Top podcast episodes in Music History

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In the late seventies, Studio 54 was the place to be for musicians and celebrities alike. John Lennon, Mick Jagger, Michael Jackson, Bruce Springsteen and others all famously hung out at the notorious club where hedonism was part of the venue’s allure. The success of Studio 54 was sudden and massive, resulting in mountains of cash, cocaine, jealousy, revenge, an FBI raid and an ironic ending for one of its owners. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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We begin with a simple question: How did the queen of the boob joke become a feminist icon? Helen Morales, author of “Pilgrimage to Dollywood,” gave us a stern directive – look at the lyrics! So we dive into Dolly’s discography, starting with the early period of what Dolly calls “sad ass songs” to find remarkably prescient words of female pain, slut-shaming, domestic violence, and women being locked away in asylums by cheating husbands. We explore how Dolly took the centuries-old tradition of the Appalachian “murder ballad”—an oral tradition of men singing songs about brutally killing women—and flipped the script, singing from the woman’s point of view. And as her career progresses, the songs expand beyond the pain to tell tales of leaving abuse behind. How can such pro-woman lyrics come from someone who despises the word feminism? Dolly explains.  
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Porter Wagoner led the most successful country music television show of its time, and in 1967 he needed a new “girl singer.” He turned to a 21 year old songwriter named Dolly Parton, who’d just recorded her first hit “Dumb Blonde.” So began a nearly decade-long partnership that, behind the scenes, was as contentious as it was commercially successful. This episode tells the story of the “Porter years,” the period during which Dolly arguably discovers her power - both as a performer and songwriter - and then makes the difficult (and radical for its time) decision to strike out on her own. Through interviews with Dolly, country music star Marty Stuart, Wagonmaster Buck Trent, and Porter’s daughter Deborah Wagoner, we explore how Dolly handled what’s sometimes called the great “hillbilly divorce” with such characteristic grace. 
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We journey into the Dollyverse dimension: "Tennessee Mountain Home."Like all law abiding Tennesseans, Jad grew up with the song on a loop.  He hadn’t planned to talk with Dolly about it, but much to his surprise, he is drawn into a Tennessee Mountain Trance.  The trance opens a portal to many questions about country music, authenticity, nostalgia and belonging.  And to a place called Dollywood. We visit the replica of Dolly’s childhood cabin and find thousands of other pilgrims similarly entranced.  Along the way, we meet Wandee Pryor, who lived in a Dolly dreamworld as a girl.  And also, halfway around the world, Esther Konkara, the self-proclaimed “Kenyan Dolly Parton,” who sings "Tennessee Mountain Home" as an ode to the hills of Nairobi - hills she has not yet left.  The Tennessee Mountain home begins to seem like part of a Disney fairytale.But then, Jad and Shima get a call from Dolly’s nephew and head of security Bryan Seaver, who makes an irresistible offer. 
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Nipsey Hussle was more than just one of this generation’s most promising voices in hip hop. He was a social activist, a community leader and aspirational entrepreneur. His death was senseless and set off grief stricken testimonials from some of the biggest names in hip hop as well as from some of the biggest names in our culture period. It also set off a riot in the streets of Los Angeles where he came up on and was shot down on. He was taken from us too soon and we’re still searching for answers.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Did you or a loved one just graduate and miss out on a commencement and graduation speech? Or do you just love great advice rooted in an undeniably effective rock ’n’ roll ethos? Either way, you need to hear DISGRACELAND’s Jake Brennan dispense career advice to the class of 2020 through the lens of Dave Grohl and the Foo Fighters’ legendary tour rider. Want to succeed in you career? Then be more like Dave. This content was originally published Friday May 15 as part of iHeartRadio’s “Commencement: the podcast” series with speeches by others including––but not limited to––Hillary Clinton, John Legend, Bill and Melinda Gates, Smokey Robinson, Ryan Seacrest and more.   Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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This episode delves into the controversy surrounding Dolly Parton’s Stampede (formerly known as “Dolly Parton’s Dixie Stampede”)—a dinner theater that presents the Civil War as a friendly competition between neighbors. In the wake of the Charlottesville Riots in 2017, the Dixie Stampede was called out by the press, and then became embroiled in the larger national conversation about Civil War monuments and the white-washing of history. Dolly’s business conglomerate decided to eliminate “Dixie” from the name, which caused further uproar.  Dolly embodies “a quivering mass of irreconcilable contradictions” in a way very few other American figures do… but has America arrived at a place where such contradictions are no longer defensible or tolerable? 
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In this episode, we go back up the mountain to visit Dolly’s actual Tennessee mountain home.  But, can you ever go home again?  Dolly tells us stories about her first trips out of the holler, and shares with us where she lives now. Back on the mountaintop, standing under the rain by the Little Pigeon River, the trip triggers memories of Jad’s first visit to his father's childhood home, and opens the gateway to dizzying stories of music and migration.
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Dolly Parton and politics have always had an interesting relationship. On the one hand, she wrote 9 to 5, the anthem for working women and the theme song for a movie inspired by a new labor union. On the other hand, she refuses to answer questions about President Trump, or any question on politics period. Her nephew calls this “Dollitics”: Dolly doesn’t take a position because she knows half her fans are on the right, half are on the left. In this moment in history, how should we think of this kind of fiercely apolitical stance?  Is it desirable, or even possible?
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One of Dolly’s most iconic and successful songs is “Jolene,” a song that, at first listen, is about a romantic rival trying to steal her man: a prime example of the classic “cheating song.”  But some see it as flipping a popular country music trope on its head. This idea takes shape when Nadine Hubbs, a professor at the University of Michigan, writes a fourth verse to “Jolene," which makes us reimagine Dolly's songs in entirely new ways. 
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On the first episode of Slow Burn’s third season: How a violent robbery severed Tupac’s friendship with Biggie Smalls and sparked a bicoastal beef that consumed the world of hip-hop. In November 1994, while on trial for sexual abuse, Tupac Shakur is shot five times in a New York recording studio. In the aftermath, he starts to suspect that his erstwhile friend Christopher Wallace, better known as Biggie Smalls, might be involved. It was the start of a beef that would consume the world of hip-hop and end with both men dead. Slate Plus members get bonus episodes of Slow Burn and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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At the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, we drop in on a history class called “Dolly Parton’s America.” (We borrowed the name for our series!) Taught by Dr. Lynn Sacco, the class is filled with college students who grew up in rural Appalachia, many of whom are the first in their families to attend college.  Dr Sacco gives the class an assignment: Write an essay that answers the question “What is Dolly Parton’s America?” Lurking just behind that question are thornier ones about Southern shame and identity and hillbillies and football and...well, Dolly.  Is Dolly helping or hurting us? The class splits down the middle.    Editor’s Note:  We made two corrections to this podcast, originally released on December 3.  In referring to the location of the Battle of Blair Mountain, we changed “Southwestern Virginia” to “West Virginia.” And on the origin of the term redneck, we inserted narration that makes clear that the etymology of the term goes back farther than the Battle of Blair Mountain.  
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As Dolly will tell you, so much of who she is - her creativity, her music, her stance on life - emanates from her faith, but what exactly is that faith? The answer is deeply surprising. In this episode, Dolly tells a story of finding God in an abandoned church filled with X-rated graffiti.  And she speaks of her plans for how she'll be remembered after she’s gone—how her voice will live on for the next 50, 100, 200 years.
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Ozzy Osbourne, along with bandmates, Black Sabbath invented heavy metal and throughout Ozzy’s post-Sabbath solo career he would invent new, self destructive forms of sabotage. Arrested at an early age for breaking and entering, Ozzy Osbourne refused to conform to societal norms and common decency. He would go on to be arrested numerous times and escape too many near death experiences to recount, including a plane crashing into his tour bus that would ultimately kill a dear friend and bandmate.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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In 1992, Ronald Ray Howard shot and killed Texas state trooper Bill Davidson. His lawyer argued he’d been driven to murder by the music he’d been playing in his car: a dubbed copy of Tupac Shakur’s first album, 2Pacalypse Now.  On the second episode of Slow Burn’s third season: How gangsta rap and law enforcement found themselves at war.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Music performed by:  Justin Hiltner (@hiltnerj, http://justinhiltner.com) Esther Konkara (@esther_konkara) Steph Jenkins (@slhjenkins, http://www.stephaniejenkins.info) Stephanie Coleman (@stephiecoleman) Courtney Hartman (@courthartman, https://www.courtneyhartman.com) Shelley Washington (@shelleyplaysaxy, http://shelleywashington.com) Bora Yoon (@borabot, http://borayoon.com) Caroline Shaw (@caroshawmusic, https://carolineshaw.com) Recordings from National Sawdust were part of the NationalSawdust+ series: Elena Park is the curator of NationalSawdust+ Special thanks to recording engineer Garth MacAleavey, Jeff Tang, Charles Hagaman, and everyone at National Sawdust.  Thanks also to Alex Overington and Jeremy Bloom for mix engineering.
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In this episode: Gangsta rap becomes a huge money maker. Civil rights activist C. Delores Tucker and conservative culture warrior Bill Bennett launch a crusade against offensive lyrics. And hip-hop divides black leaders along generational and gender lines. Slate Plus members get bonus episodes of Slow Burn and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Questions have swirled around the murders of Tupac Shakur and Biggie Smalls ever since their deaths. Who killed them, and why? How come no one was ever charged in either case? Is Tupac still alive and hiding out somewhere? On the final episode of the season, we look at the investigations into the deaths of two rap legends and the competing theories of their cases. We also explore their enormous legacies, and what hip-hop lost when they died. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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In this week's episode: After Tupac’s murder: Revenge killings in Compton, a day of atonement in Harlem, and Biggie Smalls risks everything by going back to Cali. Slate Plus members get bonus episodes of Slow Burn and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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In this episode: In the summer of 1996, Tupac Shakur seemed to be on the verge of a decision—about what kind of career he wanted to have, and what kind of life he wanted to live. And then he went to Las Vegas. Slate Plus members get bonus episodes of Slow Burn and ad-free podcast feeds. Sign up now. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Run DMC is directly responsible for elevating hip hop to previously unimagined heights. They took rap music into an entirely different direction and helped mainstream the genre. They were beloved as musicians, innovators and people. None more than their DJ, Jason “Jam Master Jay” Mizell, which makes understanding his senseless murder near impossible. Who killed Jam Master Jay and why? And why are there literally zero suspects when there were numerous eyewitnesses? Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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May 22, 2020 was the 40th anniversary of the release of Pac-Man, the video game that made video games for everybody. Two Ohio musicians living in Georgia, Jerry Buckner and Gary Garcia, loved Pac-Man so much that they decided to write a song about it. And it got them signed. This is the story of Bucker & Garcia’s Pac-Man Fever, from 1982. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bizarrealbums/support
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We kick off our series on the group that first injected horror into punk, The Misfits   Taking us out: Spiritual Warfare and the Greasy Shadows   Follow Marcus on Spotify to listen to all of the songs used in this episode
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(A special bonus episode of Disgraceland during this prolonged period of Covid-19 lockdown to help you pass the time.) John Denver was arguably one of, if not the biggest star of the seventies. His easy listening mainstream folk and his squeaky clean, environmentally friendly image made him a favorite in homes all across America. But was John Denver hiding a dark secret? One born of a mysterious military upbringing? A secret he would do anything to protect? A secret, he took to his early grave but that may soon see the light of day depending on numerous Freedom of Information Act court challenges?  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Joe Exotic, the gun toting, mullet wearing, polyamorous subject of the hit Netflix series, Tiger King was more than just a murder-minded conman. He could sing! You saw those videos. We did too. As a singer, Joe’s voice belied the tortured Everyman experience of some of the best country music crooners, hinting at deep trauma resulting from unspeakable loss, assault and violence. Most of which was for the most part, left on the cutting room floor of the popular Netflix series and is on display in this special Covid-19 bonus content episode of Disgraceland. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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For 11 hours, Monica Lewinsky faced off against federal prosecutors who wanted her to help them take down the president and threatened her with decades in jail. Slate Plus members get a bonus episode of Slow Burn every week. Find out more at slate.com/slowburn Audible is the world's largest audiobook publisher. For a 30-day trial and a free audiobook, go to audible.com/slowburnLearn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Little Richard is the originator. Without him it’s hard to imagine the Beatles, Rolling Stones, Elton John or even Led Zeppelin. He blazed a trail through popular culture that previous to him did not exist. His music was completely original for the time, the essence of rock ‘n’ roll, filled with impassioned energy, fueled at times by large quantities of drugs and always brimming with sex. The sex, the drugs, and the party for Little Richard, it was as endless as the manic energy that drove his music and it all nearly derailed him––several times––landing him behind bars and on the wrong side of the gun.  Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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In this intensely divided moment, one of the few things everyone still seems to agree on is Dolly Parton—but why? That simple question leads to a deeply personal, historical, and musical rethinking of one of America’s great icons. Join us for a 9-part journey into the Dollyverse. Hosted by Jad Abumrad, creator of Radiolab and More Perfect.
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People called her crazy, and to be fair she must have seemed crazy. But she was onto something. How Martha Mitchell, the celebrity wife of one of Nixon’s closest henchmen, tried to blow the whistle on Watergate—and ended up ruining her life.Slate Plus members get a bonus episode of Slow Burn every week. Find out more at slate.com/slowburn.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Post Appetite For Destruction, Guns N’ Roses defined the word “dysfunction”. As the band prepared for their follow up release, singer Axl Rose was losing a very public battle with the press while heroin and alcohol threatened to completely derail the band. Axl’s “recovered memories” continued to fuel his erratic behavior and thus he continued to drive his band closer and closer to the edge. It all came to a head in St. Louis at the infamous “Riverport Riot”. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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In 1993, Bill and Hillary Clinton moved into the White House on a swell of optimism. In less than a year, the new administration was mired in a sea of scandals: Travelgate, Filegate, Nannygate, and, most consequentially, Whitewater. What went wrong?Slate Plus members get a bonus episode of Slow Burn every week. Find out more at slate.com/slowburn.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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In this second bonus music episode, we play two live songs we recorded, sung by bluegrass musicians Nora Brown and Amythyst Kiah.  You can find Nora on facebook @norabrownbanjo, instagram @little.nb, and her music at jalopyrecords.org and on Spotify. Amythyst is on facebook, instagram, and twitter at @amythystkiah, and her music can be found at amythystkiah.com.
