech industry has recently been more diligent in identifying online child sexual abuse imagery, but it has consistently failed to shut it down, a Times investigation found. Facebook accounted for more than 85 percent of the imagery flagged by tech companies last year.Two sisters opened up about their lives after being sexually abused as children. Photos and videos of them online continue to remind them of the horrors they experienced.Here’s the first episode in this two-part series, describing how a finding from a tipster led to The Times’s monthslong investigation of online child abuse imagery.
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Democratic presidential candidates attacked front-runner Senator Bernie Sanders during a chaotic debate in Charleston, South Carolina. NPR asks where voters are on candidates and issues that matter to them with the launch of a new reporting project in advance of the 2020 election. Public health officials warn that a coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. is only a matter of time.
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U.S. officials have warned Sen. Bernie Sanders that Russia is trying to help him win the Democratic nomination. Officials have also said that Russia favors President Trump's re-election. In South Korea, a growing number of COVID-19 infections, about half linked to a controversial church. And in Iran, low voter turnout in the country's parliamentary elections now means that conservatives have virtually no opposition.
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Note: This episode contains descriptions of child sexual abuse. A monthslong New York Times investigation has uncovered a digital underworld of child sexual abuse imagery that is hiding in plain sight. In part one of a two-part series, we look at the almost unfathomable scale of the problem — and just how little is being done to stop it. Guests: Michael H. Keller, an investigative reporter at The New York Times, and Gabriel J.X. Dance, an investigations editor for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Last year, tech companies reported over 45 million online photos and videos of children being sexually abused. Lawmakers foresaw this crisis years ago, but enforcement has fallen short. Our reporters investigated the problem and asked: Can it be stopped?Tech companies detected a surge in online videos of child sexual abuse last year, with encrypted social messaging apps enabling abusers to share images under a cloak of secrecy.Here are six takeaways from The Times’s investigation of the boom in online child sex abuse.
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Last night, the Democratic debate in Nevada revealed more open hostility and made more personal attacks than in any of the previous six debates in the race for the nomination. Today, we explore what these attacks reflect about the state of the Democratic race and the urgency that the candidates are feeling. “The Latest,” from the team behind “The Daily,” brings you the most important developments on today’s biggest news stories. You can find more information about it here.
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Despite being a late entry into the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, Michael R. Bloomberg, the billionaire media tycoon and former mayor of New York City, has surged in the polls and is winning key endorsements before he’s even on the ballot. Today, we explore the hidden infrastructure of influence and persuasion behind his campaign — and the dilemma it poses for Democrats. Guest: Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Who is Mr. Bloomberg? And where does he stand on the key issues?We took a look at how Mr. Bloomberg’s enormous wealth helped build a national political network, and an empire of influence, for his campaign.His run has proved complicated to cover for the media empire he owns.
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Bernie Sanders took Nevada with a landslide coalition so diverse it has left Joe Biden feeling nervous heading into South Carolina. (Transcript here.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Last night seven democratic presidential candidates took the stage in Charleston, South Carolina for the tenth debate of this election cycle and the last one before Super Tuesday. Overall, this one was a mess. We’ll talk you through the big moments, and the ways the candidates tried to define themselves against frontrunner Bernie Sanders.  And in headlines: Bob Iger retires, Trump’s least favorite Supreme Court justices, and the CDC weighs in on coronavirus.
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Disgraced Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein has been convicted on two counts of felony sex crimes. The convictions are the culmination of a month-long trial and testimonies brought by six women.  The Supreme Court added a case to its docket on Monday, which will decide whether it was okay for city officials in Philadelphia to end a foster care contract with Catholic Social Services because the agency said it would not accept applications from same-sex couples.  And in headlines: Trump is big in India, marsquakes, and another coronavirus update.
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Tonight on the Last Word: Global markets plunge over coronavirus fears. Dems prepare for the final debate before Super Tuesday. Also, a New York jury finds Harvey Weinstein guilty of two felony sex crimes. Cecile Richards joins Lawrence to discuss the Weinstein verdict in the era of Donald Trump. Plus, Senate Democrats demand new Russia sanctions over interference in the 2020 election. And Jill Wine-Banks discusses her new memoir titled, “The Watergate Girl.” Jennifer Palmieri, Anand Giridharadas, Molly Crane-Newman, Cynthia Alksne and Rep. Denny Heck also join Lawrence O’Donnell.
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Russian interference in U.S. elections could go from Vlad to worse as President Trump sidelines U.S. intelligence agencies. (Transcript here.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Note: This episode contains strong language in both English and Mandarin. What started as a story about fear of a new and dangerous virus has become a story of fury over the Chinese government’s handling of an epidemic. Today, one of our China correspondents takes us behind the scenes of Beijing’s response to a global outbreak. Guest: Amy Qin, a China correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: President Xi Jinping faces an accelerating health crisis that is also a political one: a profound test of the authoritarian system he has built around himself over the past seven years.China’s leader, who rarely mingles with the public, visited several sites in Beijing and spoke to medical workers in Wuhan via video conferencing.Here are the latest updates on the global outbreak.
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Russia wants to help President Donald Trump win a second term in office. That's what a top intelligence officer reportedly told lawmakers last week. Nevada will hold its Democratic presidential primary on Saturday. State party leaders will use new technology to count the votes. But after the fiasco in Iowa, many observers are concerned. As the nine-year war in Syria continues, Idlib is in the middle of a humanitarian crisis.
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Joanna Slater on President Trump’s visit to India. Fenit Nirappil asks why D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser supports Michael Bloomberg. And NASA mourns the death of Katherine Johnson, a “hidden figure” during the space race.
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Bernie Sanders had a dominating win in the Nevada caucus on Saturday. As of Sunday night, he had captured nearly 47.1 percent of county convention delegates, with former VP Joe Biden in a distant second, followed by Mayor Pete, Senator Warren, and Senator Klobuchar. We discuss the coalition that led Sanders to victory and what to look for in South Carolina. The Wuhan coronavirus is still spreading, having produced its first major outbreak in Italy, along with South Korea and Iran. Just keep washing your hands and reading real verified reporting and you’ll stay healthy and sane.  And in headlines: Florida’s backwards new abortion law, Rihanna’s NAACP speech, and trouble at the Mike Bloomberg status update factory.
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An unprecedented cheating scandal involving the Houston Astros has roiled Major League Baseball. WSJ's Jared Diamond explains how the Astros' sign-stealing scheme began and what it means for America's pastime.
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Since his acquittal in the Senate, President Trump has undertaken a campaign of retribution against those who crossed him during the impeachment inquiry — while extending favors to those who have tried to protect him. Today, we explore what has happened so far in this new phase of his presidency. Guest: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Mr. Trump called those who testified against him in the impeachment “evil,” “corrupt” and “crooked.” After he was acquitted, he began firing witnesses.A handful of senators reached out to the White House to warn the president not to dismiss Gordon D. Sondland, the ambassador to the European Union who testified in the House hearings. Mr. Trump removed him anyway.
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Matt Viser and Lenny Bernstein on the oldest field of presidential candidates, and the new norm around releasing health records. Tracy Jan on James Clyburn’s idea for reparations. And Monica Hesse on Harvey Weinstein’s guilty verdict.
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The drug industry has long been one of the most powerful lobbies in Washington, but in recent years it hasn't packed the punch it used to. WSJ's Brody Mullins explains why the pharmaceutical industry's influence has declined.
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A study at the National Institutes of Health offers a window into some of science’s biggest mysteries, from the origins of pain to how consciousness works. (Transcript here.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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A secretive start-up promising the next generation of facial recognition software has compiled a database of images far bigger than anything ever constructed by the United States government: over three billion, it says. Is this technology a breakthrough for law enforcement — or the end of privacy as we know it? Guest: Annie Brown, a producer on “The Daily,” spoke with Kashmir Hill, a technology reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Federal and state law enforcement officers are using one company’s app to make arrests in 49 states. So what is Clearview AI, and what influence does it hold?Clearview’s app is being used by police to identify victims of child sexual abuse. Some question both the ethics and the accuracy of the results.
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Note: This episode contains descriptions of sexual violence. In the trial of Harvey Weinstein, six women have taken the stand, each making similar accusations of rape and sexual assault against the movie producer. Throughout their testimony, Weinstein’s defense lawyers have portrayed those encounters as consensual and suggested that in many cases it was the women who wanted something from Mr. Weinstein. His lawyers have seized on the fact that the two women whose accounts are at the center of the criminal charges in his New York trial agreed to have sex and friendly contact with Mr. Weinstein after they were allegedly victimized. Today, one of The Times reporters who broke the story of Mr. Weinstein’s alleged abuse more than two years ago speaks with Donna Rotunno, the lawyer behind Mr. Weinstein’s legal strategy. Guests: Megan Twohey, an investigative reporter for The Times and co-author of “She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement," spoke with Donna Rotunno, Harvey Weinstein’s lead defense lawyer. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Long before an avalanche of allegations against Mr. Weinstein set off a global reckoning over sexual harassment, Ms. Rotunno was steadily building a career as a criminal lawyer in Chicago with an unusual specialty: defending men accused of sex crimes.Haven’t been following the trial? Here’s what’s happened so far.
