Top podcast episodes in Daily News

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States are reopening. Parks are crowded. Restaurants are filling, again, with diners. But is this dangerous? Six months into the pandemic, we reflect on what we’ve learned about the virus — and ask how that knowledge should chart the course forward. Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily  Background reading: As New York businesses reopened, Gov. Andrew Cuomo warned that a second wave of infections was almost inevitable if residents did not abide by social-distancing rules. “It will come,” he said. “And once it comes, it’s too late.” Restrictions are easing across the United States, but Arizona, Florida and Texas are reporting their highest case numbers yet. As of Saturday, coronavirus cases were climbing in 22 states.
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In this episode of The Sunday Read, one man reflects on what it was like to go to prison as a child and to attempt to become an attorney upon his release. In doing so, he asks: What is punishment in America? What is it for? And how should we think about it? This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
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What does an autopsy reveal about Rayshard Brooks' death? Video shows the 27-year-old Georgia man seized a police officer's Taser as he fled an arrest. The autopsy shows the officer who shot him hit him twice in the back. Florida, Texas and other states have set records for new coronavirus cases. But Arizona's governor says the state is ready to reopen even as new cases soar.
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In this bonus episode, the team at NPR's Planet Money brings us a story on patents in the U.S. Dr. Lisa Cook found a blindspot in a big theory on innovation: the idea that if we just make strong patent laws, innovation will come. True for some, not true for others. Her research has huge implications for Black Americans — and for the wealth of entire countries. But convincing her colleagues took a lot more than data.
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Ronda McIntyre’s classroom is built around a big rug, where her students crowd together often for group instruction. But since March, when schools across the country shut down because of the coronavirus, she has had to try to create the same sense of community remotely. Her class, and her job, are not the same — and they may never be. Guest: Ronda McIntyre, a grade-school teacher at Indianola Informal K-8 school in Columbus, Ohio. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily  Background reading: Elizabeth A. Harris, a Times reporter, spoke with Ms. McIntyre earlier this year in the course of reporting about the frustrations of parents trying to do their jobs while helping children with class work.The realities of remote learning for fourteen other teachers, in illustrated vignettes.Restarting classes is central to reviving economies. But even as students in Europe return to school, a question hangs over the efforts: What’s the risk of children getting, and spreading, the virus?
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The Times critic Wesley Morris had listened to Patti LaBelle’s live rendition of “If You Don’t Know Me by Now” over a hundred times before. But one recent Sunday, the song came on and he heard something new. “I heard her thinking through an ultimatum now being laid down in the streets of this country,” he went on to write. Soon after, he got a call from one Ms. Patti LaBelle.
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Some states are seeing a worrying rise in coronavirus infections. President Trump is caught between supporting police and pressure to reform some of their tactics. Protesters in the U.K. are targeting monuments they say glorify a racist past.
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A full-scale meltdown of new voting systems in Georgia is alarming Democratic leaders — and revealing a new national playing field — ahead of the general election in November. Today, we explore why voting access in Georgia has become a national issue for the party. Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily  Background reading: Long lines and malfunctioning voting machines marred Georgia primary elections, renewing attention on voting rights there, and raising questions about how to ensure access to voting in the general election.With both Senate seats in play and President Trump up for re-election in November, Georgia Democrats are telling anyone who will listen: This time will be different.
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Rayshard Brooks was shot and killed by a white officer in Atlanta this weekend, in another horrific instance of police violence. Atlanta’s police chief subsequently announced she would step down and the officer who shot Brooks was fired.  Tens of thousands of people protested violence against Black trans people this weekend in cities across America. These protests came just as the Trump administration moved to revoke discrimination protections for trans people in health care and health insurance.  And in headlines: an update on COVID-19 in the US and around the world, African nations call on the UN to address racism and police brutality, and FKA Lady Antebellum just can’t get it right. Follow and donate to groups working to protect black trans people: The Okra Project pays Black trans chefs to go into the homes of Black trans people to cook them a healthy and home-cooked meal: theokraproject.com Black and Pink is an LGBTQ prison abolitionist organization working to support LGBTQ and HIV positive prisoners: blackandpink.org The Marsha P. Johnson Institute protects and defends the human rights of Black trans people through organizing and advocacy: marshap.org Find more: actblue.com/donate/black_led_lgbtq Support our sponsors: 60 in 6 available on Quibi: link.quibi.com/60in6
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This episode contains strong language. Nearly 30 years ago, George Perry Floyd Jr. told a high school classmate he would “touch the world” someday. We went to the funeral in Houston of an outsize man who dreamed equally big and whose killing has galvanized a movement against racism across the globe. Guest: Manny Fernandez, The New York Times’s bureau chief in Houston. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily  Background reading: Mr. Floyd’s funeral served as both a national reckoning and a moment of personal mourning. The Rev. Al Sharpton demanded more action against police brutality.As a young man, Mr. Floyd had big plans for his future. This is the story of his life and dreams.
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This episode contains strong language. Several major U.S. cities are proposing ways to defund and even dismantle their police departments. But what would that actually look like? Guest: John Eligon, a national correspondent covering race for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily  Background reading: In protests across the country, pleas for changes in policing have ranged from reform to abolition. Some proposed measures include restricting police use of military-style equipment and requiring officers to face strict discipline in cases of misconduct.Nine members of the Minneapolis City Council — a veto-proof majority — pledged to dismantle the city’s Police Department, promising to create a new system of public safety.
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President Trump plans to sign an executive order encouraging better practices by police departments, but rejected more far-reaching proposals to tackle racial injustice and police brutality in the United States. Also, a look at what some cities and states are already doing to address calls for police reforms. And, how is the development for a coronavirus vaccine going as many areas of the U.S. begin to re-open?
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Atlanta erupts as a scuffle with police officers escalates into a shooting. President Trump's campaign backs away from a plan for a Juneteenth rally. And growing Black Lives Matter protests overseas have led to violent conflicts.
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After 33 seasons, the reality TV show Cops was canceled this week. Should scripted police dramas follow? Transcript at vox.com/todayexplained. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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This episode contains strong language. Across the country, the police have responded to protests over police brutality with more force. Today, we listen in on confrontations at demonstrations in New York. Guest: Ali Watkins, a crime and law enforcement reporter at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily  Background reading: Across the country, police officers have responded to growing protests over police brutality with increasingly violent crowd control techniques, using batons, tear gas, pepper spray and rubber bullets on protesters, bystanders and journalists.In New York, officers have charged and swung batons at demonstrators after curfew with seemingly little provocation. The mayor said he would review any reports of inappropriate enforcement.
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Luckin Coffee was supposed to disrupt China's coffee market. But a Wall Street Journal investigation has found that the company used fake coffee orders, fake supply orders and even a fake employee to fabricate nearly half its sales last year. WSJ's Jing Yang explains Luckin's scheme.
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A.M. Edition for June 15. Understanding the unique challenge of slowing down the coronavirus among India's 1.3 billion people. The aftermath of a deadly police shooting in Atlanta. And why a rise in volatility, and the trading of it, are complicating things on Wall Street. Marc Stewart hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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With the presidential election just a few months away, President Trump and Democratic hopeful former vice president Joe Biden are returning to the campaign trail. How are they making their case to lead a nation in crises? Also, Amazon is putting a one-year moratorium on police use of its facial-recognition technology, yielding to pressure from police-reform advocates and civil rights groups. And, a U.S. grad student imprisoned in Iran for more than three years tells his story for the first time since being released in December.
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Today on “The Sunday Read,” listen to Claudia Rankine reflect on the precariousness of being black in America. Her words were written five years ago after avowed white supremacist Dylann Roof killed nine black people at a Bible study in Charleston, South Carolina. We are revisiting them now that they have — yet again — been rendered relevant. This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
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Police in Seattle abandoned their East Precinct building and ceded about six blocks of the city to protestors, who have now set up the Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone or CHAZ. Some conservatives are comparing that area to “Lord of the Flies,” while those on the ground say it’s more like orientation week at Evergreen State College. Another 1.5 million workers filed for unemployment last week. Trump plans to hold rallies again starting next Friday, building up to a packed RNC speech that’s now officially set for Jacksonville. And in headlines: a giant fuel spill in Siberia, a new police unit in Hong Kong, and Twitter wants you to read. Plus, Erin Ryan fills in for Akilah Hughes. Listen to her podcast! http://apple.co/hysteria
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Note: This episode contains strong language. Today, we’re sharing the series finale of “Rabbit Hole,” a Times podcast with the tech columnist Kevin Roose. In this episode, we follow one QAnon believer’s journey through faith and loss — and what becomes of reality as our lives move online. For more information on “Rabbit Hole” and today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/rabbithole.
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Vox’s Dylan Scott says it’s hard to tell because the United States is riding 50 different Covid-19 waves. Transcript at vox.com/todayexplained. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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It’s World Refugee Day on June 20, a time to commemorate the most vulnerable populations around the world. CNN’s Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta turns to Bex Wright, who covers the Rohingya refugee crisis for CNN, and David Miliband, the CEO of the International Rescue Committee, to talk about how we can never be free of a global pandemic unless everywhere in the world is safe.