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Jay Z’s career defies easy categorization. His artistry and business sense is as influenced by his past career as a drug dealer as they are anything else. Jay Z has reached unprecedented heights as an entertainer and an entrepreneur, and it almost never happened. All because of a stabbing. A stabbing that was influenced by that same street hustle that created “Jay Z”. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Few hard rock bands lived the life portrayed in their songs as authentically as Guns N’ Roses. Singer, Axl Rose was driven by deep seeded demons that drove the creation of his band’s legendary debut album, Appetite For Destruction as well as his legendary bad behavior. His band was hardly any different. Nearly dysfunctional from drug use and excess, their record label feared they would all die before their first album was even released. Listen to part 1 of Guns N’ Roses saga in Disgraceland complete with highly entertaining cameos by David Bowie, Joe Perry, Mick Jagger and others. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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In 1973, the Senate Watergate hearings gripped the nation. But the first congressional hearings on the scandal took place a year earlier—and featured an angry Texan shouting at four empty chairs.Slate Plus members get a bonus episode of Slow Burn every week. Find out more at slate.com/slowburn.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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When Bill Clinton went to Washington, rumors and accusations from his Arkansas past went with him. But even his most dedicated political enemies couldn't predict where their efforts would lead.Slate Plus members get a bonus episode of Slow Burn every week. Find out more at slate.com/slowburn.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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What happened between Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky? Why did it happen? And what are we supposed to do about the fact that the whims and impulses of individual men can—and constantly do—alter the course of history? In the fourth episode of our series on Clinton’s impeachment, Leon Neyfakh details Clinton and Lewinsky’s reckless affair. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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27 Club Season 1 featuring twelve episodes on Jimi Hendrix is now available for you to binge in the 27 Club feed. Episode 12 launched last week and detailed the many conspiracies behind Jimi’s death. If you haven’t yet heard the season finale, it is available for you here. If you’re ready to binge the entire series from the beginning you can search “27 Club” in your podcast app to access all 27 Club episodes in the 27 Club feed, all hosted and produced by Disgraceland’s Jake Brennan. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Woodward and Bernstein, Walter Cronkite, and a host of other journalists tried to make people care about Watergate in the run-up to the 1972 election. They totally failed. Slate Plus members get a bonus episode of Slow Burn every week. Find out more at slate.com/slowburn.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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How a folksy segregationist senator, a team of young investigators, and a few whistleblowers staged the hearings that made Watergate must-see TV.Slate Plus members get a bonus episode of Slow Burn every week. Find out more at slate.com/slowburn.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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In its first two seasons, Slow Burn looked back at two of the biggest stories of the late 20th century—the Watergate scandal and the impeachment of Bill Clinton. Season three of the show tackles another: the murders of Tupac Shakur and the Notorious B.I.G. The story takes place at a moment when hip-hop was taking over pop culture, and the world’s two most famous rappers were a former theater kid from the Bay Area and a one-time crack dealer from Brooklyn. In just a few years, they changed music forever. They went from friends to enemies. And they ended up victims of a deadly rivalry between two rap scenes.    How is it that two of the most famous performers in the world were murdered within a year of each other—and their killings were never solved? Find out in Slow Burn season three: Biggie and Tupac. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Why were so many Americans ready to believe conspiracy theories after Watergate? How did those beliefs help trigger Nixon‘s downfall? And given what we know about Watergate—what separates a conspiracy theory from just a theory? Slate Plus members get a bonus episode of Slow Burn every week. Find out more at slate.com/slowburn.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Aside from Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky, the most pivotal player in the Clinton impeachment saga may have been Linda Tripp—an ordinary person who made extraordinary choices that precipitated the entire crisis. In perhaps the deepest and most intimate interview she’s ever given, Tripp talks to Leon Neyfakh about what she did, and why. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Some of the most withering criticism of Clinton came from a coalition of conservative activists whose political views were bound up with their faith. The influence of the Christian right within the Republican Party had been growing steadily since the Reagan years. When the Lewinsky story broke, the movement’s leaders pounced on it with righteous vigor.In the sixth episode of our series on Clinton’s impeachment, Leon Neyfakh charts the religious right’s campaign against the president and how it failed.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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The sad story behind the “the Soul Cages” album, the 3rd LP of British rock superstar, “Sting” All Tracks by: Sting Intro Track: Acid Ghost – The Artist’s High Sponsor: Radio Majera Podcast / LastSecond.ir Radio Majera Castbox    Telegram     Website All prepared by: Bardia Barj Logo and Cover by: Nima Jamali Album Podcast Website Telegram    Twitter    Instagram حمایت ریالی از پادکست آلبوم حمایت ارزی از پادکست آلبوم
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At a bar in Queens, and in the Senate offices, Nixon's supporters stood with him long after it was clear his hands were dirty. How did they rationalize their position? And what, finally, made them waver? Slate Plus members get a bonus episode of Slow Burn every week. Find out more at slate.com/slowburn.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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What did Richard Nixon do when he felt the walls closing in? How did the country respond? And what did it feel like when people finally got to hear those tapes? Slate Plus members get a bonus episode of Slow Burn every week. Find out more at slate.com/slowburn.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Slate Plus members get a bonus episode of Slow Burn every week. To listen to the rest of the bonus episodes this season, sign up for Slate Plus now. In this Slow Burn bonus episode, host Joel Anderson and producer Christopher Johnson discuss the growing feud between Tupac and Biggie and the role of Faith Evans. Then, you’ll hear an extended interview with Larry “The Blackspot” Hester, a former staff writer at Vibe who interviewed Tupac, Biggie, and other people at Death Row and Bad Boy as their drama heated up. Production by Chau Tu. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Today it’s conventional wisdom that all feminists hypocritically turned their backs on Monica Lewinsky. In fact, the scandal provoked an intense debate within the feminist movement about sex, power, and consent. For some, it was obvious that Clinton had victimized Lewinsky and needed to be thrown overboard. For others, it was just as obvious that the scandal was part of a political war in which Clinton was the good guy. In the seventh episode of our series on Clinton’s impeachment, Leon Neyfakh excavates the arguments and ideas that divided liberals—and feminists in particular—at the height of the scandal. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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What had to happen for the Watergate scandals to end Richard Nixon’s career? And was his downfall inevitable? In the final episode of Slow Burn’s first season, Leon Neyfakh assesses the president’s desperate final campaign to save himself—and the people and institutions that finally brought him down.Slate Plus members get a bonus episode every week. Find out more at slate.com/slowburn.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Juanita Broaddrick told Ken Starr’s team of prosecutors that Bill Clinton had raped her in 1978. Her story wasn’t included in the Starr Report—but members of congress found out about it anyway, and had to decide how it would affect their vote on impeachment. In the final episode of our series on Clinton’s impeachment, Leon Neyfakh talks to Broaddrick, and to Lisa Myers, the NBC News reporter whose interview with Broaddrick became a cause célèbre during the impeachment trial. What does it mean that Broaddrick’s story has never really become a part of Bill Clinton’s?--Slate Plus members get a bonus episode of Slow Burn every week. Find out more at slate.com/slowburn.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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TEQUILA + FRESCA + LIME = PALOMA PRE SUMMER REFRESHER MIX Solarys - Let The Sunshine In (Ådå Extended Mix) Toni Braxton -Dance (Dave Aude Extended Mix) Endor -Pump It Up (BRKLYN Radio Edit) Trimtone - Mesmerized Kelly Clarkson - I Dare You (Lash Extended) Dua Lipa - Break My Heart (Joris Voorn Remix) Maverick Sabre - Slow Down ft. Jorja Smith (Vintage Culture x Slow Motion Remix) Sammy Porter/Jess Bays - Devotion Guz - U Got My Love (Extended Mix) Diplo & SIDEPIECE - On My Mind (MK Remix) Will Monotone/Angel Burke - What It Is Jaden Thompson - Flashing Lights Earth n Days - Just Be Good To Me Curt Lopez & VOLEX - Precious (Edit) Noizu = Elevate (Original Mix) Destiny's Child - Bug A Boo (George Mensah Lockdown Dub Lady Gaga & Ariana Grande - Rain On Me
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Whitney Houston was The Voice. A stunning beauty. An early MTV star and leading actress. But when she passed away in a hotel suite bath, the music industry gala downstairs that she was supposed to attend went on without her. How did it all come to this? The drugs and her husband Bobby Brown weren’t answers, just ways to avoid the question: what was the private tragedy of Whitney Houston? Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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In the summer of 1968, the Beach Boys’ drummer Dennis Wilson invited a hippie guru and his grungy harem to squat in his Pacific Palisades home. Dennis was the handsome California surfer that his brother Brian wrote all those hit songs about, while the hippie cult would soon be infamous the world over as the Manson Family. What happened when the Wilsons met the Mansons would forever change Dennis, the band, and American history itself. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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On a single Saturday in 2000, Marshall Mathers assaulted two separate men with a pistol and fought with his wife outside a nightclub, resulting in lawsuits and charges that hung over the completion of his original trilogy of albums. For that one day, the rap persona Slim Shady had escaped into the real world. How had Slim Shady come to be, and why had he gotten out? Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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In this final episode of season one, young Chelsea starts coming up against some obstacles in her new chosen major of music and sound recording. She is feeling inadequate in her musical ability once again and it hinders her bonding with her classmates. Against her own instincts, she continues an internet-based relationship. Musician and poet Sadie Dupuis of Speedy Ortiz chimes in with a guest letter describing her own early songwriting experiences and influences. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Linda Taylor was a con artist, a kidnapper, maybe even a murderer. She was also America’s original “welfare queen,” the villain Ronald Reagan needed to create a vision of a country being taken advantage of by its poorest citizens. In this new narrative mini-series, Josh Levin, one of the editors behind Slow Burn, reveals the never-before-told story of a woman whose singular life was forgotten in the rush to create a vicious American stereotype.This podcast is based on Josh Levin’s new book, The Queen: The Forgotten Life Behind an American Myth.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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The Rolling Stones, the most dangerous band on the planet, envisioned their free concert at the Altamont speedway outside San Francisco as the triumphant capstone to their 1969 tour: a west coast Woodstock, and a celebration of free love and hippiedom. But the festival, thrown together in under seventy two hours and with security managed by Hell’s Angels paid in beer, was fated for a tragic and violent end... just like the ‘60s itself. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Kurt Cobain is a celebrated and defiant icon of Generation X. His wife, Courtney Love was once the most hated woman in America. Courtney like Kurt, was unapologetic, fierce, determined, ambitious, authentic and a total hypocrite. They were both totally in love and for a minute shined brighter than most. They challenged gender norms and the music industry patriarchy and reluctantly played the roles of their generation’s John and Yoko by way of Sid and Nancy all while making great music, but only one of them would make it out of the nineties alive. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Every week, Slate Plus members get a special episode of Slow Burn in which Leon Neyfakh talks to people connected with the Clinton impeachment saga. This week, we’re presenting excerpts from those bonus episodes, featuring interviews with Linda Tripp, consultant Dick Morris, former acting solicitor general Walter Dellinger, and Dillon Teachout, an intern in the independent counsel’s office. Learn more about Slate Plus membership at slate.com/slowburn.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Iggy Pop pushed rock further than anyone before him, committing to live acts of sex, sickness, and rumored suicide on stage. From his cocaine fueled bromance with David Bowie, to his search for inspiration in the voodoo rituals of Haiti, Iggy Pop never just crossed the line between art and madness. He bled all over it, and danced on the stains. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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In the aftermath of the Manson Family murders, Hollywood was gripped with fear. Various investigations stitched together a deluded White Album-inspired explanation of the killing spree. But Dennis Wilson knew the truth; that he had made a terrible, irreversible mistake and that now, the sunny dream of the sixties was over and the nightmare it brought about, haunted him to his final days. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
63
A special edition of Slow Burn features Leon Neyfakh live on stage. In the first of two episodes, Leon was joined in by Ruth Marcus and Rick Perlstein to explore lingering questions about the Clinton legacy. Plus, a story from the season 2 cutting room floor. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Grunge, grief, the Grateful Dead and a “teenage whore.” Part 2 of the Kurt Cobain and Courtney Love story picks up with Courtney’s ascent and the couple’s heroin hazed pregnancy. An escape from rehab and a punk as f*ck group hug for Gen X. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Gun fights, heroin trafficking, burglaries, kidnapping threats, intra-band infidelity and the greatest rock ‘n’ roll record ever made, Exile on Main St. The Rolling Stones created this album as fugitives––tax fugitives––exiled from their homeland to the French Riviera and desperate to keep their career afloat after a near decade of scandal and near financial ruin amidst a cast of colorful characters including Gram Parsons, Anita Pallenberg, starlets, aristocrats, drug dealers, junkies and thieves. All of the chaos contributed to one of Keith Richards’ and Mick Jagger’s finest creative achievements, a wholly new and unique interpretation of America. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
66
The night before, Jerry Lee Lewis’ 5th wife died, she made a phone call to her Mom. She told her that she was thinking of leaving the rock and roll pioneer, but that he wouldn’t let her. Then, she made a second call — this one to the sister of her high-school sweetheart, making plans for the sister to come take her away from Jerry Lee later that month. Then… in mid-sentence the phone went dead. The next day, Mrs. Jerry Lee Lewis was found dead. Neatly placed on top of a perfectly made bed in the newlywed couple’s guest room. Despite the bruises on her body, the blood under her fingernails, the scratches on her husband’s hands, and the mountain of other physical and anecdotal evidence, the death was ruled an accident. Did Jerry Lee Lewis kill his wife and get away with murder? Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Hey Slow Burn listeners. We have something special for you this week. It's an episode of Broken Record, a music podcast from Pushkin Industries, co-hosted by Malcolm Gladwell and music producer Rick Rubin. In the episode, Malcolm and Rick talk to Questlove about his memories of the MOVE police bombing in Philly, the music of his childhood, and Quest gets behind the drums to show the evolution of his playing.  Being the music lover he is, Questlove can't help but turn the tables to ask Rick about his own Hip Hop history: working on the Beastie Boys' first album, License to Ill, and LL Cool J's first album, Radio. Then it all culminates in one of the best Obama stories ever. You can subscribe to Broken Record wherever you get your podcasts, and see some amazing studio session photos on Instagram, @TheBrokenRecordPod. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Motown Records is one of the most successful musical industry endeavors or all time. The music and the megastars Motown produced; Smokey Robinson, Diana Ross, Stevie Wonder and the Jackson 5 defined a generation. But that success is marred by rumors. Rumors that the record label and its innovative owner were controlled by the quote unquote black hand of the white American mob. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