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A.M. Edition for February 25th: The first experimental coronavirus vaccine was sent by Moderna Therapeutics for testing by U.S. regulators - Peter Loftus has more on the novel technology behind it. Plus, Quentin Webb on continued investor angst over efforts to contain the outbreak and Julie Bykowicz with what to watch for in tonight's Democratic debate in South Carolina. Kim Gittleson hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Voters in New Hampshire pride themselves on helping winnow the nomination field. While many polls show Senator Bernie Sanders leading in this year’s primary, the caucus debacle in Iowa meant no single candidate left that first contest with full momentum. We flew from Iowa to New Hampshire, following the campaign trail and talking to voters about whether Democrats who don’t support Sanders are coalescing around another choice. Guests: Lisa Lerer, a reporter at The New York Times, covering campaigns, elections and political power, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Jessica Cheung, producers on “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Mr. Sanders and Mayor Pete Buttigieg, of South Bend, Ind., are hoping to make the race for the nomination a two-person contest.Still, after a voting fiasco in Iowa, it’s possible that five leading candidates will survive beyond New Hampshire.President Trump is coming to New Hampshire, too: He’s scheduled to hold a campaign rally in Manchester tonight and will be on the Republican ballot Tuesday. Here are the latest updates from the state’s last day of primary campaigning.
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Senator Bernie Sanders won New Hampshire’s Democratic primary last night, with Pete Buttigieg and Senator Amy Klobuchar close behind in second and third. After two candidates once considered front-runners, Senator Elizabeth Warren and former Vice President Joe Biden, finished toward the back of the pack, we consider what Mr. Sanders’s win means for the rest of the race for the Democratic nomination. Guest: Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: With his New Hampshire win, Mr. Sanders tightened his grip on the Democratic Party’s liberal wing, benefiting from a field that has divided moderate voters.Here are the full results. Unlike in Iowa, where we have yet to declare an official winner, we can confidently say Mr. Sanders won in New Hampshire in a tight race with Mr. Buttigieg.
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On the Gist, caucuses are bad. In the interview, Mike talks with Touré about why his podcast title, Touré Show, doesn't have a definite article. They discuss Touré's particular interview style, how he would write his Obama-era book on race and Blackness had he written it today during the Trump administration, and his upcoming podcast series on Prince. In the spiel, where the other candidates stand with Bernie before the South Carolina debate.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg didn't exactly get a warm welcome from his rivals on the debate stage. Political operative Roger Stone will be sentenced on Thursday. Will the presiding judge stick with the original sentence? Eleven people are dead after a gunman opened fire in the German town of Hanau. The suspected shooter reportedly left a written confession expressing far-right views.
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An announcement from the CDC sparks even larger concerns about COVID-19. Democrats, in their final debate before South Carolina and Super Tuesday, shift their focus to Bernie Sanders. And President Trump crosses Attorney General William Barr's line in the sand. Like the show? Leave a review: http://bit.ly/ReviewStartHere Follow @StartHereABC for exclusive content, show updates and more: - Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/starthereabc - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/starthereabc - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/starthereabc Discover more ABC News podcasts: http://www.abcnewspodcasts.com Start Here is produced by ABC Audio. For more information: http://www.abcnewspodcasts.com
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P.M. Edition for February 24th: The Dow falls more than 1,000 points amid reports the coronavirus is spreading in more countries outside of Asia. Paul Vigna examines the markets' reaction to the outbreak, and Betsy McKay explains what's being done to contain it. Charlie Turner hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Description: Today on The Daily Beans, we're talking about Harvey Weinstein's conviction, Richard Grenell, the South Carolina primary and a lot more. Become a patron at patreon.com/thedailybeans! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Must feel good to be first. Bernie Sanders has achieved front-runner status in the 2020 Democratic primary. How is that possible after just three states have voted? We’ll explain the money (and delegate) math involved. Then: President Trump wrapped up a quick trip to India to talk trade with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. But the huge welcome party Trump got doesn’t necessarily mean that the US and India are locking down a trade deal anytime soon. Also on the show: a Zamboni driver hits the ice MVP-style.
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P.M. Edition for February 25th: The coronavirus is spreading, and Wall Street Journal reporter Brianna Abbott explains how the U.S. is preparing for it. And the Journal's Laura Kusisto discusses how the Harvey Weinstein verdict could change how we look at sexual-assault cases. Charlie Turner hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Attorney General William Barr has lost the confidence of more than 2,600 former Department of Justice employees. We talked to one of them.  Guest: Donald Ayer, who served in the Department of Justice under George H. W. Bush. Read his piece in the Atlantic, “Bill Barr Must Resign.” Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Victoria's Secret announced yesterday that a private equity firm was buying control of the retailer. The sale caps a long decline for the brand as well as the end of Les Wexner's 57-year run as CEO of its parent company. WSJ's Khadeeja Safdar explains.
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A jury in New York has found Harvey Weinstein guilty of third-degree rape and first-degree criminal sexual assault. He could face more than two decades in prison. We’ll dive into what today’s verdict means, what the jury didn’t convict him on, and what to expect next in the trial that was propelled by the #MeToo movement. Meanwhile: as coronavirus continues to spread, fears are growing that the outbreak is reaching the level of a pandemic. Also on today’s show: we remember NASA mathematician legend Katherine Johnson.
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Global markets tanked yesterday as governments reported startling rises in covid-19 cases. Our correspondents around the world assess countries' differing policies, and the prospects for overcoming the outbreak. There’s chaos and intrigue in Malaysia, where persistent ethnic divides continue to dominate the country’s politics. And why Saturday bus services in Israel are a potent election issue. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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Shane Harris talks about the lingering threat of Russian election interference and how the administration is responding. Abha Bhattarai on a new gimmick from retailers. And Gillian Brockell and Jessica Contrera on the CIA’s rebellious neighbors.
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A.M. Edition for February 26th: In a chaotic and fiery presidential debate, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders was the subject of attacks from Democratic rivals. Ken Thomas has more from South Carolina. Plus, Mike Bird on the key economic indicator that just hit a record low and Jonathan Cheng from Beijing on why the number of new coronavirus cases in China has dramatically slowed. Kim Gittleson hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Enter the Bloomberg! Exit the Bloomberg? (Transcript here.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Tonight on the Last Word: U.S. officials tell Sen. Bernie Sanders that Russia is attempting to help his presidential campaign. Also, Rep. Eric Swalwell talks to Lawrence about why Trump supporters refuse to believe Russia meddled in the 2016 election. Plus, Mike Bloomberg offers to release three women from non-disclosure agreements. And presidential candidate Fmr. Gov. Bill Weld reacts to Intelligence officials telling Congress that Russia is working to re-elect Trump. Joyce Vance, Mieke Eoyang, Rick Stengel, Stephanie Valencia and Ruth Marcus also join Lawrence O’Donnell.
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Congressman Sean Patrick Maloney (D-NY 18) represents a district in the Hudson Valley that was held by a Republican not that long ago. As you may remember from his questioning in the impeachment hearings, he is also a member of the House Intelligence Committee. That means he was in the room last week when the committee was reportedly briefed that Russia is out to help Donald trump win the presidency again. On today's show: Rep. Maloney talks about the firing of the acting Director of National Intelligence, reports of Russian interference in the 2020 campaigns, and explains why he thinks Bernie Sanders could jeopardize the House majority that Democrats won in 2018.
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In the 500th episode of Start Here, Bernie Sanders cruises to what could be a decisive victory in Nevada. President Trump's team gives conflicting accounts of whether Russia is bolstering campaigns. And South Korea becomes the latest country to install sweeping quarantines over fears of COVID-19. Like the show? Leave a review: http://bit.ly/ReviewStartHere Follow @StartHereABC for exclusive content, show updates and more: - Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/starthereabc - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/starthereabc - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/starthereabc Discover more ABC News podcasts: http://www.abcnewspodcasts.com Start Here is produced by ABC Audio. For more information: http://www.abcnewspodcasts.com
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The Democratic presidential candidates keep having the same argument over Medicare-for-all at the televised debates. To spice up the conversation, Vox’s Dylan Scott takes Sean on a journey to Taiwan to explore how the idea works in practice. (Transcript here.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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A.M. Edition for February 24th: Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders won a resounding victory in Nevada's caucuses - Emily Glazer has the key takeaways from the race. Plus, Eric Sylvers on the spread of the coronavirus outbreak to Italy, Mike Bird on the global market reaction to the spread of the virus, and Jason Douglas outside a very noisy London court, where Julian Assange's extradition hearing kicks off. Kim Gittleson hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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President Trump was acquitted by the Senate on Wednesday of both articles of impeachment. While the vote largely fell along party lines, one senator crossed the aisle to vote to convict him. Today, we hear from Senator Mitt Romney about that choice. Guest: Senator Mitt Romney, Republican of Utah, who spoke with Mark Leibovich, the Washington-based chief national correspondent for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: In a speech before voting to convict, Mr. Romney grew emotional as he pronounced the president “guilty of an appalling abuse of public trust.”“I think this is Senator Romney’s moment to shine,” Senator Amy Klobuchar said before the vote, “I hope he can bring some people with him.” Here’s a behind-the-scenes look at Mr. Romney’s isolation in the Senate and the expectations placed on him before his vote.
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Republicans have relied on one organization in particular to help pass conservative laws in states across the country: The American Legislative Exchange Council, or ALEC. The kicker is that ALEC learned its tricks from public-sector unions. Guest: Alex Hertel-Fernandez, Assistant Professor of Political Affairs at Columbia University.  Podcast production by Mary Wilson, Jayson De Leon, Danielle Hewitt, and Mara Silvers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Today on the Daily Beans, we're talking about Roger Stone's re-trial, Trump in India and a lot more. Become a paton at patreon.com/thedailybeans! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On the Gist, Bernie Sanders’ public access past. In the interview, journalist Conor Dougherty is here to talk about his new book Golden Gates: Fighting for Housing in America. They discuss potential solutions to the housing shortage in major cities, why we all flock to large metro hubs, and the difficulty of this problem when looking at people versus numbers. In the spiel, the rumble between the New York Times and West Side Story. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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If it wasn't clear before, Sanders' big win in Nevada suggests that his appeal isn't niche, nor is he too radical to win a broad base of support. Moderates worry about what that means. On today's show: Beth Fouhy, senior politics editor at NBC News and MSNBC, discusses how Sanders won, what that means for the future of the nomination contest, and the future of the Democratic party.