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The past and future of Hollywood’s love affair with law enforcement. And, the symbolism of clothes on Capitol Hill this week.
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For many of us, it's been months since we started sheltering-in-place. And it's exhausting. Now, as states begin to reopen and social distancing rules are relaxed, how do we decide what is safe to do and what isn't? And what about those of us who haven't had the luxury of staying at home? CNN’s Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta speaks to experts about quarantine fatigue and how we should move forward with our daily lives.
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P.M. Edition for June 12. Experts are worried about a spike in coronavirus cases, in states that have already reopened. Eliza Collins has more. Plus, as protests sparked by the killing of George Floyd continue, protesters are determined to keep the momentum going. Josh Jamerson reports. Annmarie Fertoli hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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This episode includes disturbing language including racial slurs. They came together to protest the killing of George Floyd — and because what happened to him had echoes in their own experiences. Today, we speak with five protesters about the moments in their lives that brought them onto the streets. Guests: Donfard Hubbard, 44, from Minneapolis; Rashaad Dinkins, 18, from Minneapolis; Joe Morris, 32, from Tallahassee, Fla.; Azalea Hernandez, 12, from Minneapolis; and Joyce Ladner, 76, from Washington. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily
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Black employment had climbed to a record level before the pandemic undid that progress in a matter of weeks. WSJ's Amara Omeokwe explains the fragility in the economic situation of black Americans and what that could mean for their recovery.
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The coronavirus has pushed a number of companies into bankruptcy and exposed the debt many had racked up before the crisis. WSJ's Matt Wirz explains why Hertz is a prime example.
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Tonight on the Last Word: Trump’s response on race in America is to praise himself. Also, new coronavirus cases are on the rise in at least 20 states. Plus, the Federal Reserve predicts a slow economic recovery. A new poll shows a majority of Americans support the Black Lives Matter movement. And Marq Claxton reflects on the extraordinary advancements in police reform in the last 18 days. Zerlina Maxwell, Jonathan Alter, Dr. Dean Sidelinger, Dr. Vin Gupta, Betsey Stevenson, Bradley Hardy and Alencia Johnson also join Ali Velshi.
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The United States has a policing problem and Congress wants to fix it. Vox’s Li Zhou explains whether the Democrats’ new bill will go anywhere. Transcript at vox.com/todayexplained. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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On the Gist, the stock market is on a coronavirus coaster. In the interview, Dr. Christina Greer of Fordham University is here to talk with Mike about politics and police reform. They discuss Joe Biden, if police unions should continue to exist, and what the future of policing could look like. Greer is the host of FAQ NYC. In the spiel, a good-faith effort to hear out the bad-faith arguments. Email us at thegist@slate.com Podcast production by Daniel Schroeder and Margaret Kelley. Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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This episode contains sounds of explosives and descriptions of violence. Today, we go inside a high-stakes White House debate over how President Trump should respond to reports that he was hiding in a bunker while the nation’s capital burned. This is the story of what happened in Lafayette Square. Guest: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily  Background reading: Our chief White House correspondent explains why, when the history of the Trump presidency is written, the clash with protesters that preceded President Trump’s walk across Lafayette Square may be remembered as one of its defining moments.“He did not pray,” said Mariann E. Budde, the Episcopal bishop of Washington, said of Mr. Trump’s militarized visit to St. John’s church for a photo opportunity. “He did not mention George Floyd.”
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As protests continue in the US, some demonstrators are now calling to ‘defund the police.’ And those calls are already having an impact. Cities like Minneapolis, New York, and Los Angeles are considering some major changes to their police departments. We’ll break down what it actually means to defund the police, and why some protestors say that doesn’t go far enough.  Also: we’re still in a global pandemic. But many public health experts don’t think protests should stop. We’ll explain why medical professionals say it’s important that demonstrators are still able to protest against racism and police brutality. And finally, you may have seen that viral video from former NFL athlete Emmanuel Acho, host of the new online series, “Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man.” We spoke to Acho about why these conversations are necessary, and how he plans to grow the series.  On this episode, you’ll hear from:  Lynda Garcia, Policing Campaign Director for The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, former trial attorney in the Special Litigation Section in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice Kimberly Burke, research fellow at the Center for Policing Equity Dr. Jaime Slaughter-Acey, social epidemiologist and Assistant Professor in the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health at the University of Minnesota Emmanuel Acho, former NFL athlete, current NFL analyst and host and creator of “Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man.”  Let us know what questions you have about what’s going on in the news right now. Email us at audio@theskimm.com or call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370. You might hear your message on the show.  If you want to add theSkimm to your daily routine, sign-up for our free newsletter the Daily Skimm. It’s everything you need to know to start your day, right in your inbox.
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What the movement to “defund the police” wants. Joe Biden’s complicated history on criminal justice. And a new hope for patients whose lungs have suffered from covid-19.
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Across the country, local officials are hiring people to track down anyone who may have been exposed to Covid-19. CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta talks to Dr. Syra Madad, an epidemiologist and special pathogens expert, about the importance and process of contact tracing.
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The Minneapolis police officer whose tactics led to George Floyd’s death had a long record of complaints against him. So why was he still on patrol? Guest: Shaila Dewan, a national reporter covering criminal justice for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily  Background reading: Efforts to hold problem officers accountable often face resistance from unions, and juries are reluctant to second-guess police decisions.Violence escalated overnight in protests across the country, with police officers under fire in St. Louis and Las Vegas. Here are the latest updates.
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Activists are demanding a radical reshaping of police departments across the country. Years before this movement, one city scrapped its police department and started from scratch. Camden, N.J.'s former police chief Scott Thomson explains how they rebuilt, and what happened.
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A.M. Edition for June 12. A look at how air travel will change because of the pandemic. We find out what's next for markets following a challenging week of trading. America's blood supply is crippled by coronavirus. Mark Garrison hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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As officials argue over whether systemic racism exists, ABC News investigates exactly how much more black Americans are arrested than their white neighbors. Seattle activists won't allow police officers within blocks of their own precinct. And a rise in COVID-19 cases has spooked Wall Street.
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More than a third of states are seeing increases in Covid-19 cases in the last week. It’s hard to draw conclusions about what’s behind that trend—among states that reopened early, some are seeing cases plateau, while others are seeing cases ramp up.  Plus, journalist and lawyer Josie Duffy Rice fills in for Akilah Hughes. We discuss the culture of policing in this country and how shifting money from law enforcement to social services could cut down on the need for law enforcement. And in headlines: Amazon won’t let police use its facial recognition for one year, racist statues and monuments keep coming down nationwide, and the pandemic’s effects on king coffee chain Starbucks. Check out Josie's work at The Appeal: theappeal.org Listen to Josie's podcast: theappeal.org/topics/justice-in-america/
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As nationwide protests about the death of George Floyd enter a second week, we speak with the leader of the city where they began. Guest: Mayor Jacob Frey of Minneapolis. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily  Background reading: Mr. Frey came into office in 2018 on promises to fix the broken relationship between the community and law enforcement in the wake of two fatal police shootings. This is what he has done in the years since.
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In the past couple of weeks, multiple high ranking military members, active and retired, have spoken out against the Trump administration's use of force in Lafayette Square. Usually, military officers prefer to stay silent on political matters. Does this mark a sea change in the way the military deals with President Trump? Guest: Fred Kaplan, Slate’s War Stories Correspondent and the author of The Bomb.  Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Please support the David J. Harris Jr. Show by taking a look at our sponsors! Episode Sponsor Blinkist - https://www.blinkist.com/harris With Blinkist, you get unlimited access to read or listen to a massive library of condensed non-fiction books -- all the books you want and all for one low price. Right now, for a limited time Blinkist has a special offer just for our audience: Go to www.blinkist.com/harris try it FREE for 7 days AND save 25% off your new subscription.  
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As the organisation’s defence ministers meet this week we look at two of its principal challenges: China’s rising influence and America’s declining interest. After more than three decades, a grand murder mystery has been solved in Sweden—but the outcome has many more frustrated than before. And why there is a matchmaking boom in Japan. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer 
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Note: This episode contains strong language. Today, we’re sharing Episode 7 of “Rabbit Hole,” a New York Times audio series with the tech columnist Kevin Roose. In this episode, our reporter investigates the QAnon conspiracy theories. The story of QAnon believers, united in a battle against what they see as dark forces of the world, reveals where the internet is headed. For more information on “Rabbit Hole” and today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/rabbithole.