69
Gaz & Liam continue to record The Blues Kitchen Podcast in lockdown... This week there is music form James Burton, Robert Johnson, The Everly Brothers, Witch, Savoy Brown, Koko Taylor & David Crosby. There's also a Blues Kitchen Archive session track from the legendary Jimmie Vaughan performing a rare solo version of 'Baby What's Wrong'.  Ciara Haidar continues to take your requests, this week she's recorded a wonderful version of Janis Joplin's 'Piece Of My Heart' Please continue to send in your requests for Ciara via radio@theblueskitchen.com  When you've caught up with the podcast, head over to The Blues Kitchen YouTube channel:www.youtube.com/BluesKitchenTV Check out The Blues Chronicles:https://theblueschronicles.com/events/ Email the show: radio@theblueskitchen.com Listen on Apple Podcasts, TuneIn, Mixcloud, Acast & many more…
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It’s long been believed that punk rock icon, Sid Vicious died of a heroin overdose. However, new evidence suggests that his overly affectionate and increasingly dependent mum gave him a fatal hotshot in a final, maternal act of mercy. Listen to find out why. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
71
A$AP Rocky’s upbringing; Harlem, Riker’s, and his own instincts and sense of history informed his world view: A view that included not only a healthy respect for the healing powers of LSD but also to want no part of the political maelstrom surrounding our cartoon president, Donald J. Trump. The bottling and selling of American outrage, for Rocky was a race to the bottom, a distraction. Despite my own distaste for Trump and for all politicians, I respect Rocky’s decision to attempt to ascend above the fray. The irony is that A$AP Rocky’s own behavior led him straight into the political fray; jailed in an international incident and in the end, in need of the unlikeliest of political allies to help him escape. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
72
Johnny Cash took no shit. Was a total original. Could maneuver that big baritone around a ballad or a rave up like nobody’s business. He also burned down a national forest, crashed cars, overdosed, was arrested for drug trafficking and obsessed with June Carter. Their love affair is one for the ages. Through it all, Johnny maintained his sense of empathy and his big heart. His story is unlike any other. Listen to Disgraceland to hear how Johnny Cash played with fire both figuratively and literally. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
73
Madonna always knew her life would be art. She rose through the late 70s New York scene reinventing pop iconography and feminism alike. But whether it was Toronto police threatening her for indecency, her short-fuse husband, Hollywood bros exploiting her charisma, or far worse, Madonna learned quick: the world doesn’t know what to do with a truly free woman. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
74
A special edition of Slow Burn features Leon Neyfakh live on stage. In the second of two episodes, Leon was joined in by Emily Bazelon, Wesley Morris, Dan Savage, and Andi Zeisler to explore lingering questions about the Clinton legacy. Plus, Clara Jeffery discusses Hillary Clinton. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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A special edition of Slow Burn features Leon Neyfakh live on stage in New York City. On April 19th, Leon was joined by Bob Woodward, Virginia Heffernan, Gail Sheehy, Mary DeOreo and Marc Lackritz to discuss Trump, Watergate and Nixon’s legacy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Hit Parade takes you back to the turn of the millennium when, for a couple of years, it seemed like a Latin pop star was topping Billboard’ Hot 100 every few weeks: Ricky Martin. Jennifer Lopez. Enrique Iglesias. Marc Anthony. Carlos Santana. Shakira. This wave of Latin crossover was hard-fought and a long time coming—from “La Bamba” to “Macarena,” Spanish-language hits in the 20th century had been treated like novelties by record buyers and radio programmers. The Latin boom of 1999 changed all that—but did it go far enough? How did we get from the slick Spanglish of “Livin’ la Vida Loca” to the Spanish-first success of “Despacito” and “Mi Gente”? And how did Ritchie Valens and João Gilberto prepare America for J.Lo and Shakira triumphing at the Super Bowl? Podcast production by Justin D. Wright. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts and bonus episodes of shows like Dear Prudence and Slow Burn. Sign up now to listen and support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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It took two years for the Watergate scandal to unfold—for a break-in at the Democratic Party's headquarters to go from a weird little caper to a constitutional crisis that brought down a president. What was it like to experience those two years in real time?Hosted by Leon Neyfakh. An eight-episode podcast series made possible by Slate Plus members. Coming Nov. 28.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Rehab, arrests, fights, hitting on Prince Harry, dramatic stage breakdowns, slagging off the press, Amy Winehouse was a rockstar’s rockstar and she was also one of the greatest musical talents of the past 20 years. Her voice was unlike any other. She modernized jazz. She gave weight to pop. When she was inspired, she was untouchable. Driven by her muse, haunted by her addictions and harassed endlessly by the paparazzi, Amy Winehouse’s story is tragic and all too familiar but her music and the way she expressed herself; entirely unique. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Slate Plus members get a bonus episode of Slow Burn every week. This week, we're releasing some samples of those episodes—interviews with people with a unique perspective on Watergate. Next week: The end. Find out more at slate.com/slowburn.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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In the 1970s, the world regarded The Rolling Stones as an insular band of hedonistic and glamorous pansexual junkies. But all of the trouble they’d stirred up during the 60s and early 70s would be dwarfed by the mess they would cause in Canada in 1977. Up until that point Keith’s constitution, the band’s money and collective luck had been enough to fend off destruction, but the scandal they embroiled themselves in touched the highest levels of government, threatened to destroy the band and their so-far indestructible guitar player, Keith Richards. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
81
The Grateful Dead became one of the most influential bands of all time and propelled themselves with improvisation, LSD and an ethos of “freedom”. Through drug busts and CIA surveillance, they thrived and created one of the largest, most fervent and commercially consequential fan bases of all time. Freedom, LSD and improvised blues in the key of bummed the fuck out on this episode of Disgraceland. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Snoop Dogg, aka Calvin Broadus has worn many hats. Inmate, pimp, Martha Stewart’s BFF: But in 1994, Snoop was the biggest name in hip hop yet his career was about to be derailed just as it was taking off due to the murder of Philip Woldemariam, a murder that Snoop was being charged with. The streets that made Snoop, the streets he came up on and that infiltrated the raps he made and the smooth style he patented, were the very same streets he could not leave behind. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Big Lurch, didn’t just rap about standard hip-hop culture; he rapped about serial killers like Jeffrey Dahmer and horror movie villains like Jason Voorhees and Freddy Krueger, and in the process contributed to a sub-genre of hip-hop called, “horrorcore.” He also smoked way too much PCP. So much so that he could not separate his horrorcore lyrics and the horror movies he watched from reality. The result? Unspeakable. Not just murder. Cannibalism. This is a special Halloween re-release of the Season 2 episode on Big Lurch Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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TLC’s Lisa “Left Eye” Lopes was known as “the crazy one”. She did, after all, burn down her NFL playing boyfriend, Andre Rison’s mansion. But given the fact that it was done after what was then one of many domestic assaults, Disgraceland chooses to view Left Eye as a bad ass… and not "the crazy one". This episode digs into what really happened that night, who Lisa Lopes really was as a person and the details surrounding her own premature death. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Rick James may have been born into a life of crime but he was determined to make his way in life through music. He intimidated George Clinton, inspired Prince and more than likely saved Jim Morrison’s life. Rick James was rock ‘n roll’s Zelig. He was also sex-crazed, dangerous and heavily addicted to crack cocaine. Three traits that led to two separate arrests for the kidnapping and torture of two different women. Listen to this episode of Disgraceland to hear the tale of the one and only Superfreak, Rick James. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
86
Robb sits down with Jason for a wild and hilarious ride discussing pornstars, skateboarding for Powell and Peralta, metal, bi-sexuality, why it’s okay to get your dick sucked by a dude, his band Taintstick, open relationships, getting molested by his father, and life as one of the most respected and funny Sirius XM jockeys. This is a must-listen! Support Our Sponsors! The Ridge is a minimal, front pocket wallet that’s designed to streamline what you carry every day. Visit www.RIDGE.com/NFR and use Promo Code NFR for 10% off your order! The newest 15 episodes are always free, but if you want access to all the archives, watch live, chat live, access to the forums, and get the show days before it comes out everywhere else, you can subscribe now at www.GaSDigitalNetwork.com and use the promo code NFR for a 14-day free trial!
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Motley Crue frontman, Vince Neil totaled his Ford Pantera on a beer run and took the life of his friend Razzle Dingley, drummer for Hanoi Rocks in the process. Bassist, Nikki Sixx survived multiple heroin overdoses. Guitarist Mick Mars walked away from a blackout drunk drowning and drummer, Tommy Lee lived through his own Caligula-like Sunset Strip sexcapades. Motley Crue, a degenerate band of death cheating rock gods has us asking, “how are these dudes still alive?” Maybe, they’re the undead. *Producer's Note: Please consider a donation in the memory of Ian Kennedy. Ian, a member of the Disgraceland family left us too soon recently. A GoFundMe campaign has been established to help his daughter and wife and can be linked to here: https://www.gofundme.com/for-sophie-and-michele-kennedy Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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XXXTentacion was one of Generation Z’s most talented hip hop stars but his ascent was marked by violence and drama; beatdowns, beefs (what’s up, Drake?) and abuse. XXXTentacion’s music quickly rose from Soundcloud to the top of the charts due in part to the relative loneliness and alienation he repped in his lyrics, sentiments his audience quickly latched onto. XXXTentacion’s connection to his audience was (and still is even in death) unique and powerful. Their connection via social media-fueled him, inspired him and ironically alienated him, just like his penchant for violence. What, if any of it, all led to his untimely demise? Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Part two of the N.W.A story finds the group dead center in America’s crosshairs due in part to their own violent behavior and at a crossroads creatively. Death Row’s Suge Knight, Public Enemy’s Chuck D. and a young thug from the east coast all ride shotgun to Dre, E, Cube, Yella and Ren as the group finds itself having predicted yet another one of America’s darkest moments. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
90
We follow The Ramones as they hit the road, meet Phil Spector and make Rock 'n' Roll High School.   Taking us out: Metroyd Myk   Follow Marcus on Spotify to listen to all of the songs used in this episode  
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For many years now MidAmerica Productions has been organizing concerts in New York City and enlisting choral ensembles from the U.S. and abroad to come to the "big apple" to perform at prestigious Manhattan venues. On today's date in 1990, choirs from Arkansas, Connecticut, Minnesota, and Texas* were on stage at Carnegie Hall for the world premiere of John Rutter's "Magnificat," specially commissioned by MidAmerica, and with the British composer himself on hand to conduct. "The chorus numbered over 200 voices," Rutter recalled, "every one of them happy and excited at the prospect of joining forces in the magnificent setting of Carnegie Hall… [so] I wanted to write something joyous because that would reflect the mood of the performers…" "The 'Magnifcat'" continues Rutter, "is known as the Canticle of the Blessed Virgin, and it is mainly in the sunny southern countries—Spain, Mexico, Puerto Rico—that Mary is most celebrated and enjoyed. This led me to conceive the music as a bright, Latin-flavored fiesta. On feast days of the Virgin Mary in Latin countries, the population sings, dances, dresses in its most colorful clothes, processes in the open air, and celebrates. I wrote my setting in that spirit." Despite composing and conducting religious music, Rutter confessed during a 2003 interview on "60 Minutes" that he was not a particularly religious man himself—just a composer deeply moved and inspired by the spirituality of sacred verses and prayers. *These were the Southern Arkansas University Heritage Singers, the Branford High School Concert Choir from Connecticut, the Moorhead High School A Cappella Choir from Minnesota, and the Sanctuary Choir of the First United Methodist Church of Houston, Texas.
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In our finale on The Ramones we follow the band through tumultuous days of questionable solo projects, love triangles and working with Phil Spector.   Taking us out: Long Knife   Follow Marcus on Spotify to listen to all of the songs used in this episode  
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Bob Marley is known as the peace and love reggae superstar but the truth of who he really was is a bit more complicated. After gunmen raided his home, putting bullets into him, his wife, his manager and his guitar player, Bob managed to live but the lives of his assassins - all of them - were eventually brought to violent, horrific ends. And their killers were never found. Many think the perpetrator was an angry young man from the Trenchtown ghetto who those who feared him called, “Screwface” aka, Bob Marley, Rasta Vigilante. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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On our first series, we cover the so-called godfathers of punk, The Stooges. Join us as we explore the early days of Iggy and the boys as the more innocent of their drug-fueled escapades as the band tries figuring out their voice in the midst of the ultimately empty peace and love movement.   Follow Marcus on Spotify to listen to all of the songs used in this episode   Listen to No Dogs In Space free on Spotify .    
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Ike Turner very well may have invented rock ‘n’ roll and his wife, Tina Turner, one of the most electrifying entertainers to ever take the stage may have ascended to icon status but the couple’s road to the top was anything but smooth. It was rough and violent. Ike Turner for all of his talent as a musician was abusive and heavily addicted to cocaine and in the end did everything he could to bring his wife down with him. This is the story of the couples rise, Ike’s ultimate demise and Tina’s triumph. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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We continue our series on The Ramones!    Taking us out: King Black Acid   Follow Marcus on Spotify to listen to all of the songs used in this episode
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What happens when the hardest working man in show business takes a break? Idle hands are indeed the devil’s workshop. This episode will detail James Brown’s scorching career as well as the scorching high speed chase he led cops on that led to his arrest and jail sentencing for drugs and firearms. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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VODKA (OR GIN) + ROSE’S LIME JUICE + ICE + LIME WEDGE (WASH YOUR HANDS AND STAY HOME!) George MIchael X Mary J Blige - Always "AS" (Waze & Odyssey vs Tommy Theo Mix) Alicia Keys - Time Machine (MK Remix Extended) Doja CaT - Say So (Friend Within Remix) Mark Knight feat. Laura Davie, Melody Men - If It's Love (Original Mix) Fallon - Yup (Extended Mix) Kelis Trick Me Erik Hagleton - Ain't Nobody (Extended Mix) The Shapeshifters, Kimberly Davis - Second Chance (Club EDIT) Disclosure - Get Close (Original Mix) Mekkah, Richard Earnshaw - Race Of Survival (Richard Earnshaw Extended ReVibe) Trimtone - Secrets you cant tell (I'm Every Woman) Midnight City - Carrie's Groove (Original Mix) Neneh Cherry - Buddy X (Honey Dijon Remix)_ Diplo & SIDEPIECE (Original Mix) - On My Mind Ann Nesby, Lorenzo Spano - So Much Joy (Lorenzo Spano Extended Remix Ekoboy (The Boy Is Mine) - Say (Original Mix) Alex Newell - Boy, You Can Keep It (Tracy Young Extended Remix Jay Vegas - Break Ya Down (Miami 2020 Update)
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Darin P. Murphy (Skyrocket) and Joey Curatolo (Rain: A Tribute to the Beatles) join us for a mostly musical holiday edition of "When They Was Fab."    We continue our discussion on the "It Was Fifty Years Ago Today" White Album tribute tour from last year before moving on to other Beatles and McCartney-related topics.     Along the way, since the pair cannot harmonize together, each plays some Lennon/McCartney/Beatles tunes, delivering their greatest vocal punches!