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The National Park Service announced that Yosemite National Park will be closed indefinitely after startled witnesses reportedly spotted a bear on the grounds. A really big bear, too.
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The Boy Scouts of America filed for bankruptcy this week. WSJ's Valerie Bauerlein and Andrew Scurria explain how the organization reached this point, after decades of declining membership and intensifying legal pressure over sex abuse allegations.
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Michael Scherer on the heated Nevada Democratic debate. And John Woodrow Cox and Hannah Natanson talk about how President Trump’s rhetoric has affected bullying in American schools.
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The Nevada caucuses are on Saturday. It’s the third contest in the 2020 Democratic presidential primary and the first where voters of color will have a huge say in the outcome. We tell you everything you need to know about the “Big Bad Battle In The Desert.” Nine people are dead following a shooting at two hookah bars in Germany on Wednesday. It’s the latest in a tragic pattern of white supremacist violence in the country.  And in headlines: Victoria’s Secret goes private, UC Santa Cruz grad students are striking, and Russia is interfering to help Trump (again).
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The coronavirus crisis engulfing China is the biggest political test yet for Xi Jinping. The Guardian’s Lily Kuo looks at how it may become an economic crisis. Plus Michael Safi on a humanitarian breakthrough in the Yemen conflict. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
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President Donald Trump said two Supreme Court justices appointed by Democratic presidents should recuse themselves from cases involving him, apparently because of a recent dissenting opinion written by Justice Sonia Sotomayor. Maya Wiley says, "She's got receipts on this because on the Obama/Bush Administrations combined, this happened about 8 times. And then the Trump Administration in 3 years ... it's already been over a dozen."
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Human rights activists are up in arms after the DOJ announced it would be resuming federal punishments, making it legal to sentence the country’s most naughty felons to a good, hard spanking.
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One coronavirus. Two cruise ships. Lots of mistakes. (Transcript here.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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The US and the Taliban have agreed to a reduction of violence for the next seven days. It’s kinda like a test run to see if they can put down their weapons for good, and possibly end America’s longest war. But there’s still a lot that could get in the way and a long way to go. Meanwhile, Russian election interference is back in the news ahead of this year’s big vote. Also on the show: Nevada is crossing its fingers for a smooth caucus this weekend, and we remember the tech legend who gave us ‘copy and paste.’
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P.M. Edition for February 21st: Philadelphia typically votes heavily for Democrats, but Wall Street Journal reporter Scott Calvert explains why presidential candidates shouldn't take the city of brotherly love for granted. The jury in Harvey Weinstein's criminal trial reaches a decision on some charges but deadlocks on two others. And Wells Fargo will pay $3 billion to settle investigations over its long-running fake-accounts scandal. Janet Babin hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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For now, a “reduction in violence” is holding, and a long-awaited agreement hangs in the balance. But can the Taliban and the country’s government engineer a lasting peace? Brazil’s surfers dominate the sport, but perhaps not for long. And the mismatch between teens’ job desires and their prospects. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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The media’s coverage of the 2016 presidential campaign has come to be criticized for operating under three key assumptions: that Hillary Clinton was certain to be the Democratic nominee, that Donald Trump was unlikely to be the Republican nominee, and that once Clinton and Trump had become their party’s nominees, she would win. With voting for 2020 set to begin in Iowa on Monday, “The Daily” sat down with Dean Baquet, the executive editor of The New York Times, to discuss the lessons he — and the organization — learned from 2016. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: This is our guide to the 2020 election.We’ve sent reporters to every corner of the country and told them not to make any assumptions in this election cycle. Here are some of the most in-depth stories we’ve told in an effort to help the country understand itself.As part of a new approach to election coverage, The Times’s editorial board has re-examined how — and why — it makes presidential endorsements.
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Today on The Daily Beans, we're discussing the 2020 primaries, and we have an interview with Frank Figliuzzi! Become a supporter at patreon.com/thedailybeans! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On the Gist, Russia is at it again. In the interview, Mike chats with historian Alexis Coe, author of the new book You Never Forget Your First: A Biography of George Washington. They discuss the founding-father's height, dentures and that awkward obsession male historians have about the man's thighs. In the spiel, a lobstar of the antentwig. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders has big momentum after a commanding win in Saturday's Nevada caucus.
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Successive governments have overlooked the concerns of indigenous peoples, and that has elevated a small gas-pipeline protest into a national conflagration. We look back on the life and legacy of Hosni Mubarak, Egypt’s longest-serving ruler. And the violent turf war in Sri Lanka—between people and elephants. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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The coronavirus has forced China, the world's second-biggest economy, into lockdown. WSJ's Yoko Kubota explains how that has disrupted businesses around the world, including companies like Disney and Apple.
81
Rahm Emanuel, the former chief of staff to Barack Obama, discusses the possibility of Sanders becoming the Democratic nominee and the reason why other candidates aren�t dropping out of the race just yet. In Hot Topics, the co-hosts discuss if Bernie Sanders' Nevada caucus win is a reckoning for the Democratic candidates, and more.
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On Bernie Sanders, Pete Buttigieg says "I am the only candidate who has beaten him at anything so far in the voting that has gone on this year."
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Tonight on the Last Word: The New York Times and the Washington Post report that Russia is meddling to re-elect Trump. Also, Roger Stone is sentenced to more than 3 years in prison for obstructing the Russia investigation. Plus, Maria Teresa Kumar and Jason Johnson talk to Lawrence about the record viewership for last night’s Democratic debate. And presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren discusses her performance at the debate and reacts to reports that Russia is interfering in the 2020 election. Rep. Jim Himes, Ned Price and Glenn Kirschner also join Lawrence O’Donnell.
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Hours after Iowa kicked off the process to choose President Trump’s 2020 opponent, and just a day before the verdict is expected in his Senate impeachment trial, the president gave his third State of the Union address. Today, we take you to The New York Times’s Washington bureau, where we examined the speech — and the unique moment in which it was delivered. Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Though Mr. Trump didn’t mention impeachment, the process hung over his address, and his refusal to shake Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s hand put the bitterness between them on full display.The speech sounded like a re-election pitch, with the president claiming credit for a “great American comeback.”
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The kickoff to the 2020 voting was undercut Monday night by major delays in the reporting of the Iowa caucus results. We traveled to Johnston, Iowa, to tell the story of the day — from the perspective of one caucus in a middle school gym. Guests: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times and Reid J. Epstein, a political reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: A new system of reporting caucus results led to confusion and few solid numbers — forcing the Iowa Democratic Party to delay the release of results until a winner could be verified later Tuesday.Here’s where you can see live results as they become available.
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With Iowa voters making their choice and the 2020 election getting underway, we’re introducing a new show: one covering the country and its voters in the lead up to Nov. 3. In our first episode of “The Field,” we ask Democratic caucusgoers how they’re feeling about the election. Traveling around the state, we found anxious Iowans asking one question over and over: Who can beat President Trump? Note: This episode contains strong language. Guests: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times, and Austin Mitchell and Andy Mills, producers for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Confused by the Iowa caucuses? Here’s how they work.The New York Times polled 584 Democrats likely to caucus in Iowa. Fifteen of them agreed to talk to us on camera. Here is what they told us.The state with a huge influence in picking presidential candidates doesn’t look much like the country as a whole, except in one very striking way: a rapidly aging population.
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With Sanders now surging to the top of the Democratic presidential field, those three-decade-old impressions on his Cold War travels introduced a volatile new element in the race Monday.
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Colorado has one of the highest rates of officer involved shootings in the country. After looking at the data, two reporters from Colorado Public Radio found that a complex mix of meth addiction, illegal firearms and car thefts are to blame.  Guest: Allison Sherry, Reporter for Colorado Public Radio Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Nearly two decades ago, China was at the heart of a public health crisis over a deadly new virus. It said it had made lifesaving reforms since. So why is the Wuhan coronavirus now spreading so rapidly across the world? Our correspondent went to the center of the outbreak to find out. Guest: Javier C. Hernández, a New York Times correspondent based in Beijing. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: What is the coronavirus? And why is China struggling to control its spread around the world?Unless you are at high risk for catching the disease, it may be a good idea to avoid buying a face mask. There is now a shortage of masks, leaving health care workers unprotected and expediting the spread of the disease.
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After a night of chaos and confusion at the Iowa caucuses, and nearly a full day since the results were initially expected, the state’s Democratic Party has announced only partial numbers, from 62 percent of precincts. We look at what the debacle in Iowa will mean for the results — when they’re finally released. “The Latest,” from the team behind “The Daily,” brings you the most important developments on today’s biggest news stories. You can find more information about it here.
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Hannah Dreier on how the government is using therapists’ notes to keep young immigrants detained. Damian Paletta explains how the coronavirus is affecting the global economy. And Ishaan Tharoor on why the “Nordic model” could be the American Dream.
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Harvey Weinstein accuser Mimi Haley and her lawyer, Gloria Allred, discuss the disgraced movie mogul�s conviction. Then, Shark Tank investors Mark Cuban and Kevin O'Leary share their take on the Democratic candidates. In Hot Topics, the co-hosts co-hosts react to the backlash Bernie Sanders received over an apparent defense of parts of Fidel Castro�s dictatorial reign in Cuba.
