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1
With crowds that are said to number 15,000 to 20,000 people, Senator Elizabeth Warren’s campaign events frequently dwarf those of her Democratic rivals. This week, we experienced the growing phenomenon that is the Warren rally. Guest: Thomas Kaplan, a political reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Ms. Warren, running on a message of sweeping change, is solidifying her place in an exclusive club of presidential candidates who have become crowd magnets.At her campaign events, Ms. Warren’s speech is only the first act. Act Two? The selfie line.Back-to-back rallies by Ms. Warren and President Trump laid out competing versions of populism that could come to define the 2020 presidential campaign.
2
In Part 1 of this series, our colleagues Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey reported on Lisa Bloom, a victims’ rights attorney who used her experience representing women to defend Harvey Weinstein. In Part 2, we look at the role of Ms. Bloom’s mother, the women’s rights lawyer Gloria Allred.  Guests: Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, investigative reporters for The New York Times and the authors of “She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.
3
Last week, our colleagues Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey published a book documenting their investigation of Harvey Weinstein. In writing it, they discovered information about two feminist icons — Gloria Allred and her daughter, Lisa Bloom — that raises questions about their legacies and the legal system in which they’ve worked. Today, we look at the role of Ms. Bloom, a lawyer who represented Mr. Weinstein.  Guests: Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, investigative reporters for The New York Times and the authors of “She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: New reporting in “She Said” shows how some figures who have presented themselves as allies of victims have helped maintain their silence — and, in some cases, profited from it.Read more about Ms. Bloom’s involvement in the Weinstein case.
4
President Trump is saying that Iran appears to be responsible for the weekend attacks on oil facilities in Saudi Arabia. We look at where things are likely to go from here. Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: President Trump said that the United States was prepared for war if necessary, but that he would “like to avoid” a military conflict with Iran.Mr. Trump’s response to the attacks offered insight into his deference to the Saudi royal family.
5
President Trump denies saying anything inappropriate to a foreign leader. But House Democrats push the intelligence community for information on a whistleblower complaint that allegedly accuses him of that. Will they get that information? Students across the world are marching for action on climate change today. Swedish teenage activist Greta Thunberg leads the cause. How did she create this movement and what are the demands? And catastrophic floods have hit large parts of southeast Texas. A state of disaster has been declared in 13 counties.
6
Last week, CNN broke the story that the United States had secretly extracted a top spy from Russia in 2017. What does that mean now for American intelligence operations? Guest: Julian E. Barnes, who covers national security for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: The Moscow informant was instrumental to the C.I.A.’s conclusion that President Vladimir V. Putin had ordered and orchestrated Russia’s election interference campaign.
7
Today on “The Daily,” we present Episode 4 of “1619,” a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast. Black Americans were denied access to doctors and hospitals for decades. From the shadows of this exclusion, they pushed to create the nation’s first federal health care programs. Guests: Jeneen Interlandi, a member of The New York Times’s editorial board and a writer for The Times Magazine, and Yaa Gyasi, the author of “Homegoing.” Background reading:“One hundred and fifty years after the freed people of the South first petitioned the government for basic medical care, the United States remains the only high-income country in the world where such care is not guaranteed to every citizen,” Jeneen Interlandi writes.The Times Magazine asked 16 writers to bring pivotal moments in African-American history to life. Read Yaa Gyasi’s story “Bad Blood” here.The “1619” audio series is part of The 1619 Project, a major initiative from The Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. Read more from the project here.
8
The vast majority of your plastic isn’t being recycled. It might be time to consider lighting it on fire.
9
Just 10 candidates qualified for the stage in Houston, but that didn’t change some recurring themes: Joe Biden was again the target of fierce scrutiny, and health care was a central point of contention. But what else did we learn? Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading:Attacks on Mr. Biden highlighted the divide over the Obama legacy, with the former vice president repeatedly invoking his old boss’s name.Many Democrats hoped that defeating an unpopular, rampaging president would be relatively simple. But party officials are wary of some potential vulnerabilities that this debate re-emphasized.Here are six takeaways from the contest.
10
Saudi Arabia presents bits of wreckage as evidence. They're blaming Iran for the attack on their oil facilities. How could the administrations in Washington and Riyadh respond? An old photo shows Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau dressed in brownface. What are the circumstances surrounding that picture? Also, the Federal Reserve cuts interest rates for the second time this year. It's a move the Fed typically makes to ward off recession. What's the move suggest about the near future of the economy?