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Who killed Tupac? Who killed Biggie? The answer has been right there out in the open for years. This episode looks at the lives and deaths of both rap superstars, the east coast/west coast beef and the media’s culpability in driving a highly sensationalized narrative that ultimately led to the murder of both men. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
101
Cardi B is one of the biggest artists on the planet and one of the most successful female hip hop artists of all time. She is accused of two counts of felony assault stemming from a fight in a Queens strip club. Her public brawl with rival, Nicki Minaj is well documented as is her rise from the Bronx to superstardom via strip clubs and reality television. It’s the stuff of legend, as is her big personality and unique form of feminism. Her trial looms but has Cardi B already committed and admitted to a crime that is possibly far worse? Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
102
Frank Sinatra had it all. Then lost it all. Then got it all back tenfold. He was a man of extreme talent, confidence and insecurity. And he had powerful and dangerous friends. He orchestrated some of the greatest music ever made and he also orchestrated an alliance between one friend, mob boss, Sam Giancana and another friend, John F. Kennedy that would help the latter win the white house and in the end prove disastrous for Frank and the country. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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John Lennon was a walking contradiction: a violent pacifist and a creative genius marred by creative inconsistency. He was gunned down just as he was getting his groove back by Mark David Chapman, a self-loathing narcissist obsessed with his contradictory hero, John Lennon, Lennon’s musical rival, Todd Rundgren and J.D. Salinger’s angsty, Holden Caulfield from The Catcher In The Rye. Hear how all of these factors and more contributed to the musical icon’s senseless murder in a two part Disgraceland episode. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Hey! Ho! Let's go! We kick off our series on our hometown boys The Ramones.    Taking us out: The Hypnophonics   Follow Marcus on Spotify to listen to all of the songs used in this episode
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This is a bonus episode of Disgraceland that is satire and not true crime. Originally released on April 1, 2019 as an April Fools joke, this episode fooled many. However, it was quickly taken off the Internet. The joke worked too well for some. After editing the episode lightly to protect the identity of the victims, here is the episode as it originally appeared in its entirety along with the original episode description below:A special emergency episode of Disgraceland that hopes to contextualize today’s fast developing story about America’s most mysterious serial killer and his relationship to one of the most infamous musicians of all time. Warning; this story is currently breaking. Information is coming in fast and furious. The episode will be updated periodically throughout the day to reflect new info as we get it. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Keith Moon of the Who was the prototype for rock drummers. Both onstage and off. His drumming was wholly unique. Like his bandmates behavior, it was violent and like his personality it was electric. Everyone loved Keith Moon aka “Moon The Loon” and it seemed that people never tired of his always hilarious and sometimes violent, drunken hijinks until one fateful night when a crew of British skinheads took issue with the drummer’s rockstar excess. The results were disastrous. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
107
NBC’s Miami Vice was the hottest show on television in the mid 80’s. The show’s breakout star, Don Johnson, told the head of CBS Records he wanted to make an album. So they signed him. This the story of Don Johnson’s Heartbeat, from 1986. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bizarrealbums/support
108
The saga of Bill Clinton’s impeachment is rich with forgotten characters, surprising subplots, and opportunities to reflect on just how much America has changed over the past 20 years. Whether you’re well-versed in the tale of Clinton and Monica Lewinsky, or you’re fuzzy on the details, this season of Slow Burn will take you further into the story than you’ve ever been.From its origins in the Whitewater real estate controversy, the Paula Jones sexual harassment lawsuit, and the suicide of Vince Foster, Clinton’s near-removal from office was the culmination of a process that remains poorly understood—and continues to reverberate through our political system today.While Season I of Slow Burn captured what it was like to live through Watergate, Season II offers a fresh reexamination of the choices, circumstances, and manipulations that nearly destroyed the 42nd president and forever changed the life of a former White House intern.Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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The Arlington, Texas rapper was involved in two killings by the time he was 17. Arrested on murder charges and placed under house arrest until hearings were to take place, Tay-K sawed off his ankle bracelet and announced to the world via twitter that he was going out on the run. He made it from Texas all the way to New Jersey where he recorded his most infamous song, “The Race”, detailing his time on the lam. The song’s lyrics and video blurred real life and art and quickly went viral garnering over 100 million downloads. It also worked as a set of clues for authorities to use to piece together the young fugitive’s whereabouts. The viral nature of the song and video, the ensuing twitter phenomenon and infamy surrounding the young fugitive also caused tipsters to come out in droves and eventually led to Tay-K’s arrest. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Marvin Gaye was born into a God-fearing home to a sweet, wholesome mother and crossdressing, philandering, pentecostal preacher who ruled his children with an iron fist. Despite his tense upbringing, Marvin Gaye found his calling - music - and used it as his ticket out of his repressive home life. He chased away his shame and followed his muse to the top of the charts; through a sea of cocaine and sex, becoming one of the biggest and most gifted entertainers of all time before sinking into addiction and depression and ultimately winding up back at home with his parents. A move that would prove to be more devastating than any of his volatile sexual relationships and more deadly than any drug he’d ever taken. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Checking in. Here to help and keep you entertained and hopefully shine light on different ways we can all help one another get through this extremely anxious time. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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GG Allin, the notorious transgressive punk rocker pushed the limits further than anyone before or after him. For GG, there were no limits. No laws. He lived and performed well outside the boundaries of the mainstream and saw himself as the leader of what he called, "The Rock 'N Roll Underground" for whom he pledged he would one day make the ultimate sacrifice: commit suicide on stage. Listen to this episode of Disgraceland to hear about GG Allin's final days. Buckle up, Sickos. To quote GG, "talk is f*cking cheap". Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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In 1968 Van Morrison was hiding out from the New York City Mafia in Boston, Massachusetts. Recently the victim of a physical attack from a Genovese crime family member, Morrison was desperately trying to piece together a band to complete what would become his landmark creative statement, Astral Weeks. One of the musicians who would help him achieve this goal; a young, handsome guitar player from Emerson College named, Rick Philp would mysteriously go missing and eventually wind up dead. Disgraceland pieces together this story using, as one of many sources, the recently released, critically acclaimed book, “Astral Weeks: A Secret History of 1968” by Ryan Walsh. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Never has there been a more extreme form of musical rebellion than Norwegian Black Metal. The genre’s founding band, Mayhem, its sister act, Burzum and supporting cast of musicians with names like, Necrobutcher, Hellhammer and Dead horrified Norway in the early nineties with supreme acts of terror, satanic ritualism, murder, arson and cannibalism. By the time the ashes settled and the corpse paint chipped away, numerous band members would be dead or in jail, convicted of arson and or murder… and a new generation of young metalheads would find their way to satanism through blast beats and dead notes. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
115
Slow Burn's Watergate season is now a TV docu-series, premiering Feb. 16 on Epix. Read more about it in this interview with host Leon Neyfakh. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Sam Cooke was a lot of things: soul superstar, civil rights champion, whip smart entrepreneur but he was also a serial womanizer with an unbridled libido. On December 11, 1964, Sam Cooke, was shot to death by Bertha Lee Franklin, manager of the Hacienda Motel in Los Angeles, CA. Franklin killed Cooke in what was ruled by the courts to be a justifiable homicide due to Cooke’s unruly, drunken behavior that involved him holding another women captive in his hotel room and allegedly raping her earlier in the evening. With full appreciation of the MeToo moment we are currently all living through as a culture, Disgraceland, with fresh eyes, looks into this crime and the successful effort by Sam Cooke’s family and powerful music industry colleagues to salvage his legacy and reputation by personally discrediting his victim. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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We pick back up with the Stooges in 1970 as they head out on tour. We travel along with them as they reach new debaucherous highs and lows that lead to them being dropped by their label, band breakups, and Iggy meeting a young musician by the name of David Bowie.    Follow Marcus on Spotify to listen to all of the songs used in this episode
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In this week's episode, Mark, Barney & Jasper talk extensively about one of the great record labels — a hallowed home to such groundbreaking acts as Jimmy Cliff, Nick Drake, Roxy Music, (Bob Marley and) the Wailers and, yes, U2. Listening to clips from John Tobler's 1989 audio interview with Island founder Chris Blackwell, RBP's power trio reflect on what made the label such a powerhouse for non-mainstream genres like folk and reggae. Blackwell talks of its transformation after 1967, as well as his first encounter with Marley in 1972. A neat segue via Lenny Kaye's 1975 overview of the label leads "the team" into a discussion of Sparks, the American art pop duo who've just released their new album, A Steady Drip, Drip, Drip. Mark & Barney reminisce about the Mael brothers' Island years in the '70s, commencing with Kimono My House and its astonishing hit single 'This Town Ain't Big Enough for the Both of Us'. We stay in the '70s, moreover, as the RBP troika considers great Disc pieces — about Lou Reed and Chinnichap — by the splendidly-named Ray Fox-Cumming. Mark rounds matters off by talking us through new library pieces about Santana, Hamilton Bohannon, John Fahey (1977), Joni Mitchell and N.W.A., while Jasper adds his tuppenceworth on articles about British folk institution Topic Records, the death of the album and Busta Rhymes. And we go out with a clip from Johnny Black's 1995 audio interview with Pretty Things frontman Phil May, who sadly passed away last week... The Rock's Backpages podcast is proud to be part of the Pantheon podcast network. Pieces discussed: Chris Blackwell audio, Island Records, Sparks, Ron Mael, Lou Reed, The Sweet, Queen, Santana, Hamilton Bohannon, John Fahey, The Pretenders, Sheena Easton, Roxanne Shanté, NWA: Straight Outta Compton, Robert Johnson, Mark Ronson, The T.A.M.I. Show, Cecil Sharp, Folk field recordings, Death of the album, Busta Rhymes and Phil May audio.
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A sneak listen to the upcoming 27 Club and a Guns 'N Roses episode tease. More Manson, Rick Rubin, Oscar nominated movies, Aaron Hernandez and a homicidal reason to hate the Patriots. Plus Little Richard, Bobby Blue Bland and Jake reading the phone book. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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We wrap up our two-parter on Suicide by discussing how this controversial and combative duo act alienated audiences worldwide while influencing and inspiring a new generation of musicians.    Follow Marcus on Spotify to listen to all of the songs used in this episode
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A special Hit Parade announcement: Like many media organizations at the moment, Slate is getting hit pretty hard by what's going on with the economy in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. We want to continue doing our work, providing you with all our great podcasts, news and reporting, and we simply cannot do that without your support. So we're asking you to sign up for Slate Plus, our membership program. It's just $35 for the first year, and it goes a long way to supporting us in this crucial moment. As part of this effort, we're going to be making Hit Parade episodes available to Slate Plus members only., including the one previewed here. To listen to it in fuyou'll need to become a Slate Plus member. This is the best way to support our show and our work, and we hope you will pitch in if you can. Your membership will also give access to everything on Slate.com, you'll get ad-free versions of this and other shows, and you'll get bonus segments and bonus episodes of other Slate podcasts. Plus, once you become a member, you can sign up to do trivia with Chris Molanphy on Hit Parade—“The Bridge” episodes.  Please sign up today at slate.com/hitparadeplus. We thank you for your support. In this Bridge episode of Hit Parade, host Chris Molanphy is joined by Julian Velard, musician and inspiration for Chris’s most recent full-length episode, about hitmaker Billy Joel. As a Jewish, New York–based piano player, Julian admits that Joel remains the most relevant touchpoint in his career to this day—and that he’s fought an existential battle with the song “Piano Man.” Chris and Julian wonder how a modern pop landscape might reward (or litigate) Joel’s tendency toward pastiche, and they discuss his ultimate legacy—to critics, to lovers, to haters and other piano men.  Next, Chris quizzes a Slate Plus listener with some music trivia, and the contestant turns the tables with a chance to try to stump Chris with a question of his own. Then, Chris teases the upcoming full-length episode of Hit Parade, which will look at the Southward journey of rap music in the late ’90s and early ’00s, spurred by chart-topping Atlanta rappers OutKast.  Podcast production by Asha Saluja.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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In March 1996, “King of the Club Kids”, promoter Michael Alig, after appearing on TV’s Geraldo and on the cover of New York Magazine, bashed his friend and DJ, Angel Melendez in the head with a hammer, who died quickly. His body was then dismembered and stuffed into a duct taped cardboard box. Alig proceeded to tell any one of his friends from the raging 90s NYC club scene who would listen, what he had done, but the problem was, Alig’s well known, over the top depraved behavior was such that no one believed him. “Has anyone seen Angel?” “He’s dead. I cut him up and put him in that box over in the corner…” Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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A special Hit Parade announcement: Like many media organizations at the moment, Slate is getting hit pretty hard by what's going on with the economy in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. We want to continue doing our work, providing you with all our great podcasts, news and reporting, and we simply cannot do that without your support. So we're asking you to sign up for Slate Plus, our membership program. It's just $35 for the first year, and it goes a long way to supporting us in this crucial moment. As part of this effort, we're going to be making Full Hit Parade episodes available to Slate Plus members only. To listen to the episode in full, and episodes in future months, you'll need to become a Slate Plus member. This is the best way to support our show and our work, and we hope you will pitch in if you can. Your membership will also give access to everything on Slate.com, you'll get ad-free versions of this and other shows, and you'll get bonus segments and bonus episodes of other Slate podcasts. Plus, once you become a member, you can sign up to do trivia with Chris Molanphy on Hit Parade—“The Bridge” episodes. Please sign up today at slate.com/hitparadeplus. We thank you for your support. On this preview episode of the show: Billy Joel’s first Top 40 hit, way back in 1974, was “Piano Man,” and the nickname stuck. But for a guy who became famous sitting behind 88 keys, few of his biggest hits are really piano songs. In fact, on all three of his No. 1 hits on the Billboard Hot 100, keyboards are not the primary instrument. This is the story of Billy Joel's hits, and the pastiches he crafted to stay on top of the charts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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A special Hit Parade announcement: Like many media organizations at the moment, Slate is getting hit pretty hard by what's going on with the economy in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. We want to continue doing our work, providing you with all our great podcasts, news and reporting, and we simply cannot do that without your support. So we're asking you to sign up for Slate Plus, our membership program. It's just $35 for the first year, and it goes a long way to supporting us in this crucial moment. As part of this effort, we're going to be making Hit Parade episodes available to Slate Plus members only. This will begin with the full-length episode coming on April 30. To listen to that episode in full, and episodes in future months, you'll need to become a Slate Plus member. This is the best way to support our show and our work, and we hope you will pitch in if you can. Your membership will also give access to everything on Slate.com, you'll get ad-free versions of this and other shows, and you'll get bonus segments and bonus episodes of other Slate podcasts. Plus, once you become a member, you can sign up to do trivia with Chris Molanphy on Hit Parade—“The Bridge” episodes. Please sign up today at slate.com/hitparadeplus. We thank you for your support. In this mini-episode of Hit Parade, originally aired on Facebook as part of Slate Live’s Q-Tip Mondays series. host Chris Molanphy is joined by Eduardo Cepeda, music editor at Remezcla. They discuss the most recent full-length episode of Hit Parade about the history of Latin pop on the Billboard charts. Eduardo tells Chris about balancing his fandoms for mainstream American music with his family’s Spanish-language music in his younger years, and offers a critical lens to the Anglophone crossover attempts of the stars of the turn-of-the-millennium Latin pop boomita. Then Eduardo gives Chris a brief history of reggaeton, and shares his current artists to watch within the genre.  Next, Chris quizzes a Slate Plus listener with some music trivia, and the contestant turns the tables with a chance to try to stump Chris with a question of his own. Then, Chris teases the upcoming full-length episode of Hit Parade, which will look at the career of piano man and master of pastiche Billy Joel. Podcast production by Asha Saluja.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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We continue on our journey with The Stooges, and explore how these counter to the counter-culture punks became underground icons to a budding new rock n roll sensibility.    Follow Marcus on Spotify to listen to all of the songs used in this episode  
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This lush, late-Romantic score, composed in 1904, had to wait until 1962 for its premiere performance, when, on today's date that year, the Philadelphia Orchestra led by Eugene Ormandy performed it in Seattle during an international festival devoted to its composer, Anton Webern. For most music lovers, the Austrian composer Anton Webern is a shadowy, vaguely mysterious figure. If they know anything at all about him, it is that he was a pupil of Arnold Schoenberg, that he wrote a small body of very short and very condensed atonal scores, and that in 1945 he was shot by accident by an American soldier in the tense days following the end of World War II. The early orchestral score that received its belated premiere on today's date in 1962 was titled "In the Summer Wind," completed when Webern was just 19 years old. It's very much in the style of Richard Strauss, Gustav Mahler, and even Arnold Schoenberg in the early years of the 20th century. To earn a living, Webern worked as a conductor of everything from Viennese operettas to worker's choral unions. He was one of the earliest European conductors to present music by the American composer Charles Ives, and even appeared as a guest conductor in London with the BBC Symphony. His conducting career came to a halt when the Nazis annexed Austria in 1938, and until his untimely death in 1945, Webern lived by doing routine work for a Viennese music publisher.