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The news to know for Monday, June 15th, 2020! What to know about another controversial police shooting, this time in Atlanta. We’ll walk you through what the video shows, who lost their jobs, and what happens next. Also, the backlash that prompted President Trump to reschedule his campaign rally. Plus, how some sports might use fake fans in the stands, get ready for the end of HBO Go, and how one man is making Bachelor history. Those stories and more in 10 minutes!  This episode is brought to you by www.Skillshare.com/newsworthy.     Sources: Atlanta Police Shooting: AJC, NBC News, CBS News, USA Today, AP Police Footage, Body Cam 1, Body Cam 2, Dashcam, Surveillance Weekend Protests: AP, WaPo, CNN Trump West Point Commencement: ABC News, NY Times, WSJ Trump Delays Juneteenth Rally: USA Today, Axios, AP, Politico, Reuters Transgender Protections Erased: Reuters, NPR, WSJ, HHS U.S. Coronavirus Hotspots: WaPo, Reuters, CNN, CBS News, Johns Hopkins Gas Prices Rising: USA Today, AAA Spanish Soccer Returns: The Verge, Fox Sports “HBO Go” Going Away: The Verge, Engadget, CNET First Black Bachelor: Variety, Fortune, NPR Monday Monday - Americans Saving More: CNN, WSJ
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Minneapolis City Council member Alondra Cano explains what the city wants to do and what might get in the way. Transcript at vox.com/todayexplained. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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As states reopen, new opportunities for the coronavirus to spread. Why public health experts predict that the virus will be with us for decades. And, a crucial step toward curbing the spread.
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The majority of Covid-19 patients will recover from the virus, but what does that recovery look like? CNN’s Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta speaks with a patient in recovery about his experience in the weeks since leaving the hospital. Medical expert Dr. Reynold Panetierri weighs in on some of the potential long-term health consequences.
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This episode contains strong language. Demonstrations have erupted in at least 140 cities across the United States in the days since George Floyd, a black man, died in police custody in Minneapolis. We were on the ground in some of them, chronicling 72 hours of pain and protest. Guests: Nikole Hannah-Jones, who writes for The New York Times Magazine; John Eligon, a national correspondent who covers race for The Times; and Mike Baker, a Pacific Northwest correspondent. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily  Background reading: The video discussed by Nikole Hannah-Jones in the episode is featured here.The Times has reporters on the ground in dozens of cities across the country. Here’s a look at what they’re seeing.George Floyd died one week ago today. Here’s a timeline of what has happened since.
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Employees at Facebook have resigned, staged a virtual walkout and publicly expressed their outrage over the company's decision to preserve a post by President Trump that some employees say was a call for violence. WSJ's Deepa Seetharaman explains the internal dissent at the company.
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From washing masks to house visits and summer travel, CNN's Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta tackles some recent questions from our listeners.
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On the Gist, dominating the streets with compassion. In the interview, John Pfaff, professor of law and criminology at Fordham University and author of Locked In: The True Causes of Mass Incarceration-and How to Achieve Real Reform, joins Mike to talk about police reformation, and why politicians touting low crime under their watches could lead to more dysfunction. As one of the foremost experts on incarceration in America, Pfaff argues that we need to rethink how the system and budgets are organized. In the spiel, Christopher Columbus and his mixed legacy. Email us at thegist@slate.com Podcast production by Daniel Schroeder and Margaret Kelley. Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Barbara Krupke won the lottery. Fred Walter Gray enjoyed his bacon and hash browns crispy. Orlando Moncada crawled through a hole in a fence to reach the United States. John Prine chronicled the human condition. Cornelia Ann Hunt left the world with gratitude. Over 100,000 people have died from the coronavirus in the United States. Today, we glimpse inside the lives of just a few of them. Background reading: Memories collected from obituaries across the country help us visualize and reckon with the incalculable loss of more than 100,000 lives.
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Tonight on the Last Word: Trump avoids talking about George Floyd at a roundtable in Texas. Also, Gen. Mark Milley apologizes for his role in Trump’s photo op. Plus, Trump plans to split the Republican National Convention between Charlotte and Jacksonville. And Robert De Niro joins Lawrence to discuss Trump and race. Peniel Joseph, Kristen Clarke, Rep, Anthony Brown, Yamiche Alcindor and Ron Klain also join Lawrence O’Donnell.
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Pandemic, protests, and the best poll numbers yet for Joe Biden. Transcript at vox.com/todayexplained.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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The U.S. Postal Service has survived the telegraph, the fax machine and the dawn of the internet. But will it survive coronavirus? Guests: Nicholas Fandos, who covers Congress for The New York Times and Derek Harpe, a Postal Service worker with a mail route in Mocksville, N.C. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily  Background reading: With the coronavirus threatening the Postal Service’s financial viability, a rescue for the organization has become a political battle.
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Today, protests continue into their 19th day, Mnuchin refuses to disclose where $500B went in coronavirus aid, Ohio GOP state senator fired from his ER doctor job after racist comments, the senate judiciary voted to give Graham subpoena power in review of the Russia investigation, Trump moves the RNC to Jacksonville on the week of the anniversary of ax handle Saturday, oral arguments in the Flynn mandamus case, the White House is pivoting to blame Mexico for the spike in coronavirus cases, Trump moves the Tulsa rally after massive backlash for holding it on Juneteenth, the Minneapolis police chief is in the hot seat, Betsy DeVos is blocked by the courts, again, Q Anon conspiracies, and border patrol spends money meant for food and medicine on dirt bikes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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As the world’s largest lockdown loosens, we examine how it went wrong and the challenges ahead for a health-care system pushed to its limits. As statues fall across the globe our culture correspondent considers how they represent shifting values and hierarchies—and when they should go. And economists weigh in once again on the phenomenon of winning streaks. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer 
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Plus, a Republican congressman loses his seat because he officiated a gay wedding, and New York’s governor threatens to reverse reopenings because people aren’t social distancing.
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P.M. Edition for June 11. A rise in cases in several states has investors worried about the pace of the recovery. Markets reporter Akane Otani has more details. Plus, some nursing homes say the government has shipped them protective gear that isn't usable. Anna Wilde Mathews explains. Annmarie Fertoli hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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This week, three of the leading developers of facial-recognition technology announced they would stop, or at least pause, selling this technology to police. The decision stems from evidence of racial bias inherent in these tools. For the researchers who first uncovered the deep-seated issues with these tools, it’s a watershed moment. Will facial-recognition technology continue to grow unchecked? Or will this week’s announcements result in lasting change? Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now. Guest: Deb Raji, technology fellow at the AI Now Institute. Host Lizzie O’Leary Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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After nearly a decade on the sidelines of space travel, Cape Canaveral is again launching a shuttle into space. But this time, a private company will be sending NASA astronauts into orbit. What does this moment mean for human exploration of the solar system? Guests: Kenneth Chang, a science reporter at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily  Background reading: Here’s a look inside the vessel that is scheduled to become the first crewed spacecraft launched in the United States since the end of the shuttle program in 2011.Meet SpaceX’s first NASA astronauts: Robert L. Behnken and Douglas G. Hurley, who have been friends and colleagues for two decades.
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SoftBank has quietly poured more than $500m into Credit Suisse investment funds that in turn made big bets on the debt of struggling start-ups backed by the Vision Fund, the White House is opposed to extending coronavirus-related federal unemployment payments because it believes the measure created a “disincentive” to work, and China is bracing for a second wave of coronavirus. Plus, the FT’s David Keohane reports on France’s efforts to save its aerospace industry. 
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The pandemic forced many American college campuses to close and move classes online. Some are now wondering whether the high cost of college tuition is worth it. CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Sanjay Gupta talks with NYU Professor Scott Galloway about what Galloway believes may be a disruption of higher education.
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Each weekday, ABC News updates the country's fight against the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic - both medical and economic. We'll answers your questions about the latest outbreak numbers and treatment developments. We'll look at the cities and towns that are reopening, and what our new normal looks like. ABC's Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Jennifer Ashton responds directly to questions submitted on Instagram @DrJAshton. Hosted by Amy Robach and Aaron Katersky. "Bringing America Back: What You Need to Know" is a production of ABC Audio, makers of the daily ABC News podcast "Start Here," the chart-topping series "The Dropout," and more: http://www.abcaudio.com/podcasts
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Georgia held its primary yesterday, and in a state where officials have been accused of voter suppression, the elections were rife with issues. Polling stations saw hours-long lines that invariably led some voters to give up.  Raquel Willis, writer and trans activist, fills in for Akilah Hughes. We discuss how we can better support black queer and trans leadership in this moment. And in headlines: Brazil’s Supreme Court orders Bolsonaro to stop hoarding COVID data, an art dealer’s buried treasure, and the legal battle for a radio in the Titanic. Find more of Raquel's work: raquelwillis.com Support these Black-led LGBTQ+ organizations: actblue.com/donate/black_led_lgbtq
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As protests spread over the death of George Floyd, the former officer at the center of the case has been charged with murder. We listen in on the demonstrations, and examine why this tragedy — though too familiar — may be a turning point. Guest: Audra D. S. Burch, a national enterprise correspondent for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Derek Chauvin, a former police officer, was charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter for kneeling on the neck of Mr. Floyd for nearly nine minutes as he repeatedly pleaded “I can’t breathe.”In the year before their fatal encounter, Mr. Floyd and Mr. Chauvin worked at the same nightclub.Protests over racism and police violence have erupted across the U.S. Follow the latest updates.
