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1
What began as a public health crisis in China is well on the way to becoming a pandemic. And while there is a lot of news about the coronavirus, there is also a lack of understanding about the severity of the threat. As officials warn of a potential outbreak in the U.S., we ask: How bad could the coronavirus get? Guest: Donald G. McNeil Jr., a science and health reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: President Trump sought to reassure the country that the U.S. government was controlling the spread of the coronavirus after his administration weathered days of criticism.Here are the latest updates on the illness’s sweep around the world, with cases in at least 44 countries.What can you do to protect yourself and your family from the virus?
2
U.S. intelligence officials have concluded that the Russian government is attempting to interfere in the 2020 presidential race — but it is doing so by supporting two very different candidates. So why is Russia rooting for both President Trump and Senator Bernie Sanders? Guest: David E. Sanger, a national security correspondent and a senior writer at The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Mr. Sanders was briefed on potential interference, and when details of the attempts emerged, he ratcheted up his attacks on Russia, warning President Vladimir V. Putin to stay out of the presidential election.Intelligence officials warned House lawmakers last week that Russia was interfering in the 2020 campaign to try to get the president re-elected. Mr. Trump was angry the intelligence briefing was held at all.What exactly do intelligence officials mean by “interference”? We don’t know, and officials can’t seem to agree on the scope of the meddling.
3
Former vice president Joseph R. Biden Jr. was once a clear front-runner in the race for the Democratic nomination. Now, he is fighting back from a string of losses and staking his candidacy on his ability to win tomorrow’s South Carolina primary, the first in a state with a large black population. But will he win, and if the margin isn’t as decisive as he hopes, can he stay in the race? Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times traveled to South Carolina with Clare Toeniskoetter and Annie Brown, producers on “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: A new poll showed Mr. Biden with a wide lead in South Carolina, with Senator Bernie Sanders and hedge fund billionaire Tom Steyer trailing behind.Mr. Biden lashed out after reports that Mr, Sanders considered mounting a primary challenge to President Barack Obama in 2012, saying it was “one of the reasons I resent Bernie.”Churches have long played the primary role in mobilizing black support in South Carolina. So how are candidates faring among congregations?
4
On the debate stage in Charleston, candidates went after Senator Bernie Sanders, painting his potential nomination as dangerous for the party and questioning his chances of winning against President Trump. “The Latest,” from the team behind “The Daily,” brings you the most important developments on today’s biggest news stories. You can find more information about it here.
5
Harvey Weinstein was found guilty on Monday of two felony sex crimes, and he now faces a possible sentence of between five and 29 years. We asked the reporters who first broke the story about the accusations of sexual misconduct against Mr. Weinstein to explain to us what the jurors in his Manhattan trial were asked to do — and what it means that they did it. Guests: Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, investigative reporters for The New York Times and the authors of “She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Mr. Weinstein was found guilty of two felony sex crimes after a trial at which six women testified that he had sexually assaulted them.Sex crimes are notoriously difficult to litigate, often because the cases are so intricate. But for many, Mr. Weinstein’s trial was a crucial landmark in the effort to hold influential men accountable for sexual misconduct.Mr. Weinstein built a network of complicity that dozens of women say kept them silent for years.
6
U.S. confirms coronavirus case of unknown origin. Handling the outbreak is a big political moment for President Trump. And, three days of violence in New Delhi leaves dozens of people dead. Correction: An earlier version of this podcast said the new coronavirus case was in San Francisco. The patient is actually at the UC Davis Medical Center, and is from Solano County, Calif.
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In recent weeks, several of the largest and most profitable American companies have introduced elaborate plans to combat climate change. So why are they doing it now? And just how meaningful are their plans? Guest: Andrew Ross Sorkin, a financial columnist for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Laurence D. Fink, the founder of the world’s largest asset management company, sparked the shift toward climate-focused corporate policies in his annual letter to C.E.O.’s. Here’s what the letter said, and why it matters.Protecting the environment and tackling climate change have climbed the list of Americans’ political priorities this year as economic concerns have faded. But the issue is as partisan as ever.