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We continue our exploration of punk music by diving into the history of Suicide, the NYC duo that would go on to be possibly the most influential band of the era, creating a blueprint for punk, electronica and industrial.    Follow Marcus on Spotify to listen to all of the songs used in this episode
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Scot and Jeff discuss Crowded House with Jeff Pojanowski.
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Spade Cooley was one of the Postwar America’s biggest celebrities and most talented musicians. He was also a violent, drunk and homicidal psychopath who had no heart. Mean, jealous, abusive and almost totally driven by the deep seeded insecurity that he wasn’t good enough for any of the women who flocked to see him in concert, on television and on the movie screen, Spade Cooley couldn’t bare the thought of his wife with another man so he he did the unthinkable and what followed was at the time, the trial of the century. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Brian Jones invented “The World’s Greatest Rock ‘N Roll Band”, The Rolling Stones but would find himself kicked out of that band just a few years after helping rocket him and his bandmates to international success. He was ousted because of his excessive drug use and his abuse of women and shortly after bottoming out, Brian Jones was found dead at the bottom of his swimming pool under somewhat mysterious circumstances. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Lots of country music stars wear the black hat but none of them wore it with more authenticity than Johnny Paycheck. Johnny Cash may have bragged about shooting a man “just to watch him die” but Johnny Paycheck actually pulled the trigger. He was a true outlaw and totally hardcore. Hardcore honky tonk. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Jake sits down with Elton John to discuss his new film, Rocketman for the pilot episode of iHeartRadio's new podcast, Icons: Intimate, incredible conversations with the most famous creators and artists of our time. Learn the backstories (and secrets) about where they came from, how they got here, and what’s next. Subscribe to Icons on Apple Podcasts, the iHeartRadio app or wherever you get your podcasts. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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We learn the role of drummers in the Military and the purpose they served as a form of communication and a way to keep the troops unified during battle starting with the US Colonies through to the Revolutionary War. Then we take a deep dive into the Civil War and learn all about the importance of the Fife and Drum Corp on both sides in the extremely bloody war that divided the country. Patrick Jones is a Fife and Drum Corps expert and regularly performs with Camp Chase Fifes and Drums at events all over the country. He also restores rope tension snare drums to exact detail. Patrick is a 5th grade history teacher and he does a great job of explaining all of these details so that people of any knowledge level of US History can understand this and learn a lot about Military drumming. Check out Camp Chase Fifes and Drums website at: https://www.campchasefifesanddrums.org/ and find them on YouTube at: https://www.youtube.com/user/pjdrums96/videos?view=0&shelf_id=0&view_as=subscriber&sort=dd A big thank you to Mark Robertson for connecting Patrick and I and being a Patron of the show and a good friend!
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This week Tom & Zeus each create a Top Ten List of their `favorite KISS songs to play during the summer. With Memorial Day weekend here, the guys discuss songs they want on their playlist for beers with friends, days at the beach or blasting in the car for that long summer drive. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Slick Rick has one of the most iconic voices in hip hip history. His style is completely his own and his success owes as much to his delivery as it does to his hustle. Slick Rick worked hard to get to the top and once he made it he was nearly cut down by drugs and violence. Violence inflicted upon him by someone from his inner circle. Listen to hear how Slick Rick fought back and continued his flow. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Eight years after her passing—and 35 years after the release of her debut album—Whitney Houston is about to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Predictably, some rock fans have carped that Houston doesn’t belong in the Hall. But they are not the only ones who, historically, have complained about Houston’s bona fides. In the ’80s, at the apex of her success, black fans complained that Houston was courting white pop fans too eagerly, and forgetting her roots in gospel and R&B. On the charts, by contrast, Whitney Houston’s achievements are indisputable. But they also might be underrated. Houston’s chart records offer a window into exactly how she crossed over…and whether she deserved the backlash. In this episode, Chris Molanphy walks step by step through Whitney’s storied chart records—including a couple that have gone unheralded—that help explain why she was a seminal, singular figure among black female crossover stars, from Aretha and Diana to Beyoncé. Podcast production by Justin D. Wright. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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We conclude our series on The Damned by following them as they break up and get back together, break up and get back together, break up and...   Follow Marcus on Spotify to listen to all of the songs used in this episode
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Big Lurch, didn’t just rap about standard hip-hop culture; he rapped about serial killers like Jeffrey Dahmer and horror movie villains like Jason Voorhees and Freddy Krueger and in the process contributed to a sub-genre of hip-hop called, “horrorcore”. He also smoked way too much PCP. So much so that he could not separate his horrorcore lyrics and the horror movies he watched from reality. The result? Unspeakable. Not just murder. Cannibalism. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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The story of the greatest southern rock band of all time, Lynyrd Skynyrd, and their unforgettable album, "Street Survivors" All Tracks by: Lynyrd Skynyrd Intro Track: Acid Ghost – The Artist’s High All prepared by: Bardia Barj Logo and Cover by: Nima Jamali WWW.ALBUMPOD.COM Telegram       Twitter        Instagram Herolic Podcast Official Website حمایت ریالی از پادکست آلبوم حمایت ارزی از پادکست آلبوم
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Episode eighty-one of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at "Only the Lonely" by Roy Orbison, and how Orbison finally found success by ignoring conventional pop song structure. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have two bonus podcasts -- part one of a two-part Q&A and a ten-minute bonus on "Walk Don't Run" by the Ventures. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ ----more----  Resources Apologies for the delay this week -- I'm still trying to catch up after last week.    As usual, I have put together a Mixcloud mix with every song excerpted in this podcast. I have relied for biographical information mostly on two books -- The Authorised Roy Orbison written by Jeff Slate and three of Orbison's children, and Rhapsody in Black by John Kruth.  For the musicological analysis, I referred a lot to the essay “Only the Lonely: Roy Orbison’s Sweet West Texas Style,” by Albin Zak, in Sounding Out Pop: Analytical Essays in Popular Music.   There are many Orbison collections available, but many have rerecordings rather than the original versions of his hits. The Monument Singles Collection is the originals.  Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript It's been nearly a year since we last looked at Roy Orbison, so it's probably a good idea to quickly catch up with where we were up to. Roy Orbison had started out as a rockabilly singer, with a group called the Wink Westerners who changed their name to the Teen Kings and were signed to Sun Records. Orbison had thought that he would like to be a ballad singer, but everyone at Sun was convinced that he would never make it as anything other than a rocker. He had one minor hit on Sun, "Ooby Dooby", but eventually got dissatisfied with the label and asked to be allowed to go to another label -- Sam Phillips agreed to free him from his contract, in return for all the songwriting royalties and credits for everything he'd recorded for Sun. Newly free, Orbison signed to a major publisher and a major record label, recording for RCA with the same Nashville A-Team that were recording with Elvis and Brenda Lee. He had some success as a songwriter, writing "Claudette", which became a hit for the Everly Brothers, but he did no better recording for RCA than he had recording for Sun, and soon he was dropped by his new label, and the money from "Claudette" ran out. By the middle of 1959, Roy Orbison was an absolute failure. But this episode, we're going to talk about what happened next, and the startling way in which someone who had been a failure when produced by both Sam Phillips and Chet Atkins managed to become one of the most important artists in the world on a tiny label with no track record. Today, we're going to look at "Only the Lonely", and the records that turned Roy Orbison into a star: [Excerpt: Roy Orbison, "Only the Lonely"] It seems odd that Roy Orbison could thank Wesley Rose for introducing him to Monument Records. Rose was the co-owner of Acuff-Rose publishing, the biggest country music publishing company in the world, and the company to which Orbison had signed as a songwriter. Fred Foster, the owner of Monument, describes being called to a meeting of various Nashville music industry professionals, at which Rose asked him in front of everyone "Why are you trying to destroy Nashville by making these..." and then used an expletive I can't use here and a racial slur I *won't* use here, to describe the slightly R&B-infused music Foster was making. Foster was part of the new wave of Nashville record makers that also included Owen Bradley and Chet Atkins, though at this time he was far less successful than either of them. Foster had started out as a songwriter, writing the words for the McGuire Sisters' hit "Picking Sweethearts": [Excerpt: The McGuire Sisters, "Picking Sweethearts"] He had moved from there into record production, despite having little musical or technical ability. He did, though, have a good ear for artists, and he made his career in the business by picking good people and letting them do the music they wanted. He started out at 4 Star Records, a small country label. From there he moved to Mercury Records, but he only spent a brief time there -- he was in favour of moving into the rockabilly market, while his superiors in the company weren't. He quickly found another role at ABC/Paramount, where he produced hits for a number of people, including one track we've already covered in this podcast, Lloyd Price's version of "Stagger Lee". He then put his entire life savings into starting up his own company, Monument, which he initially co-owned with a DJ named Buddy Deane. As Foster and Deane were based in Washington at this time, they used an image of the Washington Monument as the label's logo, and that also inspired the name. The first single they put out on the label caused them some problems. Billy Grammer, their first signing, recorded a song that they believed to be in the public domain, "Done Laid Around", which had recently been recorded by the Weavers under the name "Gotta Travel On": [Excerpt: The Weavers, "Gotta Travel On"] However, after putting out Grammer's version, Foster discovered that the song was actually in copyright, with a credit to the folk singer and folklorist Paul Clayton. I don't know if Clayton actually wrote the song or not -- it was common practice at that time for folk songs to be copyrighted in the name of an artist. But whether Clayton wrote the song or not, "Done Laid Around" had to be withdrawn from sale, and reissued under the name "Gotta Travel On", with Clayton credited as the composer -- something which cost the new label a substantial amount of money. But it worked out well for everyone, with Grammer's record eventually reaching number four on the pop charts: [Excerpt: Billy Grammer, "Gotta Travel On"] After that success, Foster bought out Buddy Deane and moved the label down to Nashville. They put out a few more singles over the next year, mostly by Grammer, but nothing recaptured that initial success. But it did mean that Foster started working with the Nashville A-Team of session musicians -- people like Bob Moore, the bass player who played on almost every important record to come out of Nashville at that time, including the Elvis records we looked at last week. Moore had also played on Roy Orbison's last sessions for RCA, where he'd seen how downcast Orbison was. Orbison had explained to Moore about how this was going to be his last session for RCA -- his contract was about to expire, and it was clear that Chet Atkins had no more idea than Sam Phillips how to make a successful Roy Orbison record. Moore told him not to worry -- he very obviously had talent, and Moore would speak to Wesley Rose about him. As well as being Orbison's music publisher, Rose was also Orbison's manager, something that would nowadays be considered a conflict of interest, but was par for the course at the time -- he was also the Everly Brothers' manager and publisher, which is how Orbison had managed to place "Claudette" with them. There were a lot of such backroom deals in the industry at the time, and few people knew about them -- for example, none of Bob Moore's fellow session players on the A-Team knew that he secretly owned thirty-seven percent of Monument Records. While Fred Foster is credited as the producer on most of Orbison's sessions from this point on, it's probably reasonable to think of Bob Moore as at the very least an uncredited co-producer -- he was the arranger on all of the records, and he was also the person who booked the other musicians on the sessions. Orbison was by this point so depressed about his own chances in the music industry that he couldn't believe that anyone wanted to sign him at all -- he was convinced even after signing that Fred Foster was confusing his own "Ooby Dooby" with another Sun single, Warren Smith's similar sounding "Rock and Roll Ruby": [Excerpt: Warren Smith, "Rock and Roll Ruby"] Wesley Rose had very clear ideas as to what Orbison's first single for Monument should be -- that last session at RCA had included two songs, "Paper Boy", and "With the Bug", that RCA had not bothered to release, and so Orbison went into the studio with much the same set of musicians he'd been working with at RCA, and cut the same songs he'd recorded there. The single was released, and made absolutely no impact -- unsurprising for a record that was really the end of Orbison's period as a failure, rather than the beginning of his golden period. That golden period came when he started collaborating with Joe Melson. The two men had known each other for a while, but the legend has it that they started writing songs together after Melson was walking along and saw Orbison sat in his car playing the guitar -- Orbison and his wife Claudette had recently had a son, Roy DeWayne Orbison (his middle name was after Orbison's friend Duane Eddy, though spelled differently), and the flat they were living in was so small that the only way Orbison could write any songs without disturbing the baby was to go and write them in the car. Melson apparently tapped on the car window, and asked what Roy was doing, and when Roy explained, he suggested that the two of them start working together. Both men were more than capable songwriters on their own, but they brought out the best in one another, and soon they were writing material that was unlike anything else in popular music at the time. Their first collaboration to be released was Orbison's second Monument single, "Uptown", a bluesy rock and roll track which saw the first big change in Orbison's style -- the introduction of a string section along with the Nashville A-Team. This was something that was only just starting to be done in Nashville, and it made little sense to most people involved that Orbison would want strings on what would otherwise be a rockabilly track, but they went ahead: [Excerpt: Roy Orbison, "Uptown"] The string arrangement was written by Anita Kerr, of the Anita Kerr Singers, the female vocal group that would be called into any Nashville session that required women's voices (the male equivalent was the Jordanaires). Kerr would write a lot of the string arrangements for Orbison's records, and her vocal group -- with Joe Melson adding a single male voice -- would provide the backing vocals on them for the next few years. Wesley Rose was still unsure that Orbison could ever be a star, mostly