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Two brothers, Javier Morales, 48, and Martin Morales, 39, died of coronavirus within hours of each other in their adopted home of New Jersey. Their last wish was to be buried at home in Mexico, but, to make that happen, their family must navigate the vast bureaucracies of two countries, international airfare and the complications of a pandemic. Guest:Annie Correal, an immigration reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Shaila and Melanie Cruz Morales, twin sisters from New Jersey who are the men’s nieces. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily  Background reading: In Mexico, being buried near home is a sacred rite. These are the obstacles the Morales family has faced as they try to return their uncles’ bodies home.
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Today on The Daily Beans, Louisville police released the incident report in Breonna Taylor's murder, two top Department of Justice officials resign on the same day, Flynn's lawyer files her brief with the DC circuit court of appeals, COVID hospitalizations increase in 9 states, Trump will hold his first MAGA rally since COVID on Juneteenth in Tulsa, LeBron James assembles a group of prominent black athletes and entertainers aimed at protecting African American voting rights, and we an interview with the voice of She-Ra on Netflix, Aimee Carrero! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Multiple law enforcement agencies in California are hunting for an armed suspect, who allegedly ambushed Paso Robles police officers on Wednesday morning. A New York woman has been charged with the murder of 100-year-old WWII veteran, Gerald Early. Finally, an Ohio inmate, who has pleaded guilty to hiring a hit man to murder a social worker, filed a lawsuit against the intended victim, demanding $25,000 in damages for infliction of mental and emotional distress.
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Note: This episode contains strong language. Today, we’re sharing Episode 6 of “Rabbit Hole,” a New York Times audio series with the tech columnist Kevin Roose. In this episode, we hear from PewDiePie, one of the biggest and most polarizing YouTube celebrities. He sat down with our reporter to discuss how he’s coming to grips with his influence — and looking to the future. If you're tuning in to “Rabbit Hole” for the first time, start with the prologue. You can find more information about the podcast at nytimes.com/rabbithole.
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The protests and unrest that have swept the country after the killing of George Floyd have recalled the riots and demonstrations of the 1960s. Historian Rick Perlstein talks about the similarities and differences between that time and now.
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There are moments when the world we take for granted changes instantaneously — when reality is upended and replaced with the unimaginable. Though we try not to think about it, instability is always lurking, and at any moment, a kind of terrible magic can switch on and scramble our lives.  You may know the feeling. In 1964, it happened to Anchorage, Alaska, and to a woman named Genie Chance. Today, the author Jon Mooallem tells her story — and the story of the biggest earthquake to hit North America in recorded history — using sonic postcards from the past. Guest: Jon Mooallem, author of the book “This Is Chance.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily
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George Floyd's brother gives a riveting address to congress, as the Minneapolis police department promises big reforms. Voting debacles on Tuesday portend even bigger issues in November. And the Confederate flag meets its biggest test of "cancel culture" in years.
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As a bonus for Maddow listeners, we’re sharing a special preview of Season 3 of The Oath with Chuck Rosenberg, an MSNBC podcast hosted by former U.S. Attorney, senior FBI official and acting head of the DEA, Chuck Rosenberg. The Oath is a series of revealing conversations with fascinating men and women who took an oath to serve our nation. Who and what shaped them? What drew them to this work? How did they overcome adversity and failure? These captivating stories exemplify what is best about our country: integrity, civility, service, humility, and collective responsibility. Listen to the first episode with former Secretary of Defense and CIA Director Leon Panetta, and subscribe to the series: https://link.chtbl.com/0R2hHEAR?sid=news.description%20
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On the Gist, Mississippi. In the interview, Ben Smith from the New York Times is here to discuss the recent ousting of editor James Bennet over an op-ed by Republican Sen. Tom Cotton of Arkansas. They talk about the cultural divides it highlighted, what it means for the Times, and the future of opinion on the internet. Smith’s latest piece is “Inside the Revolts Erupting in America’s big Newsrooms.” In the spiel, Cops is canceled. Email us at thegist@slate.com Podcast production by Daniel Schroeder and Margaret Kelley. Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Two mothers talk to their teenage sons about race and police brutality in the United States. Transcript at vox.com/todayexplained. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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To hear the president tell it, you would think that antifa activists are blanketing the country -- bringing their campaign of vandalism and looting and lawlessness to your town. These fears are sown and circulated through digital whisper networks that can be hard for outsiders to penetrate. But the online rumors are having real-life consequences.  Guest: Brandy Zadrozny, NBC News correspondent. Read her latest.  Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Around the country, states are starting to reopen, some faster than others. Given that, and the fact that cases are climbing in some areas, have we learned how to start up again, safely? On today's show, Alice Miranda Ollstein, health care reporter for POLITICO, discusses where states went wrong while reopening their economies.
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The White House is worried that the extra $600 a week in unemployment benefits makes not working too attractive. Democrats want to keep providing that money until January. The new head of the U.S. Postal Service. And, how COVID-19 is reshaping the response to domestic violence.
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Note: This episode contains strong language. Today, we’re sharing Episode 5 of “Rabbit Hole,” a New York Times audio series with the tech columnist Kevin Roose. In this episode, our reporter investigates how a Swedish gamer with a webcam grew to become the biggest YouTuber in the world. We follow PewDiePie’s path to megastardom — and the war that unfolds when his reign is threatened. If you're tuning in to “Rabbit Hole” for the first time, start with the prologue. You can find more information about the podcast at nytimes.com/rabbithole.
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A.M. Edition for June 11. An explanation of why the job market is so tricky to predict. Long-simmering debates about policing and confederate monuments all come to a boil at once. And a merger that could change how food is delivered. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Covid-19 isn’t the only health crisis threatening our nation right now. CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta talks to epidemiologist Dr. Camara Jones about the serious impact of racism on public health. Dr. Jones also shares important guidance for protesters to help reduce the spread of coronavirus.
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After decades as the continent’s penny-pincher, the country seems to be splashing out. That isn’t just a covid-19 response; a big thrift shift was already under way. Burundi’s brutal outgoing president of 15 years has died. Will his chosen successor be any better? And after some serious number-crunching, The Economist launches its US presidential forecast. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer 
 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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Plus, a troubling new report has found nearly 80% of all car accidents occur inside the home. We’ve got the latest on how to keep you and your family safe while burning rubber in your living room. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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From the earliest days of the coronavirus outbreak, health officials believed that it was largely sparing children and teenagers. But the rise of a mysterious inflammatory syndrome — with symptoms ranging from rashes to heart failure — in children testing positive for the virus is challenging that belief. Guest: Pam Belluck, a health and science writer for The New York Times, spoke with Jack McMorrow, 14, and his parents in Queens about his experience contracting the coronavirus. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily  Background reading: “If I send you home today, you’ll be dead by tomorrow.” This is what Jack heard after learning he had a mysterious illness connected to the coronavirus in children. “I would say that scared me to death but it more like scared me to life.”The new syndrome has been compared to a rare childhood illness called Kawasaki disease. But doctors have learned that it affects the heart differently and is appearing mostly in school-age children, rather than infants and toddlers.
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George Floyd is laid to rest in Texas. We hear from some of the people who knew him. President Trump and federal law enforcement vs. Washington, D.C. And how a black police officer responded to protests.
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Plus, the sign-up page for President Trump’s rallies now includes a coronavirus liability waiver, and the Trump administration is concealing the identities of coronavirus loan recipients, shielding undeserving applicants from public scrutiny.
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Democrats in Congress introduced the Justice In Policing Act yesterday, which includes a ban on chokeholds, a ban on no-knock warrants, and makes it easier to prosecute police officers. Plus, what New York's legislature is doing to reform policing in their state. Guest-host Dylan Marron fills in for Akilah Hughes. He shares lessons from his podcast “Conversations With People Who Hate Me," on how to have important discussions with people who disagree with you. And in headlines: Governor Andy Beshear to provide free health insurance for black Kentuckians, Chuck E. Cheese could file for bankruptcy, and Chris Cuomo shows ass on IG. Check out Dylan's podcast: dylanmarron.com/podcast
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The World continues its coverage of campaigns for police reform across the globe. Host Marco Werman speaks with Siana Bangura, an organizer in London, and Miski Noor, an activist with Black Visions Collective in Minneapolis. Also, The World's Jorge Valencia has a story about police killings in Latin America.  Tensions continue to escalate between the US and China. The US Navy is dispatching two aircraft carriers plus support ships to the western Pacific, a powerful signal to Beijing. Host Marco Werman speaks with military analyst Sim Tack about the escalations. With international tourism falling off a cliff, governments are trying to mitigate things by allowing their citizens to visit neighboring countries. But with "travel bubbles" forming around the world, the US hasn't been invited to buddy up with anybody. The World's Bianca Hillier has more. And, US President Donald Trump authorized economic sanctions against the International Criminal Court this week, unhappy about efforts to investigate US personnel. The World's Rupa Shenoy reports.