11
Andrew Yang, a former tech executive, remains one of the least known candidates in a Democratic presidential field that includes senators, mayors, a governor and a former vice president. But by focusing on the potential impact of automation on jobs, he has attracted surprisingly loyal and passionate support. One of our technology writers has been following his campaign since before it officially began. Guests: Andrew Yang, a candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination; and Kevin Roose, who writes about technology for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Armed with numbers, history lessons and the occasional self-deprecating joke, Mr. Yang has been preaching a grim gospel about automation. And voters are responding.The top 10 Democrats will share one stage for the first time starting at 8 p.m. Eastern. Here’s what to watch for.
12
Residents in the District of Columbia have been living with "taxation without representation" from Day 1. Today, they take their call for statehood to Congress.
13
Katie Zezima on why federal money has a limited impact in communities fighting the opioid crisis. And Emily Giambalvo tracks the lives of the dogs rescued from Michael Vick’s dogfighting operation.
14
The world was gripped by massive student-led climate strikes today. Some say the demonstrations were the largest climate protest in history. We’ll let you know what strikers want and what they’ll be watching for at a big UN climate summit on Monday. Meanwhile: Taiwan’s friend group got a bit smaller this week, as it loses support from two of its traditional backers in the Pacific. Also on today’s show: a quick update on Israel’s election, and the truth about Japanese whisky.
15
Today on “The Daily,” we present Episode 3 of “1619,” a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast. Black music, forged in captivity, became the sound of complete artistic freedom. It also became the sound of America. Guest: Wesley Morris, a critic-at-large for The New York Times. This episode contains explicit language. Background reading: “The proliferation of black music across the planet — the proliferation, in so many senses, of being black — constitutes a magnificent joke on American racism,” Wesley Morris writes.The “1619” audio series is part of The 1619 Project, a major initiative from The Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. Read more from the project here.
16
Results are too close to call in Israel's elections. Is Benjamin Netanyahu's political future in peril? Two defense department officials tell NPR they have images of Iran setting up drones and missiles. How certain can they be that those weapons were used to strike a Saudi oil facility? The governor of California warns the president to back off. But the Trump administration is set to revoke the state's power to set auto emission standards.
17
John Bolton, the national security adviser, was ousted after fundamental disputes with President Trump over how to handle foreign policy challenges like Afghanistan, Iran and North Korea. But the two men disagreed about how they parted ways. Guest: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:President Trump said he fired John Bolton; Mr. Bolton insisted that he had resigned. Regardless, they had a fundamental disagreement over foreign policy, most recently Afghanistan.Mr. Trump is now looking for the fourth national security adviser of his presidency. Here is a short list of possibilities.
18
Shane Harris on the whistleblower rattling the intelligence community. Juliet Eilperin explains the president’s move to take away California’s ability to set its own emission standards. And Maura Judkis on the legal challenges of opening a cannabis cafe.
19
President Trump abruptly called off negotiations between the United States and the Taliban that could have ended the war in Afghanistan and canceled a secret meeting at Camp David. We look at how a historic peace deal went off the rails. Guest: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:The United States and the Taliban, after nine rounds of painstaking negotiations in Doha, Qatar, appeared to have ironed out most of the issues between them. But President Trump canceled a secret meeting at Camp David and called off the talks.What jarred many Afghans was how a single attack and the death of one American, cited by Mr. Trump, could upend 10 months of negotiations.
20
In a battle over what kind of democracy would prevail in Britain, Prime Minister Boris Johnson seemed to have gained the upper hand by cutting Parliament out of Brexit. Until last week. Guest: Mark Landler. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: In Washington, scarcely a handful of Republicans have stood up to President Trump. In comparison, Prime Minister Boris Johnson has found lawmakers in his Conservative Party to be much more rebellious.Mr. Johnson has received messages of support from President Trump, and there are some obvious parallels in the rise of the two leaders. But the “bromance” between Mr. Johnson and Mr. Trump is more complex than it might seem.Mr. Johnson’s chief aide, Dominic Cummings, who appeared to revel in the feud with Parliament, has become a lightning rod for criticism of the government’s strategy.