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In a moment of national insecurity, with the future of the United Kingdom seemingly hanging in the balance, a new royal couple offered the vision of a unified, progressive future. But the same forces that pushed for Britain to leave the European Union have now pushed Harry and Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, to leave the country. Guest: Mark Landler, the London bureau chief of The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: A wish to carve out more “progressive” roles has led to the loss of perks, privileges and titles — a more thorough break than the Duke and Duchess of Sussex seem to have expected.The couple’s push for greater independence has resurfaced the same questions that animated the Brexit debate.Black Britons expressed support for Harry and Meghan. “Thank God they are free,” one Londoner said. “All of this is about her race. I know it because as a Caribbean woman who did not grow up here, I have experienced it myself.”
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Six presidential candidates took the stage in Las Vegas last night for the last debate before the Nevada Caucuses on Saturday. And folks: it was a street fight. We discuss how Bloomberg fared on his first time out (spoiler alert: not well) and some extremely tense moments between our beloved midwesterners.  And in headlines: hat birds are back, My Own Private Greater Idaho, and California to apologize for the internment of Japanese Americans.
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It’s the latest attempt to cut down on online abuse among middle and high schoolers. But will it work?
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Across the United States, parents and school districts have been wrestling with the question of whether the country’s most popular and profitable sport is too dangerous for children. Today, we explore how that dispute is playing out in one Texas town. Guests: Ken Belson, who covers the N.F.L. for The New York Times, spoke with Jim Harris and Spencer Taylor in Marshall, Texas. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Repeated blows to the head while playing football have been linked to a degenerative brain disease called C.T.E.Football is a powerful, cultural force in Marshall, a city of about 24,000 people in East Texas. But residents, coaches and educators have questioned the safety of a sport they cannot imagine living without.
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On the Gist, stop the racism. In the interview, Mike talks about the democrats with director of the Center on American Politics at the University of Denver Seth Masket. They discuss the way the debate went, and what could happen at the convention with all the delegates so spread out. In the spiel, what Bloomberg could’ve said.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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A new investigation reveals what you may have suspected: dating apps can be very dangerous. But there are safer ways to look for love online.(Transcript here.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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In the wake of an important Nevada union's decision not to endorse any candidate because of their concerns over the health care proposals across the board, a subset of Sanders voters reportedly took to social media to harass and harangue the union. On today's show: Jane McAlevey, labor and environmental organizer, post doctoral fellow in the Labor and Worklife Program at Harvard Law School and the author of A Collective Bargain: Unions, Organizing, and the Fight for Democracy, discusses how the candidates are courting organized labor, and how unions' political capital could play in the primary and general elections.
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After years of controversial content moderation decisions, from deepfakes to deplatforming, Facebook is trying something new. In January, the social network announced that its new Oversight Board, which will act as a sort of supreme court for controversial content, will begin hearing cases this summer. Could this independent board change the way we govern speech online? Guest: Kate Klonick, assistant professor at St. John’s University School of Law, and fellow at the Information Society Project at Yale.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
102
The Rise and Fall of WeWork is a stunning story of hope and hubris. WeWork was the poster child for a new economy. Its founders wanted to revolutionize everything about the way people lived their lives. Its charismatic founder Adam Neumann had an intoxicating vision for the company - but did it ever match the reality? Subscribe today: wondery.fm/wecrashedmaddow
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U.S. officials have warned Sen. Bernie Sanders that Russia is trying to help him win the Democratic nomination. Officials have also said that Russia favors President Trump's re-election. In South Korea, a growing number of COVID-19 infections, about half linked to a controversial church. And in Iran, low voter turnout in the country's parliamentary elections now means that conservatives have virtually no opposition.
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Three Rust Belt swing states are critical to winning the presidency this year — Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania. In Pennsylvania, there is one issue that could be decisive: fracking natural gas. Opposition to fracking could be fatal for a candidate in the state, yet front-runners for the Democratic nomination have committed to banning fracking nationwide if elected. We went to western Pennsylvania, where fracking affects residents daily, to see whether electability in the state could really be reduced to this single issue. Guests: Shane Goldmacher, a national political reporter for The New York Times, traveled to Pennsylvania with Andy Mills and Monika Evstatieva, producers for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Our investigative team revealed how immense amounts of methane, the primary gas acquired by fracking, are escaping from oil and gas sites nationwide, worsening global warming.What is fracking? And why is it so harmful to the communities that come in contact with the toxins it leaves behind?
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Join Jim and Greg as they tackle a wide variety of martinis today.  First, they are gratified to see a sexual predator like Harvey Weinstein headed to prison for rape and sexual assault although they're disappointed to see him acquitted on the most serious charges.  They also cringe as the spread of coronavirus in South Korea, China, and Italy send global markets sharply lower.  And they shake their heads as they walk through all the massive tax hikes Bernie Sanders wants to inflict in order to pay for has laundry list of new entitlement programs. And they preview what should be a feisty debate among the Democrats in South Carolina tonight.
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Bernie Sanders has seized a commanding position in the Democratic presidential race, building a diverse coalition that is driving his liberal movement toward the cusp of taking over the party.
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Nondisclosure agreements were a big talker at last night’s democratic presidential debate. We’ll dive into what former New York City mayor Mike Bloomberg had to say, and talk to former Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson about ongoing efforts to curtail the practice of mandatory NDAs at the office. Meanwhile: President Trump’s longtime advisor Roger Stone was sentenced to over three years in prison today. But Trump’s recent ‘big pardon energy’  could mean that this prison sentence doesn’t mean prison time. Also on the show: the Trump Administration wants Americans step up their stock investment game, and why snapping shrimp are signaling a big problem in the ocean.
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Carla DiBello used to be a reality TV producer in Los Angeles. Now, she's riding mega-yachts and attending business meetings with the world's richest people and is a direct conduit to one of the world's most influential investors: The Saudi Sovereign Wealth Fund. WSJ's Justin Scheck details her rise to prominence.
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Manchester City’s fortunes changed dramatically with the takeover by Sheikh Mansour of Abu Dhabi. But after years of success, Europe’s governing body has banned the club from its most prestigious tournament, the Champions League. David Conn explains why. Plus: Alok Jha on the ethics of gene editing. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
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The news to know for Tuesday, February 25th, 2020! What to know today about the outcome of the Harvey Weinstein trial, why the Dow took a nosedive yesterday, and a major step toward a coronavirus vaccine... Plus: we're talking NASA, New Orleans and Netflix. Those stories and more in less than 10 minutes! Head to www.TheNewsWorthy.com under the section titled 'Episodes' to read more about any of the stories mentioned or see sources below... This episode is brought to you by www.NativeDeodorant.com. Use the code 'newsworthy' for a special offer. Thanks to The NewsWorthy INSIDERS for your support! Become one here: www.theNewsWorthy.com/insider      Sources: Harvey Weinstein Guilty:  CNN, FOX News, NYT, THR Dow Nosedive: WSJ, AP, USA Today, CNBC COVID-19 Vaccine: WSJ President Trump in India: ABC News, Bloomberg Kobe Bryant Memorial: LA Times, CBS Sports, ESPN Lawsuit Filed: AP, CBS News Midwest Winter Storm: USA Today, ABC News, AccuWeather Mardi Gras: CNN, Mardi Gras Barrier-Breaking Mathematician Dies: NBC News, NYT NASA Detects Marsquakes: CNN, The Verge Uber Ads on Cars: Ad Week, Engadget Netflix Top 10: Variety, Cnet Free Pancakes: USA Today
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In this, the 500th episode of your favorite daily news podcast, Vox’s Andrew Prokop explains why the sentencing of Roger Stone has thrown the United States Department of Justice into disarray. (Transcript here.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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The 10-year Treasury yield briefly falls below its record closing level. HHS Secretary Alex Azar appears at four congressional hearings this week. The race is on for a COVID-19 vaccine.
113
On the Gist, birtherism and deatherism. In the interview, Mike chats with Daily Beast reporters, Lachlan Markay and Asawin Suebsang about their new book, Sinking in the Swamp: How Trump's Minions and Misfits Poisoned Washington. They discuss how they used their so-called "omni-shambles beat" to write the book and why there is nothing tempered about Trump's administration. In the spiel, visiting Ye Olde Bloomberg Soundbite Shoppe. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Today is Tuesday, February 25, and we’re looking at Boy Scouts of America vs. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.
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The Obama coalition has become almost mythic within the Democratic Party for having united first-time voters, people of color and moderates to win the presidency in 2008. This year, Senator Bernie Sanders is betting that he can win with the support of young voters and people of color — but without the moderates. To do that, he’s counting on winning over and energizing the Latino vote. The ultimate test of whether he will be able to do that is in California, where Latinos are the single biggest nonwhite voting bloc. While young Latinos in California overwhelmingly support Mr. Sanders, to become the Democratic nominee, he will need the support of their parents and grandparents as well. Guests: Jennifer Medina, a national political correspondent who is covering the 2020 presidential campaign for The New York Times, traveled to California with Jessica Cheung and Monika Evstatieva, producers on “The Daily,” to speak with Latino voters. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Though Mr. Sanders is a 78-year-old white senator from Vermont, in California, some Latino supporters are calling him “Tío Bernie,” as if he were an uncle or a family friend.Mr. Sanders and Senator Elizabeth Warren, the two leading progressive candidates, sparred publicly in the last debate.