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Employees are crowdsourcing donations to social justice groups, which their employers matching. Plus, a roller-coaster week on Wall Street, a new number on consumer sentiment and spikes in new COVID-19 cases. And, household debt increased in the first quarter.
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Note: This episode contains strong language. Today, we’re sharing Episode 4 of “Rabbit Hole,” a New York Times audio series with the tech columnist Kevin Roose. In this episode, our reporter interviews the woman running the world’s largest and most influential video empire: Susan Wojcicki, the chief executive of YouTube. "If you're tuning in to "Rabbit Hole" for the first time, start with the prologue. You can find more information about the podcast at nytimes.com/rabbithole.
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As the weather heats up, many of us are contemplating how to safely go out into the world and enjoy the summer. CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta talks to CNN contributor and immunologist Erin Bromage about what to consider before doing anything from hosting a cookout to going for a hike.
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Some have called the pandemic “the great equalizer.”  But the coronavirus is killing black Americans at staggeringly higher rates than white Americans. Today, we explore why. Guest: Linda Villarosa, a writer for The New York Times Magazine covering racial health disparities, who spoke to Nicole Charles in New Orleans, La. about the death of her husband, Cornell Charles, known as Dickey. He was 51. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily  Background reading: How Mardi Gras accelerated the spread of the coronavirus among an already vulnerable population in New Orleans.The coronavirus has killed black and Latino people in New York City at twice the rate that it has killed white people. Black Britons are also twice as likely to die from coronavirus.Black Americans can face subconscious bias from medical professionals when they seek care. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have advised health professionals to be on the lookout for such bias, but some say the issue is far more systemic.
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From the BBC World Service: As non-essential stores in England open for the first time in three months, the boss of bookseller Barnes & Noble and Waterstones explains how quarantining books works. Investors worry about a potential second wave of COVID-19 infections.
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It’s not what you think. Transcript at vox.com/todayexplained. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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P.M. Edition for June 10. Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell says he doesn't expect to increase interest rates for at least a year and a half. Chief economics commentator Greg Ip discusses the decision. Plus, health and science coverage chief Stefanie Ilgenfritz discusses the latest developments in coronavirus testing, treatments and vaccines. Annmarie Fertoli hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Around the country, small businesses suffered damage from looting and unrest this past week. WSJ's Scott Calvert went to one hard-hit neighborhood in Philadelphia to talk to small business owners like Shelby Jones. Mr. Jones reflects on the damage his business suffered and why he will continue protesting.
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In the wake of nationwide protests in response to the death of George Floyd, CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta and Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms candidly discuss race, outrage, and the fears about the spread of Covid-19.
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In a bizarre back-and-forth with huge public health implications, the World Health Organization backs off claims that transmission of COVID-19 by asymptomatic patients is "rare." George Floyd is laid to rest in Houston. And Congress signals a potential compromise on police reform laws.
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As workplaces around the country are reopening, some employees have big questions. CNN’s Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta is joined by CNN Business Senior Writer Kathryn Vasel to discuss what to expect when you head back to work.
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As big corporations make public statements of outrage over the death of George Floyd, black employees are dealing with complicated workplace dynamics around race and police brutality. Dr. Laura Morgan Roberts explains her research on how workplaces should confront race, and two employees describe what it's like at their workplaces right now.
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For a full ad-free video of this podcast Episode logon and support our efforts at patreon.com/truepundit or subscribestar.com/truepundit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Even after Derek Chauvin was captured on video killing George Floyd, he could still get his job back. BuzzFeed’s Melissa Segura explains how. Transcript at vox.com/todayexplained. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Oscar-winning director Spike Lee criticizes NFL commissioner Roger Goodell�s apology to players about racism and explains what sparked his new movie Da 5 Bloods. Then, viral duo JoJo Clarke and Bri�Anna Harper join along with Bri�Anna�s mother, E�boni Lomax-Harper, to share about the 12-year-old�s work with Michael Bivins and Ne-Yo. Plus, the duo performs a medley of We Shall Overcome and Ain�t No Mountain High Enough. In Hot Topics, the co-hosts question if cancel culture has gone too far, and more.
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With fans not allowed in stadiums, some sports leagues are using computer-generated crowds to fill the stands. If your hair has grown to a completely unmanageable length, this new site can help. Scientists have discovered massive unidentified structures deep beneath the earth’s surface. How to work out like a medieval night. And some video recommendations for your weekend queue.
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A man involved in a slow-speed chase in Fort Lauderdale is being investigated in connection with a double homicide. In Texas, a three-month-old girl was found dead in a submerged vehicle, after allegedly being abducted by her father. Finally, Steven Carrillo, an air-force staff-sergeant, who is accused of ambushing two Santa Cruz County sheriff deputies, made posts condemning the police in the 48 hours before the incident.
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Protests continue over the killing of George Floyd. Why police convictions are still so rare. And why black Americans are left out of the economic recovery.
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As cities like Seattle descend into anarchy and neighborhoods in major Democrat-led cities and states clean up from riots and looting, Stigall continues discussing the issues. Kathy Barnette talks with Stigall about the politics of race and her race in PA. Steve Krakauer analyzes media’s poor, partisan performance in covering the chaos across the country. Joel Pollak offers biting commentary on the coming election in his new book “Red November.” Plus mail bag.
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President Trump wants to blame the unrest on antifa. Vox’s Zack Beauchamp explains why he can’t. Transcript at vox.com/todayexplained. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Georgia’s Primary, George Floyd’s Funeral, and Congress’ Approach to Police Reform As the coronavirus pandemic has created uncertainty for the upcoming general election, many Americans are reconsidering how they’ll cast their ballots. This week, many primary voters in Georgia were greeted by long lines and malfunctioning voting machines. The chaos surrounding Georgia’s recent election has raised questions about whether or not the same issues will reoccur in November.  Also, George Floyd was laid to rest in Houston following weeks in which thousands of Americans took to the streets to decry police brutality in his name. Meanwhile, Congress is reckoning with how to respond to the protests and calls for police accountability. Two national reporters join Politics with Amy Walter to discuss the Justice in Policing Act of 2020, how Republicans are responding to calls for police accountability, and Georgia’s flawed elections.  Guest Host: Matt Katz, WNYC Guests: Nick Fandos, Congressional Correspondent for The New York Times Laura Barron-Lopez, National Political Reporter at POLITICO  Congressman James Clyburn on his Time in the Civil Rights Movement and Addressing Systemic Racism  This week, Democrats introduced the Justice in Policing Act on Capitol Hill.  If passed, the bill would prohibit chokeholds, ban some no-knock warrants, track police misconduct at the national level, and make it easier to pursue legal and civil action against the police. The momentum for the bill stems from the uprisings against police brutality after George Floyd was brutally killed by police officers in Minneapolis. Congressman James Clyburn of South Carolina reflects on his time in the civil rights movement and what he hopes to accomplish through the Justice in Policing Act.  Guest: James Clyburn, Congressman from South Carolina’s 6th Congressional District and Majority Whip How “Defund the Police” has Become More Palatable to the Mainstream The killing of George Floyd by police officers in Minneapolis has shifted the way Americans see policing. Recent polling from The Washington Post found that 69 percent of Americans found “the killing of Floyd represents a broader problem within law enforcement.” While many high-ranking members of the Democratic Party don’t support calls to defund the police entirely, the notion of some form of defunding is picking up traction. A conversation about the politics of defunding the police. Guests: Alex Vitale, Author of "End of Policing" and Professor of Sociology and Coordinator of The Policing and Social Justice Project at Brooklyn College Andrea Ritchie, Researcher at the Interrupting Criminalization Initiative and author of "Invisible No More: Police Violence Against Black Women and Women of Color" How Minneapolis Plans to Dismantle Their Police Department Minneapolis has been in the national spotlight since George Floyd was killed by police on video. Although the events there sparked protests across the nation, the city is also a catalyst for change. One progressive city leader, Steve Fletcher, has been working on police reform since he took office in 2018. He was among nine members of the Minneapolis city council that recently announced their commitment to dismantling the city’s police department.  Guest:  Steve Fletcher, Minneapolis City Council, Ward 3
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Supreme Court Won't Take Up California's Sanctuary Law Case This morning the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear the Trump Administration’s challenge to California’s so called “sanctuary state” law. That leaves in place state rules that prohibit local California law enforcement from helping federal immigration authorities apprehend and deport people in the country illegally. Guest: Prof. Jessica Levinson, Loyola Law School Protests Erupt in Palmdale and Victorville Over Two Black Men Found Hanging Amid the ongoing protests for racial justice, two Black men have been found dead, hanging from trees in desert cities outside of Los Angeles. Reporter: Cerise Castle, KCRW Should I Get Tested? And When? Mass protests and the loosening of shelter-at-home orders are bringing more people together. Public health officials recommend getting tested for COVID-19 if you think you’ve been exposed. But doctors say it’s important to know when to get a test and to understand what the results mean. Reporter: Peter Arcuni, KQED Science Imperial Co. Has Highest COVID-19 Infection Rate in Calif. So far, more than 4-thousand people have tested positive for the coronavirus in Imperial County and 43 people have died from the virus there. Reporter: Julie Small, KQED
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Join Jim and Greg as they welcome Louisville's decision to end no-knock warrants. They also hammer Seattle Mayor Jenny Durkan for claiming nothing is really different in Seattle, despite the creation of CHAZ, the Capitol Hill Autonomous Zone, where police are not allowed in and reports of violent crime are on the rise. And they welcome the news that the Lake of the Ozarks pool party and symptomatic hair stylists have not led to outbreaks of COVID-19. They also embark on fun tangents about "Law & Order" and the 2020 convention season.