21
A whistleblower is sending Washington into a tizzy today. The House Intelligence Committee is demanding information about a complaint that reportedly has to do with President Trump. Meanwhile: an actor’s arrest is making waves in Russia. And other actors are staging protests. Also on today’s show: a big Chinese tech company is launching a new smartphone model in the middle of a trade war, and the Washington Monument is making it easier to make it to the top.
22
Israeli PM Benjamin Netanyahu’s decade-long hold on power may be coming to an end. Anyone up for peace?
23
For almost two decades, the United States and Israel have tried to stop Iran from developing nuclear weapons. Israeli leaders — including the current prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu — have pushed for a military strike on Iran, a prospect that American presidents have long opposed. But a Times investigation reveals a secret history that shows how close the three countries came to war. Guest: Mark Mazzetti, a Washington investigative correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Interviews with dozens of current and former American, Israeli and European officials over several months reveal the startling details of a narrowly averted war and raise questions about how President Trump will respond.Moving further away from the 2015 nuclear agreement, Iran said on  Thursday that it had stopped honoring the deal’s limits on research and development.
24
Four hundred years ago, in August 1619, a ship carrying more than 20 enslaved Africans arrived in the British colony of Virginia. No aspect of the country that would be formed here has been untouched by the 250 years of slavery that followed.  “1619,” a New York Times audio series, examines the long shadow of that fateful moment. Today, instead of our usual show, we present Episode 1: “The Fight for a True Democracy.” Host: Nikole Hannah-Jones, who writes for The New York Times Magazine. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  This episode includes scenes of graphic violence. Background reading:“Without the idealistic, strenuous and patriotic efforts of black Americans, our democracy today would most likely look very different — it might not be a democracy at all,” Nikole Hannah-Jones writes.The “1619” audio series is part of The 1619 Project, a major initiative from The Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. Read more from the project here.
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Today on “The Daily,” we present Episode 2 of “1619,” a New York Times audio series hosted by Nikole Hannah-Jones. You can find more information about it at nytimes.com/1619podcast. The institution of slavery turned a poor, fledgling nation into a financial powerhouse, and the cotton plantation was America’s first big business. Behind the system, and built into it, was the whip. Guests: Matthew Desmond, a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine and the author of “Evicted,” and Jesmyn Ward, the author of “Sing, Unburied, Sing.” This episode includes scenes of graphic violence. Background reading:“As the large slave-labor camps grew increasingly efficient, enslaved black people became America’s first modern workers,” Matthew Desmond writes.The “1619” audio series is part of The 1619 Project, a major initiative from The Times observing the 400th anniversary of the beginning of American slavery. Read more from the project here.
26
A month after a gunman killed 22 people at a Walmart store in El Paso, the nation’s largest retailer, said that it would stop selling ammunition used for handguns and military-style weapons and call on Congress to consider a new ban on assault rifles. We look at what Walmart’s move means, and how corporate America could play a role in curbing the epidemic of gun violence. Guest: Andrew Ross Sorkin, a financial columnist for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Walmart, whose reach has reshaped communities nationwide, largely avoids publicly wading into politics. That made its decision to limit ammunition sales even more notable.The move by Doug McMillon, Walmart’s chief executive, “to engage in a meaningful conversation about responsible gun sales in America could give license to other business leaders to enter the conversation,” Andrew Ross Sorkin writes. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.
27
As the Global Climate Strike gets under way, we look at all matters climatic. History shows that fervent debate—and self-interested misinformation—go back to the mid-20th century. Uncertainties in scientists’ climate models are swamped by uncertainties about what people will do. And, plenty of people are already adapting to climate change, but that presents its own risks. Finally, climate-minded artists add their voices to the debates. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
28
This week Maine joins several states allowing terminally ill patients to end their lives with medication. Cyndie Rogers explains why she eventually wants to take advantage of Maine’s Death with Dignity Act.
29
Evidence from the attacks on Saudi oil facilities has Iran analysts worried. So what might the Trump administration do if Iran is found responsible? We haven't heard much about the Mueller report since Robert Mueller's testimony in July. But today the president's former campaign manager Corey Lewandowski goes before a house committee. What questions do lawmakers have? And Benjamin Netanyahu's political future is at stake today. Israelis vote again after the prime minister failed to form a government in April. What message will voters send today?