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With Delhi rocked by deadly protests as Muslim and Hindu groups clash violently, Guardian writer Samanth Subramanian looks at the rise of Hindu nationalism within India. And: Daniel Boffey on the EU’s negotiating position with the UK. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
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The news to know for Wednesday, February 26th, 2020! What to know today about a new warning from federal health officials and what they say America needs to do when it comes to the coronavirus disease. Also, learn a few takeaways from last night's heated Democratic debate... Plus: a surprise shakeup at Disney, Amazon's first-of-its-kind grocery store, and why the JIF vs. GIF debate is trending again. Those stories and more -- in less than 10 minutes! Award-winning broadcast journalist and former TV news reporter Erica Mandy breaks it all down for you.  Head to www.theNewsWorthy.com to read more about any of the stories mentioned under the section titled 'Episodes' or see sources below... This episode is brought to you by www.NativeDeodorant.com.  *Use the code 'newsworthy' for a special offer. And thanks to our NewsWorthy Insiders! www.theNewsWorthy.com/insider      Sources: Coronavirus Warning for U.S.: AP, ABC News, NYT Dem Debate Takeaways: Politico, AP, NYT, USA Today, WSJ Violence In India: Reuters, CNN, Washington Post Bob Iger Steps Down: CNBC, LA Times  First Cashierless Grocery Stores: TechCrunch, WSJ, Business Insider  ‘GIF’ vs. ‘JIF’: The Verge, Today Golden Shamrock Shake Auction: USA Today, CNN Ash Wednesday: Fox News, Independent Work Wednesday: The Atlantic, Buildings, Popsugar   
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In a 51-to-49 vote, Republicans shut down an effort by Democrats to bring new witnesses and documents into the Senate impeachment trial. As they cleared a path toward acquittal, some Republicans stepped forward to explain why they voted as they did — even though they believed what President Trump did was wrong. “The Latest” is a series on the impeachment process, from the team behind “The Daily.” You can find more information about it here.
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Michael Kranish reports on Mike Bloomberg’s alleged history of sexism and profane comments about women. And Travis DeShong describes a new kind of card game meant to make even people at dinner parties more vulnerable.
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U.S. stock index futures steady after Monday meltdown. The consequences of campaign fundraising. A window into the world of car insurance pricing.
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A.M. Edition for Friday, February 21st: A new Wall Street Journal/NBC News poll finds Democratic presidential candidates would do well to boost their support among African-American voters. The Wall Street Journal's Josh Jamerson fills us in. Plus, E*Trade's stock pops after it finds a buyer. More from WSJ's Paul Vigna. Charlie Turner hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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In a bid to unite a fractious populace, hardliners barred half of the parliamentary candidates; by silencing moderates, the plan will suppress turnout and deepen the disquiet. We take a look at the rise, fall and this week’s pardon of the “junk-bond king” Michael Milken. And why so few Japanese people use their widely welcomed passports. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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President Trump went on a pardoning spree on Tuesday, giving commutations or pardon to 11 individuals convicted of white-collar crime. To make his picks, he took “recommendations” from Rudy Giuliani.  Employees at Kickstarter voted to unionize yesterday, making it the first large-scale union at a well-known tech company. We discuss the ‘state of the unions’ in the world of tech.  And in headlines: Boy Scouts of America scores its “Chapter 11 badge,” Harvard students call for prison divestment, and a preview of tonight’s Democratic debate.
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A firsthand account by John R. Bolton, the former national security adviser, directly linked President Trump to a quid pro quo in the Ukraine affair, undercutting a central plank of the defense’s argument. What could that mean for the final phase of the impeachment trial? Guests: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House and Michael S. Schmidt, who covers national security and federal investigations for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: A Times investigation revealed that Mr. Bolton privately expressed concern to the attorney general last year that the president was effectively granting personal favors to autocratic leaders around the world.Republican senators had been ready to swiftly acquit President Trump. But Mr. Bolton’s revelations in the manuscript of his new book could change the calculus.
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Like 2016, Russia is again working to tip the election in Trump's favor. One of the top brass of the Intelligence Community was just ousted by an irate President after warning Congress. On today's show: Domenico Montanaro, NPR's senior political editor and correspondent, discusses recent reports that the firing of acting DNI Joseph McGuire was related to his staff briefing Congress on a major election security issue ahead of the 2020 presidential contest. 
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The New York Times reports that Trump didn’t want Congress briefed on Russia supporting his re-election. Steve Schmidt says, "What this is is an attack on the USA by a hostile foreign power, an attack on our elections ... is tantamount to an act of war and to see the president complicit with it, is as grave as abuse of power coming out of 1600 Pennsylvania Ave."
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Steamy love letters. Jazz. Scandal. Psychics. Newspapers. The Hope Diamond. In this Presidents’ Day special from Post Reports, we revisit an episode of The Post’s “Presidential” podcast with host Lillian Cunningham.
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Today, we sit down with Senator Chuck Schumer, the minority leader, to discuss what it’s like to be the leader of a party out of power at this moment in the impeachment trial of President Trump. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Look, is it an uphill fight? Yes.” he said. “Are we making progress? Yes.” Why Mr. Schumer believes he can persuade his Republican colleagues to allow new witnesses in the trial.Here are the latest updates on impeachment, including the Senate’s response to a Times investigation revealing new claims about the president’s conduct from his former national security adviser John Bolton.
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The Lord God, Maker of Heaven and Earth, was rushed into emergency surgery after accidentally shooting Himself while cleaning His gun. Hear what doctors have to say about His chances of recovery.
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This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since they appeared. Today, we introduce Ella Maners, 9, from our kids’ episode on facing fears, to Barbara Greenman, 70, who heard Ella’s story and felt compelled to reach out. Guests: Julia Longoria and Bianca Giaever, producers for “The Daily”; Ella and her mother, Katie Maners; and Ms. Greenman, a listener who used Ella’s tips to confront her own fears. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:Ella’s fears of sickness and tornadoes were taking over her life — until she went to summer camp. How the University of Florida is helping children learn to deal with obsessive-compulsive and anxiety disorders.
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What Harvey Weinstein's Rape Conviction Means for the #MeToo Movement Weinstein’s case has become synonymous with the #MeToo era. Yesterday’s verdict is a historic moment for the women at the center of this trial and survivors everywhere. Guns and Domestic Violence: Lisette Johnson's Testimony Lisette Johnson was shot four times by her husband in 2009 and survived, and has since become an advocate for victims and survivors of domestic violence.  Remembering the First Civil Rights Era Sit-in in Alabama The Takeaway speaks with St. John Dixon, who took part in the first sit-in against segregation in the state of Alabama on February 25, 1960. Appalachia Grapples with Extreme Flooding The region is also still recovering from some of the worst flooding on record from 2016. 
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Today on The Daily Beans, we're discussing the Las Vegas debate, Roger Stone's sentencing, and the apparent pardon offered to Julian Assange. Keep the beans coming for as little $3 per month: patreon.com/thedailybeans Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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President Trump pushes out the nation's top intelligence official, after Democrats were included in a crucial Russia briefing. Roger Stone is sentenced to 40 months, but could still receive a pardon. And the nation's biggest lingerie company sees a shakeup in the wake of Jeffrey Epstein. Like the show? Leave a review: http://bit.ly/ReviewStartHere Follow @StartHereABC for exclusive content, show updates and more: - Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/starthereabc - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/starthereabc - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/starthereabc Discover more ABC News podcasts: http://www.abcnewspodcasts.com Start Here is produced by ABC Audio. For more information: http://www.abcnewspodcasts.com
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Trump Administration Targets U.S. Intelligence Community Last week, President Donald Trump announced Richard Grenell, the U.S. ambassador to Germany, as the acting director of national intelligence.  Census 2020: Making Latino Communities Heard in Texas Texas lawmakers declined to fund census outreach efforts in their state, which could lead to an undercount in 2020, particularly among Latino communities. Guns and Domestic Violence: Overview In the United States, domestic violence incidents involving guns are on the rise, and women are especially vulnerable. Can Baseball Survive This Cheating Scandal? The Houston Astros were caught using cameras to read opposing teams' signs to give their hitters an advantage.
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Bernie Sanders racks up another victory and establishment Democrats have basically concluded there may be no stopping him. The hysteria is – depending on your point of view – hilarious or alarming. President Trump heads to India and receives a mind-blowing international welcome. Stigall talks with White House Deputy Communications Director Adam Kennedy about the trip, the state of the 2020 race, Coronavirus, SCOTUS, and more.
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If you’ve been campaigning and a public figure long enough, then decide you’d like to assume the highest office in the land – eventually your words come back to haunt you. Plus, an interesting peak behind the curtain of the Democrat’s fear of Bernie as Stigall parses Rahm Emmanuel’s visit with Stephen Colbert on the Late Show.
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Start your week with the Three Martini Lunch as we dissect the good, the bad, and the crazy concerning the Nevada Democratic Caucuses. Join Jim and Greg as they experience more than a little bit of schadenfreude as Democrats thoroughly freak out over Bernie Sanders dominating the vote on Saturday. But they get more serious as '60 Minutes' and even CNN remind everyone how radical Sanders is and how he praised Fidel Castro and Marxists in Nicaragua and the Soviet Union. And they unload on Nevada Democrats for running terrible caucuses plagued by having too few officials to run some precincts effectively and still not finishing the vote totals by Monday morning.
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Former California Congresswoman Katie Hall discusses the risk of taking on a relationship with one of her staffers and her decision to resign from Congress. Then, 16-year-old actress Storm Reid explains how she did fight scenes for The Invisible Man and why she decided to become an actress at such a young age. In Hot Topics, the co-hosts and guest co-host Michael Eric Dyson react to President Trump replacing the head of national intelligence after a briefing on Russian interference in the 2020 election, and more.