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Stocks continue their free-fall amid fears of the coronavirus. Scientists suggest ways people can prepare for an outbreak. And, South Carolina's Democratic primary takes place Saturday
11
Democratic presidential candidates attacked front-runner Senator Bernie Sanders during a chaotic debate in Charleston, South Carolina. NPR asks where voters are on candidates and issues that matter to them with the launch of a new reporting project in advance of the 2020 election. Public health officials warn that a coronavirus outbreak in the U.S. is only a matter of time.
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Note: This episode contains strong language. Senator Bernie Sanders is a staunchly pro-union candidate. But he has found himself mired in an escalating battle over health care with the largest labor union in Nevada. With what some call “the best insurance in America” — the fruit of struggles including a six-year strike — members of the Culinary Workers Union have been reluctant to support Mr. Sanders’s “Medicare for All” plan. We went to Nevada to ask how what is effectively an anti-endorsement of Mr. Sanders from the union’s leaders may affect his support in the state’s caucuses on Saturday. Guests: Jennifer Medina, who is covering the 2020 presidential campaign for The Times traveled to Nevada with Clare Toeniskoetter and Austin Mitchell, producers for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Mr. Sanders, who is betting on the Latino vote to win the nomination, is trying to convince Nevada’s union members his policies are in their best interest. His rivals are trying to capitalize on the fight.The Nevada Democratic Party has been scrambling to put in effect safeguards in its caucuses to avoid the technical issues that created a debacle in Iowa. Here’s how the caucuses will work.
15
The World Health Organization is not yet declaring coronavirus a pandemic, despite fears over the virus spreading in new countries. Democratic presidential candidates take the debate stage in South Carolina tonight ahead of primaries in that state on Saturday. President Trump and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi are meeting in New Delhi to discuss trade, amid deadly protests in the Indian capital.
16
Yesterday on “The Daily,” we heard about the government’s failure to crack down on the explosive growth of child sexual abuse imagery online. In the second half of this series, we look at the role of the nation’s biggest tech companies, and why — despite pleas from victims — the illicit images remain online. Guest: Michael H. Keller, an investigative reporter at the The New York Times, and Gabriel J.X. Dance, an investigations editor for The Times, spoke with the mother and stepfather of a teenager who was sexually abused as a child. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: The tech industry has recently been more diligent in identifying online child sexual abuse imagery, but it has consistently failed to shut it down, a Times investigation found. Facebook accounted for more than 85 percent of the imagery flagged by tech companies last year.Two sisters opened up about their lives after being sexually abused as children. Photos and videos of them online continue to remind them of the horrors they experienced.Here’s the first episode in this two-part series, describing how a finding from a tipster led to The Times’s monthslong investigation of online child abuse imagery.
17
Covid-19 may be on the brink of becoming a pandemic. Vox’s Julia Belluz explains what that p-word means and Brian Resnick breaks down what an outbreak response might look like in the United States. (Transcript here.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Note: This episode contains descriptions of child sexual abuse. A monthslong New York Times investigation has uncovered a digital underworld of child sexual abuse imagery that is hiding in plain sight. In part one of a two-part series, we look at the almost unfathomable scale of the problem — and just how little is being done to stop it. Guests: Michael H. Keller, an investigative reporter at The New York Times, and Gabriel J.X. Dance, an investigations editor for The Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Last year, tech companies reported over 45 million online photos and videos of children being sexually abused. Lawmakers foresaw this crisis years ago, but enforcement has fallen short. Our reporters investigated the problem and asked: Can it be stopped?Tech companies detected a surge in online videos of child sexual abuse last year, with encrypted social messaging apps enabling abusers to share images under a cloak of secrecy.Here are six takeaways from The Times’s investigation of the boom in online child sex abuse.
19
President Donald Trump held a press conference yesterday in conjunction with the CDC to update the nation on the COVID-19 preparedness plan. That plan involves appointing Vice President Mike Pence to oversee the government's response to the epidemic—but importantly, he’s not really a coronavirus czar, so don’t call him one.  The House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed legislation that would make lynching a federal hate crime on Wednesday — more than 100 years since the first measure against it was introduced to Congress.  And in headlines: a mass shooting in Milwaukee, a humanitarian crisis in Syria, and Maria Sharapova hangs up her racquet.