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It used to be rare for a president to fire an inspector general, a position created within government agencies after Watergate and assigned to fight waste and corruption. Today, we look at what President Trump’s pattern of replacing inspectors general reveals about the nature of the independent office — and about presidential power. Guest: Maggie Haberman, who covers the White House for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily  Background reading: Mr. Trump decided to fire Steve A. Linick, the Department of State’s inspector general, last week. Mr. Linick had opened an investigation into Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s spending habits. Congressional Democrats have now opened an investigation into the firing.The president also recently fired the intelligence community’s inspector general. Our chief White House correspondent explains why Mr. Trump’s drive against those he considers disloyal continues even during a pandemic.
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Note: This episode contains strong language. Today, we’re sharing Episode 2 of “Rabbit Hole,” a New York Times audio series with the tech columnist Kevin Roose. In this episode, we hear from a young man named Caleb who was pulled into a vortex on YouTube: “The truth is down there, and you’ve got to go down and dig for it.” What was he watching on the platform? And why was it so transfixing? If you're tuning in to "Rabbit Hole" for the first time, start with the prologue. You can find more information about the podcast at nytimes.com/rabbithole.
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The news to know for Friday, June 12th, 2020!  What to know today about the president’s new plans for both police reform and his campaign rallies, why the top U.S. military official is saying sorry, and when experts now expect a COVID-19 vaccine to be available. Plus, the newest travel trend, how museums are capturing this moment in history, and where you can find mini-apps within an app. Those stories and more in less than 10 minutes! Head to www.theNewsWorthy.com or see sources below to read more about any of the stories mentioned today. This episode is brought to you by www.Care.com/newsworthy and www.MagicSpoon.com/newsworthy  Become a NewsWorthy INSIDER! Learn more at  www.TheNewsWorthy.com/insider       Sources: Trump “Finalizing” Executive Order: NBC News, Reuters, Politico, NY Times Joint Chiefs Chair Apologizes: AP, NY Times, NBC News, ABC News Harvard Doc’s COVID-19 Projection: USA Today, The Hill, Tweet Case Count, Death Toll: Johns Hopkins Moderna Vaccine Final Tests: AP, Reuters, Bloomberg 1.5 Million More Unemployed: USA Today, Axios, Politico, Labor Dept.  Stock Market Falls: CNBC, WSJ, WaPo, FOX News Rally at your own Risk: NBC News, CBS News, WaPo, USA Today RNC Picks Jacksonville, Florida: WSJ, Axios, CNN, FOX News Biden Campaign Stops: Reuters, Politico DNC Milwaukee Convention: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, The Independent Microsoft Won’t Sell Police Facial Recognition: Mashable, Engadget, NPR, AP Smithsonian Collecting D.C. Protest Art: AP, CBS News, DCist Snapchat Minis: The Verge, Snap, TechCrunch, CNBC RV Sales Ticking Up: NYT, Fox Business NFL $250 Million to Black Community: Bleacher Report, USA Today, Axios, NFL Apple $100m Justice Initiative: The Verge, Axios, Tim Cook YouTube $100m to Amplify Black Creators: The Verge, Engadget, YouTube
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People across the US have flooded into the streets to protest police violence against black Americans. We’ll break down some of the concerns protests are highlighting, including disparities in how law enforcement treats black Americans, as well as police militarization. We’ll also talk to an expert about some potential solutions. Also: if you’re seeing calls to donate to a bail fund and wondering how those work, we’ll explain.  And finally, we’re ‘pressing pause’ to highlight the creative ways people are documenting their lives during the COVID-19 pandemic.  On this episode, you’ll hear from:  Kimberly Burke, research fellow at the Center for Policing Equity Bernadette Rabuy, senior policy analyst at the Prison Policy Initiative Let us know what questions you have about what’s going on in the news right now. Email us at audio@theskimm.com or call and leave us a voicemail at: 646-461-6370. You might hear your message on the show.  If you want to add theSkimm to your daily routine, sign-up for our free newsletter the Daily Skimm. It’s everything you need to know to start your day, right in your inbox.
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On the Gist, the anti-ANTIFA provocateur in Buffalo, NY. In the interview, Emily Oster, professor of economics at Brown University and NY Times bestselling author of Cribsheet and Expecting Better, joins Mike to talk about kids’ summer camps, weighing options as states begin to reopen, and assessing risk when it comes to coronavirus. In the spiel, de Blasio tries again. Email us at thegist@slate.com Podcast production by Daniel Schroeder and Margaret Kelley. Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Our worlds have contracted; once expansive, our orbits are now measured by rooms and street blocks. But there are still ways to travel. Today, escape to the worlds contained in three letters — one about the summer of 1910, another describing an upended misconception and a third about how superstitions can offer release. We hope they can offer you some meaning — or at least a distraction. This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
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For the past decade, Ying Ying and Le Le had refused to mate, until now. Hear how the two love bears managed to stay true to their Lord and Savior. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Tripoli has long been under siege by Khalifa Haftar, a warlord bent on toppling the internationally backed government. At last he has been pushed back from the capital; now what? North Korea is no longer taking calls from the South, but that is probably a diplomatic distraction from big problems at home. And how Ikea is assembling its post-covid future. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer 
 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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On today’s “A Bit of Relief,” two critics at The Times share the home rituals that they're leaning on for comfort. For the television critic James Poniewozik, it’s binge-watching television with his family (“Experiencing good or even brilliantly dumb art is a form of self-care,” he reassures). And for the restaurant critic Tejal Rao, the act of rewatching cinematic food scenes is surprisingly delightful.
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The disappearance of a three -year-old British girl at a Portuguese holiday resort in 2007 quickly became a global news story as the hunt for her grew ever more extensive. Thirteen years later, with the mystery still unsolved, German police revealed they had a new prime suspect. Is there now a conclusion in sight?. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
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Note: This episode contains strong language. Today, we’re sharing Episode 3 of “Rabbit Hole,” a New York Times audio series with the tech columnist Kevin Roose. In this episode, our reporter continues to trace the journey of a young man named Caleb. Five years into a rabbit hole on YouTube, Caleb discovers a parallel universe. If you're tuning in to "Rabbit Hole" for the first time, start with the prologue. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/rabbithole.
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As the American economy plunges toward a recession, economists and policymakers are triaging proposals to stanch the bleeding. All of their ideas will cost money the government doesn’t have. That leaves Democrats and Republicans with two major questions: How much should be borrowed for bailouts — and what spending is needed to avoid permanent economic damage?  Guest: Ben Casselman, an economics reporter at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily  Background reading: Jerome H. Powell, the Federal Reserve chair, has urged Congress to spend more on economic relief — even if doing so means increasing the federal deficit. He warned that the United States was experiencing an economic hit “without modern precedent.”
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This week, nine members of the Minneapolis City Council announced their intention to dissolve the Minneapolis Police Department. And while this moment may belong to the protesters of Minneapolis, it has just as much to do with the conduct of the city’s police, and how they’ve met even small reforms with utter contempt.  Guest: Steve Fletcher, a member of the Minneapolis City Council.  Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Today on The Daily Beans: Judge Reggie Walton has finished reviewing the full Mueller report and he has some questions for the DoJ, the WHO clarifies that COVID can be spread by asymptomatic carriers, and the amicus curiae deadline in the Flynn case. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Laura Barton has always known that she wanted to have children. After years of miscarriages, and a breakup from her partner last year, she decided to embark on solo IVF. In early March, as the world shut down, she found herself flying to Crete to undergo treatment. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
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The Investigators Who Dissected the Clinton Foundation’s Labyrinth of Global Fraud for Congress Break Their Silence in their First Interview; the Revelations are Disturbing. John Moynihan & Larry Doyle Join Paine to Break Big News on the Clinton's, Bill Gates, and Shocking Findings Surrounding Coronavirus and much much more.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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What is the internet doing to us? Today, we’re sharing the first episode of a new Times audio series called “Rabbit Hole.” In the episode, “Wonderland,” we hear from a young man named Caleb, who finds escape and direction on the internet. We follow his journey into the YouTube universe. “Rabbit Hole," a New York Times audio series with tech columnist Kevin Roose, explores what happens when our lives move online. You can find more information about it here.
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The stock market had its biggest drop since March. A big part of the Republican National Convention is moving from Charlotte, North Carolina, to Jacksonville, Florida. Calls to change the measure that lets police departments get surplus military hardware and supplies.