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In the question-and-answer stage of the Senate impeachment trial, Alan Dershowitz, the celebrity lawyer on President Trump’s legal team, made an argument that stunned many who heard it. Say that Mr. Trump did extend a quid pro quo to Ukraine, and that he did it to improve his own re-election prospects. Says Mr. Dershowitz: What’s wrong with that? “The Latest” is a new series on the impeachment inquiry, from the team behind “The Daily.” You can find more information about it here.
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In Part 3 of our series on pivotal moments in the lives of the 2020 Democratic presidential contenders, we spoke with Elizabeth Warren about how she came to be known as the blow-it-up candidate. With help from Andrew Ross Sorkin, a financial columnist at The Times and founder of DealBook, Harry Reid, a former Senate majority leader, and David Axelrod, a former Obama adviser, we explore Ms. Warren’s rise to prominence as an advocate for overhauling the financial system — and how that rise helps us understand her run for president now. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:The New York Times Magazine spoke to Ms. Warren in June, discussing the double standards that can confront professional women — and female presidential candidates.Ms. Warren has lots of plans. Together, they would remake the economy.We asked 21 candidates the same 18 questions. Hear Ms. Warren’s answers.
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This is Coronavirus 4-1-1. The latest Coronavirus info for Tuesday February 25th, 2020. The White House requests $1.25 billion from congress to fight the virus. As the repatriated citizens from the Diamond Princess are added to the list, the number of U.S. cases jumps to 53, according to ABC News. However, 6 of those patients have recovered notes NBC News including 2 in Illinois, 2 in California, 1 in Arizona and 1 in Washington State. The New York Times reports the Deputy Health Minister in Iran has tested positive for COVID-19 as numbers continue to grow there. Iran has 95 confirmed cases with 15 deaths. The Times also reports that a hotel on the Spanish resort island of Tenerife has a reported case and guests are being told to stay in their rooms. There are about 1000 guests booked in the hotel. Austria and Croatia confirm their first cases according to The Guardian. Global case totals as reported by CNBC show 80,200 cases with 2,704 deaths. The locations of U.S. and country diagnoses in a moment. There have been 53 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the U.S. This includes 39 “repatriated” individuals including those passengers infected on the Diamond Princess and 14 U.S. cases. Of those 53, 6 have recovered and those patients removed from the following list. Known active locations are as follows: California: 1 in Humboldt County 2 in San Benito County, 1 in Santa Clara County, 2 in San Diego County, 1 in Los Angeles County 1 in Orange County. Massachusetts: 1 in Suffolk County Nebraska: 12 in Douglas County Texas: 6 in Bexar County Wisconsin: 1 in Dane County
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TOP FBI Agent Spills the Beans on Working For Andrew McCabe and the Culture of Corruption Inside the Bureau -- FULL INTERVIEW -- Support our efforts here: www.patreon.com/truepundit
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P.M. Edition for February 20th: President Trump isn't pardoning longtime ally Roger Stone - at least not yet. Aruna Viswanantha has the details. Plus, Wednesday's deadly shootings in Germany are fueling a tense political debate over the rise of far-right extremism. Bojan Pancevsky reports from Berlin. Annmarie Fertoli hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Billionaire Michael Bloomberg has hugely outspent all other Democratic presidential candidates. His campaign is focusing its resources on Super Tuesday on March 3. WSJ's Tarini Parti and Michael Howard Saul look at whether his high-spending tactics could work.
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Today is Monday, February 24, 2020, and we’re looking at Brandless vs. Amazon.
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This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. Today, we talk to our critic about his reckoning with abuse allegations against Michael Jackson and his efforts to abstain from the pop star’s music. Ten months later, he shares why he still has a Shazam feed full of Jackson’s hits — and reflects on what the ubiquity Jackson’s music in public reveals about our society. Guest: Wesley Morris, a critic at large for The Times and a host of the podcast “Still Processing.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background coverage:Read Wesley Morris’s piece about confronting his own fandom in the face of the allegations made against Michael Jackson in “Leaving Neverland,” an HBO documentary.We look at Jackson’s history of sexual abuse accusations, and answer some questions about why child abuse victims often take years to come forward.A musical about the pop star’s life is set to open in New York next summer. Because of Jackson’s fierce fan base, the show’s producers are confident tickets will sell.Listen to the hosts of “Still Processing” discuss how to respond to a problematic artist whose influence has so thoroughly permeated modern culture.
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From the BBC World Service… Global markets recover slightly after Monday’s big losses. The race for a COVID-19 vaccine. President Trump promises comprehensive trade deal with India.
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Lawmakers Say Education Budget Lacks Clarity Lawmakers should reject many of the education spending proposals in the governor’s budget. That's the recommendation that’s out from the Legislative Analyst's Office, which advises the state legislature on fiscal and policy issues. Reporter: Vanessa Rancaño, KQED New Union Rules Aim To Protect Women From Sexual Abuse Film producer Harvey Weinstein could go to prison for more than twenty years after a jury in New York found him guilty him of rape and sexual assault yesterday. As Hollywood works to shift its culture, one union has implemented standards directly inspired by Weinstein. Reporter: Mary Franklin Harvin, KQED Julian Castro Campaigns For Warren In Fresno Once a political afterthought in national campaigns, California’s Central Valley has become an important stop for candidates vying for the presidency. Supporters of Elizabeth Warren gathered in Fresno to hear from someone who used to be her competitor. Reporter: Lauren Tsutsui, Valley Public Radio Women Of Color Mobilize Their Power At The Polls Voters of color flexed their muscle in Nevada over the weekend, propelling Senator Bernie Sanders to a decisive victory. Advocates say the outcome shows women of color could be a potent force for Democrats hoping to beat President Trump in November. Reporter: Marisa Lagos, KQED
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He built a career, and a presidential campaign, on a belief in bipartisanship. Now, critics of the candidate ask: Is political consensus a dangerous compromise?  In Part 4 of our series on pivotal moments in the lives of the 2020 Democratic presidential contenders, we examine the long Senate career, and legislative legacy, of former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:Mr. Biden now plays down his role overhauling crime laws with segregationist senators in the 1980s and ’90s. In an investigation, our reporter found that the portrayal is at odds with his actions and rhetoric back then.The former vice president and current Democratic front-runner wants to unite the country in a divisive time. Here’s more on what Mr. Biden stands for.This Supreme Court battle explains why Mr. Biden firmly believes in bipartisanship.
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A fresh wave of selling pressure rippled across global markets on Tuesday as public health officials warned Americans to prepare for the spread of the coronavirus, Bob Iger has stepped down as chief executive of Walt Disney a year after extending his contract, and Virgin Galactic shares fall after the space tourism company reports that losses widened in the fourth quarter. Plus, there has been a wave of leadership change at European banks in the past few months. The FT’s David Crow explains why the lenders are scrambling to find a new generation of chief executives. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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Today is Wednesday, February 26, and we’re looking at Victoria’s Secret vs. ThirdLove.
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Yesterday on “The Daily,” we heard the story of Lucia Evans, whose allegation of sexual violence against Harvey Weinstein helped launch his criminal trial in New York. After Ms. Evans was dropped from the case, questions were raised about how a man accused of sexual misconduct by more than 80 women could end up facing so few of them in court. In the second half of this series, what happened next in the case against Harvey Weinstein. Guests: Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, investigative reporters for The New York Times and the authors of “She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  This episode contains descriptions of sexual violence.  Background reading:Mr. Weinstein built a network of complicity that dozens of women say kept them silent for years. Opening statements in the trial have yet to be made, as this week has focused on jury selection and clashes over the rules of decorum in court.
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Runners wearing versions of Nike's Vaporfly shoe have smashed marathon records, leading to questions about whether the shoe offers an unfair advantage. WSJ's Rachel Bachman explains the controversy.
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The Clinton's CON Hundreds of MILLIONS From BILL GATES, But As Tech Pioneer Fumes at Bill & Hillary -- and the FBI Probes the Charity Swindle -- the DOJ Swoops In to Protect the First Family's Crime Cartel from Prosecution.; DHS Whistleblower Gunned Down; Plus Much More -- Press the Magic Button to hear the Truth. Support us here: www.patreon.com/truepundit
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As President Trump’s impeachment trial resumes this afternoon, we look back two decades to a time when Google was in its infancy, Y2K was stoking anxiety and partisanship in Congress was not quite so entrenched. That year, 1999, was the last time the Senate considered whether a president had committed high crimes and misdemeanors. So what has changed since the Senate trial of President Bill Clinton, and why is this impeachment such a different story? Guest: Peter Baker, chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Four journalists at The Times tell their stories of covering the last impeachment trial.Senator Mitch McConnell, the Republican majority leader, announced rules to try to implement a speedy trial. Here’s how the framework differs from the Clinton precedent.
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Bahrain, Kuwait and Afghanistan report first-time infections, while South Korea and Italy see sharp increases in cases. Lowe’s and Home Depot will be releasing their quarterly earnings. SCOTUS hears a case over the contested $8-billion Atlantic Coast Pipeline.