because he thought he was so odd-looking, but "Uptown" started to prove him wrong. It made number seventy-two on the pop charts -- still not a massive hit, but the best he'd done since "Ooby Dooby" three years and two record labels earlier. But it was the next single, another Orbison/Melson collaboration, that would make him into one of the biggest stars in music. "Only the Lonely" had its roots in two other songs. Melson had written a song called "Cry" before ever meeting Orbison, and the two of them had reworked it into one called "Only the Lonely", but they were also working on another song at the same time. They had still not had a hit, and were trying to write something in the style of a current popular record. At the time, Mark Dinning was having huge success with a ballad called "Teen Angel", about a girl who gets run over by a train: [Excerpt: Mark Dinning, "Teen Angel"] Orbison and Melson were writing their own knock-off of that, called "Come Back to Me My Love". But when they played it for Fred Foster, he told them it was awful, and they should scrap the whole thing -- apart from the backing vocal hook Joe was singing. That was worth doing something with: [Excerpt: Roy Orbison, "Only the Lonely", vocal intro] They took that vocal part and put it together with "Only the Lonely" to make a finished song. According to most reports, rather than have Orbison record it, they initially tried to get Elvis to do it -- if they did, they must have known that they had no chance of it getting recorded, because Elvis was only recording songs published by Hill and Range, and Orbison and Melson were Acuff-Rose songwriters. They also, though, tried to get it recorded by the Everly Brothers, who were friends of Orbison, were also signed with Acuff-Rose, and were also managed by Wesley Rose, and even they turned it down. This is understandable, because the finished "Only the Lonely" is one of the most bizarrely structured songs ever to be a hit. Now, I've known this song for more than thirty years, I have a fair understanding of music, *and* I am explaining this with the help of a musicological essay on the song I've read, analysing it bar by bar. I am *still* not sure that my explanation of what's going on with this song is right. *That's* how oddly structured this song is. The intro is straightforward enough, the kind of thing that every song has. But then the lead vocal comes in, and rather than continue under the lead, like you would normally expect, the lead and backing vocals alternate, and push each other out of phase as a result. Where in the intro, the first "dum dum dum" starts on the first bar of the phrase, here it starts on the *second* bar of the phrase and extends past the end of Orbison's line, meaning the first line of the verse is actually five bars (from where the instruments come in after the a capella "Only the"), and not only that, the backing vocals are stressing different beats to the ones the lead vocal is stressing: [Excerpt: Roy Orbison, "Only the Lonely", first line of verse] This is quite astonishingly jarring. Pop songs, of whatever genre -- country, or blues, or rock and roll, or doo-wop, or whatever -- almost all work in fours. You have four-bar phrases that build up into eight- or twelve-bar verses, choruses, and bridges. Here, by overlaying two four-bar phrases out of synch with each other, Orbison and Melson have created a five-bar phrase -- although please note if you try to count bars along with these excerpts, you may come out with a different number, because phrases cross bar lines and I'm splitting these excerpts up by the vocal phrase rather than by the bar line. The lead vocal then comes back, on a different beat than expected -- the stresses in the melody have moved all over the place. Because the lead vocal starts on a different beat for the second phrase, even though it's the same length as the first phrase, it crosses more bar lines, meaning two five-bar phrases total eleven bars. Not only that, but the bass doesn't move to a new chord where you expect, but it stays on its original chord for an extra two beats, giving the impression of a six-beat bar, even though the drums are staying in four-four. So the first half of the verse is eleven bars long, if you don't get thrown by thinking one of the bars is six beats rather than four. Structurally, harmonically, and rhythmically, it feels like someone has tried to compromise between a twelve-bar blues and an eight-bar doo-wop song: [Excerpt: Roy Orbison, "Only the Lonely", second line] There's then another section, which in itself is perfectly straightforward -- an eight-bar stop-time section, whose lyric is possibly inspired by the Drifters song that had used strings and rhythmic disorientation in a similar way a few months earlier: [Excerpt: Roy Orbison, "Only the Lonely", "There goes my baby..."] The only incongruity there is a very minor one -- a brief move to the fifth-of-fifth chord, which is the kind of extremely minor deviation from the key that's par for the course in pop music. That section by itself is nothing unusual. But then after that straightforward eight-bar section, which seems like a return to normality, we then get a five-bar section which takes us to the end of the verse: [Excerpt: Roy Orbison, "Only the Lonely", "But only the lonely know why..."] The song then basically repeats all its musical material from the start, with a few changes – the second time, the verse starts on the third of the scale rather than the first, and the melody goes up more, but it's structured similarly, and finishes in under two and a half minutes. So the musical material of the song covers twenty-four bars, not counting the intro. Twenty-four bars is actually a perfectly normal number of bars for a song to cover, but it would normally be broken down into three lots of eight or two lots of twelve -- instead it's a five, a six, an eight, and a five. I think. Honestly, I've gone back and forth several times about how best to break this up. The song is so familiar to most of us now that this doesn't sound strange any more, but I distinctly remember my own first time listening to it, when I was about eight, and wondering if the backing vocalists just hadn't known when to come in, if the people making the record just hadn't known how to make one properly, because this just sounded *wrong* to me. But it's that wrongness, that strangeness, of course -- along with Orbison's magnificent voice -- that made the record a hit, expressing perfectly the confusion and disorientation felt by the song's protagonist. It went to number two in the US, and number one in the UK, and instantly made Roy Orbison a star. A couple of slightly more conventional singles followed -- "Blue Angel" and "I'm Hurtin'" -- and they were both hits, but nowhere near as big as "Only the Lonely", and this seems to have convinced Orbison and Melson that they needed to follow their instincts and go for different structures than the norm. They started to make their songs, as far as possible, through-composed pieces. While most songs of the time break down into neat little sections -- verse, chorus, verse, chorus, middle eight, instrumental solo, chorus to fade, or a similar structure, Orbison and Melson's songs rarely have sections that repeat without any changes. Instead a single melody develops and takes twists and turns over the course of a couple of minutes, with Orbison usually singing throughout. This also had another advantage, as far as Orbison was concerned -- their songs hardly ever had space for an instrumental break, and so he never had to do the rock and roll star thing of moving around the stage and dancing while the instrumentalists soloed, which was something he felt uncomfortable doing. Instead he could just stand perfectly still at the microphone and sing. The first single they released that fit this new style was inspired by a piece of music Fred Foster introduced Orbison to -- Ravel's "Bolero": [Excerpt: Ravel, "Bolero" (West-Eastern Divan Orchestra)] Orbison and Melson took that basic feel and changed it into what would become Orbison's first number one in the US, "Running Scared": [Excerpt: Roy Orbison, "Running Scared"] That song was apparently one that met some resistance from the Nashville A-Team. A chunk of the song is in rubato, or "free time", where the musicians speed up or slow down slightly to make the music more expressive. This was not something that Bob Moore, in particular, was comfortable with -- they were making pop music, weren't they? Pop music was for kids to dance to, and if kids were going to dance to it, it had to have a steady beat. Orbison wasn't very good at all at dealing with conflict, and wherever possible he would try to take the most positive attitude possible, and in this case he just went into the control room and waited, while the musicians tried to figure out a way of playing the song in strict tempo, and found it just didn't work. After a while, Orbison walked back into the studio and said "I think we should play it the way it was written", and the musicians finally went along with him. It may also have been on "Running Scared" that they pioneered a new recording technique, or at least new for Nashville, which was surprisingly conservative about recording technology for a town so rooted in the music industry. I've seen this story written about three different early Orbison songs, and it could have been any of them, but the descriptions of the "Running Scared" session are the most detailed. While Orbison had a great voice, at this point it wasn't especially powerful, and with the addition of strings, the band were overpowering his voice. At this time, it was customary for singers to record with the band, all performing together in one room, but the sound of the instruments was getting into Orbison's mic louder than his voice, making it impossible to get a good mix. Eventually, they brought a coatrack covered with coats into the studio, and used it to partition the space -- Orbison would stand on one side of it with his mic, and the band and their mics would be on the other side. The coats would deaden the sound of the musicians enough that Orbison's voice would be the main sound on his vocal mic. In this case, the reason his voice was being overpowered was that right at the end of the song he had to hit a high A in full voice -- something that's very difficult for a baritone like Orbison to do without going into falsetto. It may also be that he was nervous about trying this when the musicians could see him, and the coats in the way helped him feel more secure. Either way, he does a magnificent job on that note: [Excerpt: Roy Orbison, "Running Scared", tag] Apparently when Chet Atkins popped into the studio for a visit, he was utterly bemused by what he saw -- but then he was impressed enough by the idea that he got RCA to build a proper vocal isolation booth at their studios to get the same effect. "Running Scared" also came along just after Orbison made one big change to his image. He'd been on tour with Patsy Cline, promoting "Blue Angel", and had left his glasses on the plane. As he couldn't see well without them, he had to resort to using his prescription sunglasses on stage, and was astonished to find that instead of looking gawky and rather odd-looking, the audience now seemed to think he looked cool and brooding. From that point on, he wore them constantly. For the next three years, Orbison and Melson continued working together and producing hits -- although Orbison also wrote several hits solo during this time, including "In Dreams", which many consider his greatest record. But Melson was becoming increasingly convinced that he was the real talent in the partnership. Melson was also putting out singles on his own at this time, and you can judge for yourself whether his most successful solo track, "Hey Mr. Cupid" is better or worse than the tracks Orbison did without him. [Excerpt: Joe Melson, "Hey Mr. Cupid"] Eventually Melson stopped working with Orbison altogether, after their last major collaboration, "Blue Bayou". This turned out to be the beginning of the collapse of Orbison's entire life, though it didn't seem like it at the time. It was the first crack in the team that produced his biggest hits, but for now he was on a roll. He started collaborating with another writer, Bill Dees, and even though Beatlemania was raging in the UK, and later in the US, he was one of a tiny number of American artists who continued to have hits. Indeed, two of the early collaborations by Orbison and Dees were the *only* two records by an American artist to go to number one in the UK between August 1963 and February 1965. The second of those, "Oh, Pretty Woman", also went to number one in the US, and became one of his most well-known songs: [Excerpt: Roy Orbison, "Oh, Pretty Woman"] That song again caused problems with his new collaborator, as Bill Dees sang the harmony vocals on it, and felt he wasn't getting enough credit for that. But that was the high point for Orbison. Wesley Rose and Fred Foster had never got on, and Rose decided that he was going to move Orbison over to MGM Records, who gave him an advance of a million dollars, but immediately the hits dried up. And the events of the next few years were the kind of thing that would would break almost anyone. He had divorced his wife Claudette, who had inspired "Oh, Pretty Woman", in November 1964, just before signing to MGM, because he'd discovered she was cheating on him. But the two of them had been so in love they'd ended up reconciling and remarrying in December 1965. But then six months later, they were out riding motorbikes together, Claudette crashed hers, and she died. And then a little over two years later, while he was on tour in the UK, his house burned down, killing two of his three children. Orbison continued to work, putting out records that no-one was buying, and playing the chicken-in-a-basket circuit in the UK. He even remarried in 1969, and found happiness and a new family with his second wife. But for about twenty years, from 1965 through to 1985, he was in a wilderness period. Between personal tragedy, changing fashions in music, and the heart condition he developed in the 70s, he was no longer capable of making records that resonated with the public, even though his voice was as strong as ever, and he could still get an audience when singing those old hits. And even the old hits were hard to get hold of -- Monument Records went bankrupt in the seventies, and reissues of his old songs were tied up in legal battles over their ownership. But then things started to change for him in the mid-eighties. A few modern artists had had hits with cover versions of his hits, but the big change came in 1985, when he collaborated with his fellow ex-Sun performers Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins, and Jerry Lee Lewis, on an album called Class of 55: [Excerpt: Roy Orbison and the Class of 55, "Coming Home"] That came out in 1986, and made the top twenty on the country charts -- the first time he'd had an album make any chart at all since 1966. Also in 1986, David Lynch used Orbison's "In Dreams" in his film Blue Velvet, which brought the record to a very different audience. He collaborated with k.d. lang, who was then one of the hottest new singers in country music, on a new version of his hit "Crying": [Excerpt: Roy Orbison and k.d. lang, "Crying"] That later won a Grammy. He recorded a new album of rerecordings of his greatest hits, which made the lower reaches of the charts. He got inducted into the rock and roll hall of fame, and recorded a live TV special, A Black and White Night, where he was joined by Elvis' seventies backing band, Bruce Springsteen, Elvis Costello, k.d. lang, Bonnie Raitt, Jackson Browne and Tom Waits, among others, all just acting as backing singers and musicians for a man they admired. He also joined with George Harrison, Jeff Lynne, Tom Petty and Bob Dylan in a supergroup called The Travelling Wilburys, whose first album made the top five: [Excerpt: The Travelling Wilburys, "Handle With Care"] And he recorded an album of new material, his best in decades, Mystery Girl, produced by Lynne and with songs written by Orbison, Lynne, and Petty -- along with a couple of songs contributed by famous admirers like Bono and the Edge of U2. But by the time that came out, Orbison was dead -- after a day flying model aeroplanes with his sons, he had a heart attack and died, aged only fifty-two. When Mystery Girl came out a couple of months later, it rose to the top five or better almost everywhere -- and in the UK and US, he had two albums in the top five at the same time, as in the UK a hits compilation was also up there, while in the US the Wilburys album was still near the top of the charts. Orbison's is one of the saddest stories in rock music, with one of the greatest talents in history getting derailed for decades by heartbreaking tragedies unimaginable to most of us, and then dying right at the point he was finally starting to get the recognition he deserved. But the work he did, both as a songwriter and as a singer, would inspire people long after his death.