30
Uber transformed American transportation and changed the United States economy. But a decade after its founding, the once-swaggering company is losing more money and growing more slowly than ever. What happened? Guest: Mike Isaac, a technology reporter for The New York Times and the author of “Super Pumped: The Battle for Uber.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background coverage: The Uber of 2019 displays little of the braggadocio of its past, and competitors and critics are moving in.
31
The Democratic presidential race has entered a phase that is specifically designed to reward front-runners and push out lesser-known candidates. We look at how that will influence the campaign. Guest: Alexander Burns, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background coverage: Which candidates are leading the Democratic primary? Here’s a look at the state of the race.Listen to an episode of “The Daily” about the intended and unintended consequences of the Democratic National Committee’s new debate qualifying rules.
32
Robin Givhan examines Sen. Kamala Harris’s political and racial identity. Ruth Eglash breaks down the negotiations for a new government in Israel. And Caroline Kitchener on who die-hard Hillary Clinton supporters will back in 2020.
33
On The Gist, late-night writers Steve Waltien, Bryan Tucker, and Alison Leiby sit down with Mike to discuss what it’s like to write on a late-night show. How do they deal with the constant churn of topical humor? Why is it so difficult to continue laughing through Trump? And what is the Sean Penn test?Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
34
The Trump Administration is unveiling new immigration courts that look a little different than what you might expect. They’re actually tents and shipping containers built right near the US-Mexico border as a part of a big new immigration policy. We’ll explain. Also: the Fed slashed interest rates for just the second time since the Great Recession today, heeding a request by President Trump. Also on today’s show: Greta Thunberg turns the tables in DC, and the dictionary gets nonbinary.
35
Congress demands to know about a conversation between President Trump and a foreign leader. Climate activists get ready to launch a global strike. And the CDC adds more vaping-related illnesses to the tally. Like the show? Leave a review: http://bit.ly/ReviewStartHere Follow @StartHereABC for exclusive content, show updates and more: - Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/starthereabc - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/starthereabc - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/starthereabc Discover more ABC News podcasts: http://www.abcnewspodcasts.com Start Here is produced by ABC Radio. For more information: http://www.abcnewspodcasts.com
36
Two battles over the meaning of democracy are now playing out in Europe. We look at the political power maneuvers this week in Britain and Italy. Guest: Katrin Bennhold, the Berlin bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background coverage: Facing a furious backlash over his decision to suspend Parliament next month, Prime Minister Boris Johnson of Britain promised to speed up Brexit negotiations with Brussels.In Italy, two political parties that had been sworn political enemies struck a deal to form a new government that sidelined Matteo Salvini, the hard-right leader.Listen to “The Battle for Europe,” a series from “The Daily” with Katrin Bennhold about the future of liberal democracy in the European Union.
37
After months of negotiations in Qatar, the United States appeared to have reached an agreement with the Taliban that could take a step to end America’s longest-running war. We spoke with our colleague about what he learned while covering the peace talks. Guest: Mujib Mashal, a senior correspondent for The New York Times based in Afghanistan. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background coverage: The American special envoy who led talks with the Taliban said that the United States had reached an agreement “in principle” with the Afghan insurgents, but that final approval rested with President Trump.
38
This episode contains descriptions of sexual assault.  Nearly a decade before any police investigation into Jeffrey Epstein’s predatory actions toward young girls, two sisters came forward to say they had been lured in and abused by the financier and his companion, Ghislaine Maxwell. Now that he’s dead, the sisters are wrestling with what might have happened if someone had listened. Guests: Mike Baker, a national correspondent for The New York Times, spoke with Maria and Annie Farmer, and shared their story with Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background coverage: The Farmer sisters spoke to The Times about their accusations, offering a look at how Mr. Epstein, who killed himself in prison this month, managed to avoid significant scrutiny for years.
39
More than 26,000 fires have been recorded inside the Amazon rainforest in August alone, leading to global calls for action. But Brazil’s government has told the rest of the world to mind its own business. Guest: Ernesto Londoño, the Brazil bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background coverage: Brazil began a military operation to battle the fires after European leaders threatened to cancel a trade deal and calls to boycott Brazilian products spread on social media.In many parts of Brazil, there is strong support for President Jair Bolsonaro’s Amazon policy, which prioritizes economic development over environmental protections.Here’s what we know about the fires.