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New Hampshire felt the Bern. (Transcript here.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Global stocks had their worst day in two years on Monday as new coronavirus cases outside China dashed hopes that the outbreak had been contained, US energy stocks are now underperforming the main US stock market index by the biggest margin since 1941, disgraced film producer Harvey Weinstein was found guilty by a jury in New York of sex crimes including rape, and HP announced a $16bn buyback plan as it claims to be engaging with printer rival Xerox in deal talks. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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The news to know for Monday, February 24th, 2020! What to know today about the clear front-runner in the race for the Democratic pick for president, which country President Trump is in this week (and why), and what to expect at Kobe Bryant's public memorial today... Plus: another major first for artificial intelligence, why Lyft cars could look more like taxis soon, and a Friends reunion with Ross, Rachel and the rest of the crew is happening. Those stories and more -- in less than 10 minutes! Award-winning broadcast journalist and former TV news reporter Erica Mandy breaks it all down for you.  This episode is brought to you by www.NativeDeodorant.com - and by Empower.me/newsworthy.  *Use the code 'newsworthy' for special offers. Thanks to the NewsWorthy INSIDERS for the support! Learn more or become an INSIDER here: www.theNewsWorthy.com/insider     Sources: Nevada Caucus Results: AP, NYT, WaPo President Trump in India: Fox News, LA Times Coronavirus Impact to South Korea, Italy: WaPo, NYT, BBC, WSJ, NBC News RIP B. Smith: USA Today, ABC News, Variety Kobe Bryant Memorial: NBC News, USA Today Fury vs. Wilder: ESPN, CBS Sports  AI-Discovered Antibiotic: FT, BBC, Engadget  Trump Ads on YouTube: Bloomberg, TechCrunch, The Hill, NPR Lyft Cartop Ads: Axios, Engadget NAACP Image Awards: THR,  Friends Reunion: The Hollywood Reporter, People Box Office: Variety, Deadline, AP Money Monday - Business Insider, CNBC, Quartz  
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On the Gist, critiquing Bloomberg critiques. In the interview, we’ve got the second part of our conversation with journalist Andrea Bernstein on her new book, American Oligarchs: The Kushners, The Trumps, and the Marriage of Money and Power. She and Mike went deep on Trump the first part, and now they’re digging into Michael Cohen and the Kushners. In the spiel, Trump’s pardons. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Medicare for All is likely to come up in tonight’s big Democratic primary debate in Las Vegas. But Nevada’s powerful Culinary Union fought hard for its members to enjoy a top-notch private health care plan, and they’re resisting change. We’ll dive into the drama between the union and candidates pushing Medicare for All. Meanwhile, the coronavirus outbreak has led to travel restrictions for nearly half of China’s population, which means that a lot of people aren’t making it to the many manufacturing companies that support the global supply chain. Also on the show: a pro-tip from Love Wellness founder and CEO Lo Bosworth.
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Our first episode of 2019 opened the year with a question: “What will Democrats do with their new power?” One of our last offered the answer: “Impeach the president.” This audio time capsule captures the weeks in between — a crescendo of controversy and culture wars to wrap up the decade. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Here’s some nostalgia as we head into 2020:Our photo editors pored over ten years of images to bring you: The decade in pictures.And if you’re looking for a longer read over the holidays, check out our editors’ picks for the 10 best books of 2019.
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Early Voting In Begins In L.A. County...Mostly In L.A. County how and where people vote is new this election cycle. Instead of voting at neighborhood polling places on a single day, people can now cast their ballots over an 11 day period at newly established “voting centers," where old fashioned paper and ink voting machines have been replaced with computerized touch screen devices. According to reports voting generally went pretty well but there were exceptions. Reporter: Saul Gonzalez, KQED 'Public Charge' Rule Breeds Anxiety In Immigrant Communities A federal rule that would penalize some green card and visa applicants for using federal public services like food stamps goes into effect today. The rule has already had a chilling effect on many immigrant communities. Reporter: Michelle Wiley, KQED Controversial Immigration Detention Center Adds 750 Beds Over the objection of critics last week, the planning commission in the High Desert community of Adelanto approved a 750 bed expansion to a controversial immigration detention center. The center is operated by a private prison company and has been criticized by the Department of Homeland Security. Reporter, Benjamin Purpur, KVCR Coronavirus Patients In Limbo After Costa Mesa Facility Says No A federal court is set to discuss what to do about 50 people who've tested positive for the new coronavirus, after temporarily blocking their transfer from Travis Air Force base to a location in Southern California. Reporter: Sarah Hossaini, KQED  Lawmakers Call For $2 Billion To Fight Homelessness A group of state lawmakers from Southern California, the Bay Area, and the Central Valley are coming together on a bill to dedicate funding to homeless services. It’s an attempt to identify ongoing funding, which Governor Gavin Newsom says is crucial if California wants to see fewer people homeless. Reporter: Erika Aguilar, KQED SF Taxi Driver Losing Teeth Over Medallion Debt A San Francisco taxi medallion, which allows drivers to operate a cab, costs a quarter of a million dollars. San Francisco has made an estimated 64 million dollars off the medallions, but many taxi drivers have wound up in crushing debt. One driver is losing his teeth because he's so stressed over money. Reporter: Sam Harnett, KQED
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This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. Today, we return to the story of Rachel Held Evans and speak to her husband, Daniel, as he heads into his first holiday season since her death. In her absence, the community she created still engages with her work online. “It tells me there’s a lot of pain in the world,” Mr. Evans said. “I find hope that there are people not yet born who may still read her words.” Guests: Elizabeth Dias, who covers religion for The Times and Daniel Evans, Rachel Held Evans’s husband. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:Rachel Held Evans, the best-selling author who challenged conservative Christianity and gave voice to a generation of wandering evangelicals wrestling with their faith, passed away in May after experiencing excessive brain swelling.
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In a ruined palace in the woods, rummaging through discarded papers, our reporter finds a clue. For more information, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.
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Spurred on by demographic shifts, Brexit and the success of the Sinn Fein party in this month’s election, the once-unthinkable idea of Irish reunification is gaining ground. The IMF is in Lebanon to discuss restructuring the country’s crippling debts; we examine the roots of the economic crisis. And visiting a frigid festival where even the instruments are made from ice. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/radiooffer For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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Sharp increases in the number of coronavirus cases worldwide wreak havoc on markets. New U.S. immigration rules take effect today. An economics professor estimates that between 5% and 8% of international aid is diverted to offshore accounts.
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Californians can now request their personal data from companies that have them. So KQED's Rachael Myrow tried it out.
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This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. Today: the unexpected story of how family history websites have been used by law enforcement to track down suspects and win convictions — and why retroactive regulation won’t be able to reverse the trend. Guest: Heather Murphy, a reporter at The New York Times who spoke with CeCe Moore, a genetic genealogist, and Curtis Rogers, a creator of the genealogy website GEDMatch. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:Today, we revisit Part 2 of our series on genetic privacy. If you’d like to catch up on the full story, make sure to listen to Part 1 as well.Do you think your DNA profile is private? A warrant granted by a judge in Florida could open up all consumer DNA sites for use by law enforcement agencies across the country.At a conference this fall, “rockstars” of the DNA industry and top law enforcement officers grappled with how to regulate the use of genetic material in policing. They also practiced solving murders together.Here’s how to protect yourself if you take a genetic test at home.
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The story of Harvey Weinstein is a story of patterns. Scores of women — more than 80 — have given eerily similar accounts of abuse and harassment by the powerful movie mogul. This week, two years after those allegations were first reported in The New York Times, Mr. Weinstein’s trial opens in New York. In the first part of a two-part series, we investigate why the case went from 80 potential plaintiffs to two. Guest: Megan Twohey, an investigative reporter for The Times and co-author of “She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:Mr. Weinstein’s reputation preceded him as he stepped into a Manhattan courthouse this week to face charges of rape and criminal sexual activity, making it difficult to find jurors who did not already have strong opinions about the case.The reporters who broke the first investigation into Mr. Weinstein explain why the trial rests on a narrow legal case with an already fraught back story and why the result is highly unpredictable.On the first day of Mr. Weinstein’s trial, two other criminal allegations against him were released in Los Angeles.
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Vox's Nicole Narea explains how new immigration restrictions that will hit a quarter of Africa's population might be President Trump's version of diplomacy. (Transcript here.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Credit Suisse's CEO Tidjane Thiam resigned last week in the fallout from revelations the bank was spying on employees. WSJ's Margot Patrick explains the story behind the scandal.
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Italy reports the most coronavirus cases outside of Asia, causing worries for the country’s economy. And Prime Minister Narendra Modi welcomes President Trump to India, with both hoping for a trade deal to resolve long-simmering tension.
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From the BBC World Service, global markets down again on fears of coronavirus spread. Hong Kong dishes out cash to its residents. South Africans brace for a crucial budget. Why European banks keep losing chief executives.
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Sen. Elizabeth Warren discusses her attacks on Michael Bloomberg during the debate and his apology for stop-and-frisk. Then, Rep. Matt Gaetz explains why he thinks Pres. Trump should pardon Roger Stone. Later, actor Nathan Fillion discusses his career path, including his telegram job before he started acting, and The Rookie.
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Today: Part 2 of our series on pivotal moments in the lives of the 2020 Democratic presidential contenders. Michael Barbaro speaks with Bernie Sanders, the democratic socialist senator from Vermont.  Mr. Sanders reflected on his early schooling in politics and how he galvanized grass-roots support to evolve from outraged outsider to mainstream candidate with little shift in his message. Guest: Bernie Sanders, the Vermont senator and candidate for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. We also speak with Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:Mr. Sanders has staked his presidential campaign, and much of his political legacy, on transforming health care in America. His mother’s illness and a trip he made to study the Canadian system help explain why.We asked 21 candidates the same 18 questions. Hear Mr. Sanders’s answers.