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Investors in US and European equities were rattled on Thursday after the Federal Reserve’s dire assessment of the US economy and fresh concerns of an uptick in coronavirus cases, and the British government has abandoned its plan to introduce full border checks with the EU on January 1. Plus, the FT’s banking editor, Stephen Morris, unpacks the pressure HSBC is under after backing China’s Hong Kong national security law. 
 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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Minneapolis City Council members have said they intend to disband the Minneapolis Police Department and replace it with a community-based public safety model. On the federal level, Democrats will introduce reform legislation today that, among other things, will change the standard for use of force. We interview Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison, who recently took the lead in the prosecuting cases related to George Floyd’s killing by police. We ask him why it's so difficult to prosecute officers, and what he makes of moves to disband police departments. And in headlines: India experiences its highest day of cases, unemployment numbers are better but still terrible, and former VP Joe Biden has enough delegates to win the nomination. Plus, Erin Ryan fills in for Akilah Hughes.
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Rick Steves is a travel evangelist, always in motion, traversing faraway places and inspiring others to do the same. So when the world shuts down, and Rick Steves can no longer travel, then who is Rick Steves? Sam Anderson, a writer for The Times Magazine, profiled the travel guru last year. Today, Sam asks Rick how he’s been expanding his horizons from home. Dreaming of travel, we learn, is nearly as sweet as the real thing.
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A.M. Edition for June 10. A look at special health challenges older workers face during the pandemic, things co-workers need to consider too. As new forecasts make predictions of widespread economic damage, some investors bet on a quick recovery. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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He was Batman. He was Iceman. Until he wasn’t. So what happened to Val Kilmer? In this weird, dark time, Taffy Brodesser-Akner tells a story about how sometimes, in the end, everything is different but everything is good. This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
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The protests sparked by the death of George Floyd have spread widely across the U.S. for the last week. Today, a protestor shares why he decided to demonstrate, and a professor explains the pandemic's relationship to the protests.
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A West Virginia woman faked her death to avoid prison. Congress is working on legislation to prevent the president from dropping nuclear bombs into hurricanes. And dogs may just be the next step in fighting COVID-19. Join Ben Bowlin for more Strange News Daily, and share your stories on Twitter: #strangedaily. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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When a family member is hospitalized with Covid-19, often a single relative is chosen to be the primary line of communication between doctors and the rest of the family. CNN producer Lou Foglia took on this role when his father was hospitalized.  Dr. Sanjay Gupta invites Lou to share excerpts from the essay he wrote about that experience.
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The round-the-clock protest for Black lives known as CHAZ (or is it CHOP?) has been at it for a week and counting outside the city's East Precinct. How long will it go? KUOW's Casey Martin gives us the view from the ground.
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The city of Camden, New Jersey disbanded and rebranded it's police department in 2013. As reform advocates around the country weigh the options, what can we learn from Camden? On today's show, Allison Steele, news reporter for the Philadelphia Inquirer, talks about the extent to which Camden, NJ's 2013 dissolution of its dysfunctional police department, and its replacement with a county force, can be a model for police reformers today.
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On the Gist, does Barr know what chemicals are? In the interview, New York Times opinion columnist and CBS News political analyst Jamelle Bouie joins Mike to talk race and policing in America. His latest column is, “The Police Are Rioting. We Need to Talk About It.” In the spiel, defining police reformation. Email us at thegist@slate.com Podcast production by Daniel Schroeder and Margaret Kelley. Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Professor Ibram X. Kendi explains how the protests and unrest are a result of black America’s living nightmare and what it will take to wake up. Transcript at vox.com/todayexplained. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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When Louisiana’s stay-at-home order expires today, restaurants across the state can begin allowing customers back inside, at their own discretion. So how do restaurant owners feel about the decision they now face? For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily   Guest: Jasmine Lombrage, a restaurant owner in Baton Rouge, La.  Background reading: America’s reopening has begun in force, just weeks after the coronavirus put most of the country on lockdown. See which states are reopening and which are still shut down.Even before the C.D.C. released checklists to help businesses decide when to reopen, chefs and public officials began considering how a post-pandemic restaurant might look.
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P.M. Edition for June 9. The latest monthly jobs report showed the unemployment rate among black Americans is more than three percentage points higher than the rest of the population-and experts fear their recovery may take much longer. Reporter Amara Omeokwe has more. Annmarie Fertoli hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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A Utah mother allegedly drove her minivan into a golf-course pond, with her 18-month-old son still strapped into his car seat, killing the child. Miami-Dade police are investigating the murder of Aubrey Figg, who was discovered dead inside her Miami Beach apartment last week. Finally, prosecutors in Virginia say that a man who drove his truck into a crowd of protesters in Richmond is a self-proclaimed leader of the Ku Klux Klan.
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Summer’s coming, but for many, it will look very different. Camps and activities are getting cancelled, so families are getting creative. CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta talks about solutions for parents and for kids.
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More police departments are suspending, firing, and charging officers, but is it too late to save their budgets? New satellite imagery shows parking lots at Chinese hospitals were packed in October, giving new insights to the rise of COVID-19. And it turns out we've been living through a recession since February. Listen and subscribe to "The Essentials: Inside the Curve": https://apple.co/2ROvcnw Like the show? Leave a review: http://bit.ly/ReviewStartHere Follow @StartHereABC for exclusive content, show updates and more: - Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/starthereabc - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/starthereabc - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/starthereabc Discover more ABC News podcasts: http://www.abcnewspodcasts.com Start Here is produced by ABC Audio. For more information: http://www.abcnewspodcasts.com
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When Medaria Arradondo became the police chief of Minneapolis, he moved quickly to reform the force's policing tactics. WSJ's Dan Frosch explains why it's easier to change the policies of a police force than its culture.
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Each weekday, ABC News updates the country's fight against the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic - both medical and economic. We'll answers your questions about the latest outbreak numbers and treatment developments. We'll look at the cities and towns that are reopening, and what our new normal looks like. ABC's Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Jennifer Ashton responds directly to questions submitted on Instagram @DrJAshton. Hosted by Amy Robach and Aaron Katersky. "Bringing America Back: What You Need to Know" is a production of ABC Audio, makers of the daily ABC News podcast "Start Here," the chart-topping series "The Dropout," and more: http://www.abcaudio.com/podcasts
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Federal prosecutors are asking a court to throw out their own criminal case against the former national security adviser Michael Flynn. We look at what led to that decision. Guest: Mark Mazzetti, a Washington investigative correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Attorney General William Barr’s extraordinary decision to drop the criminal case against Mr. Flynn shocked legal experts, won President Trump’s praise and prompted a career prosecutor to quit the caseThe federal judge overseeing the case has appointed a hard-charging former prosecutor and judge to oppose the Justice Department’s efforts. The dropped charges against Mr. Flynn granted him another turnabout in a life filled with them.
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The coronavirus pandemic could set the planet back on decades worth of progress in securing access to food for millions of people living in poverty. And, protests against police brutality and racism in the US and elsewhere are resonating in South Africa, which has its own complicated history of police violence. Also, Russian emergency teams are still working to contain an oil spill in the Arctic before it reaches the Atlantic Ocean.
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P.M. Edition for June 8. New York City, hit hard by the pandemic, begins the first phase of reopening. Reporter Stephanie Yang talks to business owners there. Plus, educators examine the challenges of remote learning as they decide how and when to reopen schools. Reporter Tawnell Hobbs and Johns Hopkins School of Education Dean Christopher Morphew join host Annmarie Fertoli for a conversation on education. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Los Angeles County Reopens Gyms, Museums, Pools, And More Today is a big day for LA county. It's set to start letting a lot of places reopen for the first time since coronavirus closure orders were issued in March. Museums, Gyms, zoos and and public pools are now allowed to do business again, and the county is allowing film and television production to restart. Reporter: Saul Gonzalez, KQED Sacramento School Officials Seek Out Hard-To-Reach Students This summer, educators are taking stock of just how dramatically COVID-19 has changed how kids learn. More than 1600 students in Sacramento lost touch with their public schools when the city district closed classrooms in March. Officials have had to find ways to reconnect with kids who are the hardest to reach. Reporter: Pauline Bartolone, CapRadio What Will Schools Look Like When They Reopen This Fall? Superintendents around the state are grappling with how to reopen schools safely. They’re figuring out how to keep kids learning, while getting a crash course in logistics. Guest: Robert Nelson, Superintendent, Fresno Unified School District Reflecting on UC President Napolitano's Tenure: 'I Want to be Remembered as Being Lively' Janet Napolitano is nearing the end of the tenure as the President of the University of California. She sat down with us this week and spoke about the decision to suspend standardized tests in admissions, the ongoing pay dispute with UC grad students, and the future of Dreamers whose immigration status is now in the hands of the U.S. Supreme Court. Guest: UC President Janet Napolitano UCLA Grad Reflects On Graduation And Uncertainty seniors at UCLA are graduating today. The university’s 100th graduating class will don their caps and gowns virtually because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Soon-to-be-graduate Noor Bouzidi recorded some reflections.