20
According to the Washington Post, the HHS whistleblower says she was improperly reassigned after raising concerns about the safety of coronavirus workers. Also, the presidential candidates make their closing arguments to South Carolina voters ahead of Saturday’s primary. Plus, Lily Adams and Yamiche Alcindor look ahead to Super Tuesday. And psychiatrist Dr. Lance Dodes considers what it means to have a president in declining mental health in charge of protecting the public health of the country. Rep. John Garamendi, Dr. Matt McCarthy, Ned Price and John Heilemann also join Lawrence O’Donnell.
21
Despite being a late entry into the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, Michael R. Bloomberg, the billionaire media tycoon and former mayor of New York City, has surged in the polls and is winning key endorsements before he’s even on the ballot. Today, we explore the hidden infrastructure of influence and persuasion behind his campaign — and the dilemma it poses for Democrats. Guest: Alexander Burns, a national political correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Who is Mr. Bloomberg? And where does he stand on the key issues?We took a look at how Mr. Bloomberg’s enormous wealth helped build a national political network, and an empire of influence, for his campaign.His run has proved complicated to cover for the media empire he owns.
22
Tonight on the Last Word: Rep. James Clyburn talks to Lawrence about his decision to endorse Joe Biden. Also, Trump contradicts U.S. health officials on coronavirus. Plus, the Democratic presidential candidates zero in on Sen. Bernie Sanders ahead of Saturday’s South Carolina primary. And Rosanna Arquette reacts to the guilty verdicts against Harvey Weinstein. Ron Klain, Laurie Garrett and John Heilemann also join Lawrence O’Donnell.
23
While there are signs that the coronavirus epidemic in China is slowing down, outbreaks in other parts of the world including Iran, Italy, and South Korea are raising alarm. After Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders' decisive victory in the Nevada Democratic caucuses, Democratic presidential candidates are looking ahead to South Carolina's primary. President Trump visits India and appears at a rally in the Indian state of Gujarat.
25
Last night, the Democratic debate in Nevada revealed more open hostility and made more personal attacks than in any of the previous six debates in the race for the nomination. Today, we explore what these attacks reflect about the state of the Democratic race and the urgency that the candidates are feeling. “The Latest,” from the team behind “The Daily,” brings you the most important developments on today’s biggest news stories. You can find more information about it here.
26
The outbreak of new coronavirus cases around the world has led U.S. health officials to warn the disease may spread in the U.S. WSJ's Brianna Abbott explains what may complicate officials' efforts to prepare.
27
U.S. officials have warned Sen. Bernie Sanders that Russia is trying to help him win the Democratic nomination. Officials have also said that Russia favors President Trump's re-election. In South Korea, a growing number of COVID-19 infections, about half linked to a controversial church. And in Iran, low voter turnout in the country's parliamentary elections now means that conservatives have virtually no opposition.
29
Russian interference in U.S. elections could go from Vlad to worse as President Trump sidelines U.S. intelligence agencies. (Transcript here.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
30
Last night seven democratic presidential candidates took the stage in Charleston, South Carolina for the tenth debate of this election cycle and the last one before Super Tuesday. Overall, this one was a mess. We’ll talk you through the big moments, and the ways the candidates tried to define themselves against frontrunner Bernie Sanders.  And in headlines: Bob Iger retires, Trump’s least favorite Supreme Court justices, and the CDC weighs in on coronavirus.
31
Abha Bhattarai unpacks Walmart’s “Great Workplace” program, and why it means layoffs for workers. Samantha Schmidt on the “radical feminists” working against trans rights. And Shibani Mahtani explains how China’s ambitions are choking the Mekong River.
32
Note: This episode contains strong language in both English and Mandarin. What started as a story about fear of a new and dangerous virus has become a story of fury over the Chinese government’s handling of an epidemic. Today, one of our China correspondents takes us behind the scenes of Beijing’s response to a global outbreak. Guest: Amy Qin, a China correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: President Xi Jinping faces an accelerating health crisis that is also a political one: a profound test of the authoritarian system he has built around himself over the past seven years.China’s leader, who rarely mingles with the public, visited several sites in Beijing and spoke to medical workers in Wuhan via video conferencing.Here are the latest updates on the global outbreak.