40
Prime Minister Narendra Modi held his first rally in the U.S. when he was elected in 2014. Now, he’s coming back to appear in front of 50,000 people in Houston, Texas. The other person expected to take the stage is President Trump. So, what do the leaders of the world’s two largest democracies plan to gain from the visit?Guest: Milan Vaishnav, director of the South Asia Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now.
41
Some say that’s how hard it is to remove the UK from the EU. Boris Johnson's Brexit strategy heads to the United Kingdom's highest court tomorrow.
42
Tens of thousands of General Motors auto workers nationwide joined the picket line this morning. Union leaders say a deal is not close. So what demands aren't being met? Drone attacks on a massive oil processing facility in Saudi Arabia have sent the price of oil surging. President Trump says the United States is "locked and loaded." But it's not clear who is behind the attack. What happens next as tensions in the gulf remain high? And Purdue Pharma, the company that makes OxyContin, has filed for bankruptcy. How might this impact people who got addicted to the drug they produced?
43
At the Group of 7 summit in France, President Trump seemed determined to prove that he can wage a trade war with China without hurting the economy. But there are already signs of distress. Guest: Peter S. Goodman, an economics correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background coverage: President Trump can confront China or expand the economy, but he can’t do both at the same time, our economics correspondent writes in a news analysis.Mr. Trump shifted his tone on the trade war yet again on Monday, calling President Xi Jinping of China a “great leader” three days after branding him an “enemy.”
44
Artificial intelligence is making its way into every aspect of life, including military conflict. We look at the thorny legal and ethical issues that the newest arms race raises. Three executives from Fukushima’s melted-down nuclear-power plant were cleared of negligence today, but the disaster’s aftermath is far from over. And, what a swish new Chinese restaurant in Havana says about China-Cuba relations. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
45
For decades, American corporations have prized profits for shareholders above all else. Now, the country’s most powerful chief executives say it’s time to do things differently. What’s driving that change? Guest: Andrew Ross Sorkin, a financial columnist for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Almost 200 chief executives, including the leaders of Apple, Pepsi and Walmart, argued that companies must invest in employees, protect the environment and deliver value to customers.Shareholder democracy seemed like a good idea at the time, but it hasn’t worked, Andrew Ross Sorkin writes in his latest column.
46
Anne Gearan explains the White House’s shifting messaging on Iran. Drew Harwell on how Beijing-based TikTok is suspected of censoring the Hong Kong protests. And Maura Judkis takes us into the kitchen with “Queer Eye” star Antoni Porowski.
47
Song playlists at presidential campaign rallies can be about more than music — they can reflect a candidate’s values, political platform, identity and target audience. We examine the role of these playlists in the 2020 campaign. Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:The Times analyzed playlists used by nine Democratic candidates and President Trump to see how they help set the tone for each campaign. Turn your sound on.
48
The complaint involved communications with a foreign leader and a “promise” that Trump made, which was so alarming that a U.S. intelligence official who had worked at the White House went to the inspector general of the intelligence community.
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Today on The Daily Beans: the IC IG testifies behind closed doors, the election in Israel, Kavanaugh asks reporters to lie, Yacht wars, Japan refutes Iran is behind the Saudi oil field attacks, Pelosi on Lewandowski, consolidation of executive power, and climate activist Greta Thunberg. Follow us on twitter @dailybeanspod!Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
50
Autoworkers across the country are joining the picket line in a strike against General Motors. They say the company needs to give them better wages and benefits. Meanwhile, President Trump’s former campaign manager was on Capitol Hill today for the first official impeachment hearing. Also on today’s show: Indonesia is making a big change to its child marriage laws, and an American is making waves across the pond.
51
After Vox's Tara Golshan reviews the third Democratic debate, Matthew Yglesias explains how Joe Biden wins even when he loses.
52
In the 20th century Russia was the more powerful partner. Take a look at the flows of money and influence today, though, and it’s clear the situation has reversed. Part-time work first took hold because it offered flexibility to women just entering the labour market—but it costs them both in terms of pay and prospects. And, a look at the burgeoning sports-betting market in Ethiopia. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
53
Federal prosecutors were confident that, this time, justice would be served in the case of Jeffrey Epstein. What happens to the case against him now that he is dead?  Guest: Benjamin Weiser, an investigative criminal justice reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:Despite Jeffrey Epstein's death, the criminal investigation that led to the sex-trafficking charges continues. Prosecutors will focus on those who may have aided him.At Mr. Epstein’s Palm Beach home, it was hard for workers to miss what was happening, with about 100 masseuses seen there at various times.