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From the BBC World Service: The U.K.’s economy shrank by 20.4% in April, the sharpest contraction since records began. Asian and European stocks follow Wall Street down on fears of a second wave of the coronavirus. And, Sony has revealed its new Playstation 5.
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For Aleksander Doba, pitting himself against the wide-open sea — storms, sunstroke, monotony, hunger and loneliness — is a way to feel alive in old age. Today, listen to the story of one man who chose to paddle toward the existential crisis that is life, crossing the Atlantic alone in a kayak. Three times. This story was recorded by Audm. To hear more audio stories from publishers like The New York Times, download Audm for iPhone or Android.
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After China announced plans to impose new national security laws on Hong Kong, the U.S. declared the city was no longer autonomous. WSJ's James Areddy explains the significance of the back and forth over Hong Kong's status.
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Georgia�s 2018 gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams responds to the state�s recent election chaos, why Americans need to �rethink� policing and reacts to Pres. Trump�s refusal to rename military bases named after Confederate figures. In Hot Topics, the co-hosts react to statues being removed and NASCAR banning Confederate flags as Trump says he will not even consider renaming military bases named after Confederate leaders, and more.
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For a full ad-free video of this podcast Episode logon and support our efforts at patreon.com/truepundit or subscribestar.com/truepundit Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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The double standard that guides who can protest – and how – in America. And, what nursing home residents are experiencing during the pandemic, told firsthand.
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More states are beginning to reopen, but not without some precautions. Hear how the latest phase will aim to reduce overcrowding in gyms by only admitting members who pose no threat of physically exerting themselves at all. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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UK Black Lives Matter protests have been taking place across the country. They have not just been about solidarity with the US or racism in Britain today, but also about the need to address Britain’s past and the impact of that legacy. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/infocus
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Plus, the Federal Reserve forecasts a slow recovery – with worsening inequality. And the voting debacle in Georgia’s primary this week does not bode well for November.
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The pandemic and turmoil over police brutality and racial injustice are pushing the 50th anniversary of Pride in new directions.
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George Floyd will be laid to rest today; our obituaries editor reflects on his life and untimely death. His murder has fuelled a long-overdue discussion of America’s fragmented and unaccountable police forces. How much could yesterday’s sweeping congressional bill actually fix? For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer 
 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.
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On Tuesday, the Supreme Court debated the nature of presidential power in two sets of cases regarding demands for President Trump’s personal records: one about his taxes, the other about claims that during his campaign he paid to silence women with whom he previously had affairs. This is what a constitutional clash on a conference call sounded like. Guest: Adam Liptak, who covers the Supreme Court for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Based on the court’s questions, our reporter thinks the two sets of cases may well be decided in different ways. Here are the full arguments, if you want to listen in.Aimee Stephens, the transgender plaintiff in another Supreme Court case who we spoke with on the show in November, has died of complications related to kidney failure. She was 59.
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Plus, the Clemson football team leads a demonstration, the CDC issues new COVID-19 guidelines, West Point cadets graduate under unusual circumstances and SpaceX launches its latest Falcon 9 rocket. (Audio: Associated Press, ClemsonTigers.com)
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It came to the United States from Asia and first appeared in Washington State. The country was slow to recognize it. Deaths mounted as it circulated for weeks undetected. And now, if it’s not stopped, it could reshape populations and industries across the country. Today, we discuss the arrival of the Asian giant hornet. Guest: Mike Baker, a Pacific Northwest correspondent for The New York Times who spoke with Ted McFall, a beekeeper in Washington State. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: The Asian giant hornet can kill humans with its stings. It also decapitates bees methodically. If the hornets spread across the United States and devastate bee populations, which we depend on for one out of every three bites of food we eat, our food supply could be threatened.Although the Asian giant hornet kills honeybees in their hives, some bees have developed a remarkable defense: cooking the hornets alive.
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Ahmaud Arbery would have turned 26 on Friday. Instead of celebrating, a crowd of protesters, protected by masks, demanded justice for his death in front of a courthouse in Georgia. So what do we know about the killing of Mr. Arbery by two armed white men? Guest: Richard Fausset, a correspondent based in Atlanta. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: On Feb. 23, Mr. Arbery was jogging not far from his home on the outskirts of Brunswick, Ga. Then he was confronted by two white men in a pickup truck and fatally shot.After video footage of Mr. Arbery’s killing was leaked, two men were arrested and charged with murder. Widespread protests and 2.23 mile solidarity runs ensued, posted on social media with the hashtag #IRunWithMaud.
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Flying can be risky these days, so what should you do if you need to travel? CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta and Erin Bromage, Associate Professor of Biology at University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, share tips on how to mitigate some of that risk.
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In the latest episode of 'Debriefing the Campaign,' Major is joined by CBS News Political Correspondent Ed O'Keefe to discuss the problems Georgia and Nevada encountered on Tuesday that could be a warning for November as well as the Republican National Committee’s decision to move President Trump’s nomination acceptance speech from Charlotte to Jacksonville. Election Day is 143 days away. Recap the week's top political news with Major and Ed.
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As the coronavirus’ death toll in the U.S. surpasses 100,000 victims, CNN’s Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta takes a moment to reflect on this tragic milestone and commemorate those we’ve lost.
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A.M. Edition for June 9. Lessons for the U.S. from abroad on reopening without causing a second wave of coronavirus infections. How to understand the mix of negative news headlines and positive stock moves. Plus, the joy and the agony of shared Netflix accounts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Today is Thursday, June 11, and we’re looking at Amazon vs. Tesla.
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In this week’s episode of “A Bit of Relief,” we turn to tea and toast for comfort. First, Kim Severson, a food writer at The Times, shares her love for buttered toast sprinkled in cinnamon and sugar. Then we hear Mark Thompson, C.E.O. at The Times, explain how to brew his ideal cup of British tea: using a stovetop kettle, loose black tea leaves, a strainer and a splash of milk. It's more complicated than you'd think.
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Weird comfort foods born out of historic times of discomfort. How to hug during a pandemic. Electric vehicle batteries may get a second life. Drones are now delivering library books to kids in Virginia. And the best custom birthday videos on the internet.
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During the pandemic, many people are struggling to make even the smallest decisions. Why does choosing what to eat for dinner or what to watch on TV suddenly feel impossible? CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta and neuroscientist Daphna Shohamy explain that we may need to look inside the human brain for the answers.
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Trump’s former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis published a scathing indictment of his presidency, and he’s been backed up by Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski. Lawmakers in the Congressional Black Caucus are preparing a piece of police legislation that will aim to end racial profiling and qualified immunity. We speak with Dr. Keisha Blain, a professor of African American History at University of Pittsburgh, about how what’s happening now is an extension of the work civil rights leaders began long ago. And in headlines: Trump signs executive order to weaken environmental protections, Zoom makes users pay for end-to-end encryption, and loud blonde man Jake Paul charged with looting.
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A bar in the Austrian Alps. A megachurch in South Korea. Scientists are focusing on certain superspreading events that might be responsible for an outsized portion of coronavirus cases. Bojan Pancevski explains how this understanding could be key to reopening. Note: An earlier version of this caption incorrectly said the bar was in the Swiss Alps.
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Everyone wants to know where the coronavirus came from. In the absence of a clear explanation, several theories are circulating — including one, pushed by the Trump administration, that the pandemic started because of malpractice in a lab in Wuhan, China. But is that a secret the Chinese government is keeping, or a mystery no one knows the answer to? Guest: Julian E. Barnes, who covers national security for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Leaders in the intelligence community have said there is no indication the virus is man-made, but have yet to reach a conclusion on its origins. While many scientists say the virus most likely made the leap from an animal to a human in southern China, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and President Trump continue to link the outbreak to a government lab.Some national security analysts are worried that pressure from senior Trump administration officials could distort assessments about the origin of the coronavirus and be used as a weapon in an escalating battle with China.
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The former police officer who killed George Floyd has been charged with murder. But Floyd’s case is just one of many recent incidents of police brutality in Minneapolis. The Marshall Project’s Simone Weichselbaum explains why police reform hasn’t worked in the city. Transcript at vox.com/todayexplained. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Universities across the United States have long prided themselves on bridging the differences between their students. How the coronavirus has instead reinforced inequalities that campus life can hide. Guest: Nicholas Casey, a national politics reporter at The New York Times, who spoke to faculty and students at Haverford College, a liberal arts school near Philadelphia. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: When the students were sleeping in the same dorms and eating the same dining hall food, the disparities in their backgrounds weren’t as clear as they are over video chat. Here’s a peek inside two students’ vastly different worlds.
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How cities failed to protect the black community from the coronavirus. President Trump’s break with the World Health Organization during a pandemic. And the double-edged sword of cameras being everywhere for racial injustice protesters and police.
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For the first time, Twitter took steps to fact check and shield from view certain tweets from President Trump. In response, the President signed an executive order targeting Section 230, which protects social media companies from legal liability for content posted on their sites. Deepa Seetharaman explains what's behind the fight.
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