34
South Carolina goes to the polls on Saturday. There are 54 delegates at stake and it’s the first state where black voters make up a majority of the electorate. More coronavirus updates: a whistleblower says more than a dozen federal employees in California weren’t given proper training or protective gear when they were assigned to interact with quarantined Americans who were evacuated from Wuhan. And Gavin Newsroom says 8,400 California residents are being monitored for the virus after one woman there tested positive. Plus, we’re joined by assistant producer Sonia Htoon for headlines: the moon’s little brother, Clearview AI is watching, and Scotland offers free pads and tampons.
35
The drug industry has long been one of the most powerful lobbies in Washington, but in recent years it hasn't packed the punch it used to. WSJ's Brody Mullins explains why the pharmaceutical industry's influence has declined.
36
Eugene Scott describes the impact young voters may have on the presidential election. Drew Harwell on the psychological toll of Web-connected cameras. And Dan Keating explains whether stop-and-frisk actually lowered the crime rate in New York City.
37
Since his acquittal in the Senate, President Trump has undertaken a campaign of retribution against those who crossed him during the impeachment inquiry — while extending favors to those who have tried to protect him. Today, we explore what has happened so far in this new phase of his presidency. Guest: Peter Baker, the chief White House correspondent for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Mr. Trump called those who testified against him in the impeachment “evil,” “corrupt” and “crooked.” After he was acquitted, he began firing witnesses.A handful of senators reached out to the White House to warn the president not to dismiss Gordon D. Sondland, the ambassador to the European Union who testified in the House hearings. Mr. Trump removed him anyway.
38
Idlib province in northwestern Syria is now the last stronghold of opposition to President Bashar al-Assad and one of the world’s greatest humanitarian crises. (Transcript here.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
39
On the Gist, the missed opportunities of the South Carolina debates. In the interview, Mike talks with Eitan Hersh, professor of Political Science at Tufts University, about his new book Politics is for Power: How to Move Beyond Political Hobbyism, Take Action, and Make Real Change. They discuss political hobbyism and why your news consumption is actually a form of slacktivism. In the spiel, who’s the most like a muppet? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
40
A secretive start-up promising the next generation of facial recognition software has compiled a database of images far bigger than anything ever constructed by the United States government: over three billion, it says. Is this technology a breakthrough for law enforcement — or the end of privacy as we know it? Guest: Annie Brown, a producer on “The Daily,” spoke with Kashmir Hill, a technology reporter for The New York Times. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Federal and state law enforcement officers are using one company’s app to make arrests in 49 states. So what is Clearview AI, and what influence does it hold?Clearview’s app is being used by police to identify victims of child sexual abuse. Some question both the ethics and the accuracy of the results.
41
Tonight on the Last Word: Global markets plunge over coronavirus fears. Dems prepare for the final debate before Super Tuesday. Also, a New York jury finds Harvey Weinstein guilty of two felony sex crimes. Cecile Richards joins Lawrence to discuss the Weinstein verdict in the era of Donald Trump. Plus, Senate Democrats demand new Russia sanctions over interference in the 2020 election. And Jill Wine-Banks discusses her new memoir titled, “The Watergate Girl.” Jennifer Palmieri, Anand Giridharadas, Molly Crane-Newman, Cynthia Alksne and Rep. Denny Heck also join Lawrence O’Donnell.
42
Bernie Sanders took Nevada with a landslide coalition so diverse it has left Joe Biden feeling nervous heading into South Carolina. (Transcript here.) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
43
Matt Viser and Lenny Bernstein on the oldest field of presidential candidates, and the new norm around releasing health records. Tracy Jan on James Clyburn’s idea for reparations. And Monica Hesse on Harvey Weinstein’s guilty verdict.
44
In 2016, Wells Fargo was slapped with a fine for creating fake accounts for customers. It was only the start of the bank's problems. WSJ's Rachel Louise Ensign explains what happened and what led to a $3 billion settlement last week.