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We conclude our series on The Stooges by following Iggy Pop as he evolves from a drugged-out figure of pity in the scene to his rise again with his landmark solo albums and continuing legacy.    Follow Marcus on Spotify to listen to all of the songs used in this episode
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Top 5 Disgraceful Christmas Movies, Charles Manson, The Beach Boys, Martin Scorsese’s ‘The Irishman’ and Joe Pesci for president. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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John Lennon was a walking contradiction: a violent pacifist and a creative genius marred by creative inconsistency. He was gunned down just as he was getting his groove back by Mark David Chapman, a self-loathing narcissist obsessed with his contradictory hero, John Lennon, Lennon’s musical rival, Todd Rundgren and J.D. Salinger’s angsty, Holden Caulfield from The Catcher In The Rye. Hear how all of these factors and more contributed to the musical icon’s senseless murder in a two part Disgraceland episode. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Eminem, 1969, Iggy Pop, A$AP Rocky, Things I Don’t Like (spoiler: negativity), Jennifer Aniston, Billy Crudup and Sam Shepard. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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In March of 1965, The Theodore Hamm Brewing Company held it’s Centennial Celebration party in Minneapolis, Attendees that night would receive a copy of the souvenir album, Hamm’s 65- Bursting with Freshness. This episode was recorded live on February 18, 2020 at Able Brewery & Seedhouse in Minneapolis, MN. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bizarrealbums/support
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Amy Winehouse and XXXTentacion news. Live show preview. Johnny Cash preview. Brian Jones lookback.Disgraceland After Party is a bi-weekly mini-spinoff show that looks at Disgraceland episodes, news surrounding Disgraceland subjects, upcoming episode previews, insight into episode influences, listener emails, deleted scenes and basically anything and everything involving the growing Disgraceland Universe. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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The story of Pink Floyd, and their remarkable album, "The Dark Side of the Moon" All Tracks by: Pink Floyd Intro Track: Acid Ghost – The Artist’s High Sponsor1: Modiseh   کد تخفیف 40هزار تومانی برای خرید بیش از 300هزار تومان: Album Sponsor2: Ponisha (online outsourcing website) All prepared by: Bardia Barj Logo and Cover by: Nima Jamali Website   WWW.ALBUMPOD.COM Telegram       Twitter        Instagram حمایت ریالی از پادکست آلبوم حمایت ارزی از پادکست آلبوم
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Ed Ward returns to talk with host Nate Wilcox about rock & roll's second miracle year when America responded to the Beatles by blending folk and blues with rock & roll. They discuss how Michael Bloomfield electrified Bob Dylan, the Beach Boys making Pet Sounds, Stax hitting its stride, James Brown getting funky, the Beatles dropping acid and the beginnings of the San Francisco scene. This show is part of Pantheon Podcasts.
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Scot and Jeff discuss the second part of The Who's career (from 1970 to 1982 and afterwards, thereabouts) with Ben Domenech.
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Jaime Kay from The Jungle Room Podcast and Ashley Drew from the Ashley Drew Adventures YouTube channel join Gurdip for a great discussion this week on some of their most interesting Elvis discoveries! But before that - which of the two ladies will prevail in this week's trivia challenge? Then, for Song of the Week, Ashley highlights the doo-wop-esque 1956 ballad "Is It So Strange." Jaime Kay sheds a light on "Tomorrow Is A Long Time," the 1966 track songwriter Bob Dylan called "the one recording I treasure the most" and Gurdip finishes off the episode with a dip back into the doo-wop well with the haunting 1956 jukebox weeper "First in Line." Featured Songs of the Week: Gurdip: First in Line Jaime Kay: Tomorrow Is A Long Time Ashley Drew: Is It So Strange
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After Party 6 (Mini Episode): Quentin Tarantino, Cardi B as Robert De Niro, Disgraceland Season 4 and more.Disgraceland After Party is a bi-weekly mini-spinoff show that looks at Disgraceland episodes, news surrounding Disgraceland subjects, upcoming episode previews, insight into episode influences, listener emails, deleted scenes and basically anything and everything involving the growing Disgraceland Universe. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Welcome to our series on The Damned! We explore how The Damned helped punk rock jump the pond from America and how they kicked off a new generation of British musicians rebelling against an increasingly right-wing post-WWII UK.     Follow Marcus on Spotify to listen to all of the songs used in this episode
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We're doing the KISS thing again this week with special guest Andrew Sgambati for The Quarantine Sessions Vol9! Andrew recently released his new KISS fan film One Last Time Live from New York City The Movie!   This part documentary / part concert film is an inside journey into the KISS End of the Road tour. While the movie is focused on the current tour, it's so much more. The movie also touches on Andrew's personal KISStory; going back to the beginning of his fandom in 1988. You can watch the movie for FREE on youtube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2hDIvQSYrwY   As per usual with The Quarantine Sessions, we're taking YOUR questions. This week, all the questions are KISS-related. You guys submitted a ton of great questions and we got to as many as time would allow.  With so much KISS to focus on, we had to forgo Beat the Geek this week but it WILL return next week. We hope you enjoy The Quarantine Sessions Vol9 and SHARE with a friend!   Contact Us! Rate, Review, and Subscribe in iTunes Join the Facebook Fan Page Follow on Twitter Follow on Instagram E-mail Us Subscribe to our Youtube channel! Support Us! Buy a T-Shirt! Donate to the show! Stream Us! Stitcher Radio Spreaker TuneIn Become a VIP Subscriber! Click HERE for more info! Comment Below Direct Download
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Whatever the 3-day Memorial Day Weekend means to you, it also means down time with friends and family. That includes us. Make yours as close to your tradition as you can this year, but stay safe and enjoy a replay of our first episode about The Magic Of Motown! This show is part of Pantheon Podcasts
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The Fab Four’s second film, shot in vivid colour, captured a very different group demeanor to that in A Hard Day’s Night. For that first effort they’d been pumped up on pills; this time around, they were laid back on the “herbal jazz cigarettes”. And director Dick Lester, together with cinematographer David Watkin, conveyed the blissed-out vibe via stunning photography, innovative graphics and offbeat comedy. The result, at the time widely regarded as inferior to its predecessor, is now acclaimed as a pop-art gem that, very much of its time, also helped to define its era while serving as a wide-ranging source of influence and inspiration. Towering above all, of course, were those personalities and their music… * ‘Help!’ * ‘The Night Before’ * ‘You’ve Got to Hide Your Love Away’ * ‘I Need You’ * ‘Another Girl’ * ‘You’re Going to Lose That Girl’ * ‘Ticket to Ride’ * Selections from Ken Thorne’s orchestral score
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Everybody knows the Beethoven story: He’s a brilliant composer who faced hearing loss; a genius who couldn’t listen to his own masterpieces. But there’s a different way to consider the story we think we know.
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On today's date in 1803, violinist George Polgreen Bridgetower, age 33, and pianist and composer Ludwig van Beethoven, age 32, gave the first performance in Vienna of a new Sonata in A Major for Violin and Piano, a chamber work now regarded as one of Beethoven's greatest. The performance was to have taken place two days earlier, but Beethoven wasn't finished with the music. At the first rehearsal, Bridgetower had to read from Beethoven's manuscript score—no easy task considering Beethoven's poor penmanship—and at one point felt compelled to improvise a passage, which so enchanted Beethoven that he added Bridgetower's improvisation to his score. In fact, the two young men became fast friends, and were inseparable for a time. Bridgetower was an English violin virtuoso born in Poland of a European mother and an African father. He ended up in England, and joined the famous Salomon orchestra which premiered many of Haydn's "London" Symphonies. They caught the eye and ear of the Prince of Wales, who became his patron and sponsored a European tour which brought him to Vienna. His Viennese friendship with Beethoven came to a sudden end, Bridgetower later claimed, when the two men became interested in the same young lady. And so, even though it should be known as the "Bridgetower Sonata," when this music was published as Beethoven's Op. 47, Beethoven dedicated the music to another contemporary virtuoso, a French violinist named Kreutzer, who apparently never performed it.
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Introducing the 27 Club, a new serialized podcast hosted and created by Jake Brennan of Disgraceland. Season 1 features twelve episodes on the life and mysterious death of Jimi Hendrix and launches next week, Monday, January 27th. Listen to hear larger than life tales of kidnapping, mafia intimidation, drug busts, bad acid trips, Otis Redding hallucinations, an intimidated Eric Clapton, a jealous Keith Richards, a bloody Mick Jagger, anarchists, hippies, nihilists and British spies. Subsequent seasons will feature Jim Morrison, Janis Joplin, Kurt Cobain and more. You can hear the season 1 trailer now but be warned: Do what Jimi Hendrix said and "watch out for your ears". Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Pretty much every Rolling Stones fan will tell you that their greatest period came between the years 1968 and 1972. In fact, many music journalists will say it’s one of the greatest runs in rock and roll period. Four legendary albums came during that time – 1968’s ‘Beggars Banquet’, 1969’s ‘Let It Bleed’, 1971’s ‘Sticky Fingers’ and 1972’s double album ‘Exile on Main Street’. This episode of DISCovery will center on ‘Sticky Fingers’ which was released on April 23rd, 1971. On May 8th of ‘71, it hit number one in the UK. Two weeks later, the album topped Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young’s live album ‘4 Way Street’ to hit the number one position on the Billboard album chart where it stayed for a full month. As Rolling Stone magazine said of ‘Sticky Fingers’ at the time, “It’s the latest beautiful chapter in the continuing story of the greatest rock group in the world.” SIDE ONE:1. "Brown Sugar"2. "Sway"3. "Wild Horses"4. "Can't You Hear Me Knocking"5. "You Gotta Move" SIDE TWO:1. "Bitch"2. "I Got the Blues"3. "Sister Morphine" 4. "Dead Flowers"5. "Moonlight Mile"Find DISCovery on Facebook at www.facebook.com/TheDISCoverypodcasthomeThe DISCovery theme song "Woo Hoo" by Reebosound (https://reebosound.bandcamp.com)Please give the show a five-star rating and review wherever you listen to DISCovery!
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Sped-up voices. Wacky instruments. Songs about cavemen, bathtubs, bikinis and mothers-in-law. From the very birth of rock-and-roll, novelty songs were essential elements of the hit parade. Right through the ’70s—the age of streaking, CB radios, disco and King Tut—novelty songs could be chart-topping hits. But by the corporate ’80s, it was harder for goofballs to score round-the-clock hits on regimented radio playlists. Until one perm-headed, mustachioed, accordion-playing parodist who called himself “Weird” rebooted novelty hits for the new millennium. A video jokester before YouTube, he just might have ushered in the age of the meme. So join Hit Parade this month as we walk through the history of novelty hits on the charts—most especially if M.C. Escher is your favorite M.C. Podcast production by Justin D. Wright. Follow @cmolanphy on Twitter Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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I will never forget seeing Trapped Under Ice at Sound & Fury 2011. I'm looking forward to the next record! https://popwigrecords.bandcamp.com/album/heatwave If you want to support the podcast. Head over to the shop and pick something up! http://www.jamieorque.com/shop
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Clara Schumann was a child prodigy turned international sensation — when she never should have been on stage at all. This is the story of a woman who was born to play, and refused to stop.
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Robb sits down with thrash metal legend Gary Holt for an in-depth discussion on life in quarantine, him surviving the Coronavirus, his early days playing with Kirk Hammet (Metallica), what led to the split with original Exodus vocalist Paul Baloff, surviving the 2000’s music scene, and how fulfilled he is playing in Exodus again after an 8 year stint with Slayer.
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In this mini-episode of Hit Parade, host Chris Molanphy is joined by Wesley Morris, Pulitzer Prize–winning critic, New York Times critic-at-large, and co-host of Still Processing. They discuss the most recent full-length episode of Hit Parade about the chart legacy of Whitney Houston, which was inspired in part by Wesley and his co-host Jenna Wortham’s analysis in Still Processing of Houston’s life, identity, and artistry. Wesley talks about his first memory of seeing Whitney on TV, his respect for the versatility of her voice, and his commiseration with her sometimes-cold reception by Black fans.  Next, Chris quizzes a Slate Plus listener with some music trivia, and the contestant turns the tables with a chance to try to stump Chris with a question of his own. Then, Chris teases the upcoming full-length episode of Hit Parade, which will look at Latin pop crossover on the American charts.  While this episode is available to all listeners, our trivia round is open only to Slate Plus members. Slate Plus members get ad-free podcasts and bonus episodes of shows like Dear Prudence and Slow Burn. Sign up now to listen and support our work. Want your question featured in an upcoming show? Email a voice memo to hitparade@slate.com. Podcast production by Asha Saluja.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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In part two, we follow The Damned as they head out onto the road. We talk about how this group of kids who neither looked nor acted like punks managed to influence scenes around the world while concentrating only on the music, and the fun of playing it.    Follow Marcus on Spotify to listen to all of the songs used in this episode
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We try to unravel the famous unsolved murder of Nancy Spungen.    Taking us out: The Lavender Scare   Follow Marcus on Spotify to listen to all of the songs used in this episode
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If you were an angsty American teenager in the 1980s—whether in real life, or in a John Hughes movie—the rock you loved probably came from the United Kingdom, complete with droning vocals, brooding lyrics, goth hair, and black nail polish. The Cure, Siouxsie and the Banshees, Bauhaus, Joy Division/New Order, the Smiths: All these U.K. postpunk acts were hard-pressed to score American hits in the first half of the ’80s—the era of fun-loving New Romantic bands like Duran Duran. But to Gen X teens, Robert Smith, Siouxsie Sioux, and Morrissey were icons. By the end of the decade, however, these bands became American hitmakers, especially after Billboard launched the music bible’s first alternative rock chart. Depeche Mode sold out a California stadium. New Order dominated dancefloors. The Smiths’ Johnny Marr became a guitar god, Morrissey an MTV crush object. And finally, in 1989, the Cure—dark, doomy, and moody as ever—were challenging Janet Jackson for the top of the Billboard Hot 100. Just in time for Halloween, Hit Parade tells the story of how spooky, spidery, U.K. mope-rock became chart-conquering pop. Podcast production by Justin D. Wright. Hosted by Chris Molanphy Follow @cmolanphy on Twitter / https://www.twitter.com/cmolanphy  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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This month, Hit Parade explores the legacy of songs by The Beatles topping the charts...without The Beatles. This is the story of how a discarded Beatles song, a superstar vanity cover, and a bizarre disco medley managed to top the charts with Beatles songwriting credits, but without the fab four.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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Robb sits down with Johnzo for an in-depth dive into his life drumming in Devildriver, his current relationship with singer Dez Fafara, hanging out with pornstars, marriage/divorce, and massive success with Bad Wolves multi-platinum cover of “Zombie".