54
Faced with growing pressure to act, President Trump decides to sanction Iran. A photo of Justin Trudeau in brownface rocks Canada. And the gun debate heats up as kids head back to school. Like the show? Leave a review: http://bit.ly/ReviewStartHere Follow @StartHereABC for exclusive content, show updates and more: - Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/starthereabc - Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/starthereabc - Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/starthereabc Discover more ABC News podcasts: http://www.abcnewspodcasts.com Start Here is produced by ABC Radio. For more information: http://www.abcnewspodcasts.com
55
“I’d be happy to slaughter them,” President Rodrigo Duterte said about three million drug users in the Philippines. It appears he is following through.
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Saudi Arabia is pressuring wealthy families to buy in to the initial public offering of state oil giant Saudi Aramco, the Federal Reserve intervened in the US money markets for the third day in a row on Thursday and promised it would so again today, Sterling climbed back over the $1.25 mark on Thursday after European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker said a Brexit deal was possible, and companies are racing to burnish their green credentials ahead of today’s global climate protest. Plus, the FT’s Anna Nicolaou tells us why Netflix is starting to look vulnerable. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
57
A buzzy new drug to help treat people with a peanut allergy was recommended for approval by an FDA advisory board this week. It would be the first government-approved method intended to combat these kinds of allergic reactions. The story behind that drug helps explain how the cost of many prescription drugs ends up being so high.Guest: James Hamblin, staff writer at The Atlantic.Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now.
58
Joel Achenbach reports on chronic pain and opioids. Sarah Kaplan on how American teens are channeling their anxiety over climate change into activism. And Max Bearak visits a Kenyan community whose members say its source of power was stolen.
59
On The Gist, screenwriters Dana Fox and John August, and film critic K. Austin Collins are here to talk all about the comedy film. What makes a funny movie? how has that changed over the years? And has humor just creeped its way into all the other genres without us realizing?Slate Plus members get bonus segments and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
60
Texans fight floodwaters to return home after Imelda’s devastation, Joe Biden hits back amid reports President Trump pressured Ukraine to investigate his son, and panic after gunshots at Philadelphia high school football game.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
61
Israelis might be feeling a little déjà vu: they’re heading back to the polls tomorrow to vote for parliament for the second time this year. Current Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has put a lot of issues in play, from the annexation of West Bank settlements to mandatory military service. Meanwhile, half of Saudi Arabia’s oil production was cut off after drones reportedly attacked the country’s largest oil plant on Saturday. Global oil markets are feeling the heat as the plant tries to get up and running again. Also on today’s show: we’re celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month and we share some weird science.
62
Al Franken resigned from the Senate more than 18 months ago over allegations of sexual harassment. New reporting about those allegations has revived the debate over whether the Democratic Party — particularly senators currently seeking the presidency — moved too fast in calling for him to step down. In an interview, one of those senators, Kirsten Gillibrand, says absolutely not. Guest: Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, a New York Democrat and 2020 presidential candidate. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Ms. Gillibrand’s stance on Mr. Franken’s departure has come up persistently during her struggling presidential campaign.Our colleague Lisa Lerer interviewed Ms. Gillibrand for the On Politics newsletter.
63
At least seven people were killed by a mysterious explosion in northern Russia, and U.S. officials believe it happened during the test of a prototype for a nuclear-propelled cruise missile. President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia has hailed the weapon as the centerpiece of Moscow’s arms race with the United States — but what will this mean for an arms race that both countries want to win? Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Intelligence officials suspect the blast involved a prototype known as Skyfall, a missile that Mr. Putin has boasted can reach any corner of the earth and evade American missile defenses.As the death toll has risen from the explosion, Russia’s silence and contradictory accounts have conjured dark memories of Chernobyl.
64
The New York Times investigated how Cordelia Scaife May, an heiress to the Mellon family’s banking and industrial fortune, used her wealth to sow the seeds of the modern anti-immigration movement — and of Trump administration policy. Guests: Natalie Kitroeff, a business reporter for The Times, spoke with Nicholas Kulish, who covers immigration issues. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Newly unearthed documents show how an environmental-minded socialite became a nativist whose vision for strictly limiting immigration has, in many ways, reached a culmination in the Trump presidency.Groups that Mrs. May funded shared policy proposals with the Trump campaign, sent staff members to join the administration and have close ties to Stephen Miller, the architect of the president’s immigration agenda.
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The news to know for Friday, September 20th, 2019!  What to know today about devastating flooding in parts of Texas, and we have an update about that whistleblower complaint involving President Trump. Plus: a walkout at Amazon, more stores start drone deliveries, and which show is breaking records at this weekend's Emmy Awards. Those stories and many more in less than 10 minutes! Award-winning broadcast journalist and former TV news reporter Erica Mandy breaks it all down for you.  Head to www.theNewsWorthy.com to read more about any of the stories mentioned under the section titled 'Episodes' or see sources below... Today's episode is brought to you by www.Zola.com/newsworthy Become a NewsWorthy INSIDER! Learn more here: www.TheNewsWorthy.com/insider   Sources: Texas Flooding: AccuWeather, Weather Channel, ABC News, AP, USA Today Whistleblower Complaint Update: TIME, Washington Post, NYT, NBC News, NPR Trump Sues Manhattan DA: Fox News, Reuters, The Hill Trudeau Brownface: NPR, NYT, CBS News, Time Global Climate Strike: CNN, Cnet   Amazon Climate Change: CNBC, BBC, The Verge iOS 13: TechRadar, Gizmodo, CNN  Lyft Bike Lanes: Engadget, The Verge Walgreens Drone Delivery: CNBC, TechCrunch Area 51 Event: The Hill, USA Today Emmys: TIME, LA Times, USA Today  
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Facebook and Instagram are thinking about ditching the thumbs and hearts. What would life be like without "Likes"?
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Under international pressure, China has said it has released a vast majority of the Muslim Uighurs it had placed in detention camps. We follow up with an American citizen who says the Chinese government cannot be trusted, and find out how Beijing’s propaganda machine has responded to his efforts to protect a relative who was detained. If you missed the previous interview, listen to it here. Guest: Paul Mozur, a technology reporter for The New York Times based in Shanghai, spoke with Ferkat Jawdat, a Uighur and American citizen who lives in Virginia. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Reporters from The Times found, over seven days of traveling through the Xinjiang region, that the vast network of detention camps erected by the government of China’s authoritarian leader, Xi Jinping, continues to operate, and even expand.China’s most recent campaign echoes tactics used by other countries, principally Russia, to inundate domestic and international audiences with bursts of information, propaganda, and in some cases, outright disinformation.
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On The Gist, our third part of comedy week is all about comedy podcasts. Podcast hosts Jesse Thorn and Ron Funches join Mike to talk about the wide variety of comedy podcasts, how they both got started, and why they are such a freeing avenue for comedians. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Today is Friday, September 20, and we’re looking at Swimply vs. GetMyBoat.
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The United States economy is in the middle of a record-long expansion. So why is the government deploying an economic weapon it last used during the 2008 financial crisis? Guest: Ben Casselman, who covers the economy for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: The Federal Reserve cut its benchmark interest rate for the first time in more than a decade as it tried to insulate the economy from President Trump’s trade war and a global slowdown.The quarter-point reduction is unlikely to get you a better mortgage rate. Here’s where you might see effects.
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Since Democrats retook the House last November, the world has come to know the progressive and divisive vision of four freshmen congresswomen known as “the squad.” But it was moderates — less well-known and laser-focused on common ground between Democrats and Republicans — who were responsible for flipping seats and winning back the House. Today, we meet a moderate Democrat who offers a competing vision of the party ahead of the 2020 election.  Guests: Representative Mikie Sherrill, Democrat of New Jersey; Kate Zernike, a political reporter for The New York Times; and Lisa Chow and Rachel Quester, producers for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Disconnects between liberal and moderate House Democrats have exploded into public view at critical moments during their seven months in power.The two rounds of Democratic presidential debates showcased divisions over ideology and identity in a party that appears united only in its desire to defeat President Trump.
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India has guaranteed a degree of autonomy to the people of Kashmir, a disputed territory between India and Pakistan, since 1947. Why did India unilaterally erase that autonomy this week? Guest: Jeffrey Gettleman, the South Asia bureau chief for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. Background reading: To Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India, eliminating the autonomy of Kashmir was an administrative move. But to his critics, the decision was a blow to India’s democracy and secular identity.On Thursday, Mr. Modi addressed the nation about the decision against a backdrop of rising protests, mass arrests and escalating tensions with Pakistan.Read more about the roots of the crisis and what could happen next.
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Protesters have flooded Hong Kong’s airport, paralyzing operations and escalating tensions between the semiautonomous territory and Beijing. The protesters are trying to send a message to government officials — and to people in mainland China. Guest: Javier C. Hernández, a New York Times correspondent based in Beijing. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading:Demonstrations led the airport, one of the world’s busiest, to suspend check-ins for two days in a row this week, causing hundreds of flight cancellations. On Wednesday, some protesters apologized for the disruption.The unrest is exposing the inherent conflict in Hong Kong’s political system since China reclaimed the territory from Britain in 1997: an effort to unite Beijing’s authoritarianism with civil liberties.Here’s a guide to what prompted the Hong Kong protests, and a look at how they have evolved.
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The whistleblower complaint that has triggered a tense showdown between the U.S. intelligence community and Congress involves President Trump’s communications with a foreign leader.
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Plus, Trump goes on a road trip with foreign leaders, the 71st Emmy Awards are here, Notre Dame takes on Georgia in a top 10 college football clash and 'Friends' turns 25. (Audio: Associated Press)
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The news to know for Thursday, September 19th, 2019! Today, we're talking about an accusation against the president that's prompted an "urgent," classified meeting on Capitol Hill, and what to know about investigations surrounding a popular heartburn medicine. Plus: Amazon's Alexa gets into politics, Facebook's new video chat device, and the late-night TV making history. Those stories and many more in less than 10 minutes! Then, hang out after the news for Thing to Know Thursday's bonus interview. We're talking about vaccines and misinformation online with the well-known doctor and social media star known as "Doctor Mike." Today's episode is brought to you by www.Zola.com/newsworthy Thanks to The NewsWorthy Insiders! Become one here: www.theNewsWorthy.com/insider   Sources: Whistleblower Complaint: The Washington Post “An Act of War”: Fox News, NYT, CNN, BBC, Al Jazeera National Security Adviser: CBS News, Axios, NPR Rate Cut: WSJ, NYT, CNBC, AP, USA Today California Emissions: Vox, WSJ, NBC News, NPR Zantac Concerns: CBS News, Reuters Washington Monument Reopens: The Hill, Washington Post, CNN Alexa’s Political Donations: CNBC, USA Today Amazon Cash: Engadget, USA Today, Cnet Facebook’s PortalTV: Reuters, The Verge, TechCrunch Late-Night TV History: The Verge, Hollywood Reporter  
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In the years before his death, Osama bin Laden seemed to be grooming a successor to lead Al Qaeda: his own son. Here’s what we learned this week about those plans. Guest: Rukmini Callimachi, who covers terrorism for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: The care Osama bin Laden showed his son was not just fatherly, but appears to have been an attempt by the world’s most hunted terrorist to secure his legacy.The United States had a role in the operation that killed Hamza bin Laden, officials said. But other details, including where he died, are unknown.
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Today on The Daily Beans, the director of national intelligence refuses to respond to a subpoena from the house intel committee, the feds cut rates, an update on the Turnberry investigation, another pedophile is nabbed, Pompeo visits Saudi Arabia, a new national security advisor, and much more. Become a Patron and support the show at patreon.com/muellershewrote.com! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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The �Handmaids Tale� author compares the events in the book to what happens in real life and discusses her sequel �The Testaments.� In Hot Topics, the co-hosts discuss Rudy Giuliani�s flip-flop on the Ukraine investigation, a controversial Halloween costume of a �sexy Mr. Rogers,� and more.
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On The Gist, improvisers Amber Nash, T.J. Jagodowski, and Zach Cherry join Mike to discuss the art of improv. Why it stands out in comparison to other comedy art forms, how it seems to be influencing the rest of the comedy world, and why improvisation and collaboration make creation so much more fun.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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The country has never had two elections in a year, and the second looks to be as close-run as the first. Could that at last spell the end of the Binyamin Netanyahu era? A mysterious illness linked to e-cigarettes has now killed seven Americans—but vaping is still less dangerous smoking. Also, we consider the lobster roll, and a wider truth it reveals about lunch economics. For information regarding your data privacy, visit acast.com/privacy
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