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Wildfires are devastating Australia, incinerating an area roughly the size of West Virginia and killing 24 people and as many as half a billion animals. Today, we look at the human and environmental costs of the disaster, its connection to climate change and why so many Australians are frustrated by Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s response.  Guest: Livia Albeck-Ripka, a reporter for The Times in Melbourne a reporter for The Times in Melbourne who spoke with Susan Pulis, a woman who fled the fires with kangaroos and koalas in her car. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: After Australia’s hottest and driest year on record, Mr. Morrison has minimized the connection between the wildfire crisis and climate change and declined to make moves to curb the country’s carbon emissions.Many Australians entered the new year under apocalyptic blood-red skies as smoke from the fires choked the country’s southeastern coast. “I look outside and it’s like the end of the world. Armageddon is here,” one woman in Canberra said.The fires have burned through dozens of towns, destroying at least 3,000 homes. Now, unbridled by continuous fire fighting, the blazes have returned to some scorched areas to level what is left. Rupert Murdoch controls the largest news company in Australia, and his newspapers have contributed to a wave of misinformation about the cause of the fires.
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This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of the year and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. After we sat down with Leo, a third grader, to talk about the impeachment inquiry, we were flooded with emails expressing gratitude for our guest. So we called Leo back and asked him about what he’s been up to while the impeachment inquiry has unfolded. Guests: Michael S. Schmidt, who covers national security and federal investigations for The New York Times; Bianca Giaever, a producer for “The Daily”; and Leo, a third grader who was obsessed with the impeachment inquiry. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:Leo predicted President Trump would be impeached in the House of Representatives. He was right.The impeachment process was paused after Speaker Nancy Pelosi said she would wait to see what the trial in the Senate would look like before sending the two charges there.
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The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints has amassed one of the world's largest investment funds, but few people know it exists. WSJ's Ian Lovett on new details about the fund and the church's plans for it.
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P.M. Edition for February 19th: The influence of the drug lobby in Washington is waning, as Republicans and Democrats join together to combat rising drug prices. Brody Mullins explains how the shift could impact drug policy. Plus, Michael Bloomberg is bankrolling a social-media army to promote his candidacy for president. Georgia Wells explains. Annmarie Fertoli hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Parliament officials in Canberra are celebrating today, touting the success of their new wildfire introduction program that is designed to control the country’s pestering koala population.
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Joseph Maguire, the acting U.S. Intelligence Director, testified before the House Intelligence Committee about a whistle-blower complaint about President Trump’s dealings with Ukraine. He defended the whistle-blowers actions as well as his own handling of the case. Maguire was questioned by committee Chair Adam Schiff (D-California), Ranking Member Devin Nunes (R-California), Rep. Jim Himes (D-Connecticut), Rep. Mike Conaway (R-Texas), Rep.. Terri Sewell (D-Alabama), Rep. Michael Turner (R-Ohio), Rep. Andre Carson (D-Indiana), Rep. Brad Wenstrup (R-Ohio), Rep. jackie Speier (D-California), Rep. Chris Stewart (R-Utah), Rep. Mike Quigley (D-Illinois), Rep. Elise Stefanik (R-New York), Rep. Eric Swalwell (D-California), Rep. Will Hurd (R-Texas), Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-Texas), Rep. John Ratcliffe (R-Texas), Rep. Denny Heck (D-Washington), Rep. Peter Welch (D-Vermont), Rep. Val Demings (D-Florida) and Rep Raja Krishnamoorthi (D-Illinois). Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of 2019 and checking in on what has happened since they first appeared. Today, we return to our conversation with the whistle-blower John Barnett, known as Swampy, about what he said were systemic safety problems at Boeing. After two 737 Max jet crashes killed a total of 346 people and a federal investigation left the company in crisis, we ask: Is something deeper going wrong at the once-revered manufacturer?  Guest: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The New York Times, spoke with John Barnett, a former quality manager at Boeing. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:Boeing successfully lobbied to reduce government oversight of airplane designs, allowing them to regulate faulty engineering internally.A congressional investigation last fall asked what Boeing knew before the two crashes.
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An extremely rich man wants to do a good thing: Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos announced a pledge of $10 billion to combat climate change. We discuss how he’s going to spend that money and reactions to the news. Over 73,000 people have been infected with coronavirus and the death toll is above 1,800. The latest on what the outbreak means for travelers and the global economy. And in headlines: floods in Mississippi, Virginia votes down an assault weapons ban, and Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg has to regulate.
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After nearly 12 hours of vicious debate, the Senate voted early Wednesday to adopt the rules that will govern the rest of the impeachment trial. But in a Republican-controlled chamber, why weren’t they the rules that Senator Mitch McConnell, the majority leader, had originally wanted? Guest: Julie Hirschfeld Davis, congressional editor for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: Voting along party lines, Senate Republicans blocked Democrats’ efforts to subpoena witnesses and documents related to President Trump’s dealings with Ukraine.As the trial began in earnest, Mr. Trump was 4,000 miles away, touting the United States’ economic growth at the World Economic Forum, an elite gathering of business leaders in Davos, Switzerland.
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According to the Nevada State Democratic Party, roughly 70,000 people have already voted. For comparison in 2016, 84,000 people turned up on caucus day and they didn't have the option to vote early.
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This week, “The Daily” is revisiting some of our favorite episodes of 2019 and checking in on what has happened since the stories first ran. Today, we return to the exclusive interview in the Oval Office between the publisher of The Times, A. G. Sulzberger, and President Trump about the role of a free press. Guest: A. G. Sulzberger, The Times’s publisher, who joined two White House reporters, Maggie Haberman and Peter Baker, to interview Mr. Trump. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:In his remarks on the media, Mr. Trump took credit for popularizing the term “fake news,” but declined to accept responsibility for a rise in threats against journalists since he took office. Read excerpts from his exchange with Mr. Sulzberger.Addressing a wide range of subjects, Mr. Trump called the border negotiations a “waste of time,” brushed off the Russia investigation and expressed frustration at not getting credit for what he sees as his accomplishments.Here are five takeaways from the interview.
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Kim Bellware on how disinformation about the coronavirus is spreading online. Danielle Paquette on the drawdown of Firestone’s factories in Liberia, where the tire company has been central to the economy. And Rick Maese takes us inside a Tokyo dojo.
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In 2015, Dr. Vineet Menachery said a SARS-like virus could spread to humans more easily than previously believed. Now he explains what we can do to stop it. (Transcript here.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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A.M. Edition for February 20th: Democratic presidential hopefuls took turns attacking one another in a fiery debate ahead of Nevada's Caucasus. Emily Glazer reports from Las Vegas. Plus, Paul Vigna on why U.S. investors are staying optimistic despite coronavirus fears. Charlie Turner hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Carlos Ghosn’s trial was poised to be one of the most closely watched in Japanese history — a case involving claims of corporate greed, wounded national pride and a rigged legal system. Then the former Nissan chief pulled off an unimaginable escape. Guest: Ben Dooley, a business reporter for The New York Times based in Japan. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Mr. Ghosn leaves behind a contentious history at one of the world’s largest car manufacturers, a record which is now unlikely to be scrutinized in Japanese courts. “Nobody’s going to take it from me,” Mr. Ghosn said of his legacy.The tycoon’s escape preparations spanned the globe, revealing the means by which the well-connected can evade legal accountability.
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At the heart of President Trump’s impeachment is his request that Ukraine investigate how his political rival, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., could be connected to an energy company called Burisma. New reporting from The Times suggests that Russian hackers may be trying to fulfill that request — and potentially hack into the 2020 election itself. Guests: Nicole Perlroth, who covers cybersecurity for The Times, spoke with Oren Falkowitz, a former analyst at the National Security Agency and co-founder of the cybersecurity company Area 1. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: The Times has evidence that the same Russian military hackers that stole emails from Hillary Clinton’s campaign in 2016 have been boring into Burisma, the energy company at the center of the Ukraine affair. Here’s what we know about the hackers.New details emerged on Tuesday of Mr. Trump’s pressure campaign on Ukraine, intensifying demands on Senate Republicans to include witness testimony and additional documents in the impeachment trial.
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Some of the most devastating blows of the 2020 campaign arrived on one night -- and they were all aimed at Michael Bloomberg. As Washington braces for fireworks at the Department of Justice, the Pentagon sheds some top brass of its own. And Britain starts to implement an immigration plan straight out of the Trump playbook. Like the show? Leave a review: http://bit.ly/ReviewStartHere Follow @StartHereABC for exclusive content, show updates and more: - Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/starthereabc - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/starthereabc - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/starthereabc Discover more ABC News podcasts: http://www.abcnewspodcasts.com Start Here is produced by ABC Audio. For more information: http://www.abcnewspodcasts.com
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The House of Representatives has impeached President Trump, charging him with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. We traveled to Michigan to understand how a fractious Democratic Party ultimately united around impeachment, having started the year divided over the issue. Guests: Representative Elissa Slotkin and Representative Rashida Tlaib, Democrats of Michigan. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:Mr. Trump became only the third president in American history to be impeached, as the House charged him with abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. The votes were largely along party lines.Moderate Democrats encouraged their party to begin the impeachment inquiry. Now, those representatives face a reckoning with that decision.Are you confused by the impeachment process? Here’s how it works.
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A humanitarian crisis is unfolding in northern Syria after the government’s attempt to take back the opposition-held city of Idlib. Bethan McKernan describes how the fighting and freezing conditions have caused hundreds of thousands of displaced people to flee for their lives. Also today: Justin McCurry on the evacuation of the coronavirus-hit Diamond Princess cruise ship. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
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A major announcement in Vatican City as Pope Francis insists that Catholic priests around the world are not about to be out-molested by some goddamned Boy Scouts.
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