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Some famous composers were notorious perfectionists—and then there was Johannes Brahms, the Perfectionist of Perfectionists. He spent 14 years tinkering with the score of his First Symphony, remember. Brahms once claimed he had written and discarded twenty string quartets before publishing his first two in the year 1873. To say Brahms was his own severest critic would be putting it mildly, but there was one other person whose opinion Brahms valued above all others, and that was Clara Schumann, one of the finest pianists of her day, the widow of his mentor Robert Schumann, and a fine composer in her own right. So it comes as no surprise that the Third String Quartet of Brahms, the Quartet in B-flat Major, published as his Opus 67, was first performed as a kind of "test run" at the Berlin home of Clara Schumann on today's date in the year 1876. The performers were the famous Joachim Quartet, led by violinist Joseph Joachim, a long-time friend of Brahms. Apparently Clara and Joseph liked the new quartet, but Brahms arranged for one more trial run the following month, and probably tinkered with the score right up to its first public performance by the Joachim Quartet in Berlin on October 30, 1876. Brahms had composed his Third Quartet the previous summer, while on vacation, and unlike his preceding two string quartets, both austere and introspective works, this one was light-hearted and cheerful—"a useless trifle," as Brahms himself put it, adding it was just his way to (quote) "avoid facing the serious countenance of a symphony."
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Season 5 of Disgraceland launches March 10, 2020 with episodes on Guns ‘N Roses, Jay Z, Prince, Selena, Little Richard and more. Hosted by Jake Brennan and winner of the recent 2019 “Best Music Podcast” award by iHeartRadio and named to Apple Podcasts “Best of 2019” list for the second straight year, Disgraceland is set to explode into your ears once more with all of the crime, grime, scandal and drama you’ve grown addicted to. Check out the trailer. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers
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Welcome back to our second installment of the Beatles in May! This time we look at Happy Christmas (The War is Over) as sung by John Lennon. I also introduce you to two new Christmas podcasts. And a new song by Harper Denhard.
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RP discusses 'Big Log' from his second solo album, 1983’s The Principle of Moments.
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Watching this year’s Grammy Awards, it’s clear hip-hop is the dominant genre in popular music. But back in the ’80s, it was an influential but still underground style looking fora place on the charts and  some mainstream respect. That is, until Run-DMC met Aerosmith. This month, how some out-of-favor ’70s rockers teamed up with the top crew in rap to remake an old hit—in the process, opening lanes for a trio of punks-turned-MCs, and a witty hip-hop lothario. We’re still feeling the reverberations today.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
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We start by asking: how does Rock n Roll affect the larger society, and how does the larger society affect Rock n Roll?
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Digging into the Journey of the Fab Four in this 2 Part Special
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THIS YEAR MARKS A FULL DECADE OF SYDNEY MARDI GRAS SETS! HERE’S TO THE FUTURE 10!
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Richard Strauss and his wife Pauline de Ahna are often described as artist and muse. But you’ve never met a muse like Pauline. One of Strauss’ greatest musical masterpieces was ripped straight from the most scandalous moment of their marriage. For a complete list of the music in this episode, as well as recommended reading, visit decomposedshow.org
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Special Episode 02: Albums from the second half of 2019 that you should listen to. Intro Track: Acid Ghost – The Artist’s High Sponsor: Sava Local     کد تخفیف ده درصدی: album All prepared by: Bardia Barj Logo and Cover by: Nima Jamali Music Tracks by: Jul. 2019 Kaiser Chiefs – Duck Sabaton – The Great War Of Monsters and Men – Fever Dream Aug. 2019 Tool – Fear Inoculum Bon Iver – i, i Trisha Yearwood – Every Girl Lana Del Rey – Norman F**king Rockwell! Sep. 2019 Pixies – Beneath the Eyrie The Hu – The Gereg Iggy Pop – Free Korn – The Nothing Beth Hart – War in My Mind Keane – Cause and Effect Eloy - The Vision, The Sword and the Pyre 2 Opeth - In Cauda Venenum Oct. 2019 Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds – Ghosteen City and Colour – A Pill for Loneliness Flying Colors – Third Degree Mika – My Name Is Michael Holbrook Elbow – Giants of All Size James Blunt – Once Upon a Mind Nils Frahm – All Encores Jonsi and Alex – Lost and Found Cigarettes After S*x – Cry Nov. 2019 Lady Antebellum – Ocean Michael Kiwanuka – Kiwanuka Coldplay – Everyday Life No-Man – Love You to Bits Leonard Cohen – Thanks for the Dance Dec. 2019 The Who – Who Website:   WWW.ALBUMPOD.COM Telegram         Twitter         Instagram حمایت ریالی از پادکست آلبوم حمایت ارزی از پادکست آلبوم
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Who else but The Beatles could produce multiple landmark albums within a landmark album? While A Hard Day’s Night was the only Fab Four long player to be penned solely by Lennon and McCartney, the ‘White Album’ can be enjoyed and analyzed as either a classic team effort or – in line with John’s recollection of the recording sessions – virtuoso individual outings within the group context. In this first installment of an STTS ‘White Album’ trilogy, musician Craig Bartock and musicologist Allan Kozinn join Richard and Erik to delve into the talents, circumstances, mindsets and motivations behind an edgy, experimental, bold and beautiful collection of eclectic John Lennon tracks.
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One year after his departure from Van Halen, David Lee Roth released his first solo album, Eat ‘Em and Smile. It was a double platinum success. And then, he re-recorded all of the vocals and released it in Spanish, under a new title. This is the story of Sonrisa Salvaje from 1986. Special thanks to Brian Keith Diaz for the Spanish intro and Zach Comtois for the guitars. briankeithdiaz.com zachcomtois.com --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bizarrealbums/support
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How, when and where did our passion for the Fab Four first get ignited? What form did it take and how has it evolved, personally and professionally? Our friend Mark Lewisohn, the group’s foremost biographer, joins us for an informal chat recorded at Erik’s home studio that provides perspective and reminiscences from both sides of the Atlantic, reaching back more than 55 years to our initial encounters with John, Paul, George and Ringo on TV, radio, record and in print. It’s been a lifelong love story, focusing on not only the music, but also the personalities… and the humour. As such, this episode speaks to fans everywhere. The Music * ‘I’ll Get You’ * ‘She Loves You’ * ‘Here There and Everywhere’ * ‘The Inner Light’ * ‘Look at Me’ * ‘The Beatles Movie Medley’ * ‘All My Loving’
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We briefly recap the first Golden Age of Rock N Roll: 1956 to 1959. A lot happened, and fast.
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Archaeology is the study of human activity in the past, looking at lots of different things from lots of different angles. We take that approach with Rock N Roll. We recap episode one, and open in Memphis, 1954. Sun Records owner Sam Phillips has found his elusive crossover sound—and the artist who can deliver it. Elvis breaks out; in just a few months he’s on the cusp of national stardom.
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Our story starts with Luke Campbell of the 2 Live Crew getting thrown in jail. Luke wound up in handcuffs because, according to a Florida judge, his music was obscene. To understand how this happened, we have to go back in time to 1980s Miami, to a sweatbox teen disco that birthed a new kind of hip hop: Miami bass.
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Lighty is at the top of his game. He’s got the fancy Manhattan office, the high-end designer clothes, and a roster of famous clients calling him 24/7. It all looks perfect. But in this episode, we discover something awful going on behind the scenes.  WARNING: This episode includes a description of domestic violence. If you or someone you know is involved in an abusive situation, the National Domestic Violence Hotline is available to help. Get more information at www.thehotline.org or by calling 1-800-799-SAFE.  CREDITS: Mogul is hosted by Reggie Ossé. This episode was produced by Eric Eddings and Meg Driscoll, with help from Isabella Kulkarni, Peter Bresnan, and Jonathan Mena. Our senior producer is Matthew Nelson. Our editors are Lynn Levy, Caitlin Kenney and Chris Morrow. Fact checking by Michelle Harris. Sound design and mixing by Haley Shaw. Music direction by Matthew Boll. This episode was scored by Nana Kwabena, with additional music by Prince Paul, Don Newkirk, and Haley Shaw. Special thanks to Cameka Crawford, Jina Moore and Bruce Shapiro.
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Chris is headed for the big time. Meeting Russell Simmons, landing a job at Def Jam, getting into Queen Latifah’s birthday party—the future looks bright. But before he can get there, he’ll have to prove himself by squeezing eight dudes into a Chevy Corsica that smells like White Castle and farts.  CREDITS: Mogul is hosted by Reggie Ossé. This episode was produced by Eric Eddings and Meg Driscoll, with help from Isabella Kulkarni, Peter Bresnan, and Jonathan Mena. Our senior producer is Matthew Nelson. Our editors are Lynn Levy, Caitlin Kenney and Chris Morrow. Sound design and mixing by Haley Shaw. Music direction by Matthew Boll. This episode was scored by Prince Paul & Don Newkirk, with additional music by Open Mike Eagle, Haley Shaw, and Bobby Lord. Special thanks to Victoria Barner, Caitlin DiLena, and Tuma Basa.
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August 30th, 2012. A day that shook hip hop. Chris Lighty was discovered dead in his Bronx home. The official cause of death: a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head. In this episode, we talk to people close to Chris to and try understand what exactly happened that day.NOTE: In this episode, we talk about suicide. Please take caution when listening to the show.  If you’re feeling depressed or you just want to talk to someone, you can call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at  1-800-273-8255.
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In our new interview series The Mogul Mixtapes, we’re talking to some of our all-time favorite people about their most treasured hip hop memories—the craziest parties, the nastiest beefs, and the most brilliant verses ever.  This episode features the dynamic hip hop personality Mouse Jones. If you ever wondered how to win a beef, Mouse got you. He takes us back to the early 2000s, to tell us what he learned from one of the most iconic, pettiest, and longest running beefs in Hip Hop history.
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The fight rages on. Luke and the Crew fan the flames in the court of public opinion, and when they go head-to-head with their biggest critics, things get heated. In this episode we bring you 90s daytime TV and rapping prosecutors, and the nastiest album in the history of the world is put on trial.
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Let’s start at the end—at a funeral. All the brightest stars in the hip-hop universe are gathered to mourn the death of Chris Lighty. He was their friend, their brother, their late-night confidant, the man who discovered them, or saved their careers, or made them millionaires. He was a hip-hop legend. But to understand how we got here, we have to go back to the beginning—back to a time before hip-hop even had a name.  CREDITS: Mogul is hosted by Reggie Ossé. This episode was produced by Eric Eddings and Meg Driscoll, with help from Isabella Kulkarni, Peter Bresnan, and Jonathan Mena. Our senior producer is Matthew Nelson. Our editors are Lynn Levy, Caitlin Kenney and Chris Morrow. Sound design and mixing by Haley Shaw. Music direction by Matthew Boll. This episode was scored by Prince Paul & Newkirk, with additional music by Open Mike Eagle, Haley Shaw, and Bobby Lord. Special thanks to Victoria Barner, Caitlin DiLena, and Tuma Basa. Check out more Gimlet podcasts at gimletmedia.com SPONSORS: Sonos
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In this episode: cold hard cash. Chris Lighty makes a pile of it, and changes the game forever, when he does the biggest deal of his career—getting 50 Cent a piece of Vitamin Water. But soon, instead of swimming in dough...Chris is drowning.  CREDITS: Mogul is hosted by Reggie Ossé. This episode was produced by Eric Eddings and Meg Driscoll, with help from Isabella Kulkarni, Peter Bresnan, and Jonathan Mena. Our senior producer is Matthew Nelson. Our editors are Lynn Levy, Caitlin Kenney and Chris Morrow. Fact checking by Michelle Harris. Sound design and mixing by Haley Shaw. Music direction by Matthew Boll. This episode was scored by Nana Kwabena, with additional music by Prince Paul, Don Newkirk, and Haley Shaw.
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I put this mix out two years ago on cassette. Special thank you to all of you who purchased it from me. I've since sold out of all my copies twice over. Since it's Summer I decided to let the entire mix go for everybody to enjoy. All I ask is that you spread the word and hook up the 5 stars on the Apple Podcast app or leave good feedback on the Podbean.  Enjoy the Summer.  *For Promotional Use Only Officially Missing You - Tamia b/w Teddy's Jam & Rumpshaker Remember The Time - Michael Jackson b/w I Like & She's Playing Hard To Get Rock With You - Michael Jackson b/w After Party Can't Feel My Face - The Weekend b/w Everything's Gonna Be Alright ForTheNight - Musiq b/w I'm So Into You Can't Stop - After 7 b/w Poor Georgie Georgy Porgy - Eric Benet & Faith Evans You're The One -SWV b/w Use Me Fire In The Rain - Adele b/w The Ledge Tell Me - Groove Theory b/w Shook Ones Pt. 2 I'd Find You Anywhere - Creative Source Get Money - Junior Mafia b/w Wouldn't Get Far Water Runs Dry - Boyz II Men b/w #!*@ You Tonight Tonight - John Legend b/w It's A Love Thing If Your Girl Only Knew - Aaliyah b/w Me Or The Papes Be Happy - Mary J Blige b/w Deep & Knicks Diggin On You - TLC b/w We Don't Care Roni - Bobby Brown b/w 9th Wonder Beat Take It Slow - Joyce Wrice - b/w Come Back To Me Good Morning - Joyce Wrice
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The 2 Live Crew drop their classic hit “Me So Horny,” which takes the Miami bass sound out of the Pac Jam and spreads it across the nation. But not everyone wants the 2 Live Crew's music on the airwaves. A group of conservatives and a notorious Miami sheriff conspire to take the Crew's records off the shelves and off the air. When the Crew hits back, it lands them in jail.
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