45
Harvey Weinstein was found guilty on Monday of two felony sex crimes, and he now faces a possible sentence of between five and 29 years. We asked the reporters who first broke the story about the accusations of sexual misconduct against Mr. Weinstein to explain to us what the jurors in his Manhattan trial were asked to do — and what it means that they did it. Guests: Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey, investigative reporters for The New York Times and the authors of “She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Mr. Weinstein was found guilty of two felony sex crimes after a trial at which six women testified that he had sexually assaulted them.Sex crimes are notoriously difficult to litigate, often because the cases are so intricate. But for many, Mr. Weinstein’s trial was a crucial landmark in the effort to hold influential men accountable for sexual misconduct.Mr. Weinstein built a network of complicity that dozens of women say kept them silent for years.
46
Voters in New Hampshire pride themselves on helping winnow the nomination field. While many polls show Senator Bernie Sanders leading in this year’s primary, the caucus debacle in Iowa meant no single candidate left that first contest with full momentum. We flew from Iowa to New Hampshire, following the campaign trail and talking to voters about whether Democrats who don’t support Sanders are coalescing around another choice. Guests: Lisa Lerer, a reporter at The New York Times, covering campaigns, elections and political power, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Jessica Cheung, producers on “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Mr. Sanders and Mayor Pete Buttigieg, of South Bend, Ind., are hoping to make the race for the nomination a two-person contest.Still, after a voting fiasco in Iowa, it’s possible that five leading candidates will survive beyond New Hampshire.President Trump is coming to New Hampshire, too: He’s scheduled to hold a campaign rally in Manchester tonight and will be on the Republican ballot Tuesday. Here are the latest updates from the state’s last day of primary campaigning.
47
Note: This episode contains descriptions of sexual violence. In the trial of Harvey Weinstein, six women have taken the stand, each making similar accusations of rape and sexual assault against the movie producer. Throughout their testimony, Weinstein’s defense lawyers have portrayed those encounters as consensual and suggested that in many cases it was the women who wanted something from Mr. Weinstein. His lawyers have seized on the fact that the two women whose accounts are at the center of the criminal charges in his New York trial agreed to have sex and friendly contact with Mr. Weinstein after they were allegedly victimized. Today, one of The Times reporters who broke the story of Mr. Weinstein’s alleged abuse more than two years ago speaks with Donna Rotunno, the lawyer behind Mr. Weinstein’s legal strategy. Guests: Megan Twohey, an investigative reporter for The Times and co-author of “She Said: Breaking the Sexual Harassment Story That Helped Ignite a Movement," spoke with Donna Rotunno, Harvey Weinstein’s lead defense lawyer. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.  Background reading: Long before an avalanche of allegations against Mr. Weinstein set off a global reckoning over sexual harassment, Ms. Rotunno was steadily building a career as a criminal lawyer in Chicago with an unusual specialty: defending men accused of sex crimes.Haven’t been following the trial? Here’s what’s happened so far.
48
A.M. Edition for February 27th: President Trump sought to reassure Americans over the U.S. response to the coronavirus outbreak, as the C.D.C. says a new case in California could be the first instance of 'community spread'. Stephanie Armour has more. Plus, Sune Engel Rasmussen explains that Iran's efforts to contain its coronavirus outbreak are complicated by where it's believed to have started: in the holy city of Qom. And oil prices hit a 12-month low over concerns of the widening economic impact of the outbreak - David Hodari has more. Kim Gittleson hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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P.M. Edition for February 27th: As coronavirus fears ripple through markets, The Wall Street Journal's Gunjan Banerji reveals the invisible forces that are exacerbating this week's wild swings. And the Journal's Josh Mitchell looks at the political reality facing Sen. Bernie Sanders' plan to wipe out Americans' $1.6 trillion in student-loan debt. Charlie Turner hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
50
As Bernie Sanders becomes the frontrunner for the Democratic nomination, pundits have started wringing their hands about Bernie’s chances of winning in a general election. Are any of these fears grounded in reality? Guest: Steve Kornacki, National Correspondent for NBC News and MSNBC Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices